Debates of 4 Mar 2016

MR SPEAKER
PRAYERS

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Mr Speaker
The nominations arereferred to the Appointments Committeefor consideration and report. Votes and Proceedings and theOfficial Report
Mr Speaker
Hon Members, Correc-tion of Votes and Proceedings. [No correction was made to the Votesand Proceedings of 2nd March, 2016.]
Mr Speaker
Hon Members, Votes andProceedings of Thursday, 3rd March,2016. Page 1…8 --[Interruption.] -- Mr Alexander Afenyo-Markin -- rose --
Mr Speaker
Yes, Hon Member forEffutu?
Mr Afenyo-Markin
Mr Speaker, I waspresent yesterday but as a matter of error,I have been marked absent.
Mr Speaker
Very well. Pages 9 -- 22 -- [Pause] Hon Members, the Votes and Pro-ceedings of Thursday, 3rd March, 2016,as corrected, be hereby adopted as thetrue record of proceedings.
10. 30 a. m. Hon Members, the Business State-ment for the Seventh Week. Hon Chairmanof the Business Committee? Hon Majority Leader?
BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

Majority Leader/Chairman of theBusiness Committee (Mr Alban S. K.Bagbin)
Mr Speaker, on behalf of the
SPACE FOR COMMUNICTION PAGE 1-10.20 A.M
Business Committee, I present theBusiness Statement for the Seventh Weekending Friday, 11th March, 2016. Introduction
Mr Speaker, the Committee met onThursday, 3rd March, 2016 and arrangedBusiness of the House for the SeventhWeek ending Friday, 11th March, 2016. As announced during the presentationof the Business Statement last Friday, toenable the House transact all scheduledparliamentary business before adjourningsine die, the Business Committee pro-poses that debate on the Motion to thankH.E. the President for the Message on theState of the Nation be taken in themornings between 10.00 a.m. and 2.00 p.m.Other public business be taken between2.00 p.m. and 4.00 p.m., while Questionswould be taken after 4.00 p.m.
Mr Speaker, pursuant to StandingOrder 56 (1), the Committee accordinglysubmits its Report as follows:
Arrangement of Business Question(s) -- Mr Speaker, the Committee hasprogrammed the Minister for Power torespond to six (6) Questions during theweek. Statements-- Mr Speaker, pursuant to Order 70 (2),Ministers of State may be permitted tomake Statements on Government policy.Mr Speaker may also admit Statements tobe made in the House by Hon Members inaccordance with Order 72.
Majority Leader/Chairman of theBusiness Committee (Mr Alban S. K.Bagbin)


Bills, Papers and Reports -- Mr Speaker, Bills may be presented tothe House for First Reading and those ofurgent nature may be taken through thevarious stages in one day in accordancewith Standing Order 119. Papers andcommittee reports may also be presentedto the House. Motions and Resolutions-- Mr Speaker, Motions may be debatedand their consequential Resolutions, ifany, taken during the week.

Debate on the Message on the State of theNation Mr Speaker, the Motion to thank H.E.the President for the Message on theState of the Nation is expected to continueand conclude on Thursday, 10th March2016.

Governor of the Bank of Ghana to briefthe House

Mr Speaker, the Governor of the Bankof Ghana has been rescheduled to apprisethe House at Committee of the Whole onTuesday, 8th March, 2016 at 2.00 p.m. onthe operations of Savings and Loans andMicrofinance Companies operating in thecountry, with particular reference to thefollowing: (i) DKM Diamond Microfinance(ii) Little Drops Financial Services (iii) Godis Love Fun Club (iv) Jaster Motors andInvestment Company Ltd. (v) Care forHumanity Fun Club.

Extended Sittings Mr Speaker, the Business Committeeonce again, proposes that the House haveextended Sittings during the week underconsideration, to enable the completionof scheduled businesses prior to recess.

Conclusion Mr Speaker, in accordance withStanding Order 160 (2) and subject toStanding Order 53, the Committee submitsto this Honourable House, the order inwhich the Business of the House shall betaken during the week.

Tuesday, 8th March, 2016 Questions Q.457. Mr Emmanuel Aboagye Didieye(Afram Plains North): To ask theMinister for Power when thefollowing communities in the AframPlains North Constituency will beconnected to the national grid: (i)Abotanso No. 1 & 2, (ii) Avatime(iii) Bodua (iv) Mafikope (v) Seibea(vi) Atiwulame, (vii) Katapilatornu,(viii) Anidzi, (ix) Kamalo (x)Adukrom, (xi) Seiwua, (xii) Bebuso,(xiii) Agodeke, (xiv) Salefe, (xv)Kyemfre. Q. 464. Mr Frank Annoh-Dompreh(Nsawam-Adoagyiri): To ask theMinister for Power what plans theMinistry has to connect the follow-ing communities and towns to thenational electricity grid: (i) Panpanso(ii) Akraman (iii) Asante Kwaku (iv)Afumkrom (v) Bowkrom. Q.470.Mr Augustine Collins Ntim(Offinso North): To ask theMinister for Power when the SHEP-4 Project initiated in 2007 in thefollowing communities in OffinsoNorth Constituency be completedand inaugurated: (i) Nsenoa (ii) Oldand New Mireku, near Akomadan(iii) Esoro-Dome, near Nkenkaasu(iv) Taekwaem (v) Mankramso (vi)Sewua Nfanti.

*471. Ms Freda Akosua Prempeh(Tano North): To ask the Ministerfor Power when Kwasoagya will beconnected to the national grid. *472. Mr Alex K. Agyekum (Mpohor):To ask the Minister for Power whenthe following towns will beconnected to the national grid: (i)Wassa Mampong (ii) Edaa (iii)Wiredukrom (iv) Bomba (v)Apraposo (vi) Domeabra (vii)Akotrom (viii) K9. *503. Mr Frederick Opare-Ansah(Suhum): To ask the Minister forPower when the following towns inthe Suhum Municipality will beconnected to the national electricitygrid: (i) Adidiso (ii) Obomofodensua(iii) Nkatekwan (iv) Kromameng (v)Gamameng (vi) Traio (vii) Trotor(viii) Koransang (ix) Teye Mensah. Statements -- Presentation of Papers --

(a) Agreement relating to theimplementation of Part XI of theUnited Nations Convention onthe Law of the Sea of 10 thDecember, 1982. (b) Protocol on the Privileges andImmunities of the InternationalSeabed Authority. (c) Report of the Auditor-General onthe Public Accounts of Ghana(Pre-University EducationalInstitutions) for the financialyear ended 31st December, 2014. (d) Report of the Auditor-General onthe Public Accounts of Ghana

(Ministries, Departments andother Agencies [MDAs]) for theyear ended 31st December, 2014. (e) Report of the Auditor-General onthe Public Accounts of Ghana(Public Boards, Corporationsand Other Statutory Institu-tions) for the year ended 31stDecember 2014.

Presentation and First Reading of Bills -- The Presidential (Transition)(Amendment) Bill, 2016.

Mr Speaker, we have a number of Bills;one would go through the First Reading,which is the Presidential (Transition)Amendment Bill, 2016. Mr Speaker, Idecided to mention this Bill because of itsimportance. I am calling on all Hon Members,including the public, to participate to makesure that we capture all the concerns andimprove upon the Bill to make sure thattransitions are very smooth and enoughtime is given for Government to settle andgo on with the governance of the country. Motions --

(a) That this Honourable Housethanks H.E. the President for theMessage on the State of theNation which he delivered toParliament on Thursday, 25thFebruary 2016. (Continuation of Debate)

Second Reading of Bills -- National Petroleum Authority(Amendment) Bill, 2015.
Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
Thank you very much,Hon Majority Leader. Yes, Hon Member?
Mr Alexander K. Afenyo-Markin 10:40 a.m.
MrSpeaker, last week Friday, the HonMinister for Water Resources, Works andHousing graciously appeared before thisHouse and made a Statement on the stateof water supply in the country. One thingthat featured prominently in the Statement,was the operations of galamsey in andaround our water bodies. Unfortunately, since that was not thecore mandate of the Ministry, when thematter came up, the Hon Minister couldnot address it. Since there seems to be arelationship between the effects ofgalamsey operations in and around ourwater bodies, resulting in the drying upand pollution of our water bodies, I am ofthe view that the Business Committeecould programme the Hon Minister forLands and Natural Resources to appearbefore this House -- considering thegravity of this matter -- to make astatement on efforts being made by hisMinistry in conjunction with other Stateagencies in bringing to an end theactivities of these galamsey operators. Mr Speaker, this is because it is notonly our water bodies that they are --
Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
Please, Hon Member,you have raised the issue --
Mr Afenyo-Markin 10:40 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I restmy case if further submissions are beingarrested.
Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
Hon Members, withregard to what you have raised, as aHouse, we have committees that performoversight. It is not every time that wewould bring Ministers here. There arematters that the committees couldappropriately take up in their own right inthe performance of their oversightresponsibilities. Any other comment? Hon Member for Tema East?
Mr Daniel N. K. Titus-Glover 10:40 a.m.
MrSpeaker, respectfully, I would want toecho what the Hon Majority Leader toldus with regard to the Right to InformationBill. Members of Parliament have never hadrest, looking at the date at which this Billwas supposed to be passed as far back as2013. He stated that there is the need forthe House to ensure that Ministers,especially the Minister for Commu-nications, avail themselves to ensure thatwhen the passage of this Bill is to be done,we can take care of it. I would respectfully appeal to yourChair, that looking at the programmes ofsome of these Ministers, if we are notcareful and the assurance that the HonMajority Leader is giving us, that weshould have no cause to worry, that, comethis year, we would be able to pass thisBill. We should fast track it to enable ushave our peace. This is because when we walk in ourconstituencies, people ask why we havetaken so long in passing this Bill. So, Iwould urge the Chair, that we encourageand assure the --
Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
Have you read the Reportof the Committee?
Mr Titus-Glover 10:40 a.m.
Not at all Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
Have you seen thenumber of amendments that have beenfiled to the Bill? If you explain to themthat the amendments are about 52 pages,your constituents should understand. Yes, Hon Asiamah, Hon Member forAyawaso Central, then Hon Member forOkaikoi Central.
Mr Isaac K. Asiamah 10:40 a.m.
Mr Speaker, youspoke about our oversight functions ascommittees. I have raised this issue here,that when the committees perform well, itis to the credit of the House and indeed,your goodself. Committees are con-strained. So, let us highlight some ofthese concerns, so that the Executivewould take action. If I should tell you the kinds ofconstraints the Public Accounts Com-mittee (PAC) is going through, it wouldshock you. Financing of committee workis a major issue that we need to addressas Parliament --
Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
Hon Member, it is nottrue. No committee has come to myattention and we have not approvedresources for them. It is not true. I alwaysapprove all the committees' proposals,which have been recommended by the HonMajority Leader.
Mr Henry Quartey 10:40 a.m.
Mr Speaker, Iwould want to associate myself with whatmy Hon Colleague, Afenyo-Markin said. In talking about oversightresponsibilities -- I am a member of thecommittee on Works and Housing. Wevisited Nsawam Adoagyiri recently andwe have also engaged the team fromGhana Water Works. The issue is notnecessarily beyond the Committee, butrespectfully, we would be grateful if theHon Minister could avail himself to guideus how far we are going as a nation withrespect to the drought issues.
The reason I am saying this is that, atthe moment, it appears we are putting inplace short-term measures. We want toknow the long-term measures as well. Thisis because currently, drought situationsare across the country and we need toknow what the Ministry of WaterResources, Works and Housing is doingto ensure that in the long-term, Ghanawould not experience these droughtsituations. Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
Mr Patrick Y. Boamah 10:40 a.m.
Mr Speaker,the Governor of the Bank of Ghana hasbeen invited to brief the Committee of theWhole on Tuesday on the operations ofDKM Diamond Microfinance, Little DropsFinancial Services, God is Love Fun Club,Jaster Motors and Investment CompanyLimited and Care for Humanity Fun Club. What I would like to know from theBusiness Committee is whether theManaging Directors (MDs) or ChiefExecutive Officers (CEOs) of thosecompanies would appear with theGovernor. This is to enable Hon Membershear from them as well, to understand theissues that led to some of the happeningsthat took place in Brong Ahafo, Upper Eastand Upper West Regions. Mr Speaker, I asked this because whenthe Governor and his team went toSunyani, the MDs of some of thesecompanies accompanied them. So, if weare sitting as --
Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
Hon Member for OkaikoiCentral, you have posed the question, so,let us wait for the answer, whether theywould accompany them. So, the Chairmanof the Business Committee wouldrespond.
Mr Boamah 10:40 a.m.
Very well, Mr Speaker
Papa Owusu-Ankomah 10:50 a.m.
Mr Speaker, Ioppose the point raised by the HonMember for Okaikoi Central. I just wouldwant to appeal to the Business Committee,that the Governor comes personally. Thisis because on various occasions, atCommittee level, he has sent his deputies.I hope this one is to him in person and hisdeputies -- to him as the person holdingthat constitutional office.
Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
Hon Member, to be fairto the Governor, on a few occasions, hehad sought advice from me, especiallywhen he was supposed to appear beforethe PAC, that no communication was sentto him as a person. At times they do not have audience onthe floor and when I asked PAC to makeavailable to me the invitation, it becameclear that no invitation was sent to him onthose occasions. If the invitation isdirected to him in person as you havesuggested, that it is the thinking of theHouse that the Governor should lead theteam, then that is a different matter. On a few occasions, it was notdirected to him, and I thought that it wouldbe fair to him to put that on record. Papa Owusu- Ankomah -- rose --
Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
Yes, Hon Member forSekondi?
Papa Owusu- Ankomah 10:50 a.m.
Mr Speaker, Ijust wanted to thank you for theclarification to the House.
Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
Yes, Hon MajorityLeader?
Mr Bagbin 10:50 a.m.
Mr Speaker, just to add tothe last point you addressed, it is for thisreason that he has been rescheduled. This
is because he did not get information. Hewanted to appear personally. So, we hadto reschedule him to this date. Mr Speaker, the issue of galamsey asyou rightly observed, is a matter that thecommittee of the House that is overseeingthat sector, could go beyond -- justlistening to the Hon Minister on the floorof the House -- to go round and meet.But the Hon Minister and the otherplayers should come out with a reporthow we could make inputs to solve thatproblem. The Hon Ministers have appeared anumber of times on this same galamseyissue and we are still not finding our wayclear. So, please, I would want to add myvoice to that of Mr Speaker, to urge theCommittees to move to the ground to seefor themselves -- not just listen to HonMinisters. But see for themselves what ison the ground and propose solutions tothe problems that the country isencountering. Mr Speaker, the Right to InformationBill, rightly, is quite a voluminouslegislation. It has gone through variousstages of metamorphosis. The wholecontinent had to look at it -- listening tothe cry of the former Prime Minister ofGreat Britain, Tony Blair, as one of thethings that if he was given the opportunity,he would not have done again. There was a rethinking on this wholeBill. The whole continent decided to takeit up and it took some time before a modellaw was passed by our Presidents andHeads of State at the African Union (AU)level. It is that model law, which is nowinforming various countries how todomesticate the laws in their countries. Itis taking some time and that is true. Butlooking at the skeletal Bill they brought,
Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
Hon Members, theBusiness Statement for the Seventh Weekis accordingly adopted. Hon Majority Leader, are we layingPapers or we should move straight to theMotion?
Mr Bagbin 10:50 a.m.
Mr Speaker, with your kindpermission, as indicated in the Statementof the Business Committee, and underStanding Order 53, I may ask for your leaveto vary the Business of the House asstated in the Order Paper. Mr Speaker, if we could take the layingof Papers.
Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
Very well. Hon Members, item number 6 --Presentation of Papers. Item number 6 (a), by the Hon Chairmanof the Committee of the Whole. Hon Members, the Hon Chairman whopresides the Committee is my First Deputyand so, an Hon Member of the Committeeon the Whole can lay it on his behalfbecause he is coming to take over fromme.
Mr Joseph Yieleh Chireh 10:50 a.m.
Mr Speaker,do I have your permission to lay it? Dr A. A. Osei -- rose --
Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
Yes, Hon Member for OldTafo?
Dr A. A. Osei 11 a.m.
Mr Speaker, before theHon Member does that, may I ask if thereare enough copies to be distributed? Itis very important. Once he is laying it, ithas to be distributed.
Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
Hon Members, itemnumber 6 (a), by the Hon Chairman of theCommittee.
PAPERS 11 a.m.

Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
Mr First Deputy Speakerto come and take the Chair. Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
Mr Bagbin 11 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the HonChairman of the Finance Committee isgoing to lay a number of Papers and I cansee that he is not on the floor of the House. I would want to plead with you if theHon Deputy Chairman --
Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader, isit item number 6 (b)?
Mr Bagbin 11 a.m.
Mr Speaker that is so.
Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
Are the Reports ready? Iask that because we were informedyesterday that the reports were not ready.
Mr Bagbin 11 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I justcrosschecked from the Ranking Memberand the signal I got was that they wereready.
Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
Hon Member for OldTafo, have you completed work on thoseBills — 6 (b) (i), (ii) and (iii)?
Dr A. A. Osei 11 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I havereviewed item 6(b) (ii) and (iii). I am notsure about (i).
Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
Very well. So, can wetake (ii) and (iii)? Very well. Hon Members, item 6 (b) (ii).
By the Ranking Member (on behalf of)the Chairman of the Committee -- (ii) Report of the Finance Committeeon the Ghana Deposit ProtectionBill, 2015.
By Mr Gabriel Kodwo Essilfie (onbehalf of) the Chairman of the Committee-- (iii)Report of the Finance Committeeon the Banks and SpecialisedDeposit-Taking Institutions Bill,2015.
Mr Bagbin 11 a.m.
Mr Speaker, if we couldtake item number 8.
Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
Very well. First Deputy Speaker to take the Chair. Before that, let me find out fromLeadership how many people from eachside of the House are contributing today?I will want to be very clear in my mind.This is because I am getting conflictingsignals.
Mr Dominic B. A Nitiwul 11 a.m.
Mr Speaker,six from each side of the House.
Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
Is it four or six? Well, I have a number of names whichwere underlined. So, I would want to besure.
Mr Nitiwul 11 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we have notunderlined anything. It is six.
Mr Bagbin 11 a.m.
Mr Speaker that is so. Theitem numbered 8 is just for an adoption ofa report of the House. So, we would thenmove on to the debate.
Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
Very well. Hon Members, item number 8 —Motion, by the Chairman of theCommittee. First Deputy Speaker takes the Chair. 11.03 a.m. —
  • [MR FIRST DEPUTY SPEAKER IN THE CHAIR.]
  • Mr First Deputy Speaker 11 a.m.
    HonMembers, Motion number 8, by theChairman of the Committee.
    MOTIONS 11 a.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Ms LaadiAyii Ayamba) 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move,that this Honourable House adopts theReport of the Committee on Gender andChildren on the “Kayayei” Phenomenonin Ghana. Mr Speaker, on 27th February, 2014, theMinister for Gender, Children and SocialProtection, Mrs Nana Oye Lithur, made aStatement on the “kayayei” (female headporters) phenomenon in Ghana. In the Statement, the Minister forGender, Children and Social Protectionprovided the background to rural urbanmigration in Ghana, the current nature ofthe “kayayei” phenomenon, reasonspeople migrate to regional capitals toengage in the “kayayei” trade, challenges
    faced by the “kayayei”, national responseto the phenomenon and the way forward. Members showed a lot of interest inthe Statement due to the effect of thephenomenon on the society, especiallywomen and children. Due to the interestdemonstrated by Members, Mr Speaker,pursuant to Standing Order 175, referredthe Statement to the Committee on Genderand Children for research, study,consideration and report to the House.
    Terms of Reference The terms of reference was mainlysituated on the presentations made by theMinister for Gender, Children and SocialProtection as well as contributions ofMembers on the phenomenon. The Committee, in considering thereferral, narrowed down the terms ofreference to the following:
    The causes of the phenomenon Nature of the phenomenon Challenges faced by the Kayayei National response to the phenomenon Recommendations on the wayforward
    Procedure In the execution of the terms ofreference identified, the Committeeadopted the following methodologies: The Committee held a workshop fromthe 23rd - 26th May, 2014 with the Ministerfor Gender, Children and Social Protection,Mrs Nana Oye Lithur and officials fromher Ministry, to deliberate on theStatement she made on the kayayeiphenomenon.
    The Committee also met with CivilSociety Organisations with focus on thekayayei phenomenon to solicit their viewsand seek further clarification on theiroperations and the way forward. There was again a meeting to deliberateon researches that have been made on thephenomenon and the legal frameworksthat can be applied to solve the problem. The Committee finally went on fieldvisits to various markets in the capital,including Agbogbloshie market, Malatamarket, Madina market and the Darkumanmarket to interact with kayayei, to obtainfirst-hand information on the pheno-menon from 21st to 22nd June 2014.
    Acknowledgement The Committe is grateful to thefollowing who participated in the variousdeliberations and the information theyprovided:
    1. The Minister for Gender,Children and Social Protection ,Mrs Nana Oye Lithur 2. Director, Department of Children 3. Director, Department of SocialProtection 4. Director, Department of SocialWelfare 5. Officials from Peoples Dialogue(NGO) 6. Kayayei from the Malata,Madina, Agbogbloshi andDarkuman markets
    Reference Documents In considering the Statement by theHon Minister for Gender, Children andSocial Protection, the underlisted
    documents were used as referencematerials: 1. The 1992 Constitution of Ghana 2. The Standing Orders of Parlia-ment of Ghana 3. Statement by the Hon Ministerfor Gender, Children and SocialProtection; 4. Report on the Kayayei pheno-menon by the Peoples Dialogue(NGO) 5. Report of the Ministry of Genderand Children on the KayayeiPhenomenon 6. The Children's Act, 1998 (Act560)
    Issues pertaining to the phenomenon Lack of national data on phenomenon
    It came to light that there has been nonational survey on the phenomenon,although the Ministry of Gender, Childrenand Social Protection conducted a studyon the phenomenon in Accra in 2009 andtwo non governmental organisations, thePeoples Dialogue and the GhanaFederation of Urban Poor also did anotherin 2011. The report of the Ministry on Gender,Children and Social Protection put thenumber of head porters or kayayei inAccra at 2,300 while that of the NGOsstated a figure of between 15,000 - 17,000head porters in Accra. These porters are mostly located inmarkets across the capital, especially atthe Agbogbloshie market, Mallam Attamarket, Madina market, Tema Station,Darkuman market and Ashaiman market.There are however, others in Sekondi-Takoradi, Kumasi, Tamale, Techiman andKintampo.

    According to the two researches madeon the phenomenon, 80 per cent of thehead porters are females, mostly from thenorthern parts of Ghana and 20 per centare males engaged in truck pushing, saleof metal scraps, loading and offloading ofgoods from trucks. Mr Speaker, 86 per cent of them are notmarried and 41 per cent of them are singlebut have children. 50 per cent of them haveno formal education and 54 per cent ofthem are of Dagomba, Sissala andMumprusi extraction from the northernregions. 58 per cent of them were engagedin farming prior to migrating to Accra.Most of them are also school dropouts.

    Key factors for the prevalence of thephenomenon The following factors were identifiedas reasons for the prevalence:

    a. Poverty and financial difficultiesexperienced by young girls in theNorth. b. Climate change which has seriouslyimpacted on rain-fed agriculture inthe North. c. Inability to complete educationdue to lack of funds. d. Irresponsible parentage and harmfulsociocultural practices like earlymarriages and adoption. e. Inadequate schools and teachers. f. Lack of jobs

    Challenges faced by Kakayei In Accra, these young girls and boysgo through myriads of challenges as they

    ply their trade. These include rape, sexualabuse, long working hours, harassmentand extortion by city officials, lack ofaccess to good health, education andaccommodation, drug trafficking andmaltreatment. Early deaths are alsorecorded among them due to theexperiences they go through. National Responses

    The Committee was briefed on variousresponses made by governments to tacklethe phenomenon. These interventionsinclude apprenticeships in dressmakingand hairdressing, soap making and batik/tie and dye production. Some traineeswere given sewing machines and hairdryers as start-up capital for theirbusinesses, after which they werereintegrated back into their communities. Most of these interventions did notyield the required result as most of thegirls sent back to their communities didnot have customers to patronise theirservices in the North or fend forthemselves. Some could not also use theirelectric sewing machines due to lack ofelectricity in their villages. As a result,almost all of them returned to Accra tocontinue with the head porting business.

    Observations The Committee is of the opinion that itwould be prudent to address this socialmenace as a national or developmentissue, rather than a problem of the threenorthern regions. This is because most ofthese migrant females are avoidingpoverty and hardships as are charac-teristics of all migration patterns wherepeople migrate to places where there areabundant resources. It is only when a holistic approach isadopted in solving the problem that themenace would be completely eradicatedor brought to its barest minimum.

    The Committee also observed that,head porting serves as a means oflivelihood to many of these migrants andit would not be prudent to completely banit. It would be proper to regulate thepractice by licensing the adults andbanning children below the age of 18. The under aged children whoseparents are in Accra should be enrolled inschools while those whose parents are intheir original place of abode should besent back to their parents and enrolled inschools. The Committee also observed withworry the numerous interventions madeby the Ministry of Gender, Children andSocial Protection, international organisa-tions and civil society organisations butdid not yield the desired impacts. In fact,the experts admitted, it would be difficultto send them back to their communitiesand integrate them as they prefer living inAccra than going back to theircommunities. The Committee also noted that thestudy conducted on the kayayeiphenomenon was based primarily on girlsin Accra and did not cover the whole ofGhana. It does not therefore, provide aclear picture of the magnitude of theproblem as the numbers may be more thanwhat was mentioned. It is necessary to undertake anationwide data collection or nationalsurvey on kayayei as most regionalcapitals and towns such as Kumasi,Techiman, Takoradi, Kintampo and Tamalehave large numbers of female head porters.

    Recommendations The Committee recommends short-medium and long-term solutions to beimplemented to reduce the phenomenon.

    Short-term Solutions National Survey on Kayayei Phenomenon

    In the short-term, the Committeerecommends that a more thorough nationalsurvey should be conducted on thephenomenon by a team of officials fromthe Ministry of Gender, Children andSocial Protection, Ghana StatisticalService and other stakeholders in orderto obtain a comprehensive situationalanalysis of the kayayei phenomenon. The team is to identify the researchgaps in the existing literature and try tofill them up. This would afford the Ministryof Gender, Children and Social Protection,the opportunity to carve an informed andrealistic policy framework, which wouldprovide a clear national policy directionto tackle the kayayei phenomenon. The Minister for Gender, Children andSocial Protection should also considertheir situation and enroll them under theLEAP and National Health InsuranceScheme.

    Donor Mapping Policy frameworks drawn out of thenationwide survey on the phenomenonmay need a financial out lay adequateenough to bring the phenomenon to itsbarest minimum. The Committee therefore urges theMinistry of Gender, Children and SocialProtection to draw up a framework aimedat identifying funding sources that canbe approached for support. The Committee also tasked theMinistry to conduct donor mapping toascertain donor agencies whose coreinterests lie with improving the life of thegirl-child and source funds to implementthe policy.

    Inter-Ministerial Collaboration The Committee noted that the problemof kayayei cannot be tackled by a singleMinistry because issues related to the
    Chairman of the Committee (Ms LaadiAyii Ayamba) 11 a.m.


    phenomenon cut across variousMinistries. It, therefore, recommends aninter-Ministerial collaboration betweenMinistries such as Agriculture, Interior,Health, Justice, Roads, Education,Employment and Labour Relations, LocalGovernment and Rural Development,Chieftaincy and Culture and the NationalYouth Development Authority to helpsolve the problems of kayayei. Each Ministry should also fashion outactivities or policies aimed at improvingthe welfare of the girl child or promotingthe welfare of the kayayei.

    Increase budget of Gender, Children andSocial Protection Ministry Owing to insufficient budgetaryallocations and irregular releases of funds,the Ministry of Gender, Children andSocial Protection does not have therequired funds and personnel to tackle theproblem. The Committee observed thattackling the kayayei phenomenon wouldinvolve huge financial commitments,which currently, the Ministry of Gender,Children and Social Protection does nothave. The Committee, therefore,recommends that the budget of theMinistry of Gender, Children and SocialProtection should be increased toaccommodate the kayayei menace.

    Immediate Intervention in IdentifiedMigrant Areas Data from the survey conducted by thePeople's Dialogue indicates that 51.4 percent of the kayayei are of Dagombaextraction, 29.7 per cent are Mamprusis,4.5 per cent are Gonjas, 5.9 per cent areSissalas, 0.9 per cent are Akans and 7.7per cent are from other ethnic extractions.

    The Committee, therefore, calls forimmediate intervention in the form ofeducation and advocacy within theidentified migrant areas. The interventionsshould aim at discouraging the practiceand encouraging the girls to stay at home. Education on Family Planning

    Committee members also noted thatmost of the kayayei migrate to the Southto seek greener pastures because theycome from large families where parents donot have sufficient resources to cater forthem. The Committee recommends thescaling up of family planning educationwithin those communities to informparents of the need to plan theirhouseholds in order to have an improvedstandard of living.

    Medium-term Solutions Increase and Strengthen HumanResource Capacity of Gender, Childrenand Social Protection Ministry

    The Committee noted that with therealignment of the Ministry of Gender,Children and Social Protection, themandate of the Ministry has increased andthere is the need to recruit more staff tohandle the additional responsibilities. The Ministry of Gender, Children andSocial Protection lacked offices in thedistricts. The Ministry relies on DistrictSocial Welfare Officers for information. Itis, therefore, unable to track emergingsocial problems at the micro leveleffectively. The Committee recommends that theMinistry should be empowered to acquirepermanent offices and train staff in thedistricts to ensure efficiency in datacollection. The capacity of the staff shouldalso be strengthened with regard to thedata collection, collation and analysis.

    Increase visibility of District Assembliesand Traditional Rulers The Committee also noted that DistrictAssemblies and traditional rulers have amajor role to play in combating the kayayeiphenomenon, by providing the requiredinfrastructure for development such asschools, roads, electricity, hospitals andthe exploitation of local resources toimprove the lot of the people. It is onlywhen these resources are available thatpeople would desist from migrating to theurban centres. Again, district officers should ensurethat all children of school going age areenrolled. They should also lead advocacyprogrammes in communities whereoutmoded cultural practices, such asfemale genital mutilation, early marriagesor forced marriages compel the girls tomigrate down South.

    Strict enforcement of the Children's Act Section 16 of the Children's Actexpressly requires District Assembliesand local authorities to protect the welfareof children. The Committee, therefore,urges all District Assemblies tocollaborate with the Ghana Police Serviceand the Departments of Social Welfare inthe districts, to strictly enforce section 16of the Children's Act, which prohibitschildren under the age of 15 years fromworking.

    Increase Public Education The Committee calls for increasedpublic education on the dangers ofharmful sociocultural practices and theireffects on the wellbeing of children. Incommunities where the phenomenon is rife,government, civil society organisations andthe media should mount educational

    campaigns and advocacy programmes tosensitise the youth, especially girls fromthe three northern regions in Ghana onthe need to go to school and not migrateto the South. Corporate Social Responsibility by thePrivate Sector

    The Committee also recommends thatcorporate entities within the private sectorshould be sensitised to channel part oftheir social responsibility programmestowards the improvement of the welfareof kayayei in the capital. In this regard, the Ministry of Gender,Children and Social Protection shouldprepare a policy document on thephenomenon, together with the fundingrequirements and solicit help fromcorporate entities to ameliorate the plightof the young girls.

    Adoption and Implementation of Policies The Committee was informed of thereview and adoption of the NationalMigration Policy by the Ministry of theInterior and the Child and Family WelfarePolicy Department of the Ministry ofGender, Children and Social Protection. The Committee is of the view that,these policies, when adopted andcarefully implemented, can reduce thekayayei phenomenon drastically. TheCommittee therefore, urges the Ministryof Gender, Children and Social Protectionto ensure that the preparation of thepolicies is fast-tracked and implemented.

    Establishment of a Fund The Committee recommends theestablishment of a Trust Fund, theproceeds of which would be used to trainthese young girls in various vocations oftheir choices and reintegration into theircommunities. The Fund managers shouldbe carefully chosen and held accountable
    Mrs Gifty Eugenia Kusi (NPP—Tarkwa-Nsuaem) 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise tosecond the Motion. In doing so, I wouldlike to comment that the phenomenon of“kayayei” in Ghana is a worryingsituation. Mr Speaker, a visit to Agbobgloshieand Mallam Atta markets , where most ofthese “kayayeis” could be found, reallyput us in a situation which is very pathetic.One sees these young ladies lie in placesthey should not be. They are susceptibleto rape, beatings and other things thatmay happen to them.
    We, as a Committee, thought that weneeded to do what we did. But afterpresenting this Report, we want to urgethe authorities, especially the Ministry,to take this situation very serious. Mr Speaker, when I read the State ofthe Nation Address, the Presidentmentioned that one thousand (1,000)“kayayeis” have been put on the NationalHealth Insurance Scheme. I want to saythat they are more than that. In fact, theyare four thousand (4,000) and over. So,all of them should be registered -- andnot only 1,000. Mr Speaker, in the North, we haverecommended that shelters in the threenorthern regions — Some of theinterventions which the Ministry plans todo is something that they should reallytake up. This is because we can sometimessay these things but the implementationsbecome a problem. Mr Speaker, I know that if they get aplace to sleep, they can do jobs that wouldnot even let them come down here to stayin deplorable conditions. Mr Speaker, we also recommend theestablishment of a Trust Fund, theproceeds of which would be used to trainthese girls. And it all boils down to girl-child education, which we are advocatingin this country. Mr Speaker, we realised that among the16 visitors that the President brought,majority of them were females. This is atestimony that in Ghana, women are reallyin situations that need a lot of help. Mostof us women are not in school, and not injobs. When we look at the economicladder, we are below. Even in this Chamber,we are 30 out of the 275 Members ofParliament. It is not the best.
    Mrs Gifty Eugenia Kusi (NPP—Tarkwa-Nsuaem) 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, education of the girl-childis something that this country should takevery serious. Mr Speaker, I would want to urge everyMember of Parliament here to identifythese kayayeis in their constituencies andensure that they put them to economicallyviable ventures, so that the girls wouldnot travel down to the major cities to lookfor non existent jobs. Mr Speaker, if we all decide to dosomething for the girl-child in ourconstituencies, we would get somewhereand this problem would be curtailed. Mr Speaker, with these few words, Iurge this Honourable House to adopt thisReport and ensure that the implemen-tation is also really given a seriousthought. Thank you.

    Question proposed.
    Mr Ignatius Baffour Awuah (NPP --Sunyani West) 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, thank youfor the opportunity to contribute to theMotion on the floor. Mr Speaker, I would want to say thatthis issue of kayayei or head porters, inmy view, is the result of our failure toaddress the issue of development withinour country. We have high disparity ofincomes, especially between peopleliving in the southern part of the countryas compared to people living in thenorthern part of our country. Besides,
    even when you come to physicaldevelopment, the South is more deve-loped than the North. It is therefore notsurprising to see people moving all theway from the North to come and seekgreener pastures in the southern portionsof our country. Mr Speaker, to be able to address thisproblem, we have to ensure that we haveeven development throughout the wholecountry. Apart from that, to be able toaddress this issue of kayayei, we should,as a nation, take the issue of girl-childeducation very serious. Mr Speaker, the more the girls stay inschool, hardly will they want to go intothis kayayei business. But what do wesee? Even at primary school level, we haveequal numbers of boys and girls enrolling,but as and when they progress into juniorhigh schools, the number of girls in theschools start dropping. Most of thesegirls either get pregnant or movesouthwards to partake in this kayayeibusiness. Mr Speaker, we have to seriously lookat retaining our girls in school, especiallygirls from the northern part of our country.This, we can best do by ensuring that wepay their school fees and also get themcertain basic things that they would needto keep them in school. Mr Speaker, that is why policy makersin this country should give meaning tothe Free Secondary School Education(FSSE) that both sides of the House havepromised Ghanaians. This is because, ifindeed, education is becoming affordableand accessible and we are encouragingpeople to stay, I would want to believethat, hardly would somebody completesenior high school or even junior highschool and want to take kayayei asperhaps, the next trade to engage in.
    Mr Speaker, besides, I would also wantto believe that if we want to solve thisproblem, we would also have to givemeaning to our various development plansthat we have for the North. Yes, we havethe Savanna Accelerated DevelopmentAuthority (SADA) to address the issueof poverty in the North, but are we reallygiving meaning to what SADA was meantfor? It should not just be a lip service; itshould be a commitment by Governmentto help develop the North. As of now, SADA has not actuallysucceeded in solving this problem. Iwould want to urge Government to makesure that it comes up with moreprogrammes for SADA to be able toaddress the poverty situation that wehave in the North. I believe that if we areable to address the poverty situation inthe North, people moving southwards forgreener pastures would cease, and thisissue of kayayei would never arise again. Mr Speaker, I just want to also drawthe attention of the House to an issue.Yes, very often, we talk about the kayayeiand where they sleep as well as wheretheir children attend school. But hardlydo we also talk about other cases, evenlike our watchmen who perhaps, take careof our properties and what have you. How do we accommodate them in ourvarious premises? Some of them hardlyhave comfortable places to sleep when itis raining. So, while drawing the nation'sattention to the menace of kayayei, let usalso as individuals, organisations and anation, also take care of other vulnerablepeople in the society, so that we wouldnot have the issue of kayayei beingsolved and then leaving the otherproblems still with us. Thank you.
    Minister for Roads and Highways(Alhaji Inusah A. B. Fuseini)(MP) 11:10 a.m.
    MrSpeaker, thank you for the opportunity tocontribute to the Motion on the floor ofthe House and to urge the Ministry ofGender, Children and Social Protection totake action to be able to address some ofthe difficulties that kayayei or headporters in Accra, originating largely fromthe three northern regions are goingthrough. Mr Speaker, these head porters aredrawn to Accra by borrowing the wordsof Max Assimeng, “the conocopia oflife”. The opportunity to have workwhereas they lack work in the North. Theopportunity to live easy lives becausewhen they arrive, they are not really underthe control of anybody and so, they canpursue whatever life they would want. The opportunity to join their friendswho had early on taken off to Accra andhave come back home with some littleriches, which had attracted their attentionand so, they also want to look like theirfriends hence they migrate. Mr Speaker, when they come, they areunable to reach Accra and the major citiesthat attract them are expensive ones. Evenpeople who work are unable to rent decentaccommodation. So, they congregate atlow-line areas. Fadama, which is a low-line area, wasinitially conserved as a restoration areato be able to restore the land to ameaningful status -- a status befittingthe city. But when they came, they foundsolace at that place and started buildingtheir houses and it became a home forthem. Mr Speaker, a visit to Old Fadamawould clearly expose the indecent andinhumane conditions under which thesepeople live. Mr Speaker, in some areas,they are described as the inner-citypeople. No decent sanitary conditions;no planning whatsoever and what is more
    Mr Frank Annoh-Dompreh (NPP--Nsawam Adoagyiri) 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I thankyou for your kindness. Mr Speaker, insupporting the Motion, a few words wouldsuffice. First of all, as a nation, we can prideourselves in the fact that, at least, we havedone a Report espousing and elucidatingthe challenges and the issues affectingour sisters and mothers, but we couldhave done better because this issue hadbeen with us for some time now. However, as the saying goes, it is betterlate than never. So, I associate myself fullyand support the Motion. Mr Speaker, it is also a fact that , wehave a relevant Ministry mandated toprosecute a certain national agenda in thisregard. As important as the matter stands,we would want to appeal to the Executivearm of Government that, this could be ablot on our democracy, so the necessarywherewithal and supportive policydirection that needs to be given in thisaction area should be given to ensure thatour mothers and sisters breathe a sigh ofrelief. Mr Speaker, also, we do not need toreinvent the wheel. This is because I amfully aware of the existence of a body likethe National Board for Small ScaleIndustries (NBSSI). We have used thetaxpayer's money to establish thisinstitution, for instance. The NationalVocational Training Institute (NVTI) alsostands in wake. What we need to do, just as PresidentBarrack Obama has admonished some timeback, is that, we need strong institutions
    as a country to develop. So, all theserelevant and germane institutions of Stateshould be strengthened. Necessarybudgetary provisions should be given tothem, especially in real terms, so that theywould be able to deliver on their coremandates. Mr Speaker, certainly, the provision ofsanitary pads cannot resolve this problem.What we need to do as a nation is that,there should be a conscious effort to showa policy direction and then support theinstitutions of State mandated to performin these subject area. This is to ensurethat, for once, we would not come back tothis House to revisit the same matter. Mr Speaker, it is quite a disgrace to us,that from 1992, when we started mul-tiparty democracy, especially theGovernment in power today, who pridesitself as a social democratic party, thingslike this pose a challenge to the nationand to the Government. Mr Speaker, here, I am not beingpolitical, but the fact be told that, it ismost ironical that we have a Governmentthat prides itself as a socially sensitiveone, yet we have these things aschallenges.That is quite backward untoour forward march as a country. With these few words, let usstrengthen the Ministry, and also theGovernment should show a policydirection and strengthen the institutionsof State mandated to deliver on theseareas, so that for once we can put thisthing behind us and move on as a country. Mr Speaker, I am grateful for theopportunity.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:20 a.m.
    Thank youvery much.
    Hon Minister for Youth and Sports?
    Minister for Youth and Sports (MrEdwin Nii Lante Vanderpuye)(MP)) 11:20 a.m.
    MrSpeaker, I would want to thank yousincerely for the opportunity given me tocontribute to this issue of head porters. Profiling majority of the head porterswho are principally within my consti-tuency tells me that the menace of kayayeihas moved away from only the northernregions to other parts of the country.Young girls are moving from the BrongAhafo, Volta, Ashanti and even theEastern Regions to Accra to engage in theactivities of the kayayei. Mr Speaker, as much as this could bedue to the social pressures within thesystem, I would say that, principally, asa country, we have not taken our socio-cultural practices serious. Mr Speaker, within our system, whenwe were growing up, it was said,especially in my native language, thatmokome foo shi jee mokome kweo. Thismeans that one person gives birth to achild, but it is not only the responsibilityof that person to take care of the child. Itmeans that our whole extended familysystem was the response mechanism totake over the shocks of the weakness in aparticular nuclear family structure. Mr Speaker, but today, we have acountry of each one for himself, God forus all. The welfare of my child is not theresponsibility of Hon Richard Quashigah.Hitherto, I would not see Hon RichardQuashigah's child go through difficultyif I have the means and the wherewithalto support. Our family support systems haveeroded to the extent that, we do not careanymore about one another. Inasmuch aswe continue to allow our extended familysystems to whittle away, we shall continueto have these problems on our hands.
    Minister for Youth and Sports (MrEdwin Nii Lante Vanderpuye)(MP)) 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, that also brings me to theissue of the legal regimes that controlparental delinquency. Certain parents arejust shirking their responsibilities of takingcare of their children. It is time, as acountry, to make sure that parents becameresponsible for the needs of their children. The education and welfare of the childshould be the responsibility of that fatherand mother who decided to bring thatchild into the world. We should make surethe legal regimes protect the children. Mr Speaker, if we continue to make surethat parents who shirk their responsibilitiesare dealt with, people would becomeconscious of the need for them to becomeresponsible for their children. Mr Speaker, I do not believe the issueof kayayei is just a social problem. I thinkit is an indictment on our conscience as apeople -- for me to put a load that I cannotcarry on the head of another person. Mr Speaker, in my constituency, I seesome of these young girls carrying loadsthat donkeys and camels cannot carry.Sometimes, you see their necks“breaking”, but for them, to survive andhave something, they continue to carrythese loads. In the evening, they sleepwherever they find themselves. Mr Speaker, we must address this as acountry. It is not only the issue of theGovernment; it is the issue that as acountry, we must take a political decisionon what we have to do in order to addressit for the rest of our lives. It is wrong; it isnot right and I do not believe we shouldencourage it in our society. It is aneyesore, which I see almost every day inmy life. I do not think it is right.
    Mr Speaker, that brings me to the issueof -- my very good Hon Friend, HonKyeremeh is here. It is about the Ministryof Education. I believe that we must, as apolicy, try to also refocus setting up ofmore vocational technical schools in thenorthern part of the country, especially inthe three northern regions, the northernpart of the Brong Ahafo Region and theVolta Region. If we could have more of vocationaland technical schools in these areas, thenthey can easily absorb some of our younggirls who finish the basic schools. Whenwe force and retain them in school, thenthey can easily be absorbed. Mr Speaker, on this note, I would alsosay that, as the Hon Member of Parliamentfor Odododiodioo, which harbours closeto 70 to 80 per cent of these head porters-- Mr Speaker, the critical issue of OldFadama has to be dealt with. Alhaji InusahFuseini talked about the depriving anddeplorable situation in which our youngmen and women live in Old Fadama. As a country, whether we like it, Ibelieve the issue of Old Fadama hasbecome a social problem that we shouldtackle. We should try and see what wecan do. We have seen that being done inBloomfields in Zimbabwe, Brooklyn in theUnited Kingdom (UK) and Bronx in theUnited States of America (USA). Mr Speaker, as we speak, if we go toKenya, with the support of the UnitedNations Human Settlements Programme,the Kenyans are slowly removing thebiggest slum in Africa. I think as a country,we must look at what we can do to changethe situation in Old Fadama, so that thepeople there could live as Ghanaians andhuman beings to contribute to thedevelopment of this country.

    Mr Speaker, with these few words, Ithank you for that opportunity.
    MrFirst Deputy Speaker 11:30 a.m.
    Thank youvery much. Hon Member for Sekondi?
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah (NPP --Sekondi) 11:30 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, when we debatethese matters, then I ask myself, are wesinging woes of lamentation? This is theHouse of the people of this country. Whatare we doing? We talk -- yes. Mr Speaker, the Hon Member forOdododiodioo - and the Hon Minister forYouth and Sports -- I say that it is hightime we set our priorities right as a countryand I do not want to pre-empt the ongoingdebate on the State of the Nation Addres.This is the state of the nation [Hear!Hear!] Mr Speaker, it worries me -- Yes! Arewe just interested in power? We aretransforming the lives and talking“kayayei” at Old Fadama? We have beentalking about it for over 20 years [Hear!Hear!] Mr Speaker, we should all bear theresponsibility. Let us understand that,as collective Leadership of this country,when we are talking about developing thecountry, building its people, it is aboutour value system. I expect that, ascollective leadership, if we are talkingabout changing the country and assumingpolitical power, then we should be talkingabout how we are going to reinstate ourvalue system. Mr Speaker, I always ask, why? Lookat the countries in the Far East -- China,Japan and even Vietnam. I do not think
    they have lost their value system but as acountry, we are prepared to do anythingand everything to gain political power tothe extent of corrupting the system --[Interruption] Alhaji Inusah A. B. Fuseini -- rose--
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:30 a.m.
    Yes, HonMinister, is it on a point of order?
    Alhaji I. A. B. Fuseini 11:30 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, itis on a point of order. I am actually enjoying the flow. Ihesitated in interrupting my Hon seniorColleague because he has taken flight. Mr Speaker, I heard him distinctly clear,that if we are talking about changing ourcountry -- Mr Speaker, I do not think thatis what we are doing. We are talking abouttransforming our country and changinglives.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:30 a.m.
    Mr Speaker,you transform lives -- That is my view;others may be different. Fortunately forme, I have had the benefit of sitting in thisHouse for 20 years. I would be exitingand I ask myself, to what extent have Icontributed in improving our valuesystem? That is the task. So, if we arehere, let us think about the future and thatis where the future is. Mr Speaker, this is because, if we donot tackle this seeming intractableproblem, I am telling you that in everymajor city in this country, we are going tohave this. We have a youth unemploymentproblem and as a country, we tickleourselves, that we are doing something.No, please. Mr Speaker, as a political class, the timehas come for us to realise that, when weleave office, the legacies that we are goingto leave, will be such that people will ask,are they legacies that are changing thevalues of the people or they are legacies
    of brick and mortar? I do not think so.Having said this, please,m let us movefrom talk to action. I am fed up of talking and if the Reportthat we have debated contains anyproposals, let the relevant committee betasked to follow-up, make suggestions fortimelines and engage the relevantagencies in ensuring that, at least, it isnot mere talk but we have got a series ofactions by which we will determinewhether the talk has been worthwhile.
    Minister for Environment, Science,Technology and Innovation (Mr MahamaAyariga (MP) 11:30 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, thank you forthe opportunity to contribute to thedebate on this Report. Mr Speaker, I think it is important forus to put the issue of “kayayei” in properperspective. We may debate it in a waythat shows poverty and demonstrates somany other ills of our society but we couldalso exactly understand what ishappening there. Mr Speaker, the essential thinghappening there is that, our urbandevelopment has created a necessitythere -- a certain service. For instance, if we look at the markets,the parking lots are often far away fromwhere the shops are. If we look at theAgbogbloshie area, we have the yam,onion and different markets, all situatedthere and goods are brought fromdifferent parts of the country and they dothe distribution there. Mr Speaker, there is a need for peopleto help by providing a certain service.People come and buy but how to get totheir vehicles is a difficulty, mostly, themiddle class. So, these people are there toprovide a certain service. The incomes are
    rose
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:40 a.m.
    Is it on apoint of order?
    Mr Vanderpuye 11:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is on apoint of information. I think the issue of ‘kayayei” is notjust about the planning of our markets andI refuse to accept that. The question is,why should someone carry anotherperson's load? If one goes to buy fromthe market, that person should carry hisor her own load. Why should anotherperson carry the other person's load?Why should that happen?
    Mr Ayariga 11:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, that is thereality of the way that our cities areplanned. This issue is being addressed --as we urbanise, we have shopping mallsemerging across the cities and manyfamilies would go to these malls and buythe basic necessities for their families.One would realise that in those places,there is infrastructure for carryingwhatever one buys from the shop to thevehicle. It is reducing the number of peoplewho go to Agbogbloshie and other areasto buy. I would want to respond to the HonPapa Owusu-Ankomah, concerning theissue that he raised about what his
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:40 a.m.
    Thank youvery much. Hon Members, I will take one morefrom each side and then we will bringthis to a close.
    Mr Namoro S. Azumah (NPP --Chereponi) 11:40 a.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, forgiving me the opportunity to contributeto the debate on the floor of the House. One of the main issues that as a nationwe have not tackled, is the national dataon the kayayei. This is because if youlook at the document, the Ministry issaying that we have about 2,300 kayayeiin Accra. Then some NGOs also came outto say that we have about 15,000 to 17,000. It means that we do not have a nationaldata on Kayayei. So, there is the need forus to have a national data -- Let us knowthe number of Kayayei in Accra.
    Mr Speaker, let us ask ourselves aquestion -- What is the root cause ofpeople leaving, not only the North butCentral Region, Eastern Region and allother regions in this country to Accra? Infact, when you go round the nation andyou get to certain communities in thiscountry, in certain households, you canonly find an old lady and an old man.People who are strong and capable haveall left their homes in search of greenerpastures. They find themselves in Accra andother parts of the country. In my view,there is one basic thing that we haveforgotten to mention; firstly, we havestated that school dropouts are kayayeiin Accra. Why are they school dropouts?The basic issue is that they are notcapable of paying school fees. Theirparents cannot afford. In fact, the Committee went roundvarious areas in Accra to visit kayayei andone of the main things that we observedwas that the school dropouts would tellyou that their fathers or mothers couldnot pay their school fees, so they are herein Accra to work and get money to go backand pay. The other issue we would also have totackle is investment. Some of us arefortunate enough to be in Accra to beworking and we are well to do. Please,have we gone back to our owncommunities to invest whatever we havegot? This is because when we go back toinvest what we have got, that is wherewe would employ the youth, so that theycould also remain there and get somethinginto their pockets. So, as Hon Members of Parliament --Those of us from the North and other partsof the country where the youth aretrooping to Accra -- there is the need forus to also go back there and invest. Thosedays, when rice and groundnut farming
    was booming, people invested in thoseareas and employed the youth; when itcame to removing of weeds andharvesting, they were paid enough. Another thing that we should also keepin mind is adventure. When you get intouch with most of the youth, they wouldsay that “I have a friend in Accra whoalways talks about Accra. They would askif you know Adabraka, Dansoman, etcetera”. So, he would also want to cometo Accra to know those areas. I would want to give a typical example.My own brother's son, found himselfdoing galamsey around Kumasi. I invitedhim to Accra, sat him down, spoke to himand then I decided to send him to a placeto go and learn some skills. Do you know what he told me? He said:“Oh, father, I would like to farm”. I asked,are you sure you would want to farm? Andhe said, “yes”. “Where do you want tofarm?” He said, “I would go back to farm”.I said that was alright. I got him enough money, transportedhim back to my village in the North but hespent only two weeks there and he wentback into galamsey. So some of these are for adventure.People would want to travel. And someare for technology. His friends have cellphones; they give information to themand so, they would also want to come toAccra to acquire a very nice cell phone.And the type of cell phones they wouldwant to handle, is an issue. If the cell phones do not supportWhatsApp, Facebook and other appli-cations, they do not want them. Theywould want cell phones that are veryexpensive.

    The complementary basic education isa system that tries to educate those whoare not able to go to school. We get theminto the classroom for maybe, three orfour hours in the day, late in the afternoon,to train them and after that put them in theformal school. Let us try to adopt some ofthese things and see whether we cannotkeep the youth back into our communities. Thank you for giving me theopportunity.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:50 a.m.
    Thank youvery much. The last contributor, Hon Baba Jamal. Baba Jamal Mohammed Ahmed (NDC-- Akwatia): Thank you very much. Mr Speaker, I would be very brief onthis. I just wanted to draw the attention ofthe House to two things from the Report. One major thing that the Report cameout with is that they have recognised thatthe service provided by the kayayei is anecessity, and for that matter, to ban itcompletely might not be the best way togo. And I associate myself with that partof the Report that says we can ban thosewho are below 18 years and ratherproperly register those who are above 18years and can provide the service. So, is

    something that I associate myself withand I would want it to be carried through.

    Mr Speaker, the second aspect of theReport that I would want to draw attentionto is that, they recognised the fact thatthe Report was not comprehensive anddwelt mainly on girls and left out boys. Italso concentrated on Accra. When we aretalking about the kayayei issues, weshould not only be thinking of Accra. We have Kumasi, Techiman, Takoradiand other major cities that are sufferingfrom this. When we are looking at it, wemust be comprehensive about it andensure that we resolve the matter onceand for all. Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:50 a.m.
    Thank youvery much. Hon Members, you would realise thatthis issue has become rather disturbing,and I am minded to give some directionsas far as this Report is concerned. This isbecause, we could go on making variousStatements, if we do not specificallyaddress the issues to the respectiveMinistries responsible, we would endeverything here and that is the end of it. So, I would want to direct that, copiesof this Report be sent to the Ministry ofGender, Children and Social Protection,the Ministry of Youth and Sports and theMinistry of Finance because it involvesexpenditure, so that they would take theappropriate actions based on the outcomeof the Report. I so direct. Question put and Motion agreed to. Resolved accordingly.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:50 a.m.
    Mr First:Yes, Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Agbesi 11:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, we will moveto item number 12 on page 4 of the OrderPaper.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:50 a.m.
    Very well. Item number 12 on the Order Paper. Hon Chairman of the Committee?
    MOTIONS 11:50 a.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (MrJames K. Avedzi) 11:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg tomove, that notwithstanding the provisionsof Standing Order 80 (1) which require thatno Motion shall be debated until at least,forty-eight hours have elapsed betweenthe date on which notice of the Motion isgiven and the date on which the Motionis moved, the Motion for the adoption ofthe Report of the Finance Committee onthe request for waiver of Import Duties,Import/Domestic VAT and NHIL,ECOWAS Levy, EDIF, inspection fees,withholding tax, other related taxes andStamp Duty amounting to eighty-threemillion, two hundred and eighteenthousand, five hundred and five UnitedStates dollars and ninety-seven cents(US$83,218,505.97) on project materialsand equipment to be procured domes-tically or imported for use in theimplementation of the GovernmentConsent and Support Agreement (GCSA)between the Government of the Republicof Ghana and Amandi Energy Limitedrelating to a 190-240 MW Combined CycleGas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze maybe moved today.
    Dr Anthony A. Osei 11:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I begto second the Motion. Question put and Motion agreed to. Resolved accordingly.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:50 a.m.
    Yes, HonDeputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Agbesi 11:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, item number13.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:50 a.m.
    Item number13, Hon Chairman of the Committee?
    Report on request for Waiver ofImport Duties, Domestic VAT and NHIL, ECOWAS Levy and StampDuty, et cetera between the Governmentof the Republic of Ghana and AmandiEnergy Limited
    Chairman of the Committee (MrJames K. Avedzi) 11:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg tomove, that this Honourable House adoptsthe report of the Finance Committee onthe Request for Waiver of Import Duties,Import/Domestic VAT and NHIL,ECOWAS Levy, EDIF, inspection fees,withholding tax, other related taxes andStamp Duty amounting to eighty-threemillion, two hundred and eighteenthousand, five hundred and five UnitedStates dollars and ninety-seven cents(US$83,218,505.97) on project materialsand equipment to be procureddomestically or imported for use in theimplementation of the GovernmentConsent and Support Agreement (GCSA)between the Government of the Republicof Ghana and Amandi Energy Limitedrelating to a 190-240 MW Combined CycleGas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze. Introduction
    The request for waiver of ImportDuties, Import/Domestic VAT and NHIL,ECOWAS Levy, EDAIF, Inspection Fees,withholding tax, other related taxes and
    Stamp Duty amounting to the cediequivalent of eighty-three million, twohundred and eighteen thousand, fivehundred and five United States dollars andninety-seven cents (US$83,218,505.97) onproject materials and equipment to beprocured domestically or imported for theuse in the implementation of theGovernment Consent and SupportAgreement (GCSA) between the Govern-ment of the Republic of Ghana andAmandi Energy Limited relating to a 190-240 MW Combined Cycle Gas Power Plantfacility at Aboadze was presented toParliament by the Hon Deputy Ministerfor Finance, Mr Cassiel Ato Baah Forsonon Thursday 25 th February, 2016 inaccordance with article 174 (2) of the 1992Constitution. Mr Speaker referred the request to theFinance Committee for consideration andreport in accordance with Order 169 of theStanding Orders of the Parliament ofGhana. The Committee was assisted in itsdeliberations by the Hon Deputy Ministerfor Finance, Mr Cassiel Ato Baah Forsonand officials from the Ministries ofFinance and Power and the GhanaRevenue Authority (GRA). The Committee is grateful to the HonDeputy Minister and officials from the twoMinistries and GRA for their assistance.
    Reference The Committee referred to thefollowing additional documents during itsdeliberations:
    The 1992 Constitution of Ghana The Standing Orders of the Par-liament of Ghana
    Chairman of the Committee (MrJames K. Avedzi) 11:50 a.m.
    The Government Consent andSupport Agreement (GCSA) be-tween the Government of theRepublic of Ghana and AmandiEnergy Limited relating to a 190-240MW Combined Cycle Gas PowerPlant facility at Aboadze. GCSA Deed of Acknowledgementand Consent Agreement betweenthe Government of the Republic ofGhana, Amandi Energy Limited andEcobank Ghana Limited relating toa 190-240 MW Combined Cycle GasPower Plant facility at Aboadze.
    Background Amandi Power Plant was conceived asa 203 MW power plant, to produceelectricity for sale to ECG as the sole off-taker. The plant is a Combined Cycle GasTurbine power plant (“CCGT”). The plantwill comprise one gas turbine coupled witha generator for producing electricalenergy. Waste heat from the gas turbineexhaust will be channeled into a HeatRecovery Steam Generator (“HRSG”) forthe purpose of converting the waste heatto energy by producing steam to drive asteam turbine generator (“STG”). Thesteam from the steam turbine exhaust willbe condensed in an air cooled condenser. The project is in line with theGovernment's objective of increasingtotal installed generating capacity to5,000MW in the medium-term andincreasing private investment in powergeneration as well as increasing thermalgeneration in the energy mix. The project to be undertaken by AEL,is thus aimed at meeting the demand forthermal energy in Ghana and allows thecountry to reduce its dependency uponhydropower and increase its energy
    independence while meeting load growthas the country's economy grows. Theproject itself will see a new 203 plantadded to the existing generation capacityavailable for the country. One of the key constraints facing thedevelopment of private power plants inthe country is the lack of a suitablebankable project structure. The Govern-ment Consent and Support Agreement, inconjunction with the Amended PPA andother project documents, approved byParliament in December, 2014, addressedthis constraint thus enabling AEL tosatisfy one of the key requisites forprocuring financing for the project. Government's major policy thrust is toincrease the installed capacity of Ghana'selectricity generation capacity from thecurrent level of about 2,000 MW to about5,000 MW and develop a non-congestedtransmission system. This required accelerated efforts toadd more generation and also reinforceand expand the electric transmission gridto ensure reliable and secure evacuationof all power that would be generated tomeet the ever-increasing customerdemand. The project therefore, aligns wellwith the Government's medium term policyframework.
    Project description The 203 MW Amandi Energy Limited'sIPP project involves the development,ownership, operation and management ofa 203 MW Combined Cycle Gas Turbine(“CCGT”) power plant to be located inAboadze in the Western Region.According to the project design, AEL willalso construct a generator step up andauxiliary transformers to the power stationas well as storage and treatmentinfrastructure and other vital powerfacilities.
    The power plant is planned anddesigned for multiple fuel operation(natural gas, Light Crude Oil and Distillate)and uniquely placed, adjacent to existinginfrastructure such as VRA TI, T2 and T3thermal plants and sited few meters fromthe Atlantic Ocean enabling the use of seawater for cooling. AEL has also put inplace a Fuel Supply letter of credit. Theproject has full responsibility for fuel,thereby taking the burden for fuelfinancing from ECG, and by extension, theGovernment of Ghana. Approval of the loan agreement
    Hon Members may recall that Parlia-ment at the twenty-fifth (25th) Sitting heldon Friday, 12th December, 2014, approvedby Resolution the Government Consentand Support Agreement (GCSA) betweenthe Government of the Republic of Ghanaand Amandi Energy Limited Relating to a190-240 MW Combined Cycle Gas PowerPlant Facility at Aboadze and GCSA Deedof Acknowledgement and ConsentAgreement between the Government ofthe Republic of Ghana, Amandi EnergyLimited and Ecobank Ghana Limited
    Relating to a 190-240 MW Combined CycleGas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze. Required waiver
    A waiver of tax liability, amounting tothe cedi equivalent of eighty-threemillion, two hundred and eighteenthousand, five hundred and five UnitedStates dollars and ninety-seven cents(US$83,218,505.97) is being sought onequipment/materials to be imported orpurchased locally in respect of theimplementation of the 190-240 MWCombined Cycle Gas Power Plant facilityat Aboadze. Observations Tax assessment by the Ghana RevenueAuthority
    The Committee noted that based onestimates provided by the Ministry ofPower on behalf of the contractor, a totaltax liability of cedi equivalent ofUS$83,218,505.97 has been assessed bythe GRA for interim waiver awaitingParliamentary approval. The tax liabilitycomprises both onshore and offshorecomponents and a stamp duty. Summaryof the various competents of the taxexemption is as follows:

    US$

    Import Duties -- 24,539,216.00 Domestic Tax, VAT and NHIL -- 29,837,894.97 Withholding taxes (EPC) -- 20,000,000.00 Assessed Stamp Duty -- 8,841,350.00 Total exemption requested -- 83, 218,505.97 The Committee expressed worry thatthough the waivers that Parliament havebeen approving were just estimates the

    final assessments and actual tax liabilitieswaived have never been submitted for theinformation of Parliament.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker noon
    Thank youvery much.
    Dr Anthony A. Osei (NPP -- Old Tafo) noon
    Mr Speaker, I rise to second the Motion.In doing so, I would not repeat what theHon Chairman has said but I would referto page 5 of the Committee's Report. Unfortunately, the Hon Minister is nothere, although for the sake of our work,this is very important. Very often, we grantwaivers, which constitute initialassessment before the final waivers aregiven but we do not get the report back. So I urge the Ministry of Finance to assoon as possible, as the Report says, comeback to this House and give us a finalassessment on the tax waivers. That way,we could keep track whether we arefollowing the work. This is because if thisis an estimate and the final thing is doneand we do not know what it is, it is difficultfor us to know whether they kept to ourdirection. I have discussed this with the HonMinister and his deputy but they are nothere. I want to reiterate that we expect thatwhen this company brings in the
  • [DR A. A. OSEI equipment, the Ministry would come backto give the House a final report on theactual assessment that was done. Mr Speaker, with these few words, it isimportant to note that in approving theloan, we agreed to waive the taxes. So thisis more or less consequential. Question put and Motion agreed to.
  • Mr Agbesi noon
    Mr Speaker, we humblyseek your permission for the Hon Ministerfor Roads and Highways to move theResolution contained in item number 14on the O rder Paper on behalf of the HonMinister who is currently outside thecountry. His deputy is also with the MrSpeaker, taking on some parliamentaryduties.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker noon
    Yes, HonMinority Chief Whip?
    MrBotwe noon
    Mr Speaker, we have noobjection.
    RESOLUTIONS noon

    Mr First Deputy Speaker noon
    Yes, HonDeputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Agbesi 12:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker , we can nowgo back to the debate on the State of theNation Address as captured in itemnumbered 7.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:10 p.m.
    Very well. Hon Members, we are back to thedebate. I have been furnished with sixnames from each side; I believe that iswhat we are going by. We will start from the Majority side. Hon Members, Hon Eric Opoku has thefloor. He has 10 minutes.
    Dr A. A. Osei 12:10 p.m.
    On a point of order. Mr Speaker, I think my good Friend theHon Minister wanted to say “currentaccount deficits” and not “balance ofpayments”. I say so because it is notnecessarily true that when we have atrade gap, we would experience balanceof payment deficits.
    In fact, in some periods that he is talkingabout, we have had surpluses. But I thinkthe President meant “current accountdeficits”. He would be on the right path ifthat is the case.
    Mr Opoku 12:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I said“balance of payment deficit”. I did not talkabout “current accounts”.
    Dr. A. A. Osei 12:10 p.m.
    The “balance ofpayment deficits” do not necessarily flowfrom a trade deficit. In fact, we have hadbalance of payment surpluses even withthe trade deficit. But I remember thePresident mentioned “current accountdeficit”, which would have been correct.
    Mr Opoku 12:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I say thatbecause between 2012 and 2013, gold andcocoa prices on the world market declinedand we lost export revenue to the tune ofUS$1.3 billion. Mr Speaker, in the same year, importbill went up; it rose dramatically to US$17billion. What it means is that, as a country,we spend more on goods produced inother countries, thereby creating jobopportunities for the people in thosecountries. His Excellency the President ex-pressed the strongest determination toensure that we put in place the necessarymechanisms to reverse this situation. Mr Speaker, in 2016, the Presidentappeared before this House to deliver theState of the Nation Address. He said thatit was evidence-based, therefore mycontribution to the debate is also goingto be evidence-based. Mr Speaker, in the 2015 State of theNation Address, the President indicatedthat, annually, we import 375,000 metrictonnes of sugar into our country at a costof US$300 million. He said that if this
    Mr Isaac K. Asiamah 12:10 p.m.
    On a point oforder. Mr Speaker, the Hon Member hasindicated that his argument will beevidence-based. Mr Speaker, I am asking him, thePresident brought Ghanaians here, so,where are the Ghanaians he is referringto? He brought some people as evidence,so, where are the people? Let us see thosepractical examples. Let us see whetherthey are here -- the vulcaniser and allthose people. Let us see whether the farmers are here.Mr Speaker, we would like properevidence, if he wants to do properevidence-based arguments.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:10 p.m.
    HonMember, you are out of order.
    Mr Opoku 12:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would ignorethis heckling, with all the contempt itdeserves. I said that Government of Ghana hadinvested US$27 million in the reconstruction-- [Interruption]
    Mr Dan Botwe 12:10 p.m.
    On a point of order. Mr Speaker, our Friend on the otherside of the House could still say he wouldignore, even if that was necessary at all,the statement or the interjection or theinterruption, but to say “with the contemptit deserves”, I think it is unparliamentary.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:10 p.m.
    I cannothear you.
    Mr Botwe 12:10 p.m.
    He said “with the contemptit deserves”. Our Friend said that he wouldignore the statement made by the HonMember here with the contempt that itdeserves. That certainly is unparliamentary and Ithink it should be withdrawn.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:10 p.m.
    HonMember, actually there was no need forthat statement because I had ruled himout of order. Very well. Let us make progress.
    Mr Opoku 12:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we haveinvested US$27 million in thereconstruction of the Komenda SugarFactory. If completed, this project wouldcreate a lot of jobs, especially for theoutgrowers within that enclave. Mr Speaker, it is going to reduce thepressure on our cedi, because we are nomore going to use US$300 million to importsugar. This is because we are going toproduce the sugar here and we are goingto put the moneys into the pockets ofpeople. Mr Speaker, this would increaserevenue generation in our country. Thisis a step towards improving trade balancein our country. Mr Speaker, one major intervention thatwe need to mention is the Atuabo GasFactory. Even on the Komenda SugarFactory -- let me finish with that one. Look at this analysis. We invest US$27million. If we are capable of using the sameUS$27 million to reduce our import bill byUS$300 million, is it not a strategicinvestment?
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:10 p.m.
    HonMember, you have three more minutes.
    Mr Opoku 12:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have notexhausted even five minutes.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:10 p.m.
    You have.
    Mr Opoku 12:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, on the AtuaboGas Project, Government has investedUS$1 billion. This has now reduced --[Interruption]
    Dr A. A. Osei 12:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think wehave been advised to be factual so thatwe do not get into controversy. If the Hon Member who just spokestates that spending US$27 million wouldreduce the import bill by US$300 million,it is factually incorrect. He could say itwould reduce the trade balance, but to sayUS$27million -- It is incorrect. I do notthink he should be allowed to make that -- It is incorrect. He should go on and say“reduce trade”, but to be that precise, it iswrong. That is not what happened.
    Mr Opoku 12:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, early on, Iindicated that annually, we import sugarto the tune of US$300 million. The factorywe are putting in place would be capableof producing enough to meet the demandof our country. Mr Speaker, if we invest US$27 millionand we are no more importing US$300million, is it not strategic investment? On the Atuabo Gas Plant. Atuabo hascome on board; it has reduced Ghana'sreliance on Nigeria's gas and crude oil. Itis estimated that this year alone thatproject would rake in US$500 million asrevenue. If we invest US$1 billion andwithin a year we are able to rake in US$500million, is it not strategic investment? These are the issues we are talkingabout. They are aware that we have these
    Dr A. A. Osei 12:20 p.m.
    On a point of order. Mr Speaker, this year, as we speak, theAtuabo Gas Project has not yielded anyrevenue. In fact, it is negative revenue. The VoltaRiver Authority (VRA) has not paid adime. So, to say that -- [Interruption] -- No revenue. The books are loaded withdebts. Officially, as a Member of Parliament,this House does not know of the AtuaboGas Project. That contract has never cometo Parliament. How can he be talking abouta project that we have not approved of?We do not know that in this House; thecontract has not come here. So, it ishypothetical.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:20 p.m.
    HonMember, I believe that with regard to thecontract, that is a different issue al-together. He is talking about the fact thatthe thing is in existence and that these arethe benefits that as Ghanaians we willmake out of it.
    Dr A. A. Osei 12:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, factually,in my books, it has not yielded thatrevenue. At least, let us be factual.Potentially, yes. But in my book right now,it is zero -- [Interruption] -- Yes.
    Mr Opoku 12:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he hasadmitted that potentially, it can generateUS$500 million and that is why I said thatthe expected revenue is US$500 million,which the Hon Member is already aware;he knows.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:20 p.m.
    HonMember, your time is up, but I give youone more minute.
    Mr Opoku 12:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, last year, theHon Minister for Finance announced thatGovernment had used part of its IBAallocation from the World Bank to leveragea private sector financing of US$7.6billion for the Sankofa Project. Mr Speaker,this US$7.6 billion stands in the books ofGhana as loans. Meanwhile, it is not -- itis an investment in the real sector of theeconomy. When they calculate the loans, theytalk about US$37 billion; meanwhile, weare talking about investment in the realsector. Mr Speaker, if we look at the debt stockwithout relating it to real investments inthe economy, we would be making anargument that does not make anymeaning. We take the loans for specificinvestments. So, if we guarantee forprivate sector investment in our country,is that a loan? That is why we are sayingthat, we have embarked on strategicinvestments that will generate jobs for thepeople of our country.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:20 p.m.
    HonMember, your time is up. The next Hon Member to have the flooris Hon Isaac K. Asiamah.
    Mr Isaac K. Asiamah (NPP -- Atwima-Mponua) 12:20 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for thisopportunity to contribute to Motionnumbered 7 on the Order Paper. Mr Speaker, energy provides thecatalyst for the growth of any economy.Job creation depends heavily on reliablesupply of energy. The challenge is that,in this country, youth unemployment ison the ascendency, because we have not
    been able to manage our energy sectorvery well, therefore, industry is suffering. I think, as a country, we need to positonour energy sector so well that it canprovide the much needed jobs for theteeming unemployed Ghanaians. Mr Speaker, every year, thousands ofGhanaian youth from the junior highschools, senior high schools, polytechnicsand universities graduate. Of late, we haveeven added teachers and nurses. Thesepeople, for some years back, were reliablyemployed. They never had issues withemployment; they had guaranteedemployment. As we speak, that is not thecase. Mr Speaker, more worrying is the factthat, we have not been able to handle thepower sector seriously. What ishappening now is that, dumsor is notgone -- [Interruption] -- It is just beingartificially managed.
    Mr Speaker, I would give you examples.When you read page 43 of the State ofthe Nation Address by the President, withyour permission, I beg to read:
    “Much work still needs to be doneto give us sustainable generation.” My argument is about sustainablegeneration. What is happening is artificial.I would like to give you clear examples.
    Mr Speaker, let us ask ourselves aboutthe functions of the Ghana NationalPetroleum Corporation (GNPC); it isobvious. It is captured in the PNDCL 64,section 2 (1), and with your permission, Ibeg to read:
    “...to undertake the exploration,development, production anddisposal of petroleum”
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 12:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the HonMember is not listening to me. I saidUS$41 million to Universal Merchant Bankand US$100 million to Karpower. It is hereon page 17 of GNPC's own document. TheHon Member has not read the document. Mr Speaker, let us understand themandate of GNPC. Some years back,instead of going to look for oil, they werelooking for other interests -- real estates
    and telecommunication. It was becauseof that, that we could not hit oil incommercial quantities. If we are not carefulwe will return to that same situation. Whyam I saying this? Mr Speaker, GNPC came to this House,and said they wanted to rent an apartmentcosting about GH¢40 million; but thisHouse said, no. This is because they hadmoney, so, they could build their ownoffices. As we speak, I have a documentthat I would tender in as evidence. The GNPC has gone to rent anapartment costing the poor taxpayer about50 billion cedis for only two or three years.[Interruption]-- Mr Speaker, theevidence is here.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:20 p.m.
    HonMember, can you table it for us?
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 12:20 p.m.
    One of the buildingsis called Dennis House in Tema, closer toPetroleum House where they have theiroffice. Within the same apartment, they havedone renting floor by floor and in somecases, by square metres. Why? Couldthey not have rented the whole apart-ment? [Interruption] Mr Agbesi -- rose --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:20 p.m.
    Yes, HonDeputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Agbesi 12:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I thought thatthe Hon Member would refer us to aparticular page of what he is holding, sothat we are convinced that what he issaying, is truly contained in the docu-ment.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:20 p.m.
    Yes, canyou refer to the specific page?
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 12:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, thereare three Agreements for one building.That is why I said they had done thedivisions. In some cases, it is floor byfloor and others, per square metres
    Agreements, which cost the poor tax-payer. The amounts are all quoted here.Mr Speaker, that cost you and me andthe poor Ghanaian a colossal amount ofGH¢5 billion cedis.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    HonMember, it is not enough to say that it isall here. He wants you to make a specificreference to the relevant pages.
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 12:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, pageone of the Tenancy Agreement is betweenDennis House, plot number TC 15,Harbour Road, Tema in the Greater-AccraRegion of Ghana and GNPC.
    Mr Speaker, it is here 12:30 p.m.
    “Now, therefore,the partners agreed as follows . . .” Item 2 says that the tenant shall payan amount of US$551,000.00 per annum inadvance of the property rent. That is oneof the Agreements. Mr Speaker, the other one is here. “Anamount of US$162,000.00 per annumpayable in advance of the commencementof a one-year term”. That was also signedon the 3rd March, 2014.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    HonMember, I have a little problem. Yesterday,there was a ruling to the effect that weneeded original documents, but thisappears to be a photocopied document.How do you address that?
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 12:30 p.m.
    The original is here.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    Yes, HonMember?
    Mr Dominic B. A. Nitiwul 12:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker,it would be very difficult for the HonMember to get the original of the TenancyAgreement. -- [Interruption.]
    Please, excuse me. It is a Tenancy Agreement. Now, if itis, for example, in the Hansard, somebodywould say, quote from the original, do notquote from a copy. But to say that theHon Member should get the original of aTenancy Agreement is wrong. Mr Speaker, I think the issues that theHon Member is raising are very germane.Mr Speaker, he said, GNPC was in thisHouse and it told GNPC not to go andrent. Now, he has produced a TenancyAgreement that indicates that GNPC hasgone to rent. It is for this House to investigate thatthing and punish any official who hasdone that. This is because it is an insultto this House.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    But that is,if we have the original. If we do not havethe original, you can have a certified truecopy and then we will be alright. Is it acertified true copy?
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 12:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is acertified true copy. The Committee askedfor it officially and it was sent to the Clerk;they gave Hon Members copies. This isofficially certified copy from GNPC.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    Is itcertified?
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 12:30 p.m.
    It is certified, MrSpeaker.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    Let me havea look at it.
    Mr Nitiwul 12:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think thatwe can table what the Committee gave.This is because if you look at what theCommittee gave, there are stamps on it.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    What kindof stamps?
    Mr Nitiwul 12:30 p.m.
    GNPC dispatched stampdated 18th December, 2015. That was whatwas given to Parliament. He just made hisown copy of what was given toParliament. So, it is a true copy unless --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    No! Itcannot be a certified true copy. Yesterday,if you would remember, there was adocument which one of the Hon Memberstried to rely on; it had to do with variousState of the Nation Addresses and we hadto verify whether it was coming from theproper source, that is, the ResearchDepartment of Parliament. We conducted our search and that wasnot the case and so, we had to do awaywith that particular document. Yes, Hon Member for Sekondi?
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 12:30 p.m.
    Thank youvery much, Mr Speaker. What you are saying is entirely correctbut I believe that, in respect of this matter,it can be distinguished. Mr Speaker, in the case of yesterday'sdocument, it was supposed to be a copyof the State of the Nation Address. MrSpeaker, you said that, as for the State ofthe Nation Address, we could have thecopies that were distributed to HonMembers but we also have the Hansard. They said, no; it was an officialdocument coming from the ResearchDepartment. We said, no, this is areproduction by someone who sells it toMembers of Parliament and it wasconfirmed. The Hon Member says this was adocument given to Hon Members of theCommittee, upon request, by the GNPC.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    Yes, HonDeputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Agbesi 12:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, my HonColleague finds it very difficult to justifyhis position. Mr Speaker, yesterday, we were all herewhen we made the argument. Mr Speaker,your ruling was perfect -- to the pointand they agreed with you, that there areonly two sources of documents, whichwe could tender on this floor; theHansard or the original -- [Inter-ruption]-- Mr Speaker, nothing takes itaway -- that it was made clear yesterday. Mr Speaker, yesterday, your rulingwas clear and our Hon Colleagues had towithdraw their documents, which were notoriginal.
    Mr Speaker, this is exactly whathappened and that is why Hon PapaOwusu-Ankomah finds it extremelydifficult to justify his position today. Mr Speaker, do not depart from yourruling.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    Yes, can Ihear your response?
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 12:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker,my Hon Colleague, friend and classmatehas made a statement, which I believe,can never come out of your mouth. He says, you ruled that in this House,for purposes of debate, the onlydocuments that can be used are theHansard or a copy of the State of theNation Address. Mr Speaker, you couldnot have made that statement. Probably --[Laughter]
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    Whathappened was that, yesterday, it was theRt. Hon Speaker who gave a certain rulingand we were all guided by that ruling. Itwas in line with that ruling that I gave thissubsequent ruling. But I think our problem here has to dowith how to treat documents given to HonMembers of a committee by a particularinstitution? How do we treat suchdocuments?
    Mr Agbesi 12:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with yourguidance, it was only yesterday, youmade a ruling and this House would beenriched if Mr Speaker can, with duerespect, refer to the ruling that was madeyesterday on this floor [Interruptions] It is not a matter of shouting; the issueis on record. I seek Mr Speaker'sguidance.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    Yes, can Ihear you, Hon Member?
    Mr Nitiwul 12:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I refer you toStanding Order 89, and I beg to quote:
    “A Member shall not read hisspeech, but may read extracts fromwritten or printed documents insupport of his argument and mayrefresh his memory by reference tonotes.” Mr Speaker, the Hon Member just saidthat this document was given to aCommittee of Parliament of which he is amember.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    That is whyI am asking the question, how do we treatthis?
    Mr Nitiwul 12:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he has tabledit and copies would be made to HonMembers. There are members of theCommittee on both sides. It is for them tosay, “Mr Speaker, that it is not true”.Otherwise, he has tabled it and the HonMember should be allowed to continuereading extracts from it and then we canmake progress. Baba Jamal -- rose --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    Yes, let mehear you. Baba J.M. Ahmed: Mr Speaker,yesterday, what happened here -- and Iam the very person -- After the ruling ofMr Speaker, I made the same argument asour Hon senior Colleague, Hon PapaOwusu-Ankomah said, that there areprocesses in Parliament; an Hon Memberwants to lay a document but he or shelies, there are processes to hold the personresponsible. So, I said we should allow thedocument, which was presentedyesterday to be used as a basis for theargument but our Hon Colleagues on theother side vehemently refused.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:40 p.m.
    Very well. Hon Members, let us look at it this way.It could well be that it is a document thatwas given to Hon Members of aCommittee. Since the Hon Member isgoing to rely on it in debating this issue, Iwould have expected that he wroteofficially to the Clerk of that particularcommittee to request a certified true copyof what was given to the committee bythe institution. That would have satisfied therequirement. You do not just hold on to adocument which has not been certifiedand which is not original, for us toaccept. I do not think that it is right.
    Dr A. A. Osei 12:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with respectto the Chair, yesterday's ruling pertainedto a specific document, the State of theNation Address, which we get copies ofor is captured in the Hansard -- I have been in this House for, at least,12 years. Every committee member
    receives all kinds of documents frominstitutions. We have never been askedto bring certified copies here. That is whywe are allowed to table it in our regularjob as a committee. If we move in thedirection we appear to be talking about,we cannot debate here. It has never beendone --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:40 p.m.
    I do notthink that it would be dangerous. Let usset the parameters right. If you rely on a document purportedlygiven to you as a member of a committeeby a particular institution, that alone isnot enough. If you want to rely on it, asper yesterday's ruling by the Rt HonSpeaker, get a certified true copy from thecommittee.
    Dr A. A. Osei 12:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, yesterday'sruling was not on a document from acommittee. The private venture of someoutside person selling documents --there is a big difference and that is true.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:40 p.m.
    HonMember, I am not relating the currentsituation to that one. What I am saying isthat we need a certified true copy.
    Dr A. A. Osei 12:40 p.m.
    I would beg that we donot move in that direction, and thatLeadership meets to discuss this. This isbecause if we go in that direction, theHouse cannot work. It would beimpossible.
    Mr Nitiwul 12:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we shouldpay attention to what the Hon Memberhas said. When an organisation meets acommittee and Hon Members request fordocuments, they bring a single documentand make photocopies for all members. Ifwe are not careful and begin to say thatthey are not true certified copies, then whatare we doing to the Hon Members? We use these documents to prepareour reports to Parliament and thensomeone would turn round and say thatthey are not true copies. Then what arewe doing to Parliament? It means that we
    have been misleading Parliament all thiswhile. Parliament is as strong as itscommittees. If the committees ofParliament are doing their work diligentlyand are very strong, Parliament would bevery strong. Once a document has been given to acommittee of Parliament by an organi-sation and distributed to all members, Ibelieve it is a true certified copy. Whenthe Budget Statement and EconomicPolicy or other documents come here, onedocument is given and the Clerk makesphotocopies for all of us, can we then saythat because the Clerk has madephotocopies, they are not true certifiedcopies?
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:40 p.m.
    That is themore reason the Clerk should certify it,that this is what he or she gave to HonMembers of the committee. It is as simpleas that.
    Mr Nitiwul 12:40 p.m.
    Unless we doubt him. TheHon Member says that the Committee wasgiven the copy through the Clerk of thatCommittee. We have Hon Members of theCommittee on Mines and Energy here. Letanybody come out and say that it is nottrue, then we could take the Hon Memberon. [Interruptions.]
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:40 p.m.
    HonMembers, please, let us have some order. When it comes to an issue like this,that is the reason we need to get the Clerkto the committee to certify, that that isexactly what he was given and as a resulthe made copies for Hon Members, so that,those of us who are not Hon Members ofthat committee would feel safe.
    Mr Nitiwul 12:40 p.m.
    It would not give anyserious problem. Hon Members, let us make someprogress. Hon Member, the document you seekto rely on cannot be relied upon becauseit is not certified.
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 12:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I thankGod that I am speaking to Ghanaians. Thisissue --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:40 p.m.
    HonMember, I give you three more minutes.
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 12:40 p.m.
    The reason this issuecame up is that, on Friday, 13th December,2013, this House told Ghana NationalPetroleum Company (GNPC) not to go andrent. Column 3082 of the Official Reportfor Friday, 13th December, 2013, thesubmission by the Hon Minister forEnergy at the time says and I beg to read;
    “GNPC had come to the HonMinister with two proposals to builda modern office accommodation andpossibly to lease. Mr Speaker, after we had evaluatedit, we agreed that that was not anoption and that they should build apermanent office.”
    Mr Speaker, that is it. This is authori-tative. Parliament passed this and that iswhy it is here and I have quoted. So, GNPChas no right whatsoever to go and rentbecause they have the money and land.They should go and build their own officeaccommodation. That is the point. Mr Speaker, my last point. I have some of the PetroleumAgreements (PAs) we have approved asa country -- about 16 or 18 of them. Thedocument is here. This document alsocame from GNPC and we asked for it. Iasked how many PAs had been approved
    [BABA J.M. AHMED] [MR NITIWUL]
    rose
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:40 p.m.
    Is it on apoint of order? Let us be specific. I am going to bevery strict on this.
    MrAhi 12:40 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker. My Hon Colleague is acting as if thisis the first time a State institution hasrented premises. In 2002, on the Spintexroad, the Energy Commission gave 7.4billion cedis to renovate Frema House forthe Energy Commission.
    Mr Ahi 12:40 p.m.
    After that, they also gave 7.6billion cedis to complete Frema House onthe Spintex road.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:40 p.m.
    Hon DeputyMinister --
    Mr Ahi 12:40 p.m.
    So, this is not the first time.They gave 7.4 billion cedis and then 7.6billion cedis to renovate Frema House onthe Spintex road --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:40 p.m.
    HonMinister --
    Mr Ahi 12:40 p.m.
    Is it the first time a Stateinstitution is --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:40 p.m.
    Hon DeputyMinister, you are completely out of order.
    Mr Ahi 12:40 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 12:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, thepoint I am making is that, since 2009, about
    13 PAs have been approved --[Interruption] -- That is, PetroleumAgreements on the selling of the oil blocs.About 13 oil blocs have been sold since2009. The issue is that, we have afundamental law, the PetroleumExploration and Production Bill before thisHouse. That Bill has inbuilt mechanisms toensure that there are transparency andaccountability. Also, we have the fiscalterms, so that Ghana can benefit more.What are we doing to ourselves? Whyare we rushing to sell the blocs?
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:50 p.m.
    HonMember, your time is up.
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 12:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that iswhy I said we had three before us and Iurge this House to not approve it andasked the Government to withdraw thosePAs. [Hear! Hear!] Dr A. A. Osei-- rose --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:50 p.m.
    HonMembers, the next Hon Member to takethe floor would be Hon Baba Jamal. Baba Jamal M. Ahmed (NDC --Akwatia): Thank you, Mr Speaker. Before the excellent delivery by H.E.the Presidentof the State of the NationAddress, a lot of people asked about whatwas new and what was going to be new.When he succeeded in bringing to the forethe new things that he had done -- Oneof them is where you are sitting and whereyou have as your office --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:50 p.m.
    HonMember, you were up even before he tookthe floor.
    Dr A. A. Osei 12:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I was tryingto catch your eye on a point ofinformation about what happenedyesterday just in case you have forgotten.When the issue of the Research Officecame back, you advised the Clerks-at- the-Table to go and bring them in. -- I am suggesting that, if you want theClerk of the Committee to come and verify,you call are in just like you did yesterday.If we are just asking for a true certifiedcopy, you call the Clerk in. That would bebetter than going through the --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:50 p.m.
    HonMember, you are out of order. Hon Baba Ahmed, please, continue. Baba J. M. Ahmed: Mr Speaker, for thepurpose of time, I am starting afresh. Thisis because the Hon Member interjectedfrom the beginning.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:50 p.m.
    No! HonMember, please, continue. Baba J. M. Ahmed: Mr Speaker, as Isaid early on people started asking H.E.the President: “What is new”? I would want to associate myself withthe statement made by H.E. the Presidentabout the fact that when he comes toParliament, he is at home. H.E. thePresident has proved that he stayed inthis House for 12 years; for that matter,when he had the opportunity to serve thiscountry, he never disappointed thisHouse. For the first time, and even though weacknowledge the fact that otherPresidents started this project, he madesure that during his time, he restored somedignity that we lost as a result of lack ofaccommodation -- [Interruption]
    Mr I. Asiamah 12:50 p.m.
    On a point of order. Mr Speaker, the Hon Member says, H.E.the President cares about Parliament. Mr Speaker, as it is now, Hon Membersdo not even know how much they receive--
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:50 p.m.
    HonMember, please, proceed. Baba J.M. Ahmed: Mr Speaker, at least,my Hon Colleague has carried his bag andhe is going to his office. As a result of thegood works of H. E. the President, he isgoing to his office to be able to properlyoperate as a Member of Parliament, andserve this country. With that, we shouldsay kudos to H.E. the President. Mr Speaker, one thing that struck methe most when H.E. the President wasmaking his speech, was the associatedjobs that were created as a result of thedevelopments that we were having. Whenhe mentioned, for instance, schools, hesaid that a certain number of jobs hadbeen created. For example, when one goes to page15 of the State of the Nation Address,H.E. the President said that 815 direct jobshad been created and with the indirectjobs, one could not count them. When one goes to page 41 of the Stateof the Nation Address, 5,500 jobs havebeen created and plenty indirect jobs too.H.E., the President was associating thenumber of jobs that had been created asa result of the developmental projects thathe was executing. That is a kudos to H.E.,the President and we thank him for that. Mr Speaker, I would want to make asimple calculation on education. From theyear 1876, when the first senior secondaryschool was built in this country to 2012 -- between the years 1876 and 2012, wehad 526 senior secondary schools in this
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:50 p.m.
    HonMember, you have three more minutes.
    Dr A. A. Osei 12:50 p.m.
    On a point of order. Mr Speaker, when the Hon Member didthe arithmetic, he misled this House andI had wanted to bring it to your attention. There is a difference between actualand expected. His assertion was that,because H.E. the President has built 123
    divided by three -- Expected is differentfrom actual. If the project does not exist,you cannot divide it. So, if four iscompleted, you divide four by three. Youcannot just divide 123 by three; it is notan arithmetic.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 12:50 p.m.
    Very well. Hon Members, the next person to havethe floor is in the person of Hon Titus-Glover.
    Mr Daniel Nii Kwartei Titus-Glover(NPP -- Tema East) 12:50 p.m.
    Thank you verymuch, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity tocontribute to the Motion on the State ofthe Nation Address delivered by H.E., thePresident on the 25th of February, 2016.
    Mr Speaker, I would start my debateby making reference to a quote H.E., thePresident made. With your permission, Ibeg to quote:
    “Mr Speaker, I began this Addresswith an admission that, politicianstalk a lot -- as I have, no doubt,proved here today -- but that ourwords sometimes fail us becausethey do not always accuratelyreveal the human faces that informour ideas and benefit from theprogrammes and policies we enact.” Mr Speaker, H.E. the President said, aspoliticians, we talk too much. For fourhours H.E. the President was here. Mr Speaker, when I went through hisStatement, I was struggling to look at the
    area about manufacturing because I comefrom the industrial hub of this countryand we know the challenges facingmanufacturing. Mr Speaker, hitherto, the NationalDemocratic Congress (NDC) had a slogan,“I care for you”, “Better Ghana”. They arenow talking about transforming Ghanaand “changing lives”. Let us go back tothe 2016 Budget Statement. Mr Speaker, I hold in my hands, thebvudget of this year and when we look atIndustry Growth and Performance — itshows that, in 2013, manufacturing grewby 0.5 per cent.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1 p.m.
    Can youplease, make specific reference to thepage, the paragraph, et cetera for theavoidance of doubt?
    Mr Titus-Glover 1 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I amholding the Budget Statement of this year,and on page 14, table 3, we have “IndustryGrowth Performance” (per cent). By theirslogan, we are looking at how we aretransforming this country and relate it tothe performance of manufacturing. And Iam saying that, in 2013, manufacturinggrew by -0.5 per cent. In 2014, it grew by --0.8 per cent and -- 2.0 per cent in 2015. Mr Speaker, what are we transforming?Industry, and for that matter, manufac-turing and agriculture have been holdingthis country from the days of Adam. It isnot about oil. From the presentation ofthe President, I never saw anything as tothe vision he has in the manufacturingindustry. It is a pity and disappointing thatpeople and employers in the manufac-turing sector are crying.
    Mr Fiifi Fiavi F. Kwetey 1 p.m.
    On a point oforder. Mr Speaker, the Hon Member soughtto mislead the House and for that matter,this country, by making an inference tonegative performance of the manufac-turing sector. Mr Speaker, anybody who takes a lookat the composition of the economy overthe last year, would know thatmanufacturing did not have negativeperformance at all. Industry, as a whole,did not have negative performance andso, he should not mislead this country.There is a difference between having achallenge and having a negativeperformance. Mr Speaker, the negativity I know, isthat, which occurred in this economy in2007 when under their leadership, theyactually had -1.7 per cent in agriculture.Since then, there has been no negativityin any sector of this economy and that isa fact— [Hear! Hear!]
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1 p.m.
    Very well.
    Hon Member, please, proceed.
    Mr Titus-Glover 1 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, this is aHouse of records and we cannot run awayfrom the fact that I have brought out. It isclear and members of the media can comeand get a copy when they finish. I amsaying and I would want to repeat, thatthe Government has performed abysmallyin the manufacturing sector --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1 p.m.
    HonMember, your time is up but I will giveyou one minute more because of theinterruptions.
    Mr Titus-Glover 1 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I amsaying that, as part of the challenges ofthe Association of Ghana Industries, taxesare becoming too much. Mr Speaker, the DICs hitherto werecharging 1 per cent service charge fordoing the work of Customs, Excise andPreventive Service (CEPS) -- classifi-cation and evaluation. Today, this job isbeing taken over by CEPS themselves andthey continue to charge that same 1 percent. Mr Speaker, we have a special levy of 2per cent and we were told by the HonMinister for Finance that it was going tolast for only 2015, but it has gone beyond2015. And it is a cost to the businesscommunity. Mr Speaker, I am saying this because Iam not happy. The President needs to betold the truth. It is either he is not beingtold the truth or the advisers are notadvising him well.
    Mr Speaker, when we come to thefisheries sector, I have been struggling toinvite the Hon Minister for Fisheries andAquaculture Development through myQuestions, on the US$53.8 million WorldBank money —
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:10 p.m.
    Your timeis up. I made it clear to you. Hon Members, it is now the turn of theHon Hannah Tetteh. [Hear! Hear!]
    Minister for Foreign Affairs andRegional Integration (Ms HannahSerwaaTetteh)(MP) 1:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I thankyou for this opportunity to contribute andto thank H.E. President John DramaniMahama for coming to this House to giveus -- [Interruption] Mr Dan Botwe— rose --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:10 p.m.
    HonMember, is it on a point of order?
    Mr Botwe 1:10 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker. Mr Speaker, it is about the statementyou just made. You asked the Hon Member about thecopy and he said that he had only onecopy and the ruling was that when it ischecked from the source, that is AGI,then --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:10 p.m.
    No! I didnot say that. I said that if he submitted it and there was any defect with it, I would expunge whatever submission he had made --
    Mr Botwe 1:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what is the defect in this?
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:10 p.m.
    Now, it turns out to be a photocopy.
    The Hon Member knows he is going to rely on this copy. What he should do is to write to the institution concerned, get a true certified copy and bring it with him, then we would not have any problem.
    Yes, Hon Hannah Tetteh, can you please, proceed?
    Mr Botwe 1:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I hope we are going to get the Hansard for today's proceedings and it would guide us
    Ms Tetteh 1:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, when H. E., the President was giving the State of the Nation Address, when he was talking about our external relations, he intro- duced what would certainly be an innovation that can help to connect Ghana to the rest of the world and promote trade, business and investment in our country.
    Mr Speaker, I am specifically referring to page 99 of the State of the Nation Address where he says that:
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:10 p.m.
    HonMember, this issue came up some timeback and I remember that the SecondDeputy Speaker was in the Chair at thetime. I cannot remember offhand the wayhis ruling went with documents online. Ithought there was some debate on theissue but I cannot remember offhand howit was finally settled. I do not know if anyHon Member here was present at the timeand followed the proceedings.
    This is because with moderntechnology, we have to look at how weoperate -- Mr Samuel Atta Akyea — rose --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:10 p.m.
    Were youhere, Hon Member?
    MrAkyea 1:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I was not herebut I am going to have something to sayin relation to the Evidence Act. The Evidence Act is clear -- electronicevidence is admissible evidence and solong as probably one could be in tangentwith the reference, then Mr Speaker couldpermit it. [Interruption.] It is accessible.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:10 p.m.
    If it isdownloaded? Is it still --
    Mr Akyea 1:10 p.m.
    Yes, it is still electronicevidence and it can be verified by theadjudicator.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:10 p.m.
    I thoughtthat we needed to verify it. It is onlineand you would want to make reference toit. You have not downloaded it for ourbenefit and so, we are now --
    Mr Akyea 1:10 p.m.
    But Mr Speaker, I thoughtyou were online from where you areseated, so that you could just crosscheckwhat she is trying to do. [Laughter.]
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:10 p.m.
    Yes, HonMember?
    Dr Owusu Afriyie Akoto 1:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker,if you rejected a photocopy of evidencepresented to you and you do not havethe means to verify what the Hon Memberis saying, then I do not think it should beadmissible.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:10 p.m.
    No! We arereferring to the Evidence Act and that iswhat the Hon Atta Akyea is referring to,that it makes room for that kind ofprovision. So, I asked a few questions.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 1:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker,this is a House of debate, please. It is nota court of law. Once we are tempted toimport court rules relating to evidence intothis Chamber, it is going to stultifyproceedings and will amount to gaggingHon Members. All that we need to do andencourage, is to let Hon Members tell ustheir sources and let them be verifiable. If possible, lay them on the Table andwhere the source is within Parliament, toget the best source. But once we starttalking about evidence, then are we goingto determine whether on the balance ofevidence, which ought to be admitted? Mr Speaker, please, you are not a judgeand you are not here to evaluate facts.No! You do not judge facts; you justoversee debates and maintain a modicumof order in accordance with our StandingOrders. I am urging you not to let thisHouse -- [Interruption] -- No! I am notchanging my mind. What I am saying isconsistent and to repeat, I said that if youreferred to a statement someone hadmade in this Chamber, the best source isthe Hansard. If you refer to a page in the State of theNation Address -- For instance, the HonMinister referred to a certain page. Shereferred to a page of the State of the NationAdress presented before this House. Notthe message supposedly delivered tenyears ago. You do not have the Hansard;you also do not have the original State ofthe Nation Address and you say that youhave a compilation. How can we know that that compilationis a true, accurate and proper record? So,please, let us not --

    Mr Speaker, this is just to assist theHouse. This is a House of debate andrules are made to expand the boundariesof debate; it is not to restrict us. That isnot the purpose.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:20 p.m.
    HonMembers, I think that we would have tolook at the issues raised by the HonMinister for Foreign Affairs and RegionalIntegration. She wanted some clarification.
    Mr Agbesi 1:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, once it is agovernment website and we can find itover there, why should we not allow it?[Interruption] - They are doing the samething they did yesterday and it is noweating them up.
    Ms Tetteh 1:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, actually, thereason I asked you for the clarificationwas because, I wanted to make referenceto a statistic, which is in a particulardocument. It is the Ghana National ClimateChange Policy Action Programme formmplementation. It is not because I amreferencing the policy initiative and I amgoing to expand on it at great length. It is only because I wanted to refer toa particular statistic with regard to thisissue of making sure that we do not havecarbon emissions increasing, such thatglobal temperatures increase by twodegrees celsius. Mr Speaker, the reason I wanted to referto it -- and if I may refer to the statisticwithout referencing the report, I know thatit is something that other Hon Membershave the opportunity to go and check forthemselves. I do not think this should be a matterof controversy. This is because we arelooking to work together to develop this
    country. We have just had an extensivedebate this morning on the issue ofkayayei and migration from the North tothe South of Ghana. Mr Speaker, the point I wanted to makewas that it is not just an issue of lookingat the externals of development --developing infrastructure, education andschools. The records that we have, saythat from the 1960s, our temperatures haveincreased by zero point two degreescelsius every decade. If we look from 1960 to where we areright now in 2016, if we want to continueat that rate, we would get to the twodegrees celsius level long beforeeverybody else and certainly, not withinthe frames of the global agreement thatwe have just come up with. Mr Speaker, what it means is that,going forward, in our nationaldevelopment policy, the difficulties andthe challenges that we would face, thatare directly attributable to climate change,must engage us more than they have. When we were preparing for theUnited Nations Conference of the Parties(COP) 21, we had to do our ownindependent nationally -- determinedcommitments -- what we were going todo as a nation to make sure that we makethese reductions become a reality. Mr Speaker, if we are not able, in theBudget Statement, going forward, to lookat every sector, especially when it comesto environment, agriculture and financingthese things, to make sure that we areactively working to ensure that ourcountry is not negatively impacted, whatwe are seeing right now and complainingabout as climate change and the changesin the weather and rainfall patterns are notgoing to get better. They are going to getworse. That was what I wanted to drawattention to.
    This is because, when we are talkingabout sustainable developments -- Lastyear, we committed ourselves to theSustainable Development Goals -- Thatis also an important part of the equation. Mr Speaker, so, I have gone round itwithout entering into any newcontroversies. Mr Speaker, I would also like toreference the comment the President madeabout actualising our linguistic pacts thatwe have entered into with the L'Organisation Internationale de laFrancophonie. It was during theAdministration of the New Patriotic Party(NPP) Government that we becameAssociate Members of the ' OrganisationInternationale de la Francophonie. Mr Speaker, to me, it was a goodinitiative because we are surrounded byFrench speaking countries and at the endof the day, while we would be focusingon the Economic Community of WestAfrican States (ECOWAS) markets of 350million people plus, and while we think ofNigeria as a huge market and because wealso speak English and have similarsystems, there is a certain level ofaffinity --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:20 p.m.
    HonMember, you have two more minutes.
    Ms Tetteh 1:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the truth of thematter is that, with our immediateneighbours, all the Francophonecountries surrounding us and ourpopulation of 74 million, which is asizeable market in and of itself, and forour manufactures and producers, if theybegin to have the luxury or producing andlabelling both in English and in French,they would find that they do not only havea domestic market, but they also have an
    immediate regional market to access. Thatshould help to improve our manufacturingsector and trade. Mr Speaker, on the domestic front, H.E.the President made reference to a numberof roads that have been constructed. Thepeople of Awutu Senya West Consti-tuency are very grateful. Indeed, when hewas referencing the roads in the CentralRegion, especially the important feederroads that he referenced on page 68 ofthe State of the Nation Address, all ofthose roads are the Awutu Senya WestConstituency. [Hear! Hear!] We are happy that we are seeing thattransformation taking place in our part ofthe country. Mr Speaker, we are also a beneficiaryof one of the new 123 senior high dayschools. We are almost on the verge ofcompletion, and we are very much lookingforward to the inauguration of the newBawjiase Senior High School, which isgoing to be very much a landmark withinour constituency. Mr Speaker, finally, I think that it isimportant for us to reference that indeed,while we are talking about our domesticagenda, it has to fit within the context ofboth regional and continental ambitionsthat we have for ourselves. We havealways wanted to see ourselves as morethan just a State, but as a driver on theAfrican Continent. Indeed, the commentsthat H.E., the President made during theState of the Nation Address are taking uscloser to that ambition. Thank you very much, Mr Speaker, forthe opportunity. [Hear! Hear!]
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:20 p.m.
    Thank youvery much.
    Dr Kojo Appiah-Kubi (NPP--AtwimaKwanwoma) 1:20 p.m.
    Thank you Mr Speaker, forthe opportunity to comment on the 2016State of the Nation Address, which wasdelivered by the President as required ofhim under article 34 (2) of the 1992Constitution. Mr Speaker, indeed, the Constitutionrequires of the President to takeappropriate measures to promote thedevelopment of industry and, byextension, the manufacturing sector andreport on all steps taken to ensure therealisation of, among others, a healthyeconomy and the right to work. Mr Speaker, according to the 2012National Democratic Congress (NDC)Manifesto, the industrial sector and, byextension, the manufacturing sector holdsthe key to the economic transformationof the economy by adding value to ourraw materials. The President would not betired of putting emphasis on economictransformation. The President himself alsoacknowledges that the manufacturingsector can contribute immensely towardsjob generation, poverty reduction andserve as an engine of growth. These arefacts that the President accepts. Mr Speaker, but despite all theseadvantages, the President, in his threeand a half hour Address, does not evenmention the manufacturing sector. It is sadthat in an economy like that of Ghana,where the manufacturing sector isacknowledged by the President himself to
    be the engine of growth, yet in his threeand a half hour Address, the Presidentdoes not make any mention of themanufacturing sector. Even the word,“manufacturing” cannot be found in thewhole State of the Nation Address --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    HonMember, I think that this issue was raisedby one Hon Member, and references weremade to portions of the State of theNation Address, which showed that somecomments were made about themanufacturing sector. So, I do not wantus to revisit it.
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what Iam saying is that the word “manu-facturing” is not mentioned in thisdocument. [Interruption] -- It isimportant. Where is it mentioned in theState of the Nation Address? Mr Speaker, let me move on.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    HonMember, please, proceed.
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, indeed,the President has not helped themanufacturing sector at all -- with hightaxes, high cost of doing business, lipservice sector policies, unfavourablemacro economic policies, rising inflation,deterioration of the cedi and the high costof credit. Mr Speaker, the Mahama Governmentis rather de-industralising the economy.Let us take a look at how this Governmentis de-industralising the economy. In theyear 2013, as my Hon Colleague said, themanufacturing sector grew by -0.5 percent. In the year 2014, it grew by -0.8 percent [Interruption.]
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    HonMember, I believe you will save us all theordeal if you had the document with you,making references thereto.
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I hold inmy hands the State of the GhanaianEconomy Report issued by the renownedInstitute of Statistical Social and EconomicResearch (ISSER) of the University ofGhana. I can lay it. [Interruption.] Mr Speaker, if you look at these figures,you would realise that the decline in the--
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    No! Onceyou are making reference to a particulardocument, give us the page and possiblythe paragraph, then we are alright.
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Let me also say thatthese figures can also be obtained on page14 of the 2015 Budget Statement. Mr Speaker, looking at these figures,you would realise that the pace of declinein the manufacturing sector is accelerating.This is an indication that the manu-facturing sector is dying --[Interruption]
    Mr Richard Mawuli Quashigah 1:30 p.m.
    On apoint of order
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Yes, HonMember, if there is a point of order --
    Mr Quashigah 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, you askedmy Hon Colleague to give us the pagesand paragraphs and so on. He just
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Order!Order! Hon Member, your point is well made. Yes, Hon Member, how do yourespond?
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, indeed,the manufacturing sector is dying as saidby Hon Colleagues and they have severalindicators to underscore that --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    So, youare no longer referring to any particulardocument? You are making a generalstatement? Is that it?
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, when Ireach there, I will refer to the appropriatedocument.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    No! Youare making a general statement?
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Yes.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Fine.This is because you are no longer referringto any document. Alright.
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have aproblem with that. This is because, we areall experts in our own fields and we shouldbe allowed to make expert statements. Mr Speaker, another indicator that wecould use to underscore the fact that, themanufacturing sector is dying, is the shareof the manufacturing sector to the GrossDomestic Product (GDP). Mr Speaker, under this Government --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    HonMember, I thought you would veer off thisline because you are facing a lot ofresistance.
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I amproducing this document --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    You mustrefer to the relevant page and paragraph.
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, themanufacturing share of GDP page, is on149 of the ISSER document. If they want,they could have it.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Can youread from that document, so that later,you lay it at the Table? Please, could you read the particularpage you are referring to and theparagraph?
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what didI say? [Interruption] But I have not evensaid it.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Yes!That is what I am waiting for. You makereference, you read it out, then we arehome and dry. -- [Pause] --
    Mr Samuel O. Ablakwa 1:30 p.m.
    On a point oforder. Mr Speaker, when he made referenceto the 2015 Budget Statement, he saidpage 14. So, I have just downloaded itfrom the Ministry of Finance's website andthat page deals with abbreviations --[Laughter]-- So, he is totally misleadingthis House.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Let ushave some order! Hon Members, this is the reason I havebeen insisting that you should makereference to the document, turn to therelevant page or paragraph, read it out,
    after that, you lay it before the Table andwe are alright. Hon Member, you have the floor.
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I wastalking about the share of themanufacturing sector in relevance to theGDP. Over time, under this particularGovernment, that share has declined to4.5 per cent --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    They areasking for your source.
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, thesource is once again -- [Pause] --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    HonMember, your time is running out.
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    The pageand the paragraph. Very well. Hon Member, it is unfortunate yourtime is up.
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I wouldlike to refer to page 130 and this is thetable. They could just read from this table,that the manufacturing share of the GDPhas declined under this Government --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Yourtime is up. You could lay it at the Table,so that we could look at it. Your time is up,unfortunately. Yes, Hon Members, it is now the turnof Hon Samuel Okudjeto Ablakwa. Hon Okudjeto Ablakwa, you have thefloor.
    Mr Samuel Okudjeto Ablakwa (NDC-- North Tongu) 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am mostgrateful -- [Interruption] Mr Ignatius B. Awuah -- rose --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Yes, HonAblakwa, please, hold it.
    Mr Ignatius Baffour Awuah 1:30 p.m.
    MrSpeaker, we all agreed that any HonMember on the floor will be given 10minutes to make his submission. Mr Speaker, you would agree with methat our Hon Member on his feet has hadquite a number of interruptions which didnot allow him to make his case. So, Mr Speaker, I just want to pleadwith you, that he is given some little time,maybe, some three more minutes for himto sum up.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    I wouldhave agreed with you but for the fact thatwhen he was asked to provide the pageand paragraphs, it took him so long andtime was running out. It was not as ifsomebody was preventing him fromcontinuing with his presentation. I havegiven him the benefit of the doubt bysaying he should lay that document at theTable and then we will take a look at it.
    Mr Awuah 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I perfectlyagree with you and I will not challengeyour ruling, except that I am just pleadingwith you, that you allow him some moretime. Since he was actually searching forthe page -- I must admit that your goodself and Mr Speaker have actually set thestandard quite high for this debate. Forsome of us, some of the rules are quitenew and it will take a little time for us toadopt. So, Mr Speaker, --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:40 p.m.
    HonMember, I will want to encourage HonMembers to prepare when they come. As
    soon as you were asked to provide thepage and paragraph, you would havedone your notes, you would just openthem and make reference to them. It isnot as if you are now being given theopportunity and when you are addressing,you go looking for the page. That one, it would be to your owndetriment. That is all I am saying. For meto go to the extent of asking him to make itavailable to the Table Office, the recordshe was referring to would be there.
    Mr Awuah 1:40 p.m.
    Very well. Mr Speaker, I agree with you and Iwould also want to remind you of adecision we took before we even sat, thatwhen the Report of the Committee of theWhole on the National Health Insuranceissue is ready, perhaps, we would breakthe debate, take that one --[Interruption] -- I have just been toldthat the Hon Minister is not in; so, MrSpeaker, I just want to plead with you, justgive him some three minutes to sum upand when the Hon Minister appears, thenwe would take the Report.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:40 p.m.
    What weare doing -- word has been sent out toinform the Hon Minister to be here. Again,the Second Deputy Speaker would alsobe here, so that he can take the Chair whileI move the Motion for the Committee ofthe Whole. While we are at it, we have afew names left. So, we would continuewith the process and when they appear --we might even cut off some names, sothat we can take those on a later date. Hon Members, it is now the turn of HonOkudzeto Ablakwa.
    Mr Samuel O. Ablakwa 1:40 p.m.
    I am mostgrateful, Mr Speaker.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:40 p.m.
    HonMember, is it on a point of Order?
    Mr Akyea 1:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think that byour Standing Orders, an Hon Member whois contributing to a debate has the libertyto make references to the notes. But mygood Hon Friend here and who is a name-sake, “Samuel”, is reading copiously as if
    he is delivering the State of the NationAddress himself.Mr First Deputy Speaker: HonMember, since we started this debate,there have been occasions when HonMembers have been seen reading. But Ithink that they are at liberty to refresh theirmemories, so, we do not want to --
    Mr Akyea 1:40 p.m.
    But not to read copiously. Very well, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Frank Annoh-Dompreh 1:40 p.m.
    MrSpeaker, I heard my Hon Colleaguemention the source. Mr Speaker, per yourearlier ruling, it is important that he quotesthe specific page and paragraph for usto --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:40 p.m.
    HonMember, please, refer to the source.
    Mr Ablakwa 1:40 p.m.
    I am most grateful, MrSpeaker. This is the Report on Basic Statisticsand Planning Parameters of BasicEducation in Ghana 2014/2015 -- EMISMay, 2015. Mr Speaker, page 6 to 9 of theReport would give you these statistics.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:40 p.m.
    Can youlay it on the Table? Make reference to the page and theparagraph.
    Mr Ablakwa 1:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is in atabular form and so, page 6 to 9. Tables2.1.10, 2.1.12 and 2.1.14.[Hear! Hear!] Mr Annoh-Dompreh --rose --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:40 p.m.
    Yes, HonMember.
    MrAnnoh-Dompreh 1:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, withthe greatest respect, I am just going byyour earlier ruling in respect of Hon Titus-Glover; you have ruled that, a photocopy
    document is not admissible. I have seen aphotocopy document being displayed bythe Hon Member. Can he prove if that isan original document he is quoting from,because I have seen a photocopydocument?
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:40 p.m.
    HonMember, I have asked him to lay thedocument. What is sauce for the goose issauce for the gander. If when he lays it,we take a look at it and we find any defect,that makes it inadmissible; whatever hewould have said from that documentwould be expunged -- [Interruptions.]
    Dr Appiah-Kubi 1:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I did nothave that opportunity.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:40 p.m.
    HonMember, you had the opportunity and Ihave asked you to lay your document atthe Table but so far, you have not doneso. Yes, Hon Okudzeto Ablakwa.
    Mr Ablakwa 1:40 p.m.
    I am grateful, Mr Speaker. Mr Speaker, all the indications are that,the investment that the PresidentMahama-led Government has been makingin education is yielding the right results. The President talked about how genderparity has been achieved and what is evensignificant when you come to discussgender parity is that, for the first timeaccording to the 2014/2015 EMIS data --in the Greater Accra Region, enrolment offemales at the primary and junior highschools has exceeded that of boys. Girls is 51.6 per cent. In the Upper EastRegion as well, girls' enrolment at thejunior high school has exceeded that ofboys. All of this is contained in the EMIS
    data page 10 of 22 of the EducationManagement Information Systems Data. Still on the dividends of investing ineducation, the West Africa ExaminationCouncil has just informed us that for thefifth consecutive year running, Ghana hasswept the top three awards in the WestAfrica Certificate Examinations. I know my boss and the Hon Ministerfor Foreign Affairs and RegionalIntegration would be happy to hear thatall the three females are students of theWesley Girls' Senior High School. [Hear!Hear!] Mr Speaker, this is evidence thatindeed, the investment made in educationis yielding results -- [Interruption]
    Mr Annoh-Dompreh 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, theHon Deputy Minister and my HonColleague has just made a blatantstatement, which the West AfricaExaminations Council has informed us. Hewent ahead to make a very positivestatement. How were we informed? Couldhe reference the exact source or wherethat information came from. This isbecause to say that we have just beeninformed --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Order!Order! Hon Members, I believe that at certainpoint [Interruption] we must give credit,because he is the Hon Deputy Ministerfor Education. And he says that they havejust received this information. If we aredoubting it, we can verify. I do not think that we need to be sotight about some of these things.
    Mr A. A. Osei 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I agreewith you and I hope the same would begiven to Hon Members of Parliament. Wehave to at some point, believe them; thesame way we do for Ministers.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    There havebeen occasions where Hon Members ofParliament, in the course of theircontributions, have referred to their own
    Mr Ablakwa 1:50 p.m.
    I am most grateful, MrSpeaker. The evidence of the investment wemade in education is obvious for all tosee. I would want to move to thecommunity day schools, which PresidentMahama promised.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    HonMember, you have two more minutes togo.
    Mr Ablakwa 1:50 p.m.
    President Mahama saidin the State of the Nation Address that123 of these schools are at various stagesof completion. The point has been madethat because President Mahama hasinaugurated four of them, only four havebeen completed so far. Mr Speaker, I would want to state herein this debate that, there is a differencebetween inauguration and completion.[Hear! Hear!] There are many moreschools that have been completedawaiting inauguration. At the tertiary level, the University ofHealth and Allied Sciences wasinaugurated in November 19th, 2015. Sofar 2,386 students have been enrolled;815 direct jobs have been created forlecturers at the University of Health andAllied Sciences. The same is for the University ofEnergy and Natural Resources in Sunyani,where 315 jobs have been created andover 2,000 students admitted. On the
    University of Environment andSustainable Development for the EasternRegion, this Parliament has passed theBill, and this year, actual constructionwould begin. An implementationcommittee has been set up. On technical and vocational educa-tion, Mr Speaker, I am glad to observethat President Mahama's vision is oncourse. We are rebranding technical andvocational training. We are converting ourpolytechnics to technical universities.Only two days from now, on Monday,President Mahama and his brother, thePresident of Kenya would cut the sod atAda Training Institute to begin theconstruction of 13 new technicalinstitutes. Mr Speaker, it is clear that education isthe future of any nation. When one looksat the commitment, averagely, 30 per centof our budget is spent on education. Wehave exceeded the United NationsEducational Scientific and CulturalOrganisation's (UNESCO) target of 6 percent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP)contribution to education --*
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    HonMember, your time is up.
    MrAblakwa 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, you couldsee that this is a sector which is receivingthe support and the priority of PresidentJohn Mahama. Mr Speaker, I am most grateful for thisopportunity. [Hear! Hear!]
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    HonMembers, it is now the turn of Hon DerekOduro. If he is not here, could we takeHon (Nana) Marfo? Is he also absent?
    Nana Amaniampong Marfo 1:50 p.m.
    MrSpeaker, please, I am here.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Oh! Verywell. You have the floor.
    Nana Amaniampong Marfo NPP --Afigya Kwabre North) 1:50 p.m.
    Thank you, MrSpeaker, for the opportunity to makecomments on the Address presented bythe President of the land, His ExcellencyPresident John Dramani Mahama. Is it not mind boggling that thePresident conveniently shelved the mostimportant happening of the land, which islabour agitation? Mr Speaker, as the President wasrevising his notes to be delivered to thisaugust House, it was interesting thatmembers of Ghana Union of TradersAssociations (GUTA) were busilyrehearsing how to hit the streets of Ghanato -- [Interruption] Mahama Ayariga: On a point of order. Mr Speaker, it is mind boggling that heis reading his -- [Laughter] Mr Annoh-Dompreh -- rose --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Yes, is italso on a point of order?
    Mr Annoh-Dompreh 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I amjust seeking your kind guidance; earlier,you had ruled that after our Hon DeputyMinister had made his presentation, youwould want to check a particular referencehe had made and that if it was not inaccordance with the rules you had givenearlier, then that part of his speech wouldbe expunged. Mr Speaker, I plead with you if he couldtender that document for you to have alook at it.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Very well.
    Clerks- at-the-Table, do you have thedocument? Yes, Hon Member, you can continuewhile we take a look at it.
    Nana Marfo 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what didGhanaians do wrong for them to be giventhree bitter pills to swallow, which can beinferred from the Address given to us bythe President? What does this data showin the economy of Ghana? If the President cares to know, by notmanaging the economy well, the interestrate being paid by Ghanaians has becomequite exorbitant, and it has led to thecollapse of so many industries in Ghana,of which our own Cocoa ProcessingCompany (CPC) is one. [Pause]
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    HonMember, are you through?
    Nana Marfo 1:50 p.m.
    No! I thought you --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    No! Youhave the floor. Do not let your time runout.
    Nana Marfo 1:50 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker. It has led to the total collapse ofbusinesses, of which our own CPC is avictim. Where are the former workers ofCPC now? Mr Speaker, your guess is asgood as mine. Mr Speaker, as if this horrendouseffects are not enough, the Government,in his bid to score cheap political pointsand leading this non achievable bid to fixthe power problem of Ghana once and forall, has ended up saddling thesecompanies with exorbitant tariffs, whichare theirs to enjoy.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Yes, HonMember, is it on a point of order?
    Mr Dery 1:50 p.m.
    Exactly so, Mr Speaker. Yesterday, in this House, Mr Speakerruled on the conduct of Members ofParliament. So, if a Member of Parliamentcould rise up and say “if the Presidentcares to know,” referring to that on threesubsequent times, what is he trying tosay? We talked about decorum and othercommunication - He should care to know.The President cares so much forGhanaians and of course, if he is referringto him caring to know, he should addresshim very well.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Yes, HonDeputy Minority Whip?
    Mr Awuah 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, when my HonColleague was making his submission, Irealised you were chatting with theDeputy Clerk. Without my Hon Colleaguefrom the other side of the House catchingyour eye, he got up and started talking. Mr Speaker, I did not see you give himthe permission to speak.
    2. 00 p.m.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    I gave himthe floor.
    Mr Awuah 1:50 p.m.
    If you did, I rest my case.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    HonMembers, having regard to the state ofproceedings, I direct that we Sit beyondthe stipulated time under Standing Order40(3). But after this contribution, we wouldbring the debate on the State of theNation Address to a close and move onto some other business.
    Mr Awuah 1:50 p.m.
    But Mr Speaker, havinghad the floor, I realised the documentwhich has been tabled has been broughtto --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Yes, it hasbeen brought to me and I have seen thatit is in order. The pages he referred to areverified and the tables are there.Everything is alright.
    Mr Awuah 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I only neededyour verdict on it. I am alright with that.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Very well. Thank you very much. Hon Member, please, continue.
    Nana Marfo 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, is it notintriguing that our President alwayschooses the line of least resistance? Bythis, I mean that while it is very obviousthat by solving this electricity problem,he could create a lot of jobs, which is nowthe problem of the Ghanaian community,he chose this populist attitude byshowcasing one out of every 100,000Ghanaians to prove a point that theeconomy is on course.
    Mr Speaker, if there is a paradox, it cancertainly not be a paradox of exposure. Itis a paradox of plenty by which in themidst of plenty, we are suffering from --[Interruption] Mr Agbesi -- rose --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Yes, HonDeputy Majority Leader, is it on a point oforder?
    Mr Agbesi 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, my attentionwas drawn to a word used by our HonColleague on the floor, referring to thePresident as having shown a “populist”attitude in the House. I think that he canrefer to him in a more polite way thansaying “the President having shown apopulist attitude on the floor”. In myview, that is greatly unfair to the President.
    Mr Awuah 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I find the usageof the word “populist” as not offendingat all. Someone can choose to be popularand can choose to appear and presenthimself as popular to people. I do not seeanything wrong if people say that, forthat particular act of his, he has beenpopulist. Mr Speaker, I think this is not offensiveand should be allowed.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Very well. Hon Members, it is allowed. Let us hearhim to the end.
    Nana Marfo 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, as I said, ifthere is a paradox, it certainly cannot be aparadox of exposure. It is a paradox ofplenty, where in the midst of plenty rawmaterials, we seem not to get anything thatwe wish for ourselves. Mr Speaker, the twin devils of energycrisis and high cost of doing business isthe reason the state of the economy is
    what we see today. Both have been visitedonto us by --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    HonMember, you have one more minute to go.
    Nana Marfo 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, these thingshave been visited on us by theincompetent administration of HisExcellency, President Mahama.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    HonMember, your time is up. Hon Members, this brings us to theend of the debate on the State of the NationAddress by His Excellency the President. The Second Deputy Speaker willnow take over the Chair. Yes, Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Agbesi 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Report ofthe Committee of the Whole has just beendistributed and we propose to move toconsider the formula for the disbursementof the National Health Insurance Fund. Mr Speaker, could we move to itemnumber 11?
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    That is themore reason I have directed that theSecond Deputy Speaker takes the Chair. 2: 06 p.m. --
    MR SECOND DEPUTY SPEAKER
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    HonDeputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Agbesi 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we are justmoving to item number 11 - the Report ofthe Committee of the Whole on theformula for the disbursement of theNational Health Insurance Fund for theyear 2016.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Did yousay item number 11?
    MrAgbesi 2:10 p.m.
    Item number 11 -- page 4. Mr Ebo Barton-Odro -- rose --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    I thoughtthe Chairman of the Committee would waitfor me to recognise him.
    Mr Barton-Odro 2:10 p.m.
    Thank you verymuch, Mr Speaker --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    HonChairman, I have not recognised you yet.
    Mr Barton-Odro 2:10 p.m.
    Not yet?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    No! Hon Agbesi, you said we should go toMotion number 11. Is that the situation oryou would like to change it? I see you onyour feet. Would you like us to consider Motionnumber 10 first before Motion number11?
    Mr Agbesi 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we havedetected an error.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Look atMotion number 10.
    Mr Agbesi 2:10 p.m.
    Item number 10.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Sorry.Item number 10. You said 11, that is whyI called on the Hon Chairman of theCommittee to move item number 11.
    Mr Agbesi 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we are sorry.The mistake has been detected, so withyour permission, we would go to itemnumber 10.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    HonChairman of the Committee, item number10.
    MOTIONS 2:10 p.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Mr EboBarton-Odro) 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move,that notwithstanding the provisions ofStanding Order 80 (1) which require thatno Motion shall be debated until at leastforty-eight hours have elapsed betweenthe date on which notice of the Motion isgiven and the date on which the Motionis moved, the Motion for the adoption ofthe Report of the Committee of the Wholeon the proposed formula for thedisbursement of the National HealthInsurance Fund for the year 2016 may bemoved today. Ranking Member (Dr RichardAnane): Mr Speaker, I beg to second theMotion. Question put and Motion agreed to. Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Itemnumber 11, Chairman of the Committee.
    Proposed Formula for Disbursement ofNational Health Insurance Fund
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr EboBarton-Odro) 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move,that this Honourable House adopts theReport of the Committee of the Whole onthe proposed formula for thedisbursement of the National HealthInsurance Fund for the year 2016. Mr Speaker, we had the Committee ofthe Whole meeting yesterday,Thursdaythe 3rd of March, 2016.
    Introduction The proposed formula for disburse-ment of the National Health InsuranceFund for the year 2016 was laid before theHouse on Thursday, 3rd March, 2016.
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr EboBarton-Odro) 2:10 p.m.


    SPACE FOR APPENDIX 1 CONT. --PAGE 19 -- 2.10 PM SPACE FOR APPENDIX 1 CONT. --PAGE 20 -- 2.10 PM
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr EboBarton-Odro) 2:10 p.m.


    SPACE FOR APPENDIX 1 CONT. --PAGE 21 -- 2.10 PM
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Thankyou, Hon Chairman.
    Dr Richard W. Anane (NPP--Nhyiaeso) 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to secondthe Motion and in so doing, takecognisance of the recommendations of theCommittee, to make a few points. Mr Speaker, first, I thought in thepresentation, there was possibly a slightslip of the tongue in the summation of theappropriation for the National HealthInsurance Authority (NHIA). It is ratherGH¢1,497 billion and not GH¢1,479 million.I thought that should be corrected. Mr Speaker, in addition, when we lookat the formula for the NHIA, 8.1.2, then at8.1.3 of page 30 of the formula, there is theissue of premium subsidy, where someallocations are made to support thepremiums that are expected to be paid bycertain persons in the country who areexempt. This includes the indigenes, thechildren, Social Security and NationalInsurance Trust (SSNIT) pensioners, theaged, SSNIT contributors and pregnantwomen. Mr Speaker, because we are findingsome difficulty with respect to theallocation to the National Health InsuranceScheme (NHIS), I would like to submit thatwith respect to the allocation to SSNITcontributors, the Ministry and theAuthority have a deeper look and see ifthat could not be taken away and addedto the core business of the NHIA. Mr Speaker, I do say so because theimpression is created as if SSNITcontributors are not expected to paypremiums for registration under theScheme because of the contribution oftheir 2 ½ per cent.
    This has been a major issue of concern,and the clarification must be made thatthey are paid their moneys at the end whenthey go on retirement. So, in effect, it ismore of a loan, and if it is a loan, it is notas if it is a largesse that has been offloadedonto the Authority. It is a loan, and theseSSNIT contributors are paid that amount. So, we have to look at it and see if wecannot take the GH¢8.41 million that isallocated to the registration or thepremium for payment of registration ofthese members. If we look at the formula at certainpoints, we could still make some fundsavailable to the core business of the NHIAas the Ministry takes steps to make up forthe shortfall, which does not fall underthe Appropriation Act but which theAuthority still wants. Mr Speaker, the other area is the areawe have been asking for since 2009, forthe Ministry to take cognisance of andfor the Health Insurance Authority to takeup, which is, to lobby Government tocede one per cent of the Value Added Tax(VAT), which has now been added to theGhana Infrastructure Fund (GIF). Mr Speaker, the one per cent is todayequivalent to over GH¢400 million and webelieve that, if this one per cent is cededto the National Health Insurance Fund(NHIF), it would cater for whatever theywant to call it. If they want to call it a gap,it would erase that gap and make theHealth Insurance Authority function. We do say so, based on the fact thatwe have added children, and the case ofthe pregnant women, as well as the aged,must be catered for. We believe that is onegood way of solving this problem, whichhas been hanging on the NHIA for quitesome time now.

    With these few words Mr Speaker, Ibeg to second the Motion and to ask ourHon Colleagues to take cognisance of thestrains that the Authority is goingthrough and help to get this through, aswe hammer on the need for therecommendations to be taken on boardby Government.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Before Irecognise anybody, Hon RankingMember, did I hear you say that SSNITcontributors are not exempt? Because onpage 6 of the Report, it talks about exemptgroups, and it includes SSNIT contri-butors, and you are saying that it isfactually wrong?
    Dr Anane 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what I amsaying is that, that is what has been heldby the system for a long time. But I thinkit needs to be revised and the reason iswhat I brought up, that SSNITcontributors have long been seen aspeople who are contributing per the 2.5per cent allocation to the Authority. WhatI would like to bring up is that, it is, so tospeak, a loan and at the end of theirservice to the nation, they are given theirmoneys in full. It is not as if that money is subtractedfrom their pension claims. So, if they aregiven that money, then what it means isthat it is more a loan to the State and theState pays for it at the end. So, it cannot be said to be so much acontribution out of the ordinary. That isall what I want to clarify. It is not acontribution out of the ordinary; it is acontribution for their partaking in theadministration. But we may have to make
    a provision for all of them to be coveredby the State. In that case, Mr Speaker, I would evenwant to posit that I know that people makeclaims when they are seen at hospitals. Iwould even be pushing that in that case,no claims should be entertained by anyinstitution.

    Question proposed.
    Mr Joseph Y. Chireh (NDC -- Wa West) 2:20 p.m.
    Thank you Mr Speaker, for the oppor-tunity to support the Motion. In doingso, I would like to refer to some of theissues which have been raised in theCommittee's Report.
    The review of the NHIS operation is akey matter that the Government hasembarked on. We believe that, after thereview is done, the restructuring of thewhole NHIS would ensure efficiency andbetter use of resources. Apart from that, it would answer thebasic need of relevance of this, in termsof the delivery of services to thesubscribers. One other major issue is getting thefacilities, so that there is equity in accessto this service. If we look at the northern sector andthe rural areas of this country, people havethe NHIS cards, but accessing the healthfacilities sometimes costs them three orfour times the amount of premium theyhave paid and ought to pay, because theirdistances are far apart from the servicecentre. One major issue is getting the calibreof health delivery staff to be improved
    upon. But above all, the computerisationshould ensure that we are running ahealth insurance scheme, therefore, fraudis always one of the biggest problems. Ifwe computerise, double check and do theaudit, I believe that we should be able todo something about that. That is why, inmy view, in terms of the review exercise, itshould be carried through where it ispossible for us to cut cost and redirectthe money elsewhere. Ghana is aiming at getting universalhealth coverage and if we have to do so,it is this basic one -- the NHIS that willbe the indicator that we will get it. That is why in this formula, eventhough we talk about the gap in terms ofsupport, many of us are of the view thatwe should get some dedicated source ofadditional resources to support theexpansion and eventual universal healthcoverage for the people of Ghana. On this note, I thank you very muchfor the opportunity, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Ignatius Baffour Awuah (NPP --Sunyani) 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to contributeto the Motion on the floor. In doing so, I would want to draw ourattention to one or two things. MrSpeaker, looking at the sources ofrevenue, I realised that premium from theinformal sector is estimated to beGH¢67.56 million. This is only three percent of the total expected inflow. Mr Speaker, we are told that the totalenrolment is 11.2 million subscribers andit is projected to be 11.9 million by the endof the year. The total number of people onthe Social Security and NationalInsurance Trust (SSNIT) Scheme isprojected around one million. This meansthat 10 million out of 11.2 million
    subscribers come from the informalsectors. What this means is that, 10 millionof the population is contributing onlythree per cent of the total Fund. Whereas,one million is contributing 18 per cent ofthe Fund. Mr Speaker, what this means is that,either the subscription per head is too lowor we have so many people subscribingbut not paying. This is one thing I wouldwant to draw the attention of the handlersof the Scheme to investigate and comeout with the real facts on the ground. Mr Speaker, apart from that, the Schemehas been in operation for over 10 years. Ifup till now the penetration is only 41 percent, then it is a major source of worry; itis something that we should be thinkingof. This is because we have heard overand over again that coverage is about 70per cent of the total population more orless is enrolled on the NHIS. Indeed, H. E. the President, in his lastyear's State of the Nation Address didindicate that the number of people whoare subscribing to the NHIA is 27 millionas of last year -- [Interruption] -- No!That is what he said. I am so careful aboutthat. Mr Speaker, we are now being told that-- [Interruption] Mr Chireh -- rose --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Yes, HonYieleh Chireh?
    Mr Chireh 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I did not hearthat from the President. But there is aterminology that is used in this industry,which is “utilisation”. So, we can have 11million as registered subscribers, but theusage will be more than that.
  • [DR ANANE We have people going to the hospitalthree or four times. I do not think that --[Interruption] -- I doubt that.
  • Mr Awuah 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I know what Iam talking of. It was the subject of mydebate when I was contributing to theState of the Nation Address last year; Iam convinced of what I am saying. Mr Speaker, what I mean is that, if wesay that the Scheme is growing and weare lauding it -- Everybody is enrolling,then the penetration of 41 per cent for over10 years is something which should giveus a cause to worry. Mr Speaker, what is even more seriousis that we have cases where somebodyenrolls for a particular year and refuses torenew his membership in the subsequentyears. We have to find out the percentageretention that we have and why peopledo not stay on the Scheme for long. Mr Speaker, in concluding, I wouldwant to say that perhaps, the issue of thefunding gap has come up, because theScheme is taking so many programmes onboard, which are not part of their corebusiness. For instance, there is the support forthe Ministry of Health, which is GH¢146.6million. I do not know what this supportis for. But I thought that if the Ministryof Health needed any support that shouldcome from the main national budgetallocation to the Ministry, it should notcome from the Fund. So, why should the Fund be under-taking projects like Rollback Malaria,supporting Ministry of Health, when theMinistry of Health itself has its corebudget to operate?
    I want to believe that, if some of thesethings are taken off, it would help reducethe financing gap. Mr Speaker, I would want to urge theScheme not to twist the hands of theMinistry of Finance. The Ministry ofFinance has already made an appro-priation for them and they should staywithin that.
    2. 30 p.m
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Thankyou very much. I think this brings us -- Hon Deputy Minister for Education,then Hon Atta Akyea. Deputy Minister for Education (MrSamuel O. Ablakwa):I am most grateful,Mr Speaker. My comment will be very brief since Itake note of your indication about time. I just want to support the Committee'sReport and also add my voice to theobservations that have been made,especially on the need for Government totake note of the funding gap of GH¢337million and also recommendation by theCommittee, that it will be important forthe National Health Insurance Authorityto stay within their budget and not exceedtheir expenditure. I also want to draw attention to theongoing concerns about the possiblefraud in the Scheme. We do know that, aswe speak, the Bureau of NationalInvestigations (BNI) has been conductingsome investigations into the Scheme. I willwant to urge the management of theNational Health Insurance Authority to do
    everything within its power to assist withthe investigations. But most importantly,to prevent these things from happeningright from the claims made from thehospitals all the way to the managementstructures within the Authority. It is important that we work hard toregain public confidence and to assureeverybody that the Scheme, which is asocial intervention and a pro-poorScheme, works for the masses of thiscountry. Finally, I would also want to appeal tothose who keep saying that the Schemehas collapsed; I think we can raisechallenges and we can all work together,collectively, in the national interest, tokeep this Scheme function and work forthe people of this country. When we make blanket statements thatit has collapsed and it is not working, Ithink that does not augur well for theScheme and for public confidence incooperating with the Scheme to make surethat this works as a pro-poor intervention. I am grateful, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Thankyou very much. Hon Atta Akyea?
    Mr Samuel Atta Akyea (NPP --Abuakwa South) 2:20 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker. Mr Speaker, because of the mood ofthe House, I will just be brief with mycomments. Mr Speaker, I am concerned that thereis no arrangement, which will succeed ifthe capacity to dupe the system throughfictitious claims is encouraged. I amtempted to believe that one of the simple
    reasons the Scheme is faced with thosechallenges is that, there are so manyloopholes for fraudsters to take theScheme for granted. Until such a time that we plug in theloopholes and deal with the fraudstersthrough serious and active prosecutionof experts, pharmacists and the rest ofthem, who could put together fraudulentclaims, and by so doing, squeeze hugesums of money out of the Scheme, it willbe a monumental joke to believe that theNational Health Insurance Scheme, whichis a very good project for the nation, oneof the best that we have had, will eversucceed. I am also worried that we have lawsbut they are not applied. If you pay regardto the Fund, section 39 of Act 852, there isthe case that moneys are mobilised for theScheme but they are not applied to theScheme. For instance, if the Governmentof Ghana has revenue challenges, but thelaw has set aside moneys for specificdepartments or sectors like the healthsector or the National Health InsuranceScheme and these moneys are not appliedfor the purpose, it brings so manyproblems in its wake. Therefore, if the law has set a Scheme,all those who tinker with the Fund,should have been singled out for bashingin this Report. Whether it is the HonMinister for Finance who cannot balancehis accounts and for that matter, he wouldnot respect the law - and you could seethis arrangement of taking money from thestatutory source and applying it here andthere, in this marking time period, inwhich the moneys will not come in handy-- the Scheme would suffer. Let those who want this Scheme tosucceed be law abiding. They shouldleave the Fund alone. Moneys gatheredshould be applied for the purpose andtimeously.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Thankyou very much, Hon Atta Akyea. Hon Members, I think you will all agreewith me that I should put the Question.
    -- [Pause]--
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, this Housemust find a way not to continue on thispath. What we are doing right now is justlike what we did last year.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    I willrecognise you because you are the HonMinority Leader in the House now.
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would wantto make a contribution and remind us thatwhat we are doing now, if we are notcareful, it may end up in something likewhat we did last year. I think the Houseshould take a position. All we were required to do was toapprove a formula. The issue about thebudget, should not be brought into thedebate between health and theauthorities. That is what we are doing. The Executive must have their priorityand Parliament must do what the law sayswe should do. That is to provide theformula. Mr Speaker, providing theformula, is about the percentages. Wehave already approved the Appropriationin December last year. The Report goes into the same - wecannot keep repeating the issues. Wemust find a way; I thought that wouldcome out boldly but the Report says weshould do what we did last year. I hopenext year, we do not come back and dothe same report. We approved the Appropriation inDecember and the formula is all we neededto approve of now. If the Ministry of Healthdecides -- and that is why it is importantthat the Hon Minister is here to representthem to spend GH¢68 million for biometricregistration and they want us to endorsethat it is not right. That is not its core
    mandate and we are being brought intothat debate. There is a gap of GH¢337 millionbecause we chose to spend GH¢68 millionon some biometric exercise. Why do wenot allow the National Identification folksto do that? Last year, they spent GH¢68million and this year, they want to spendGH¢69 million. That is almost GH¢140million in two years of biometricregistration. If I go to the year before andI even say GH¢50 million, they would havespent GH¢200 million on the biometricregistration, when the National Identifi-cation could have done that and then theytap into it. I think that Parliament should take adecision that we should not get into thedebate of what they want to do and whatwe are supposed to do. Otherwise, it is asif we do not know what we are doing.Leadership should be bold and take somedecisions in that respect. We are not theExecutive; we do not prioritise and weshould not pretend that this is what weare doing. They want to do a biometric exerciseand then we tell them to go and ask theGovernment for money. That is not ourjob. Their core mandate is to provideNational Health Insurance. The nationalidentification system can do that for them.So far, we have spent close to GH¢300million on biometric identification and thenthe gap happens to be GH¢337 million.They cannot keep on forever. Mr Speaker, Government has a budgetcalled the Ghana Infrastructural Fund(GIF) Budget. I think that to close the gap,the Ministry should ask the Governmentto take the money from GIF -- We do nothave any difficulties with thatarrangement.
    Finally, Mr Speaker, on the amount ofwages and compensation, the HonMinister might want to look at it. GH¢115million for compensation; what kind ofbenefits are they getting? GH¢115 million?I am sure the entire Parliament, ourcompensation budget is not that much.We need to look at these matters and cutthem down, so that there would be nofunding gap.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    HonMember, their budget is audited. Is itnot?
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:40 p.m.
    The issue is not the audit.They have asked us to approve GH¢2billion and because there is a gap, weshould go to Government. I am sayingthat part of the reason it is high is becausethe compensation is too much. Theycannot go and ask Government forGH¢327 million when they are spendingmoney on all kinds of things internally andwe are being asked to support it. That isthe issue.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Thecompensation. Is that wages, compensa-tion for employees?
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:40 p.m.
    How much is the chiefofficer earning? Do we have to comparethat in relation to everybody else? Thebenefits -- what do they get and howmany vehicles? That blows up the figurethen there is a gap. Of course, there wouldbe a gap. If we want to support them, theymust look internally. Office building at Ridge, for four yearsin a row, I am sure we have reached overGH¢100 million for office building in Accraalone. You can see it there. Do they needthat? That is the problem. I am sure thatthe Hon Minister knows. As I speak, I amsure some high officials have beeninterdicted and that is where they aremisusing money --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Do notlet us go there; what you just said. Conclude. I did not say you should sitdown.
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:40 p.m.
    I have concluded. Question put and Motion is agreedto. Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Thankyou very much, Hon Chairman and HonRanking Member.
    Mr Agbesi 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we could goto Questions, item number 4.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Itemnumber 4, Question numbered 422.
    Mr Agbesi 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with yourpermission, the Hon Deputy Minister isin to answer the Questions on behalf ofthe Hon Minister who is currentlyengaged in another assignment.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    The chairhe is sitting in is the chair that an HonMinister --
    Mr Agbesi 2:40 p.m.
    The Hon Minister was herebut he was called to perform anotherassignment.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    I agreewith you but I said that the chair he issitting in is the chair an Hon Minister orHon Deputy Minister answering Ques-tions sits in. That is the chair he is sittingin. We have not given him leave and he isalready sitting in the chair. I have notgiven him leave. I am surprised. Hon Akoto Osei, they have asked forleave. What is your view on the matter?
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we have lethim stay here all morning for theseQuestions. So, it is only proper that weallow him to answer them.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    HonDeputy Minister, now, you can take thechair. Hon Kingsley Aboagye-Gyedu,Bibiani-Anhwiaso-Bekwai, Questionnumbered 422.
    Mr Gifty E. Kusi 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the HonMember has asked me to ask the Questionon his behalf as he is unavailable at themoment.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Hon GiftyKusi, following the current trend in theHouse, where is the evidence that heasked you to?
    Mrs Kusi 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he has givenme authority. I have him on my phone here.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    You wantto lay your phone?
    Mrs Kusi 2:40 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker.[Laughter.]
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Ask yourQuestion.
    ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS 2:40 p.m.

    MINISTRY OF ROADS ANDHIGHWAYS 2:40 p.m.

    Mrs Kusi 2:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the contract forthe Patabuoso Nkwanta-Chirano-Etwebo
    road was awarded in 2008 andconstruction works were started. I wantto know why it was terminated. When exactly would the constructionon the Subiri Nkwanta-Chirano road start?
    Mr I. A. Mensah 2:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, non-performance of projects would certainlylead to termination. The road is a criticalone, therefore, the termination for rewardwas occasioned by non-performance. The Subiri Nkwanta - Chirano road, asI initially mentioned, works are expectedto commence by the third quarter of thisyear. That means in this year, 2016,maintenance programme would start.
    Mrs Kusi 2:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, when thecontractor was not performing, why wasit not given to a second contractor sincethe year 2009 that this Governmentassumed power? Mr Speaker, why are we now going tore-award it?
    Mr I. A. Mensah 2:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, is it theSubiri Nkwanta-Chirano road she istalking about?
    Mr I. A. Mensah 2:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, yes, thePatabuoso Nkwanta-Chirano-Etweboroad is for reshaping and as part of theDepartment of Feeder Roads (DFR) plan,it is going to happen in the third quarterof this year.
    Mrs Kusi 2:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if one goes tothe area now, one would see that theculverts have been done and some areeven lying by the roadside. It was awardedin 2008. That is what I asked about. I do not know the reason; when onecontractor is not performing and hiscontract was terminated, why was thecontract not given to another contractor?Up till now, the culverts are lying idleand nothing is going on.
    Mr I. A. Mensah 2:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, theinformation I have is that, this road isprogrammed for DFR maintenanceprogramme in the third quarter of the year2016. The comfort is that, the road wouldallow motorability for the people in thatarea.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:50 p.m.
    HonGifty Kusi, Question numbered 423.
    Construction of Roads (Sefwi - Anhwiaso/SefwiAwaso Town Roads)
    Q*423.Mrs Gify Eugenia Kusi (onbehalf of) Mr Kingsley Aboagye-Gyeduasked the Deputy Minister for Roads andHighways when the following roadswouldl be worked on: (i) Sefwi Anhwiasotown roads (ii) Sefwi Awaso town roads.
    Mr Mensah 2:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker,
    (i) Sefwi Anwiaso Town Roads Background
    Sefwi Anhwiaso town is located withinthe Bibiani-Anwiaso-Bekwai District ofthe Western Region. The town is fastexpanding and new accesses are beingcreated by developers, which are not partof DFR network. Current Programme
    DFR will liaise with the DistrictAssembly to undertake inventory of theroads to capture them in the database forconsideration in the 2017 maintenanceprogramme.
    (ii) Sefwi Awaso Town Roads Background
    The Sefwi Awaso town roads are gravelroads located in the Bibiani-Anwiaso-Bekwai District in the Western Region. Current Programme
    GHA has packaged 5.7 kilometres outof the roads studied for ugrading.Procurement process is in progress toselect a contractor to execute the works.
    Mrs Kusi 2:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, this is theproblem we also have with Sefwi Anwiaso.It was awarded in 2008 and the first coatwas done. It was not completed and weexpect that it would be continued. Mr Speaker, they are now repackaging.It is the same question I have but it lookslike the Hon Deputy Minister has noAnswers to my Questions. So, Mr Speaker, I rest my case.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:50 p.m.
    Thankyou, Hon Member. Question numbered 426, standing in thename of Hon Ameen Salifu -- Member ofParliament for Wa East.
    Tarring of Funsi Town Roads Q. 426. MrAmeen Salifu asked theDeputy Minister for Roads and Highwayswhen the Funsi town roads would betarred.
    Mr I. A. Mensah 2:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker,
    Background The Funsi town roads are located inthe Wa East District of the Upper West
    Region. The roads were planned forexecution in phases. Already 2 kilometresof the roads have received bituminoussurfacing. Current Programme
    The remaining gravel section of theroads being maintained under the GhanaHighways Authority 2016 Reshaping/Grading Routine Maintenance programme. Meanwhile, engineering studies onadditional 3 kilometres are in progress. Upon completion, a contract will beawarded for upgrading.
    Mr Salifu 2:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, can the HonDeputy Minister tell us how soon thiswould be done, please?
    Mr I. A. Mensah 2:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, as soonas the engineering studies haveconcluded, appropriate action would betaken to award the contract.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:50 p.m.
    Questionnumbered 427.
    Kulun River between Bulenga/Yaala Construction of Bridge
    Q*427. Mr Ameen Salifu asked theDeputy Minister for Roads and Highwayswhen a bridge would be constructed overKulun River, between Bulenga and Yaala.
    Mr I. A. Mensah 2:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker,
    Background The Kulun River crosses the Bulenga-- Yaala Road around a village calledKulun which is 80 kilometres from Wa. Itis located in the Wa East District of theUpper West Region.
    Currently, no bridge structure exists onthe Kulun River. The river bed dries upduring the dry season, which makes theroad accessible, but inaccessible in thewet season, when the river channel getsfilled up. Current Programme
    The Danish Government has givenfinancial assistance to support theconstruction of six (6) bridges in theUpper West and Upper East Regions.This includes the 125 m span bridge overthe Kulun River. Procurement process to select acontractor to execute the bridge works isin progress. It is anticipated that by theend of the third quarter of the year, acontractor will be selected for the work.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 3 p.m.
    Questionnumbered 428, standing in the name ofHon Kwadwo Kyei - Frimpong -- Memberof Parliament for Bosome-Freho.
    Dr A. A. Osei 3 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the HonMember had to exit for some emergencyreasons, so, we can skip that.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 3 p.m.
    All right. He also has Question numbered 429. Question number 430 standing in thename of the Hon Member for Bortianor-Ngleshie-Amanfro. He is also not here, so, I will --
    Mr Ibrahim Ahmed 3 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he isaround.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 3 p.m.
    I cannotsee him. Hon Member, you used to sitsomewhere here.
    Mr Demordzi 3 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, this is mynew seat.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 3 p.m.
    The NewTestament.
    New Bortianor to Old Bortianor andAmanfro Junction to Top TownConstruction of Roads Q.430. Mr Bright Edward KodzoDemordzi asked the Deputy Minister forRoads and Highways what plans theMinistry had to construct the NewBortianor to Old Bortianor and AmanfroJunction to Top Town roads. Mr Speaker,
    i. Amanfrom Junction -Top Town Roads Background
    The Amanfrom Junction to Top Townroads links the main Kasoa Ashalaja road.It is a six kilometre (km) gravel road in apoor condition. It is located in the GaSouth Municipal Assembly of the GreaterAccra Region. Current Programme
    A contract for the upgrading of the roadto bituminous surface has been awarded.Currently,. 3 kilometres of drainage works
    have been completed. The surfacing ofthe road will commence by the thirdquarter of 2016. ii. Bortianor - New Bortianor Background
    Bortianor-New Bortianor road is in theGa South Municipality of the GreaterAccra Region. It forms part of the Kasoabypass road, which is currently underconstruction. Current Programme
    The contractor is working fromBortianor to Old Barrier. He has completedthe drainage works and surfacing worksare currently ongoing. Future Programme
    Upon completion of the ongoing worksby the last quarter of 2016, attention willbe directed towards all other roadsincluding the New Bortianor road.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 3 p.m.
    Thankyou very much, Hon Deputy Minister, forattending upon the House. You aredischarged.
    Mr Ahmed Ibrahim 3 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it ispast 2.00 p.m. so, we are entirely in yourhands.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 3 p.m.
    There areno more items to consider.
    Mr A. Ibrahim 3 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, rightly so.
    ADJOURNMENT 3 p.m.