Debates of 22 Jul 2015

MR SPEAKER
PRAYERS 10:15 a.m.

Mr Speaker 10:15 a.m.
Hon Members, we will defer the Correction of Votes and Proceedings. I will move on to the Commencement of Public Business.
Mr Speaker 10:15 a.m.
Hon Members, we will defer the Correction of Votes and Proceed- ings. I will move on to the Commencement of Public Business.
Dr Matthew O. Prempeh 10:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, a bit trivia, that I would like to find out.
Mr Speaker, on the day of the 2015 Budget -- not the supplementary budget -- the Hon Minister for Finance came to give a presentation to this House. Mr Speaker, the presentation is missing from all our records. So, I am drawing your mind to it. What do we do about such issues?
The power point presentation that the Hon Minister delivered on the floor of Parliament is not in the Hansard Office and it is not in our archives. It cannot be found anywhere in this House, which I think --
Dr Matthew O. Prempeh 10:15 a.m.
Mr Speak- er, a bit trivia, that I would like to find out.
Mr Speaker, on the day of the 2015 Budget -- not the supplementary budget -- the Hon Minister for Finance came to give a presentation to this House. Mr Speaker, the presentation is missing from all our records. So, I am drawing your mind to it. What do we do about such issues?
The power point presentation that the Hon Minister delivered on the floor of Par- liament is not in the Hansard Office and it is not in our archives. It cannot be found anywhere in this House, which I think --
Mr Speaker 10:15 a.m.
Please, these are matters you should discuss with me earlier and then we find out. I do not know exactly what presentation you are talking about. However, I will find out from the Clerks- at- the-Table, so that we know exactly how to deal with the matter.
Hon Members, my attention has just been drawn to a communication from the Ministry of Education with regard to a Question that was supposed to be answered this morning by the Hon Minister for Education.

The Question is about the implementa- tion and management of feeding grants. The communication to the Table Office is to the effect that it is not under the purview of the Ministry of Education and so, it should be redirected to the appropriate agency in charge of that.
Mr Speaker 10:15 a.m.
Please, these are matters you should discuss with me earlier and then we find out. I do not know exactly what presentation you are talking about. However, I will find out from the Clerks- at- the-Table, so that we know exactly how to deal with the matter.
Hon Members, my attention has just been drawn to a communication from the Ministry of Education with regard to a Question that was supposed to be an- swered this morning by the Hon Minister for Education.

The Question is about the implemen- ta-tion and management of feeding grants. The communication to the Table Office is to the effect that it is not under the pur- view of the Ministry of Education and so, it should be redirected to the appropriate agency in charge of that.
Mr Dominic B. A. Nitiwul 10:15 a.m.
Mr Speak- er, the volume is very low, so, we cannot hear you. I just heard --
Mr Dominic B. A. Nitiwul 10:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the volume is very low, so, we cannot hear you. I just heard --
Mr Speaker 10:15 a.m.
The microphone?
Mr Nitiwul 10:15 a.m.
Yes!
Mr Speaker 10:15 a.m.
The Business Committee programmed the Minister for Education to come and respond to an Urgent Question this morning but the Clerks-at-the-Table just gave me a copy of a letter from the Ministry of Education.
They just showed me a copy. They did not indicate when they received the communication but it was copied to the Hon Majority Leader, who is in charge of Government Business. He is not in the Chamber; that is why I am trying to explain, in case an Hon Member raises an issue about the Question.

Hon Members, let me read the Communication for the avoidance of doubt.
Mr Speaker 10:15 a.m.
The Business Committee programmed the Minister for Education to come and respond to an Urgent Question this morning but the Clerks-at-the-Table just gave me a copy of a letter from the Ministry of Education.
They just showed me a copy. They did not indicate when they received the communication but it was copied to the Hon Majority Leader, who is in charge of Government Business. He is not in the Chamber; that is why I am trying to explain, in case an Hon Member raises an issue about the Question.

Hon Members, let me read the Commu- nication for the avoidance of doubt.
Mr Nitiwul 10:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, it is very necessary for us to know the content.
Mr Speaker 10:15 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader, did you receive your copy of the Com- munication? I hand over to you.
Mr Speaker 10:15 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader, did you receive your copy of the Communication? I hand over to you.
Mr Alban S. K. Bagbin 10:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the Business Committee scheduled this Question, which had been directed to the Hon Minister for Education as an urgent Question for the Hon Minister to respond to this morning.
The Hon Minister replied through the Chief Director of the Ministry, Mr Enoch Cobbinah, in a letter dated 21st July, 2015, titled Re: Notice of Question.
Mr Alban S. K. Bagbin 10:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the Business Committee scheduled this Question, which had been directed to the Hon Minister for Education as an urgent
Question for the Hon Minister to respond to this morning.
The Hon Minister replied through the Chief Director of the Ministry, Mr Enoch Cobbinah, in a letter dated 21st July, 2015, titled Re: Notice of Question.
SPACE FOR COMMUNICATION 10:15 a.m.

SPACE FOR COMMUNICATION - 10:15 a.m.

COMMUNICATION 10:15 a.m.

Mr Speaker 10:25 a.m.
Hon Members, before I open the floor, under our rules, Hon Min- isters can only respond to Questions that they are responsible for. So, it is entirely right for an Hon Minister to say that “that
matter is not under my purview.” And that is precisely what they are saying. So, I will direct that the Question should be properly redirected.
The second point I want to make is that, the suggestion being made by the Hon Majority Leader is not captured in our Standing Orders, just as Statements are not captured in the Standing Orders, but we are evolving that you route your Statements through your Leaders to make recommendations.
So, it is in the same vein - When I was in Leadership, this idea came up and we were trying to see whether Questions are routed through Leadership even though it is not in the Standing Orders, so that at that level, your Leaders will know the kind of Questions that you are filing, which are coming to the Speaker for admission or otherwise.
It is more of a suggestion that is coming from the Hon Majority Leader. Leadership makes recommendations to the Speaker on a Statement to be made by an Hon Member. If you go to our Standing Orders, there is no provision like that but it has evolved as a result of practice. It is in that same spirit that the Hon Majority Leader is suggesting to the House that the same thing should apply to Questions, so that you can process your Questions through your Leaders before they get to the Table Office, who then recommend or otherwise to the Speaker.
Mr Speaker 10:25 a.m.
Hon Members, before I open the floor, under our rules, Hon Ministers can only respond to Questions that they are responsible for. So, it is entirely right for an Hon Minister to say that “that matter is not under my purview.” And that is precisely what they are saying. So, I will direct that the Question should be properly redirected.
The second point I want to make is that, the suggestion being made by the Hon Majority Leader is not captured in our Standing Orders, just as Statements are not captured in the Standing Orders, but we are evolving that you route your Statements through your Leaders to make recommendations.
So, it is in the same vein - When I was in Leadership, this idea came up and we were trying to see whether Questions are routed through Leadership even though it is not in the Standing Orders, so that at that level, your Leaders will know the kind of Questions that you are filing, which are coming to the Speaker for admission or otherwise.
It is more of a suggestion that is coming from the Hon Majority Leader. Leadership makes recommendations to the Speaker on a Statement to be made by an Hon Member. If you go to our Standing Orders, there is no provision like that but it has evolved as a result of practice. It is in that same spirit that the Hon Majority Leader is suggesting to the House that the same thing should apply to Questions, so that you can process your Questions through your Leaders before they get to the Table Office, who then recommend or otherwise to the Speaker.
Mr Nitiwul 10:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am a bit taken aback. It is true that the Scholarships Secretariat releases the funds for feeding grants but the management of the schools and the feeding grants are undertaken by the Ministry of Education. It is not the Scholarships Secretariat. Unless this Government is telling us a different thing, we have known from time immemorial that questions about feeding grants are responded to publicly by the Hon Minister for Education. It is always so publicly--
[Interruption]-- unless we are being told today that from hence, until this Govern- ment is no more in office, any Question regarding feeding grants should be routed to the Scholarships Secretariat.
Mr Nitiwul 10:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am a bit taken aback. It is true that the Scholarships Secretariat releases the funds for feeding grants but the management of the schools and the feeding grants are undertaken by
the Ministry of Education. It is not the Scholarships Secretariat. Unless this Government is telling us a different thing, we have known from time immemorial that questions about feeding grants are responded to publicly by the Hon Minister for Education. It is always so publicly-- [Interruption]-- unless we are being told today that from hence, until this Government is no more in office, any Question regarding feeding grants should be routed to the Scholarships Secretariat.
Mr Speaker 10:25 a.m.
Hon Deputy Minority Leader, you know that the person who signed the letter does not know our rules, otherwise, he would not have used the word “Scholarships Secretariat”. That is why the Hon Majority Leader made the point -- They do not have audience on this floor. So, we cannot direct the Question to the Scholarships Secretariat because they do not know our rules here. But the Hon Majority Leader has suggested --
Mr Nitiwul 10:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I heard him but I am also saying publicly, whether from the heads of assisted secondary schools or even ordinary citizens, when questions about the feeding grants are raised, it is the Minister for Education or her deputy and in fact, the Ministry that responds. It was so during our time, and as late as possible, it has been so.
But if today we are being told that any Question regarding feeding grants for schools should be directed to that place and for that matter --
Mr Speaker 10:25 a.m.
Hon Member, let us draw a clear cut distinction. This Question is specific in relation to the three northern regions, and so whether it is the three northern regions that are under the Scholarship Secretariat or the feeding grants throughout the whole country to Government-assisted high schools, it is another matter.
Mr Speaker 10:25 a.m.
Hon Member, let us draw a clear cut distinction. This Ques- tion is specific in relation to the three northern regions, and so whether it is the three northern regions that are under the Scholarship Secretariat or the feeding grants throughout the whole country to Government-assisted high schools, it is another matter.
Mr Nitiwul 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, all feeding grants to the high schools, particularly from the three northern regions which started in the year 1960 are routed through the Scholarships Secretariat but managed by the Ministry of Education. This is because they bring the input. They will tell them the number of people, bring the input, and account --
Mr Nitiwul 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, all feeding grants to the high schools, particularly from the three northern regions which started in the year 1960 are routed through the Scholarships Secretariat but managed by the Ministry of Education. This is because they bring the input. They will
tell them the number of people, bring the input, and account --
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Deputy Minority Leader, there is a way of still getting the Minister to come and answer a Question on this matter, whether they have anything at all to do with feeding grants.
Mr Bagbin 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the Question is not about the management of feeding grants. The Question is about the release -- [Interruption] -- Please, listen.
Mr Speaker, he seated here says a lot of things publicly. He cannot say the same thing on this floor. There are rules here, and so, he cannot be talking about what people say publicly and the Ministry responds to. No! We are talking about a House governed by rules. And the Question says;
“To ask the Minister for Education whether feeding grants have been released.”
The one dealing with the release is the Scholarships Secretariat. And I am saying that the Scholarships Secretariat is under the Office of the President. He is talking about release. That is the relevant authority. It cannot be the Ministry of Education. We are referring to governments and governments; he should go and look at the other Questions and see whether the Questions talk about release of the funds. It is not the same thing.
Mr Bagbin 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the Question
is not about the management of feeding grants. The Question is about the release -- [Interruption] -- Please, listen.
Mr Speaker, he seated here says a lot of things publicly. He cannot say the same thing on this floor. There are rules here, and so, he cannot be talking about what people say publicly and the Ministry responds to. No! We are talking about a House governed by rules. And the Ques- tion says;
“To ask the Minister for Education whether feeding grants have been released.”
The one dealing with the release is the Scholarships Secretariat. And I am saying that the Scholarships Secretariat is under the Office of the President. He is talking about release. That is the relevant authority. It cannot be the Ministry of Ed- ucation. We are referring to governments and governments; he should go and look at the other Questions and see whether the Questions talk about release of the funds. It is not the same thing.
Mr Nitiwul 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to confirm that the Hon Member discussed it with Leadership. It is just that we did not write on it. So, I do not want to talk about the Hon Member. The Leadership on this side still thinks strongly that the release of the money is done through the Ministry to the schools. There is no way that the money is released from the Scholarships Secretariat directly to the schools; it is never done that way. So, the Scholarships Secretariat could release the money but whether the money gets to the schools, it is the Minister for Education who should come and answer and not the Scholarships
Mr Nitiwul 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to confirm that the Hon Member discussed it with Leadership. It is just that we did not write on it. So, I do not want to talk about the Hon Member. The Leadership
Mr Nitiwul 10:35 a.m.


on this side still thinks strongly that the release of the money is done through the Ministry to the schools. There is no way that the money is released from the Scholarships Secretariat directly to the schools; it is never done that way. So, the Scholarships Secretariat could release the money but whether the money gets to the schools, it is the Minister for Education who should come and answer and not the Scholarships Secretariat.

The Minister cannot shirk her responsibility and say that she has no knowledge whether the release has been done. It is her duty and this House must hold her responsible. She should come and tell us on this floor that it is not her duty and then we will ask her questions; that is the way it is done.

This is the first time a Minister has written to us to say that she has no jurisdiction over the Question and so, she cannot answer. They always come to the floor and tell this House that they have no jurisdiction and that is the way it is done.
Mr Nitiwul 10:35 a.m.


Secretariat.

The Minister cannot shirk her respon- sibility and say that she has no knowledge whether the release has been done. It is her duty and this House must hold her responsible. She should come and tell us on this floor that it is not her duty and then we will ask her questions; that is the way it is done.

This is the first time a Minister has written to us to say that she has no ju- risdiction over the Question and so, she cannot answer. They always come to the floor and tell this House that they have no jurisdiction and that is the way it is done.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
That is a different matter; that is one of the ways. She can come to the floor and do the same thing and she could also inform the House. What you are suggesting is one of the ways and this one is also not wrong.
Let me hear from the Minister for Defence and then I will call the Majority Leader.
Dr Benjamin B. Kunbuor 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I think this issue is also about a matter that this House has been concerned with. When you draft a Question, you must make sure that it is specific and clear enough. What you are indicating on the floor here should have been whether that
money has been released by the Scholarships Secretariat to the Ministry of Education. So, should you go ahead and make the assumption that the money has been released and that is why the Minister for Education must come and explain whether it has further been released.
Then it is an assumption that you would make, which would not be right. We are indicating that if you want, ask whether the money has been released from the Scholarships Secretariat to her. Do not make that assumption that the money has been released. And the Hon Minister coming to this floor to make such a commitment is a dangerous one and she could end up misleading the House. [Interruption] --
Dr Benjamin B. Kunbuor 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speak- er, I think this issue is also about a matter that this House has been concerned with. When you draft a Question, you must make sure that it is specific and clear enough. What you are indicating on the floor here should have been whether that money has been released by the Scholar- ships Secretariat to the Ministry of Edu- cation. So, should you go ahead and make the assumption that the money has been released and that is why the Minister for Education must come and explain whether it has further been released.
Then it is an assumption that you would make, which would not be right. We are indicating that if you want, ask whether the money has been released from the Scholarships Secretariat to her.
Do not make that assumption that the money has been released. And the Hon Minister coming to this floor to make such a commitment is a dangerous one and she could end up misleading the House. [Interruption] --
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Members, I do not want us to bedevil this issue.
Yes, Hon Member for Old Tafo?
Dr Anthony A. Osei 10:35 a.m.
My good Friend, the Minister for Defence, I am surprised, is habouring that opinion.
A few days ago, he got the First Deputy Speaker in trouble when he said that what he was saying was not in our Standing Orders. Standing Order 113 (2), he said that there was no headcount. So, please, this time -- [Interruption.]--
Dr Kunbuor 10:35 a.m.
He should substantiate his allegation from the Official Report because I am not sure that the period he is talking about, I was even in the House.
Dr A. A. Osei 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the First Deputy Speaker was here, when the Question was called and I wanted to refer to Order 113 (2), and he said it was not in our Standing Orders until we found out then --
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Minister for De- fence --
Please conclude.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Minister for Defence
Dr A. A. Osei 10:35 a.m.
So, I beg him to sit
down and relax because this House does not want to be misled and engage in some serious confrontation with your goodself -- He is my good Friend. So, he should be careful.
-- 10:35 a.m.

Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Members, let me refer to Standing Order 62, which states:
“(1) Questions may be asked of Ministers relating to public affairs
with which they are officially con- nected, proceedings pending in Parliament or any matter of admin- istration for which such Ministers are responsible.”
Hon Members, the issue that the Min- istry of Education is raising has something to do with Standing Order 62. What I will want us to do at this stage, is to get the Leaders and see how we could get this Question to be answered. We will want the Question to be answered and we want to get who will come and answer it. Our wor- ry is not whether it should be the Ministry of Education or a Minister in the Office of the President. We want the Question to be answered because Hon Members want an Answer to the Question.
I do not think that we should devote too much time to whether it should be the Minister for Education, but somebody must come and answer this Question. Somebody is responsible for the release of feeding grants to schools in the three northern regions and we have to get that person to come and answer the Question.
That is my concern as Speaker pre- siding over this issue. So, I will ask Leadership and the Business Committee to get whoever is responsible to come and answer that Question as early as possible.
Hon Majority Leader and Chairman of the Business Committee?
Dr A. A. Osei 10:35 a.m.
So, I beg him to sit down and relax because this House does not want to be misled and engage in some serious confrontation with your goodself -- He is my good Friend. So, he should be careful.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Members, let me refer to Standing Order 62, which states:
“(1) Questions may be asked of Ministers relating to public affairs with which they are officially connected, proceedings pending in Parliament or any matter of administration for which such Ministers are responsible.”
Hon Members, the issue that the Ministry of Education is raising has something to do with Standing Order 62. What I will want us to do at this stage, is to get the Leaders and see how we could get this Question to be answered. We will want the Question to be answered and we want to get who will come and answer it. Our worry is not whether it should be the Ministry of Education or a Minister in the Office of the President. We want the Question to be answered because Hon Members want an Answer to the Question.
I do not think that we should devote too much time to whether it should be the Minister for Education, but somebody must come and answer this Question. Somebody is responsible for the release of feeding grants to schools in the three northern regions and we have to get that person to come and answer the Question.
That is my concern as Speaker presiding over this issue. So, I will ask Leadership and the Business Committee
to get whoever is responsible to come and answer that Question as early as possible.
Hon Majority Leader and Chairman of the Business Committee?
Mr Bagbin 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we would programme this Question appropriately for the relevant Minister to come and answer it.
I recall that I had during their time not only asked a Question but even had a press conference on this same issue.
I also recall that Hon Likpalimor who was in charge of the Scholarships Secretariat at the Office of the President also appeared here to respond to a similar Question. So, this is how things have gone and my Hon Colleagues, when they were in Government as I stated earlier, called the “Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning”.
We are in Government now and we believe that economic planning is properly under the National Development Planning Commission. So, we do not add it to the Ministry of Finance's remit. That does not mean that by so doing, any thing wrong has been committed. So, the reference to our regime and theirs as if they did some- thing and we must follow it, is not relevant here. There are so many things that they did in their regime that we are not doing. We do not have a Kodwo Mpiani who was the Chief of Staff and Minister for Presidential Affairs.
We also do not have Presidential Staff- ers, Spokespersons and others. So, it is not the same thing. We had the Minister for Parliamentary Affairs but I am not the Minister for Parliamentary Affairs --- [Interruption.] --
Mr Bagbin 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we would programme this Question appropriately for the relevant Minister to come and answer it.
I recall that I had during their time not only asked a Question but even had a press conference on this same issue.
I also recall that Hon Likpalimor who was in charge of the Scholarships Secretariat at the Office of the President also appeared here to respond to a similar Question. So, this is how things have gone and my Hon Colleagues, when they were in Government as I stated earlier, called the “Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning”.
We are in Government now and we believe that economic planning is properly under the National Development Planning Commission. So, we do not add it to the Ministry of Finance's remit. That does not mean that by so doing, any thing wrong has been committed. So, the reference to our regime and theirs as if they did something and we must follow it, is not relevant here. There are so many things that they did in their regime that we are not doing. We do not have a Kodwo Mpiani who was the Chief of Staff and Minister for Presidential Affairs.
We also do not have Presidential Staffers, Spokespersons and others. So, it is not the same thing. We had the Minister for Parliamentary Affairs but I am not the Minister for Parliamentary Affairs --- [Interruption.] --
Mr Nitiwul 10:35 a.m.
But this man was the
Minister for Parliamentary Affairs --
Mr Nitiwul 10:35 a.m.
But this man was the Minister for Parliamentary Affairs --
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Deputy Minority Leader, you do not have the floor.
Mr Bagbin 10:35 a.m.
So, Mr Speaker, we would programme it appropriately and get the rel- evant Minister to respond to the Question. It is an important issue and it is of serious public interest. As a Colleague Member of Parliament from the North, I know how people are concerned with the delay in the release of these funds.
Mr Speaker, we would do so because it is an urgent matter and immediately after today, we would try and channel it to the appropriate quarters.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Deputy Minority Leader, you do not have the floor.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Members, that brings us to the end of --
Yes, Hon Member?
Mr Bagbin 10:35 a.m.
So, Mr Speaker, we would programme it appropriately and get the relevant Minister to respond to the Question. It is an important issue and it is of serious public interest. As a Colleague Member of Parliament from the North, I know how people are concerned with the delay in the release of these funds.
Mr Speaker, we would do so because it is an urgent matter and immediately after today, we would try and channel it to the appropriate quarters.
Mr Nitiwul 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, if this House were to break, we may not come back until October, and I am making an application to you, that as much as possible, you may have to advise Leadership to programme the Question before we rise on Friday.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Member, that was why I referred this matter to the Chair- man of the Business Committee and the Leaders, so that we will get this resolved.
Hon Majority Leader, at the com- mence-ment of Public Business?
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Member, that was why I referred this matter to the Chairman of the Business Committee and the Leaders, so that we will get this resolved.
Hon Majority Leader, at the commence- ment of Public Business?
Mr Bagbin 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we would take item number 4 -- Laying of Papers and after that, we would move to Reso- lutions.
Mr Bagbin 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we would take item number 4 -- Laying of Papers and after that, we would move to Resolutions.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Is the Minister for Fi- nance here? [Pause.]
Very well. We will start with item number 4(b).
Hon Members, Presentation of Papers. Item 4(b), by the Hon Chairman of the joint Committee on Defence and Interior, and Constitutional, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Is the Minister for Finance here? [Pause.]
Very well. We will start with item number 4(b).
Hon Members, Presentation of Papers. Item 4(b), by the Hon Chairman of the joint Committee on Defence and Interior, and Constitutional, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs.
PAPERS 10:35 a.m.

Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader, which one are we taking?
Mr Bagbin 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we are taking items number 4(d), and (e) and I think 4 (i) and (ii).
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
What about item number 4(g)? The Hon Chairman of the Public Accounts Committee is here.
Is it ready?
Mr Kwaku Agyeman-Manu 10:35 a.m.
Yes, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
All right.
Hon Majority Leader, what about the 4(f)? --
Very well.
Hon Members, item number 4(d).
By the Chairman of the Committee--
Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Emergency Power Purchase Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and GPGC Limited for the provision on a fast-track basis, up to 107MW (ISO) Installed Capacity of power delivery services.
By the Chairman of the Committee--
Report of the joint Committee on Mines and Energy and Finance on the Commercial Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Weldy/ Lamont Associates Inc. of Illinois, USA for the extension of Credit Facility Availability and Letter of Credit (LC) under the Credit Facility Agreement between the Govern- ment of the Republic of Ghana and
US EXIM Bank for the financing of the Self Help Electrification Pro- gramme (SHEP IV) Turnkey Rural Electrification.
By the Chairman of the Committee
Report of the Public Accounts Com- mittee on the Performance Audit Report of the Auditor-General on the GETFund-funded Infrastructural Projects in Public Tertiary Institu- tions.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader,
what about item number 4(h)? I am only asking. Is it not ready?
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
All right.
Hon Majority Leader, what about the 4(f)? --
Very well.
Hon Members, item number 4(d).
By the Chairman of the Committee--
Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Emergency Power Purchase Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and GPGC Limited for the provision on a fast-track basis, up to 107MW (ISO) Installed Capacity of power delivery services.
By the Chairman of the Committee--
Report of the joint Committee on Mines and Energy and Finance on the Commercial Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Weldy/Lamont Associates Inc. of Illinois, USA for the extension of Credit Facility Availability and Letter of Credit (LC) under the Credit Facility Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and US EXIM Bank for the financing of the Self Help Electrification Programme (SHEP IV) Turnkey Rural Electrification.
By the Chairman of the Committee
Report of the Public Accounts Committee on the Performance Audit Report of the Auditor-General on the GETFund-funded Infrastructural Projects in Public Tertiary Institutions.
Mr Bagbin 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I have no information on item 4(h).
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader, what about item number 4(h)? I am only asking. Is it not ready?
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Very well.
Hon Members, item number 4(i).
By the Chairman of the Committee
Report of the Committee of Privileges on contemptuous remarks allegedly made against Hon Members of Par- liament by Mr Abubakar Ahmed, also known as Blakk Rasta, on Hitz FM Entertainment News, that eighty per cent (80%) of Members of Parliament Smoke “wee”'.
By the Chairman of the Committee
Report of the Committee on Privileges on contemptuous remarks allegedly made against Hon Members of Par- liament by Prof. Alex Dodoo in the media following their comments on the suspended phase I Ebola Vaccine trial exercise in the Hohoe Municipality of the Volta Region.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader, can we take item number 5, which I have admitted as an urgent Motion? It is a straightforward matter, so that we can dispose of it.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Very well.
Hon Members, item number 4(i).
By the Chairman of the Committee
Report of the Committee of Privileges on contemptuous remarks allegedly made against Hon Members of Parliament by Mr Abubakar Ahmed, also known as Blakk Rasta, on Hitz FM Entertainment News, that eighty per cent (80%) of Members of Parliament Smoke “wee”'.
By the Chairman of the Committee
Report of the Committee on Privileges on contemptuous remarks allegedly made against Hon Members of Parliament by Prof. Alex Dodoo in the media following their comments on the suspended phase I Ebola Vaccine trial exercise in the Hohoe Municipality of the Volta Region.
Mr Bagbin 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want us to stand that down for my Hon Colleague, the Minority Leader to --
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
It is a very straightfor- ward matter, which was raised by the Hon Member for Old Tafo, the Hon Ranking Member. So, it is not a contentious issue.
Dr A. A. Osei 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, you re- ferred to me as the Ranking Member for Old Tafo.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
It is a very straightforward matter, which was raised by the Hon Member for Old Tafo, the Hon Ranking Member. So, it is not a contentious issue.
Dr A. A. Osei 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, you referred to me as the Ranking Member for Old Tafo.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
No! I said the Hon Mem- ber for Old Tafo and Ranking Member for Finance.
Dr A. A. Osei 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I thought
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
No! I said the Hon Member for Old Tafo and Ranking Member for Finance.
Dr A. A. Osei 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I thought --
-- 10:35 a.m.

Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Member, you are out of order. [Laughter.]
Very well. I thought we should --
Mr Bagbin 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we would definitely get to that Motion. But I had wanted us to take the Resolutions.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Very well. But I thought that --
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Very well. But I thought that --
rose rose
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Yes?
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Yes?
Dr A. A. Osei 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the sooner it is done, the better. Otherwise, the Com-

mittee is disabled. If we cannot rescind the decision, we have no locus to meet as a Committee. So, if we do it and get it out --
Dr A. A. Osei 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the sooner it is done, the better. Otherwise, the Committee is disabled. If we cannot rescind the decision, we have no locus to meet as a Committee. So, if we do it and get it out --
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Technically, that is the position.
Dr A. A. Osei 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, yes. [Pause] --
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader, before we move to that Motion, I have been advised by the Clerks-at-the-Table that if you could get an Hon Minister to lay item number 4(a).
Mr Bagbin 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I have been reliably informed that it is ready and that it could be laid. So, I have asked that they bring a copy, usually after the laying, before they go to gazette it. And they will gazette it the same day. That is what he is going to bring, and so, with your kind permission, the Hon Minister for Defence could do so for and on behalf of the Hon Minister for Finance.
Mr Speaker 10:35 a.m.
Hon Deputy Minority Leader?
Mr Nitiwul 10:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, fair enough.
Mr Speaker 10:55 a.m.
Very well.
Hon Members, item number 4(a).
By the Deputy Minister for Finance (Mr Cassiel Ato Baah Forson)(on behalf of the Minister for Finance) --
a) Fees and Charges (Amendment) Instrument, 2015.
Referred to the Committee on Subsidiary Legislation.
Mr Speaker 10:55 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader?
Mr Bagbin 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speaker, as I said earlier, I wanted us to take the Resolutions which are financial, take the Motions and then release the Hon Members on the Fi- nance Committee to go and start the Con- sideration on the supplementary budget. So, we will now move to the Resolutions.
Mr Bagbin 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speaker, as I said earlier, I wanted us to take the Resolutions which are financial, take the Motions and then release the Hon Members on the Finance Committee to go and start the Consideration on the supplementary budget. So, we will now move to the Resolutions.
Mr Speaker 10:55 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader, there is no Resolution standing alone. They are all attached to Motions and so, the Motions have to be cleared before we move to the Resolutions.
So, which Motion are we taking?
Mr Bagbin 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we have a number of Resolutions and I wanted us to start with item number 8, which is a Motion.
Mr Speaker 10:55 a.m.
Yes, item number 8 is a Motion that will pave way for the Resolution.
Mr Bagbin 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speaker, that is so.
Mr Speaker 10:55 a.m.
Item 5 too is a Motion — [Laughter]— Anyway.
Hon Members, item number 8 on the Order Paper.
Chairman of the Committee?
Mr Speaker 10:55 a.m.
Item 5 too is a Motion —[Laughter]— Anyway.
Hon Members, item number 8 on the Order Paper.
Chairman of the Committee?
Mr Bagbin 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the Chairman says that he would prefer to start from item number 10 because item number 8 is not available here with him.
Mr Speaker 10:55 a.m.
Very well.
Hon Members, item number 10 on the Order Paper.
Chairman of the Finance Committee?
Hon Majority Leader, if the Reports
are not ready, then let us move to item number 5.
Mr Speaker 10:55 a.m.
Very well.
Hon Members, item number 10 on the Order Paper.
Chairman of the Finance Committee?
Hon Majority Leader, if the Reports are not ready, then let us move to item number
5.
MOTIONS 10:55 a.m.

Majority Leader (Mr Alban S. K. Bagbin) 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House rescinds its deci- sion taken on the 26th day of March, 2015 in respect of the Eurobond Financing Plan for an amount up to one billion United States dollars (US$1.00 billion) for the refinancing of existing debt and financing of the 2015 Capital Budget.
Mr Speaker, we, as a House, approved a proposal from the Government through the Ministry of Finance to approve a process for the Ministry of Finance to issue Eu- robond up to the amount of US$1 billion, in order to raise the necessary financing to refinance our existing debts and also use part for the capital budget for this year.
Mr Speaker, after the successful nego- tiations with the International Monetary Fund (IMF), it has given the go-ahead for the Government to up the Eurobond to US$1.5 billion. So, the Ministry deems it fit to come back to the House for us to give approval to the lump sum of US$ 1.5 billion. This was contained in yesterday's supplementary budget which was submit- ted by the Minister for Finance. My initial advice to the Ministry was for them to come for us to approve US$500 million as an addition to what we earlier approved. But the Ministry said that the IMF prefers a single Resolution in respect of this matter and not two separate Resolutions to cover the US$1 billion and the US$500 million. So, the Ministry decided that it is tidier to bring it in one lump sum. That is why they are coming before us to approve the US$ 1.5 billion in one Motion and Resolution.
Mr Speaker, this House would have to do the honourable thing, which is to rescind the earlier approval to give way to this second process to take place. It is in
respect of this, according to our Standing Orders, that I move this Motion.
Majority Leader (Mr Alban S. K. Bagbin) 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House rescinds its decision taken on the 26th day of March, 2015 in respect of the Eurobond Financing Plan for an amount up to one billion United States dollars (US$1.00 billion) for the refinancing of existing debt and financing of the 2015 Capital Budget.
Mr Speaker, we, as a House, approved a proposal from the Government through the Ministry of Finance to approve a process for the Ministry of Finance to issue Eurobond up to the amount of US$1 billion, in order to raise the necessary financing to refinance our existing debts and also use part for the capital budget for this year.
Mr Speaker, after the successful negotiations with the International Monetary Fund (IMF), it has given the go-ahead for the Government to up the Eurobond to US$1.5 billion. So, the Ministry deems it fit to come back to the House for us to give approval to the lump sum of US$ 1.5 billion. This was contained in yesterday's supplementary budget which was submitted by the Minister for
Finance. My initial advice to the Ministry was for them to come for us to approve US$500 million as an addition to what we earlier approved. But the Ministry said that the IMF prefers a single Resolution in respect of this matter and not two separate Resolutions to cover the US$1 billion and the US$500 million. So, the Ministry decided that it is tidier to bring it in one lump sum. That is why they are coming before us to approve the US$ 1.5 billion in one Motion and Resolution.
Mr Speaker, this House would have to do the honourable thing, which is to rescind the earlier approval to give way to this second process to take place. It is in respect of this, according to our Standing Orders, that I move this Motion.
Mr Dominic B. A. Nitiwul 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion numbered 5 on the Order Paper.
The Hon Majority Leader has already read out what the Motion itself is, but just to say that there were two ways of going about it and that is why we have to do what we are doing.
Mr Speaker, the first way was for the Ministry to bring the extra US$500 million for the House to approve. We would not have gone ahead to rescind this decision. That is the way they wanted it, but the Ministry brought it in a single document to make it as if it is US$1.5 billion.
In that case, the House could not have approved of that US1.5 billion added to this US$1 billion and it would have been US$2.5 billion. So, we have to rescind this decision and approve the US$1.5 billion to make it a bulk thing and a tidier way than saying we are raising US$1.5 billion instead of the US$2.5 billion. I believe that is the way the Ministry is going about it.
Mr Speaker, there are other matters regarding this extra US$500 million and its usage, but I believe Hon Members of the House, particularly this side would wait; we have some reservations about it. We
Mr Dominic B. A. Nitiwul 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speak- er, I beg to second the Motion numbered 5 on the Order Paper.
The Hon Majority Leader has already read out what the Motion itself is, but just to say that there were two ways of going about it and that is why we have to do what we are doing.
Mr Speaker, the first way was for the Ministry to bring the extra US$500 million for the House to approve. We would not have gone ahead to rescind this decision. That is the way they wanted it, but the Ministry brought it in a single document to make it as if it is US$1.5 billion.
In that case, the House could not have approved of that US1.5 billion added to this US$1 billion and it would have been US$2.5 billion. So, we have to rescind this decision and approve the US$1.5 billion to make it a bulk thing and a tidier way than saying we are raising US$1.5 billion instead of the US$2.5 billion. I believe that is the way the Ministry is going about it.
Mr Speaker, there are other matters regarding this extra US$500 million and its usage, but I believe Hon Members of the House, particularly this side would wait; we have some reservations about it. We would wait for the substantive Motion itself to come and when we are debating it, we would raise those matters, otherwise, the whole thing would be clouded if I raise those matters now. So, I would want to second the Motion, urge the House to support it, and then when we come to the substantive Motion, we would raise the matters that we have regarding the usage of that US$500.
Question proposed.
Dr A. A. Osei (NPP - Old Tafo) 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speaker, as the two Leaders have said, this is the proper way to go as was raised
Dr A. A. Osei (NPP - Old Tafo) 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speaker, as the two Leaders have said, this is the proper way to go as was raised yesterday. But in presenting the Motion, the Majority Leader made a claim that the IMF had agreed for the Government to up — Mr Speaker, the only agreement which is official, is this IMF document. If there is some agreement, the Minister should show us that. The official approval on 3rd April was for US$1 billion, which is contained in this document. This is the binding document. Can the Minister show us the revision if it has been revised?
Mr Speaker 10:55 a.m.
The Majority Leader did not say it in relation to the quantum, but in relation to —
Dr A. A. Osei 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speaker, my point is that, in the approved IMF document, the ceiling is US$1 billion and the Minister is saying that they have agreed. I am saying that at the appropriate time, he should show documentation, so that we are not in violation of the official agreement.
Dr A. A. Osei 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speaker, my point is
that, in the approved IMF document, the ceiling is US$1 billion and the Minister is saying that they have agreed. I am saying that at the appropriate time, he should show documentation, so that we are not in violation of the official agreement.
Mr Bagbin 10:55 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the matter is to go to the Finance Committee and at the Committee level, the Ministry of Finance would provide evidence to support my statement that the IMF agreed. I did not say,“Agreement”. I said “agreed”, and there are forms of agreement that can be made available to my Hon Colleague.
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Hon Member for Old Tafo, you should please, take a cue from the Hon Deputy Minority Leader who did not want to go into the details, but limited himself to the issue of rescission.
Dr A. A. Osei 11:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am not going to go into detail but because he made the statement, I am putting the Hon Deputy Minister --
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Very well.
Dr A. A. Osei 11:05 a.m.
So, I think that this is the proper thing to do.
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Hon Members, I will put the Question.
In actual fact, let me refer once more to Standing Order 93 (3) which says:
“It shall be out of order to attempt to reconsider any specific Question upon which the House has come to a conclusion during the current Session, except upon a substantive motion for rescission.”
The Motion speaks for itself and maybe, the approval of the US$1.00 billion was within this Session, that was 26th March, 2015. So, it was within this Session. Therefore, we cannot go ahead to approve any other thing within this Session relating to the same subject matter unless by a substantive Motion, and that is why the Hon Majority Leader brought the substantive Motion.
Hon Members, I will now put the Question.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Accordingly, the decision taken by this House on the 26th day of March, 2015 to approve an amount of US$1.0 billion for the Refinancing of the Existing Debt and Financing of the 2015 Capital Budget has been rescinded.
I direct the Clerk's Office to inform the Ministry of Finance accordingly.
Hon Majority Leader?
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Accordingly, the deci-
sion taken by this House on the 26th day of March, 2015 to approve an amount of US$1.0 billion for the Refinancing of the Existing Debt and Financing of the 2015 Capital Budget has been rescinded.
I direct the Clerk's Office to inform the Ministry of Finance accordingly.
Hon Majority Leader?
Mr Bagbin 11:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I have just been informed that the necessary Reports have been made available to Hon Mem- bers and that we could now start from item number 8.
Mr Bagbin 11:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I have just been informed that the necessary Reports have been made available to Hon Members and that we could now start from item number 8.
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Hon Members, item number 8 on the Order Paper -- Motions.
Chairman of the Committee?
MOTIONS 11:05 a.m.

Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 11:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Finance Committee on the Financing Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and the International Development Association (IDA) for an amount equivalent to sixteen million, two hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights (SDR16,200,000 [equivalent to US$25 million) as additional financing for the Transport Sector Project.
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker to take the Chair.
Mr Avedzi 11:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, in doing so, I present your Committee's Report.
Introduction
The request for approval of the Financ- ing Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and the International Development Association (IDA) for an amount equivalent to sixteen million, two hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights (SDR16,200,000) (Equivalent to US$25 million) as an additional support to the Transport Sector Project was presented to the House on behalf of the Minister for Finance by the Hon Deputy Minister for Finance, Mr Cassiel Ato Baah Forson on Friday, 10th July, 2015 in accordance with article 181 of the 1992 Constitution.
Mr Speaker referred the request to the Finance Committee for consideration and report in accordance with Order 169 of the Standing Orders of the House.
The Committee was assisted in its de- liberations by the Hon Deputy Ministers for Finance and Roads and Highways, Messrs Cassiel Ato Baah Forson and Isaac Adjei Mensah respectively and officials from the Ministries of Finance and Roads
and Highways and considered the referral.
The Committee is grateful to the Hon Deputy Ministers and officials for the cooperation and assistance.
Reference
The Committee referred to the following additional documents at its deliberations:
The 1992 Constitution of Ghana
The Standing Orders of the Parlia- ment of Ghana
The Loans Act, 1970 (ACT 335)
Background
The Government of Ghana (GoG) in 2009 secured US$225.0 credit facility from the World Bank to support the implementation of the Transport Sector Project (TSP). The project was designed to increase Ghana's competitiveness in foreign trade by reducing internal transport cost and by promoting linkages in domestic markets which are crucial factors for rapid and sustained growth. The project also aims at improving governance through clarifying the roles and responsibilities of institutions in the transport sector and encouraging wider and more meaningful participation of stakeholders in the decision-making process and to provide support for decen- tralised planning, management, finance and regulation of transport infrastructure and services. It has, however, become ev- ident that the original amount will not be able to support all the activities envisaged under the project. The Ministry is therefore requesting for additional financing in the sum of US$25.0 million in order to be able to achieve the full objectives of the project.
Original project description
The original project is being financed by a US$225 IDA facility and is scheduled to be implemented within six years period from December, 2009 to 30th June, 2015. The project is divided into seven main components, which are as follows:
Mr Avedzi 11:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, in doing so, I present your Committee's Report.
Introduction
The request for approval of the Financing Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and the International Development Association (IDA) for an amount equivalent to sixteen million, two hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights (SDR16,200,000) (Equivalent to US$25 million) as an additional support to the Transport Sector
Project was presented to the House on behalf of the Minister for Finance by the Hon Deputy Minister for Finance, Mr Cassiel Ato Baah Forson on Friday, 10th July, 2015 in accordance with article 181 of the 1992 Constitution.
Mr Speaker referred the request to the Finance Committee for consideration and report in accordance with Order 169 of the Standing Orders of the House.
The Committee was assisted in its deliberations by the Hon Deputy Ministers for Finance and Roads and Highways, Messrs Cassiel Ato Baah Forson and Isaac Adjei Mensah respectively and officials from the Ministries of Finance and Roads and Highways and considered the referral.
The Committee is grateful to the Hon Deputy Ministers and officials for the cooperation and assistance.
Reference
The Committee referred to the following additional documents at its deliberations:
The 1992 Constitution of Ghana
The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana
The Loans Act, 1970 (ACT 335)
Background
The Government of Ghana (GoG) in 2009 secured US$225.0 credit facility from the World Bank to support the implementation of the Transport Sector Project (TSP). The project was designed to increase Ghana's competitiveness in foreign trade by reducing internal transport cost and by promoting linkages in domestic markets which are crucial factors for rapid and sustained growth. The project also aims at improving governance through clarifying the roles and responsibilities of institutions in the transport sector and encouraging wider and more meaningful
MR FIRST DEPUTY SPEAKER
Mr Avedzi 11:05 a.m.


the International Development Association (IDA) for an amount equivalent to sixteen million, two hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights (SDR16,200,000) (equivalent to US$25 million) as additional support to the Transport Sector Project in accordance with article 181 of the 1992 Constitution, sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970, (Act 335) and Order 169 of the Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.

Respectfully submitted.
Dr A. A. Osei (NPP -- Old Tafo) 11:10 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion and in so doing, remind Hon Members that, as the Chairman said, this is to complete an earlier project which was worth about US$225 million. Unfortunately, there
Dr A. A. Osei (NPP -- Old Tafo) 11:10 a.m.


were some bad decisions with respect to the designs, specifically on the Ayamfu- ri-Asawinso road and also on selected roads in the Accra East Corridor, that is, the Giffard road and the rehabilitation of the Burma Camp road. So, the US$25 million is for these two roads and not for the entire project.

With the first one, which is the Ayam- furi-Asawinso road, the additional cost is US$7.64 million and the cost for the Bur- ma Camp and Giffard roads is US$17.9 million. Those of you who drive around Burma Camp will notice that -- [Inter- ruption] -- It is not finished; it is ongoing.

Mr Speaker, the question was put to the Hon Minister and as always, the response was that they have done a Debt Sustain- ability Analysis (DSA) but the effect on the country is marginal, untenable. If you borrow 20 times and you say each one is marginal, they will add up. So, we have been asking the Hon Minister if he can bring us documentation to confirm the marginality or otherwise but we do not get it. So, this is another loan for US$25 million and the terms are reasonable.

Yesterday, we had three loans and each one was marginal; but if we add all the three, they cannot be marginal. This is because considering the rate we are going, US$90 billion -- these will add up to the total stock of debt.

So, I think it is about time that the Hon Minister brought the actual calculation regarding the debt sustainability analysis because the International Monetary Fund (IMF) itself is calling us debt distressed and he says it is sustainable. That cannot be consistent. So, we need to see.

I think aside from that, I urge Hon Members to support the Motion.

Question proposed.
MR FIRST DEPUTY SPEAKER
Dr A. A. Osei (NPP -- Old Tafo) 11:10 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion and in so doing, remind Hon Members that, as the Chairman said, this is to complete an earlier project which was worth about US$225 million. Unfortunately, there were some bad decisions with respect to the designs, specifically on the Ayamfuri- Asawinso road and also on selected roads in the Accra East Corridor, that is, the Giffard road and the rehabilitation of the Burma Camp road. So, the US$25 million is for these two roads and not for the entire project.
With the first one, which is the Ayamfuri-Asawinso road, the additional cost is US$7.64 million and the cost for the Burma Camp and Giffard roads is US$17.9 million. Those of you who drive around Burma Camp will notice that -- [Interruption] -- It is not finished; it is ongoing.
Mr Speaker, the question was put to the Hon Minister and as always, the response was that they have done a Debt Sustainability Analysis (DSA) but the effect on the country is marginal, untenable. If you borrow 20 times and you
say each one is marginal, they will add up. So, we have been asking the Hon Minister if he can bring us documentation to confirm the marginality or otherwise but we do not get it. So, this is another loan for US$25 million and the terms are reasonable.
Yesterday, we had three loans and each one was marginal; but if we add all the three, they cannot be marginal. This is because considering the rate we are going, US$90 billion -- these will add up to the total stock of debt.
So, I think it is about time that the Hon Minister brought the actual calculation regarding the debt sustainability analysis because the International Monetary Fund (IMF) itself is calling us debt distressed and he says it is sustainable. That cannot be consistent. So, we need to see.
I think aside from that, I urge Hon Members to support the Motion.
Question proposed.
Mr Ken O. Agyapong (NPP -- Assin Central) 11:10 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I have a problem with the second lot, that is, the Burma Camp road. Mr Speaker, we need value for money; I do not have a problem with the first one, but if you happen to be on the Burma Camp road, you would see that they have done a fantastic job.
So, if they come up with another esti- mate, which says changes in design cost US$17.9 million -- when we look at the kilometres, I think it is on the high side and therefore, the Committee should give us details what is involved -- [Interruption] -- I have seen it. But the road is almost completed. So, if he comes up again with design changes and asks for US$17.9 million, Mr Speaker, honestly, I think it is on a higher side and we should therefore, ask the Finance Committee to furnish us with details of what is involved that costs US$17.9 million.
Mr Ken O. Agyapong (NPP -- Assin Central) 11:10 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I have a problem with the second lot, that is, the Burma Camp road. Mr Speaker, we need value for money; I do not have a problem with the first one, but if you happen to be on the Burma Camp road, you would see that they have done a fantastic job.
So, if they come up with another estimate, which says changes in design cost US$17.9 million -- when we look at the kilometres, I think it is on the high side and therefore, the Committee should give us details what is involved -- [Interruption] -- I have seen it. But the road is almost completed. So, if he comes up again with design changes and asks for US$17.9 million, Mr Speaker, honestly, I think it is on a higher side and we should
therefore, ask the Finance Committee to furnish us with details of what is involved that costs US$17.9 million.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Very well.
Hon Deputy Minister for Finance, are you in a position to respond?
Mr Cassiel A. B. Forson 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am not the Minister for Roads and High- ways, but I would attempt to answer some of the concerns.
Yes, the Hon Member did indicate that the Burma Camp road is not up to the sev- en kilometres, but one would always make a mistake if he looks at the Giffard road alone as the only road that the financing is actually catering for.
Mr Speaker, behind the Burma Camp, there is a road that links Burma Camp all the way to Spintex road. That is also part of this financing. Indeed, there is an addi- tional road from the Spintex road that links the way towards Teshie- Nungua, which
goes all the way behind the Ghana Trade Fair Company Limited. It is part of this financing and it should not be seen as if this financing is only for the Giffard road; it is more than the Giffard road. So, as a point of information, I think it is important that I share that with Hon Members.
Mr Cassiel A. B. Forson 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am not the Minister for Roads and Highways, but I would attempt to answer some of the concerns.
Yes, the Hon Member did indicate that the Burma Camp road is not up to the seven kilometres, but one would always make a mistake if he looks at the Giffard road alone as the only road that the financing is actually catering for.
Mr Speaker, behind the Burma Camp, there is a road that links Burma Camp all the way to Spintex road. That is also part of this financing. Indeed, there is an additional road from the Spintex road that links the way towards Teshie- Nungua, which goes all the way behind the Ghana Trade Fair Company Limited. It is part of this financing and it should not be seen as if this financing is only for the Giffard road; it is more than the Giffard road. So, as a point of information, I think it is important that I share that with Hon Members.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Member, I hope you are satisfied with the explanation.
Mr Agyapong 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am. Next time, he should give us the details, so that we do not get up to ask for.
Mr Isaac Osei 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, just a cou- ple of corrections, which I think the Hon Chairman should probably have made.
It may appear rather small. But US$225 and US$225 million, is a huge difference. So, in paragraph (3.0), we have on the first line, US$225 credit facility. I do not know who would go for a US$225 credit facility.
I think it is also repeated in the first line at paragraph (4.0). Then in the second paragraph of the following page, we have the sum of US$6.5 allocated. Perhaps, he might want to add the word “million” to make it tighter and more reasonable.
I thank you, Mr Speaker.
Mr Avedzi 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member is right. The amount is in mil- lions. So, wherever you see the US dollar sign with “225” without a million, please, amend it to add “million” to it.
Mr Isaac Osei 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, just a couple of corrections, which I think the Hon Chairman should probably have made.
It may appear rather small. But US$225 and US$225 million, is a huge difference. So, in paragraph (3.0), we have on the first line, US$225 credit facility. I do not know who would go for a US$225 credit facility.
I think it is also repeated in the first line at paragraph (4.0). Then in the second paragraph of the following page, we have the sum of US$6.5 allocated. Perhaps, he might want to add the word “million” to make it tighter and more reasonable.
I thank you, Mr Speaker.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Very well. Leave granted for the necessary amend- ments to be effected.
Hon Members, I will put the Question.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Mr Avedzi 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member is right. The amount is in millions. So, wherever you see the US dollar sign with “225” without a million, please, amend it to add “million” to it.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Yes, Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Very well. Leave granted for the necessary amendments to be effected.
Hon Members, I will put the Question.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Mr Agbesi 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we would take the consequential Resolution as captured in item number 9.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Very well.
Is the Minister for Finance here? [Interruption.] The Deputy Minister for Finance is here.
Can you seek leave of the Minority
side?
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Very well.
Is the Minister for Finance here? [Interruption.] The Deputy Minister for Finance is here.
Can you seek leave of the Minority side?
Mr Agbesi 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, with your kind permission, if the Hon Deputy Min- ister for Finance can --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Very well.
Deputy Minister for Finance, item numbered 9 -- Resolution?
Mr Agbesi 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, with your kind permission, if the Hon Deputy Minister for Finance can --
RESOLUTIONS 11:15 a.m.

Minister for Finance) 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
WHEREAS by the provisions of article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), the terms and conditions of any loan raised by the Government of the Republic of Ghana on behalf of itself or any public institution or authority shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by a Resolution of Parliament;
PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), at the request of the Government of the Republic Ghana acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has been laid before Parliament the

terms and conditions of a Financing Agreement between the Govern- ment of the Republic of Ghana and the International Development Association (IDA) for an amount equivalent to sixteen million, two hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights (SDR16,200,000 [equivalent to US$25 million]) as additional financ- ing for the Transport Sector Project.
RESOLUTIONS 11:15 a.m.

THIS HONOURABLE HOUSE 11:15 a.m.

Minister for Finance) 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
WHEREAS by the provisions of article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), the terms and conditions of any loan raised by the Government of the Republic of Ghana on behalf of itself or any public institution or authority shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by a Resolution of Parliament;
PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), at the request of the Government of the Republic Ghana acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has been laid before Parliament the terms and conditions of a Financing Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and the International Development Association (IDA) for an amount equivalent to sixteen million, two hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights (SDR16,200,000 [equivalent to US$25 million]) as additional financing for the Transport Sector Project.
HEREBY RESOLVES AS FOL- 11:15 a.m.

Mr James K. Avedzi 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Members, I think this is consequential. I will put the Question.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Mem- bers, I think this is consequential. I will put the Question.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr Agbesi 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, can we take item number 10?
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Mem- bers, item number 10 -- Motion by the Chairman of the Committee.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Members, item number 10 -- Motion by the Chairman of the Committee.
MOTIONS 11:15 a.m.

Mr James K Avedzi 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80 (1) which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Finance Committee on the Financing Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and the International Development Association (IDA) for an amount equivalent to thir ty-two million, seven hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights (SDR32,700,000 [equivalent to US$45 million]) to support the Public Financial Management Reform Project may be moved today.
Mr James K Avedzi 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80 (1) which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Finance Committee on the Financing Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and the International Development Asso- ciation (IDA) for an amount equivalent to thirty-two million, seven hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights (SDR32,700,000 [equivalent to US$45 million]) to support the Public Financial Management Reform Project may be moved today.
Dr A. A. Osei 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Item numbered 11.
Financing Agreement between GoG/ IDA to support the Public Financial
Management Reform Project
(PUFMARP)
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Item numbered 11.
Financing Agreement between GoG/IDA to support the Public Finan-
cial Management Reform Project
(PUFMARP)
Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Finance Committee on the Financing Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and the International Development Association (IDA) for an amount equivalent to thir- ty-two million, seven hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights (SDR32,700,000 [equivalent to US$45 million]) to support the Public Financial Management Reform Project.
Mr Speaker, in doing so, I present your Committee's Report.
Introduction
The request for approval of the Financ- ing Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and the Inter- national Development Association (IDA) for an amount equivalent to thirty-two, million, seven hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights [ (SDR 32,700,000.00) (USD$45 million equivalent)] to support the Public Financial Management Reform Project was presented to the House by the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Emmanuel Terkper, on Thursday, 9th July, 2015 in accordance with article 181 of the 1992 Constitution.
Mr Speaker referred the request to the Finance Committee for considera-tion and report in accordance with Order 169 of the Standing Orders of the House.
The Committee was assisted at its deliberations by the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Emmanuel Terkper and his deputy, Mr Cassiel Ato Baah Forson and officials from the Ministry of Finance.
The Committee is grateful to the Hon Minister, his deputy and officials for the cooperation and assistance received during the deliberations.
Reference
The Committee referred to the fol- lowing additional documents during its deliberations:
The 1992 Constitution of Ghana
The Standing Orders of the Parlia- ment of Ghana
Loans Act 1970 (Act 335)
Background
The Government of Ghana (GoG) has over the years implemented varied forms of reforms to streamline its financial manage- ment systems. The first comprehensive Public Financial Management Reform Programme (PUFMARP) was implemented during the period 1997- 2003. The ultimate objective was to enhance efficiency, transparency and accountability of financial management functions of government.
The programme components involved the Medium Term Expenditure Frame- work (MTEF); Financial Accounting and Reporting, Legal and Regulatory Framework, Revenue Management, Aid and Debt Management, Comprehensive Auditing, Procurement reforms, Fiscal Decentralisation, Integrated Personnel and Payroll Database and Budget and Public Expenditure Management System
(BPEMS).
Planning reforms were also debuted during 2006-2009 with the introduction of Integrated Short and Medium Term Action Plans (ST/MTAP), following the release of the Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda (GSGDA I)
There were some successes recorded under the reforms. Prominent among them was the Legal and Regulatory Framework which helped with the promulgation of the following financial laws: Financial Administration Act (FAA) 2003, Act 654; the Financial Administration Regulations (FAR) 2004; and Public Procurement Act, 2003. The recent Ghana Revenue Authority Act, 2009, Act 791 also brought all the three revenue agencies (IRS, CEPS and VAT)
Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Finance Committee on the Financing Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and the International Development Association (IDA) for an amount equivalent to thirty- two million, seven hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights (SDR32,700,000 [equivalent to US$45 million]) to support the Public Financial Management Reform Project.
Mr Speaker, in doing so, I present your Committee's Report.
Introduction
The request for approval of the Financing Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and the International Development Association (IDA) for an amount equivalent to thirty-two, million, seven hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights [ (SDR 32,700,000.00) (USD$45 million equivalent)] to support the Public Financial Management Reform Project was presented to the House by the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Emmanuel Terkper, on Thursday, 9th July, 2015 in accordance with article 181 of the 1992 Constitution.
Mr Speaker referred the request to the Finance Committee for considera-
tion and report in accordance with Order 169 of the Standing Orders of the House.
The Committee was assisted at its deliberations by the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Emmanuel Terkper and his deputy, Mr Cassiel Ato Baah Forson and officials from the Ministry of Finance.
The Committee is grateful to the Hon Minister, his deputy and officials for the cooperation and assistance received during the deliberations.
Reference
The Committee referred to the following additional documents during its deliberations:
The 1992 Constitution of Ghana
The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana
Loans Act 1970 (Act 335)
Background
The Government of Ghana (GoG) has over the years implemented varied forms of reforms to streamline its financial management systems. The first comprehensive Public Financial Management Reform Programme (PUFMARP) was implemented during the period 1997- 2003. The ultimate objective was to enhance efficiency, transparency and accountability of financial management functions of government.
The programme components involved the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF); Financial Accounting and Reporting, Legal and
Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 11:15 a.m.
Component 2: Public Financial Management Systems and Control
This component will support the development and implementation of the public financial management systems and control, such as:
a. strengthening the government information systems for public financial management;
b. improving cash and treasury management through;
c. strengthening internal audit at the national and local levels;
d. improving public procurement planning, management and capacity;
e. strengthening payroll and pensions management; and
f. improving financial reporting and asset management through and (i) building the capacity of relevant government institutions on financial reporting and implementation of the interna- tional public sector accounting standards; and (ii) establishing and implementing policy guidelines on the management, control and reporting of public assets.
Component 3: Reinforcing Financial Oversight and Accountability
Activities under this component will enhance external audit capacity and legislative oversight on budget management by strengthening the financial oversight role of the Ghana Audit Service to carry out comprehensive performance and systems-based audits. It will also look at enhancing the capacity
systems of Parliament to exercise oversight on public financial management processes.
Component 4: Public Financial Management Reform Coordination and Change Management
This component will support activities to provide a continuing institutional and coordination basis for the oversight of public financial management reforms as well as provide support for project management, co-ordination, monitoring and evaluation.
Observations
Justification for Government Action
Justifying government actions and the importance of the Facility, the Deputy Minister for Finance indicated that notwithstanding Government programmes aimed at strengthening PFM in the country, significant institutional, policy and systems and process weaknesses continue to manifest themselves, thus limiting the impact of reforms already implemented.
According to the Deputy Minister, these issues have been identified through the articulation of lessons learned so far during GIFMIS implementation, the directions embedded in the Government's medium-term Public Financial Manage- ment Reform Strategy (PFMRS) (2015- 2018), and through a project preparation workshop where the stakeholders outlined the key problems that have led the country into an unsustainable fiscal path.
The Hon Deputy Minister added that the PFMR Project is in line with GoG's overall goal of improving the budget management, financial control and reporting of the Government of Ghana. The Project, the Hon Deputy Minister further indicated, will contribute to enhance fiscal discipline, strategic allocation of resources
and service delivery efficiency through strengthened systems and procedures and targeted capacity- building.
He also stated that in spite of the achievements, the procurement system still has a number of weaknesses and bottlenecks, which is hoped to be addressed under this project. The Hon Deputy Minister cited the lack of integration of the procurement planning tool with the Hyperion Budget Planning Tool and ultimate interface with the GFMIS as one of the major weaknesses of procurement planning.
It was emphasised that the project will improve public procurement planning, management and capacity through the enhancement of online procurement planning tool, integration of the e- Procurement system with the GIFMIS, establishing a database for the unit cost of infrastructure, establishing functional procurement units, building the capacity of private sector stakeholders on bidding processes and establishing a framework for procurement audits.
The Committee was also informed that the project is in line with Government's commitment of addressing the payroll challenges. It was stated that a number of measures have been developed into strengthening payroll and pension's management through supporting the implementation of the payroll cleaning plan and conducting payroll and personnel verification audits which needs to be maintained and reinforced.
Further, Financial Reporting and Asset Management have always been a challenge and the project will help improve financial reporting and asset management through building the capacity of relevant government institutions on financial
reporting and implementation of the international public sector accounting standards; establishing and implementing policy guidelines on the management, control and reporting of public assets.
The Hon Deputy Minister concluded by indicating that there was the need to reinforce financial oversight and accountability and this he explained, would be achieved by enhancing the external audit capacity as well as building the capacity and systems of Parliament, specifically, the Public Accounts and Finance Committees to enable them exercise oversight on PFM process.
Institutional and Implementation Arrangement
The Committee noted that the Ministry of Finance shall be responsible for the overall strategic co-ordination and oversight of the project.
The overall institutional and implemen- tation arrangement is detailed below:
i. PFM Steering Committee --
A PFM Steering Committee, chaired by the Minister responsible for Finance, shall be maintained throughout the implementation of the Project and shall meet at least three times in a fiscal year. The Steering Committee shall provide strategic guidance and oversight to ensure prompt and efficient implementation of the Project.
ii. PFM Technical Committee --
The PFM Technical Committee will be a sub-committee of the Steering Committee with the responsibility of reviewing, evaluating and providing recommendations on technical issues related to Project implementation.

iii. PFM Coordination Unit --

The PFM Coordination Unit operating under the Chief Director of MoF shall be responsible for coordinating and consolidating all projects under the PFM Reform Strategy, including: (a) confirming Project goals and objectives; (b) monitoring resources and annual work plans and projects; (c) reviewing progress reports; (d) supporting the resolution of implementation issues.

iv. Project Management Unit --

A Project Management Unit shall be established to be responsible for the day-to-day administration of overall planning, coordination, the technical and fiduciary (i.e. procurement and financial management) compliance, moni- toring, evaluation, reporting and communication of the activities under the Project.

Expected Outcomes

The following were highlighted as some of the expected outcomes of the project:

(a) Greater budget discipline will be exercised by all key stakeholders in the budget process.

(b) Sector medium-term strategy plans will be comprehensively costed to provide a sound input for the development of annual budget ceilings that are more closely related to the Govern- ment's policy objectives, and consistent with available fiscal space.

(c) An orderly process exists for ensuring that all projects submitted for funding through the budget are appropriately prepared. This will impact favourably on budget credibility and avoidance of “throw-forward” instances for projects that remain uncompleted year upon year.

(d) Fiscal risk monitoring will become institutionalised as an established part of the budget process. This will both strengthen the authority of the responsible entity and demonstrate the commitment of the Government to comprehensive management of fiscal risks.

(e) Coverage and usage of the integrated budgeting and financial modules of the GIFMIS will improve.

(f) Control of warrant release within expected cash receipts, over the forecast period to avoid over- commitment and, combined with progressive improvement in cash flow forecasting.

(g) Accumulation of arrears will be limited signaling that spending plans must be adjusted.

(h) A comprehensive TSA to reduce borrowing requirements and costs is established.

Conclusion and recommendation

The Committee after a careful examination of the facility recommends to the House to adopt its report and approve by resolution, the request for approval of the Financing Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and the International Development Association (IDA) for an

amount of equivalent to thirty-two, million, seven hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights [ (SDR 32,700,000.00) (USD$45 million equivalent)] to support the Public Financial Management Reform Project in accordance with article 181 of the 1992 Constitution, section 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335) and Order 169 of the Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.

Respectfully submitted.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 11:15 a.m.
on the management, control and reporting of public assets.
Component 3: Reinforcing Financial Oversight and Accountability
Activities under this component will enhance external audit capacity and leg- islative oversight on budget management by strengthening the financial oversight role of the Ghana Audit Service to carry out comprehensive performance and systems-based audits. It will also look at enhancing the capacity systems of Par- liament to exercise oversight on public financial management processes.
Component 4: Public Financial Manage- ment Reform Coordination and Change Management
This component will support activities to provide a continuing institutional and coordination basis for the oversight of public financial management reforms as well as provide support for project man- agement, co-ordination, monitoring and evaluation.
Observations
Justification for Government Action
Justifying government actions and the importance of the Facility, the Deputy Minister for Finance indicated that not- withstanding Government programmes aimed at strengthening PFM in the coun- try, significant institutional, policy and systems and process weaknesses continue to manifest themselves, thus limiting the impact of reforms already implemented.
According to the Deputy Minister, these issues have been identified through the articulation of lessons learned so far during GIFMIS implementation, the direc- tions embedded in the Government's me-
dium-term Public Financial Manage-ment Reform Strategy (PFMRS) (2015-2018), and through a project preparation work- shop where the stakeholders outlined the key problems that have led the country into an unsustainable fiscal path.
The Hon Deputy Minister added that the PFMR Project is in line with GoG's overall goal of improving the budget management, financial control and re- porting of the Government of Ghana. The Project, the Hon Deputy Minister further indicated, will contribute to enhance fiscal discipline, strategic allocation of resources and service delivery efficiency through strengthened systems and procedures and targeted capacity- building.
He also stated that in spite of the achievements, the procurement system still has a number of weaknesses and bot- tlenecks, which is hoped to be addressed under this project. The Hon Deputy Minister cited the lack of integration of the procurement planning tool with the Hyperion Budget Planning Tool and ul- timate interface with the GFMIS as one of the major weaknesses of procurement planning.
It was emphasised that the project will improve public procurement planning, management and capacity through the enhancement of online procurement plan- ning tool, integration of the e-Procurement system with the GIFMIS, establishing a database for the unit cost of infrastructure, establishing functional procurement units, building the capacity of private sector stakeholders on bidding processes and establishing a framework for procurement audits.
The Committee was also informed that the project is in line with Government's commitment of addressing the payroll challenges. It was stated that a number of measures have been developed into
strengthening payroll and pension's management through supporting the implementation of the payroll cleaning plan and conducting payroll and person- nel verification audits which needs to be maintained and reinforced.
Further, Financial Reporting and Asset Management have always been a chal- lenge and the project will help improve financial reporting and asset management through building the capacity of relevant government institutions on financial re- porting and implementation of the interna- tional public sector accounting standards; establishing and implementing policy guidelines on the management, control and reporting of public assets.
The Hon Deputy Minister concluded by indicating that there was the need to reinforce financial oversight and account- ability and this he explained, would be achieved by enhancing the external audit capacity as well as building the capacity and systems of Parliament, specifically, the Public Accounts and Finance Com- mittees to enable them exercise oversight on PFM process.
Institutional and Implementation Arrange- ment
The Committee noted that the Ministry of Finance shall be responsible for the overall strategic co-ordination and over- sight of the project.
The overall institutional and imple- men-tation arrangement is detailed below:
i. PFM Steering Committee --
A PFM Steering Committee, chaired by the Minister responsi- ble for Finance, shall be maintained throughout the implementation of
the Project and shall meet at least three times in a fiscal year. The Steering Committee shall provide strategic guidance and oversight to ensure prompt and efficient imple- mentation of the Project.
ii. PFM Technical Committee --
The PFM Technical Committee will be a sub-committee of the Steering Committee with the responsibility of reviewing, evalu- ating and providing recommenda- tions on technical issues related to Project implementation.
iii. PFM Coordination Unit --
The PFM Coordination Unit op- erating under the Chief Director of MoF shall be responsible for coordinating and consolidat- ing all projects under the PFM Reform Strategy, including: (a) confirming Project goals and ob- jectives; (b) monitoring resourc- es and annual work plans and projects; (c) reviewing progress reports; (d) supporting the reso- lution of implementation issues.
iv. Project Management Unit --
A Project Management Unit shall be established to be responsible for the day-to-day administration of overall planning, coordination, the technical and fiduciary (i.e. procurement and financial man- agement) compliance, moni-to- ring, evaluation, reporting and communication of the activities under the Project.
Expected Outcomes
The following were highlighted as some of the expected outcomes of the project:

(a) Greater budget discipline will be exercised by all key stakeholders in the budget process.

(b) Sector medium-term strategy plans will be comprehensive- ly costed to provide a sound input for the development of annual budget ceilings that are more closely related to the Gov- ern-ment's policy objectives, and consistent with available fiscal space.

(c) An orderly process exists for en- suring that all projects submitted for funding through the budget are appropriately prepared. This will impact favourably on budget credibility and avoidance of “throw-forward” instances for projects that remain uncompleted year upon year.

(d) Fiscal risk monitoring will become institutionalised as an established part of the budget process. This will both strengthen the author- ity of the responsible entity and demonstrate the commitment of the Government to comprehen- sive management of fiscal risks.

(e) Coverage and usage of the inte- grated budgeting and financial modules of the GIFMIS will improve.

(f) Control of warrant release with- in expected cash receipts, over the forecast period to avoid over-commitment and, combined with progressive improvement in cash flow forecasting.

(g) Accumulation of arrears will be

limited signaling that spending plans must be adjusted.

(h) A comprehensive TSA to reduce borrowing requirements and costs is established.

Conclusion and recommendation

The Committee after a careful examina- tion of the facility recommends to the House to adopt its report and approve by resolution, the request for approval of the Financing Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and the International Development Association (IDA) for an amount of equivalent to thirty-two, million, seven hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights [ (SDR 32,700,000.00) (USD$45 million equivalent)] to support the Public Financial Management Reform Project in accordance with article 181 of the 1992 Constitution, section 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335) and Order 169 of the Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.

Respectfully submitted.
Dr Anthony Akoto Osei (NPP-Old Tafo) 11:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Mr Speaker, almost 20 years since the introduction of PUFMARP, we still have challenges with our public financial man- agement system. I used to say that it looks like we are purchasing a Rolls-Royce to drive on potholes when all we need is a Volkswagen to do our public financial management.
In principle, I do not have any diffi- culty with a new reform instrument to try to improve public financial management systems in Ghana.
Mr Speaker, if you look at the Commit- tee's Report, as the Hon Chairman noted, one of the key difficulties we have had is that in the past, we appeared to have brought in consultants who had a reason to stay on the programme forever. So, the local people never really bought in. Every time we brought a reform programme, it was resisted. I hope that this time, we would use our local people to implement these reforms. Mr Speaker, so in principle, this is another reform programme and I hope it is the last one that would put us on the right track.
Mr Speaker, the part that I have a diffi- culty with, is the component on page 5 of the Report, and with your kind permission, I beg to read:
“It will also look at enhancing the capacity systems of Parliament to exercise oversight on public finan- cial management process.”
Mr Speaker, I do not know how Parlia- ment got in there. But it appears that some system is being brought to Parliament for Members of Parliament to use our over- sight for, of which some of them are not aware. So, I do not know how somebody sitting somewhere in the Ministry of Fi- nance wants to introduce a system that we are going to use, and we do not have an input. Certainly, some of the money would come to Parliament. Who in Parliament is supposed to have oversight, if not Mem- bers of Parliament?
If it is us, we were not consulted but the money is going to be borrowed to enhance our capacity. I have a difficulty. The oversight would be coming from the Ministry of Finance to have control over Parliament. It is a very bad precedent and I do not know if the Leadership of the House is aware. But I would want to bring their
attention to this matter to make sure that it is not the Ministry of Finance telling us how our capacity needs to be improved; we should be proposing that. If we have to amend the loan for that purpose, we should.
This is because I have asked around and it appears that nobody is aware that part of the amount is for us; but it says so in the Report. In particular, it talks about the Public Accounts Committee and the Finance Committee but we are both not aware. At least, we hope that our Lead- ership would discuss this matter with the Ministry of Finance to ensure that it is what we need for our oversight that we purchased.
Mr Speaker, aside from that, as I said, I think that in all fairness, having a continu- ation of our reform process and improving the capacity of our institutions is welcome.
So, I urge Hon Members to support the Motion.
I thank you.
Dr Anthony Akoto Osei (NPP-Old Tafo) 11:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Mr Speaker, almost 20 years since the introduction of PUFMARP, we still have challenges with our public financial management system. I used to say that it looks like we are purchasing a Rolls-Royce to drive on potholes when all we need is a Volkswagen to do our public financial management.
In principle, I do not have any difficulty with a new reform instrument to try to improve public financial management systems in Ghana.
Mr Speaker, if you look at the Committee's Report, as the Hon Chairman noted, one of the key difficulties we have had is that in the past, we appeared to have brought in consultants who had a reason to stay on the programme forever. So, the local people never really bought in. Every time we brought a reform programme, it was resisted. I hope that this time, we would use our local people to implement these reforms. Mr Speaker, so in principle, this is another reform programme and I hope it is the last one that would put us on the right track.
Mr Speaker, the part that I have a difficulty with, is the component on page 5 of the Report, and with your kind permission, I beg to read:
“It will also look at enhancing the capacity systems of Parliament to exercise oversight on public financial management process.”
Mr Speaker, I do not know how Parliament got in there. But it appears that some system is being brought to Parliament for Members of Parliament to use our oversight for, of which some of them are not aware. So, I do not know how somebody sitting somewhere in the Ministry of Finance wants to introduce a system that we are going to use, and we do not have an input. Certainly, some of the money would come to Parliament. Who in Parliament is supposed to have oversight, if not Members of Parliament?
If it is us, we were not consulted but the money is going to be borrowed to enhance our capacity. I have a difficulty. The oversight would be coming from the Ministry of Finance to have control over Parliament. It is a very bad precedent and I do not know if the Leadership of the House is aware. But I would want to bring their attention to this matter to make sure that it is not the Ministry of Finance telling us how our capacity needs to be improved; we should be proposing that. If we have to amend the loan for that purpose, we should.
This is because I have asked around and it appears that nobody is aware that part of the amount is for us; but it says so in the Report. In particular, it talks about the Public Accounts Committee and the Finance Committee but we are both not aware. At least, we hope that our
Prof. George Yaw Gyan-Baffour (NPP--Wenchi) 11:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, it is so sad that it looks like we are running in circles. I am not even sure whether we have already finished paying for the loan that we took to do PUFMARP. Now, we have started another one, which is almost the same programme that we started not more than 20 years ago.
Mr Speaker, with the earlier one, be- cause we did not have the capacity, it gave room to a lot of corruption, which we all know about. Now, we are going back to the same thing. Are we saying that we cannot manage our own affairs, so, we always have to get people to come from outside the country to do our financial management for us?
Dr Anthony Akoto Osei (NPP-Old Tafo) 11:25 a.m.


Leadership would discuss this matter with the Ministry of Finance to ensure that it is what we need for our oversight that we purchased.

Mr Speaker, aside from that, as I said, I think that in all fairness, having a continuation of our reform process and improving the capacity of our institutions is welcome.

So, I urge Hon Members to support the Motion.

I thank you.
Prof. George Yaw Gyan-Baffour (NPP--Wenchi) 11:25 a.m.


Mr Speaker, this is serious. The way we are borrowing is just too much. When we look at the supplementary budget esti- mates that were presented yesterday, about GH¢9 billion is for paying off interest, which is almost half the same amount as we are paying for salaries and wages and it is almost half of the revenue that we are collecting. We continue borrowing, which has no use. This money we are talking about here, I am sure because of the capac- ity to use it, there would be some space for people to just squander the money.

Mr Speaker, because these things are easy to come by, it looks as if this country is just a young nation which has just start- ed. We have gone that way before. These officials at the World Bank are young people who probably do not remember that we have been there. We go in there and they make suggestions to us, we agree and actually tie the hands of this country with another US$45 million.

Mr Speaker, this is a very dangerous

step that we are taking. I think that we should not be going for this programme at all. It is good to allow the Government to have a fiscal space to do their projects and whatever they have been elected to do. Mr Speaker, but when the results are so bad, some of us would have to speak about it. This Public Financial Management Reform Project is the same PUFMARP painted differently. It is something that we should not go for again.

We should really take a very serious cue from what is going on to avoid future du- plication of efforts and recycling of things that we have done before and came up with nothing. Nothing is coming out of this.

Mr Speaker, I am against this loan.

Thank you Mr Speaker.
Prof. George Yaw Gyan-Baffour (NPP--Wenchi) 11:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, it is so sad that it looks like we are running in circles. I am not even sure whether we have already finished paying for the loan that we took to do PUFMARP. Now, we have started another one, which is almost the same programme that we started not more than 20 years ago.
Mr Speaker, with the earlier one, because we did not have the capacity, it gave room to a lot of corruption, which we all know about. Now, we are going back to the same thing. Are we saying that we cannot manage our own affairs, so, we always have to get people to come from outside the country to do our financial management for us?
Mr Speaker, this is serious. The way we are borrowing is just too much. When we look at the supplementary budget estimates that were presented yesterday, about GH¢9 billion is for paying off interest, which is almost half the same amount as we are paying for salaries and wages and it is almost half of the revenue that we are collecting. We continue borrowing, which has no use. This money we are talking about here, I am sure
because of the capacity to use it, there would be some space for people to just squander the money.
Mr Speaker, because these things are easy to come by, it looks as if this country is just a young nation which has just started. We have gone that way before. These officials at the World Bank are young people who probably do not remember that we have been there. We go in there and they make suggestions to us, we agree and actually tie the hands of this country with another US$45 million.
Mr Speaker, this is a very dangerous step that we are taking. I think that we should not be going for this programme at all. It is good to allow the Government to have a fiscal space to do their projects and whatever they have been elected to do. Mr Speaker, but when the results are so bad, some of us would have to speak about it. This Public Financial Management Reform Project is the same PUFMARP painted differently. It is something that we should not go for again.
We should really take a very serious cue from what is going on to avoid future duplication of efforts and recycling of things that we have done before and came up with nothing. Nothing is coming out of this.
Mr Speaker, I am against this loan.
Thank you Mr Speaker.
Mr Avedzi 11:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to correct the impression that this is a new programme that the GoG is going into. This is not a new programme; this is GIFMIS phase 2.
The Hon Member said that we should not go in for this programme. We are al- ready in GIFMIS and this is the funding needed to complete the programme. So, if he says that we should not go for the facility and for that matter, what we have already spent should go waste,that should be his proposal. It is not a new thing that we are going in for. We are already in GIFMIS, and this is the continuation to complete the process to achieve the objectives that are envisaged under this programme.
Mr Avedzi 11:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to correct the impression that this is a new programme that the GoG is going into. This is not a new programme; this is GIFMIS phase 2.
The Hon Member said that we should not go in for this programme. We are already in GIFMIS and this is the funding needed to complete the programme. So, if
he says that we should not go for the facility and for that matter, what we have already spent should go waste,that should be his proposal. It is not a new thing that we are going in for. We are already in GIFMIS, and this is the continuation to complete the process to achieve the objectives that are envisaged under this programme.
Prof Gyan-Baffour 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, he just mentioned me, so, let me just finish with him, please.
Mr Speaker, what I am saying is this, when one starts a project, the idea is that one would take it over, and not that every time one wants to do it, one would go and borrow money. When are we going to stop? In the third phase of GIFMIS, do we have to borrow money ad infinitum? Is that what he is saying?
Mr Avedzi 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, one funny thing about GIFMIS is that, the new sys- tem is being driven by Ghanaians. Unlike the previous ones, PUFMARP, Budget and Public Management System (BPEMS) and the rest, where the consultant comes, brings everything on board and gives it to us. Now, our own people are driving the programme. We think that this would be successful because the local people are driving it and they are involved in its programming. So, I think this is better than the previous ones.
Mr Avedzi 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, one funny thing about GIFMIS is that, the new system is being driven by Ghanaians. Unlike the previous ones, PUFMARP, Budget and Public Management System (BPEMS) and the rest, where the consultant comes, brings everything on board and gives it to us. Now, our own people are driving the programme. We think that this would be successful because the local people are driving it and they are involved in its programming. So, I think this is better than the previous ones.
Mr Kwaku Agyeman-Manu (NPP-- Dormaa Central) 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am going to speak about this particular facility and I would urge my Hon Colleagues to support it because of the significance of the activity we would want to apply this money to.
My Hon Colleague from Tafo Pankrono started listing from PUFMARP, BPEMS to GIFMIS 1 and 2. If one puts the financial commitments to all these programmes geared towards financial sector reforms, in trying to do what would facilitate us to do several things in a more efficient manner --
Mr Speaker, you would be amazed with the quantum of how much money we have put in that sector. Looking at this portion of the Committee's Report, the institu- tional, implementational and structural arrangements - they are going to set up PFM Steering Committee that shall meet, at least, three times a year. That Committee would take allowances. They are setting up PFM Technical Committee that would be meeting and would be taking allowances out of this same facility. We are setting up a PFM Coordination Unit that would go for meetings and take allowances; and we are setting up a Project Management Unit --
I have mentioned about five committees in the Hon Chairman's own Report, which are going to be meeting to take up allow- ances from this same envelope. How much they would take, nobody knows.
Parliament has oversight responsibility; meanwhile, we approve loans which go out but when they are doing these types of things, nobody in Parliament sees or approves them and before one is aware, we may have finished disbursing the facility and we may not have finished with the
activity these moneys are intended to do. What oversight is Parliament undertaking?
Mr Speaker, in my capacity as the Public Accounts Committee Chairman, we have sat on reports on some of these facilities that we have approved here --
[11:37 a.m. -- Power outage] -- [Up- roar.]
Mr Speaker, I have seen the Hon Deputy Majority Leader whipping me to continue to speak but I want to be captured on the video because what I am saying is very important. So, I would want to wait until “His Excellency the President” who has just visited us leaves the House before I continue. [Laughter]--
Mr Kwaku Agyeman-Manu (NPP-- Dormaa Central) 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am going to speak about this particular facility and I would urge my Hon Colleagues to support it because of the significance of the activity we would want to apply this money to.
My Hon Colleague from Tafo Pankrono started listing from PUFMARP, BPEMS to GIFMIS 1 and 2. If one puts the financial commitments to all these programmes geared towards financial sector reforms, in trying to do what would facilitate us to do several things in a more efficient manner --
Mr Speaker, you would be amazed with the quantum of how much money we have put in that sector. Looking at this portion of the Committee's Report, the institutional, implementational and structural arrangements - they are going to set up PFM Steering Committee that shall meet, at least, three times a year. That Committee would take allowances. They are setting up PFM Technical Committee that would be meeting and would be taking allowances out of this same facility. We are setting up a PFM Coordination Unit that would go for meetings and take allowances; and we are setting up a Project Management Unit --
I have mentioned about five committees in the Hon Chairman's own Report, which are going to be meeting to take up allowances from this same envelope. How much they would take, nobody knows.
Parliament has oversight responsibility; meanwhile, we approve loans which go out but when they are doing these types of things, nobody in Parliament sees or approves them and before one is aware, we may have finished disbursing the facility and we may not have finished with the activity these moneys are intended to do. What oversight is Parliament undertaking?
Mr Speaker, in my capacity as the Public Accounts Committee Chairman, we have sat on reports on some of these facilities that we have approved here --
[11:37 a.m. -- Power outage] -- [Uproar.]
Mr Nitiwul 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member of Parliament for Tamale just came in. Where is he? It was when he walked in that the lights went off. [Laugh- ter] --
11.39 a.m. -- Sitting suspended.
1:40 p.m -- Sitting resumed.
Mr Kwaku Agyeman-Manu (NPP-- Dormaa Central) 11:35 a.m.


Mr Speaker, I have seen the Hon Deputy Majority Leader whipping me to continue to speak but I want to be captured on the video because what I am saying is very important. So, I would want to wait until “His Excellency the President” who has just visited us leaves the House before I continue. [Laughter]--
Mr Nitiwul 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member of Parliament for Tamale just came in. Where is he? It was when he walked in that the lights went off. [Laughter] --
11.39 a.m. -- Sitting suspended.
1:40 p.m -- Sitting resumed.
MR FIRST DEPUTY SPEAKER MR FIRST DEPUTY SPEAKER
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:35 a.m.
Hon Ma- jority Leader, can you assist us to know where we were before the power failure?
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:35 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader, can you assist us to know where we were before the power failure?
Mr Bagbin 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am informed that you had just finished with the debate on item number 11 and the Question was to be put -- [Interruption] --
You were in the middle --[Interrup- tions] --
All right.
I understand that the Hon Chairman of the Public Accounts Committee was in full flight when we had the dumsor. And so, if he could continue with his submissions.
Mr Bagbin 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am informed that you had just finished with the debate on item number 11 and the Question was to be put -- [Interruption] --
You were in the middle --[Interruptions] --
All right.
I understand that the Hon Chairman of the Public Accounts Committee was in full flight when we had the dumsor. And so, if he could continue with his submissions.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:35 a.m.
Very well.
Hon Chairman of the Public Accounts Committee, you have the floor.
Mr Kwaku Agyeman-Manu 11:35 a.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Rightly so. As has been said by the Hon Majority Leader, I was seriously in full flight when “the President” visited us unannounced. And so, we had the dum. We pray that he should leave the Chamber unannounced, so that we can have the sor.
Mr Kwaku Agyeman-Manu 11:35 a.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:35 a.m.
What do you mean “the President visited us”?
rose
Mr Agyeman-Manu 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am surprised my Hon Colleagues are not aware that these days when you get dumsor in your area, children shout that the President has come over there. [Laughter]--
I did not want to announce this but I have been provoked.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:35 a.m.
But Hon Member, I do not think that you will want us to follow the kids. This is a House of records and so, if you could just retract, we can move on.
Mr Agyeman-Manu 11:35 a.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker, I will proceed on your advice.
rose
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:35 a.m.
Yes, Hon Member, are you up on a point of order?
Alhaji Sorogho 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, this is a House of records and for him to have made a statement that “until the President visited us…”, when we all know that the President did not visit us here in Parliament. It is totally wrong. This is House of Parliament and for him to even go further --
Alhaji Sorogho 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, this is a
House of records and for him to have made a statement that “until the President visited us…”, when we all know that the President did not visit us here in Parliament. It is totally wrong. This is House of Parliament and for him to even go further --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:35 a.m.
But I thought he had retracted?
Alhaji Sorogho 11:35 a.m.
No, Mr Speaker. He must withdraw it. He must withdraw what he said. It is a serious statement; let us not take it --

It is even worse, Mr Speaker. He must withdraw it. It is a serious thing. He cannot say that and go scot-free.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:35 a.m.
Yes, Hon Minority Leader?
Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, this House has listened to Hon Members speak on the floor, who de- scribed jerry cans that people used in looking for water as “Kufuor's gallons”. It has happened here and I would suggest to you that even the current President ever used that in this House. It is part of our records.
And he said -- he did not say it to us that the President physically visited. He only said these days whenever commu- nities experience dum -- that is power outages, people say that the President has visited.
Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:35 a.m.
Mr Speaker, this House has listened to Hon Members speak on the floor, who described jerry cans that people used in looking for water as “Kufuor's gallons”. It has happened here and I would suggest to you that even the current President ever used that in this House. It is part of our records.
And he said -- he did not say it to us that the President physically visited. He only said these days whenever communities experience dum -- that is power outages, people say that the President has visited.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:35 a.m.
He said children.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:35 a.m.
Yes!
Mr Speaker, I would say that way back, some two months or so back, a friend of mine, whom I was programmed to visit, called to say that the President had visited
him. I did not know. I had not heard that terminology before. So, I went to the place and asked what they talked about? Did you say that the President passed by or what? Then he said he had suffered power outage and now, that is what is in vogue.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:35 a.m.
Yes!
Mr Speaker, I would say that way back, some two months or so back, a friend of mine, whom I was programmed to visit, called to say that the President had visited him. I did not know. I had not heard that terminology before. So, I went to the place and asked what they talked about? Did you say that the President passed by or what? Then he said he had suffered power outage and now, that is what is in vogue.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:35 a.m.
Hon Mem- bers, I take it that the Hon Chairman of the Committee was speaking in parables. So, -- [Interruptions]
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:35 a.m.
Hon Members, I take it that the Hon Chairman of the Committee was speaking in parables. So, -- [Interruptions]
Mr Agyeman-Manu 11:35 a.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
I would wish that for want of time, the Hon Majority Leader would sit down for me to proceed and we would have a very nice debate.

He would want to support me?

No! But for want of time, I would leave the area. I would take the Speaker's advice and progress. So, Hon Sorogho would sit down and we would continue.

Mr Speaker, what I was trying to say is that, we have been receiving and approv- ing these requests for loans to be taken and these loans have always been disbursed.

Parliament has oversight responsibility but then the way we exercise our oversight responsibility does not augur well for the efficient and prudent management of these resources that we place at the doorsteps of Ministries to utilise for certain pro- grammes and activities.

Mr Speaker, in this particular instance, I mentioned one area of the Finance Com- mittee's Report that talked about institu- tional and implementation arrangement, to the extent that they are setting up about five committees at the Ministry of Finance to implement this programme -- the Pub- lic Financial Management Steering Com- mittee, the Public Financial Management Technical Committee, the Public Financial Management Coordination Committee, and again, the Project Management Unit within the same Ministry.

All these committees take allowances; there are expenditures on them. If we are going to spend US$45 million to do GIFMIS Phase II -- if I want to cut it short, some part of the money, as my oth- er Hon Colleague said, would go waste and Parliament would have to insist that they should lay before this House, details of how these moneys are going to be disbursed.

Mr Speaker, I made reference to a particular Report that has been laid and referred to the Committee for considera- tion. We would soon submit a Report on that; the Lab Administration Project Phase I that was undertaken by the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources -- but more especially, the Lands Commission, Mr Speaker, what is in there -- the Audi- tor-General has reported -- to the extent that even Parliament has been cited for not exercising very efficient oversight role.

So, if we want to do that and safeguard this money to avoid us borrowing again -- we started 20 years ago with a loan of 30 million dollars when the late Victor Se- lormey was the Hon Deputy Minister for
Mr Agyeman-Manu 11:35 a.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
I would wish that for want of time, the Hon Majority Leader would sit down for me to proceed and we would have a very nice debate.

He would want to support me?

No! But for want of time, I would leave the area. I would take the Speaker's advice and progress. So, Hon Sorogho would sit down and we would continue.

Mr Speaker, what I was trying to say is that, we have been receiving and approving these requests for loans to be taken and these loans have always been disbursed. Parliament has oversight responsibility but then the way we exercise our oversight responsibility does not augur well for the efficient and prudent management of these resources that we place at the doorsteps of Ministries to utilise for certain programmes and activities.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 11:35 a.m.
Thank you very much.
Yes, Hon Member for Subin?
Mr Isaac Osei (NPP - Subin) 1:50 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to take part in this debate.
Mr Speaker, the project for which we are seeking SDR32,700,000.00 is the Public Financial Management Reform Project. I support the Motion but I would like to make a few comments.
I support it mainly because of the ulti- mate objective which would put the Finan- cial Management functions of government to the test of efficiency, transparency and accountability. If this is what is intended, then I support the project.
Also, on the PUFMARP -- in the Report, the Committee points out some of the achievements of PUFMARP. So, PUFMARP was not entirely useless. It spread over 1997 until 2003 and some of these results, achievements or successes have been enumerated on page 2 as the Financial Administration Act, which was promulgated through this process, the Financial Administration Regulations and the Public Procurement Act.
But the Report is quite clear, that there were many budget management challeng- es, and I think if we could look at some of these challenges properly under this new project, then perhaps, we could be getting somewhere.
Mr Speaker, in the Report, it is clear that the Committee has established, that fiscal transfers have not been transparent and have not been predictable. If we are going to correct this, then it is a good thing.
Secondly, we are talking about synch- ing the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Programme with Government's economic policy management. But we know that in this country and certainly, under this Government, we have used the budget deficit as our fiscal anchor. We are talking about instilling fiscal discipline and using this system to keep the deficit within critical bounds. The truth of the matter is that we have been able to show sufficient fiscal discipline to keep the budget deficit in due bounds.
Part of the problem has to do with the way line Ministries behave. We know that consistently, we have overrun the budget, which has been approved by this House without any sanctions placed on any of these line Ministries. Therefore, if the aim of this is to improve the whole process of fiscal management, then I think this House should support this.
Mr Speaker, another matter has to do with improving the public procure- ment planning. I think this is important, particularly because of the rampant use of single sourcing for our procurement purposes, when in fact, we could probably get proper value for money if we use other means available to us under the Public Procurement Act.
At the core of this is the necessity for us to obtain full value for money, especially if we have competitive tendering and have a pre-audit process, which would enable us to get the best value for our moneys.
Mr Speaker, if we go to the Report, the Committee admits that we are probably on an unsustainable fiscal path, and that is why we need a project of this nature. And these reforms, I believe, should enable us resolve some of these issues.
The other matter is enhancing the capacity of the external audit processes. I think this is also extremely important. But we know that because of the nature of the audit reports, which we received in this House from the Auditor-General, the time- liness of these reports are questionable.
They are questionable because they do not allow us to make real time recom- mendations. It does not allow the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) to make real time recommendations for some of the fallible mistakes of many of these depart- ments. In my opinion, if these processes are going to assist us to do that, then it is a positive thing.
Mr Speaker, there is an inter-temporal dimension when we look at the whole payment process in Government.
First of all, Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) might apply to the Ministry of Finance. It takes quite some time for these applications to be approved and the releases take some time. After the releases, it takes another period before the cash is actually made available by the Controller and Accountant-General's Department. So, I believe that if we could
have a proper control of the whole pay- ment chain, from warrant release to cash availability, then this project could have served us well.
Mr Speaker, with these comments on the Report, I would urge the House to support it, particularly in view of the fact that the key objective is to improve on our whole financial and fiscal management system.
Mr Isaac Osei (NPP - Subin) 1:50 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to take part in this debate.
Mr Speaker, the project for which we are seeking SDR32,700,000.00 is the Public Financial Management Reform Project. I support the Motion but I would like to make a few comments.
I support it mainly because of the ultimate objective which would put the Financial Management functions of government to the test of efficiency, transparency and accountability. If this is what is intended, then I support the project.
Also, on the PUFMARP -- in the Report, the Committee points out some of the achievements of PUFMARP. So,
PUFMARP was not entirely useless. It spread over 1997 until 2003 and some of these results, achievements or successes have been enumerated on page 2 as the Financial Administration Act, which was promulgated through this process, the Financial Administration Regulations and the Public Procurement Act.
But the Report is quite clear, that there were many budget management challenges, and I think if we could look at some of these challenges properly under this new project, then perhaps, we could be getting somewhere.
Mr Speaker, in the Report, it is clear that the Committee has established, that fiscal transfers have not been transparent and have not been predictable. If we are going to correct this, then it is a good thing.
Secondly, we are talking about synching the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Programme with Government's economic policy management. But we know that in this country and certainly, under this Government, we have used the budget deficit as our fiscal anchor. We are talking about instilling fiscal discipline and using this system to keep the deficit within critical bounds. The truth of the matter is that we have been able to show sufficient fiscal discipline to keep the budget deficit in due bounds.
Part of the problem has to do with the way line Ministries behave. We know that consistently, we have overrun the budget, which has been approved by this House without any sanctions placed on any of these line Ministries. Therefore, if the aim of this is to improve the whole process of fiscal management, then I think this House should support this.
Mr Speaker, another matter has to do with improving the public procurement planning. I think this is important, particularly because of the rampant use of single sourcing for our procurement purposes, when in fact, we could probably get proper value for money if we use other means available to us under the Public Procurement Act.
At the core of this is the necessity for us to obtain full value for money, especially if we have competitive tendering and have a pre-audit process, which would enable us to get the best value for our moneys.
Mr Speaker, if we go to the Report, the Committee admits that we are probably on an unsustainable fiscal path, and that is why we need a project of this nature. And these reforms, I believe, should enable us resolve some of these issues.
The other matter is enhancing the capacity of the external audit processes. I think this is also extremely important. But we know that because of the nature of the audit reports, which we received in this House from the Auditor-General, the timeliness of these reports are questionable.
They are questionable because they do not allow us to make real time recommendations. It does not allow the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) to make real time recommendations for some of the fallible mistakes of many of these departments. In my opinion, if these processes are going to assist us to do that, then it is a positive thing.
Mr Speaker, there is an inter-temporal dimension when we look at the whole payment process in Government.
First of all, Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) might apply to the Ministry of Finance. It takes quite some time for these applications to be approved and the releases take some time. After the releases, it takes another period before the cash is actually made available by the Controller and Accountant-General's
Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
Thank you very much.
Hon Members, I will take the last con- tribution and put the Question.
Yes, Hon Simon Osei-Mensah?
Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
Thank you very much.
Hon Members, I will take the last contribution and put the Question.
Yes, Hon Simon Osei-Mensah?
Mr Simon Osei-Mensah (NPP -- Bosomtwe) 1:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would make a very brief comment.
Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion on the floor. However, I wish to state that irrespective of whatever systems we put in place, the central issue has to do with the managers of the economy, whether they are going to adhere to whatever system we have. I am saying this in reference to the outcomes, specifically (g) and with your permission I beg to read:
“Accumulation of arrears will be limited, signalling that spending plans must be adjusted.”
Mr Speaker, we have laws in this coun- try that give dedicated funds to certain departments. For instance, if one takes the Ghana Education Trust Fund (GET- Fund), if one takes the District Assemblies Common Fund (DACF), these are backed by laws.
However, due to priority setting of the Government, the Government does not find these areas to be very important or to
Mr Simon Osei-Mensah (NPP -- Bosomtwe) 1:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would make a very brief comment.
Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion on the floor. However, I wish to state that irrespective of whatever systems we put in place, the central issue has to do with the managers of the economy, whether they are going to adhere to whatever system we have. I am saying this in reference to the outcomes, specifically (g) and with your permission I beg to read:
“Accumulation of arrears will be limited, signalling that spending plans must be adjusted.”
Mr Speaker, we have laws in this country that give dedicated funds to certain departments. For instance, if one takes the Ghana Education Trust Fund (GETFund), if one takes the District Assemblies Common Fund (DACF), these are backed by laws.
However, due to priority setting of the Government, the Government does not find these areas to be very important or to be priority areas. In these areas, we have accumulated arrears, and so, we could have the laws and the systems in place, but the priority setting of the Government and the managers of the economy might be such that we would not even adhere to the laws.
We could have millions of laws sitting on our shelves, which are not being enforced. If we are setting our priorities right, when one takes allocation of our DACF, it is a percentage of a certain revenue. Why is it not going? Are we saying we do not collect the revenue in the country? If we come to the National Health Insurance, why is the 2.5 per cent of Value Added Tax (VAT) not going? Are we not receiving the money?
So, Mr Speaker, it is very important that we get these systems in place, but the central issue is whether the managers of the economy are themselves fiscally disciplined. If they are not, we could borrow money and do all these things, but would come back to square one.
So, we urge the managers of the economy to respect whatever laws we have in the country. Now, we have the Public Procurement Act. But what do we see? About 80 per cent of contracts are being given only on sole sourcing, even those which would require competitive international bidding.
So, Mr Speaker, I support the Motion, but while we are using the money, we should use it to enforce and implement whatever system we put in place.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
Thank you very much.
Hon Minister for Finance, would you want to make some comments with regard to the issues raised?
Mr Terkper 2 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to express my gratitude to Hon Members for their support to this impor- tant facility.
Mr Speaker, as the Report indicates, this is to sustain phase 2, and I have heard contributions relating to PUFMARP. In- deed, part of the problem of PUFMARP was that, there was no such facility to sustain the BPEMS in particular in the project.
In the process, just when we got to the deployment phase and to widen its application, it became a bit dysfunctional. So, yes, it is true that GIFMIS project was based on some of the platform which was laid for the PUFMARP.
Mr Speaker, the issue is that, we are crossing a milestone. As we indicated, even in the 2015 Budget, it was tested on the pilot of the budget module. This is very important, and it is going to strengthen it.
Besides the strengthening of the budget module, the other element is that the phase 2 of this system would integrate the budget and financial accounting. That is where the budget control comes in. This is because, for the first time, we are going to have the annual estimates; the Parlia- ment would approve interfacing with the disbursements which are made through the warrants, and the limits would be set electronically. If in fact, we are practising some of these already.
So, that is the major development of this system. Mention was also made of procurement. There would be procure- ment interface, building on the contract database and the accounts payable model. So, again, what is going to help -- The accounts payable model was not part of the BPEMS. This is going to track arrears and accounts payable and complement the contract database, which we have set up for all contracts. As we speak, we know about contracts in the system.
Mr Speaker, finally, it is important also to take note that, the integration would involve the payroll and therefore, very important element of this is the Human Resource (HR) system that we are putting in place in conjunction with the Public Services Commission. The issue of the payroll is not just accounting. It has to do with the lack or ineffectiveness of an HR system.
Therefore, the current audit that was done by Ernst and Young and the draft report is ready and it shows that, it takes 18 to 24 months for the recruitment of a teacher or health worker and for their personal data to be inputted by the rele- vant MDAs before it gets to the financial clearing stage. Then, immediately it gets to the financial clearing stage, it is taken as a failure of the Controller and Account- ant-General or the Ministry. We are setting up HRMI system as part of this Phase II, to interface with the payroll electronically.
Mr Speaker, similar to what is being done now, where statements are being checked electronically and we are no longer issuing paper statements to employ- ees; we will move to the situation where applications for employment, transfers, and even retirement, would be done elec- tronically and this would significantly improve this interface.
Mr Speaker, with these few words, I would want to thank Hon Members for their contributions and I urge that they support the Resolution.
Mr Terkper 2 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to express my gratitude to Hon Members for their support to this important facility.
Mr Speaker, as the Report indicates, this is to sustain phase 2, and I have heard contributions relating to PUFMARP. Indeed, part of the problem of PUFMARP was that, there was no such facility to sustain the BPEMS in particular in the project.
In the process, just when we got to the deployment phase and to widen its application, it became a bit dysfunctional. So, yes, it is true that GIFMIS project was based on some of the platform which was laid for the PUFMARP.
Mr Speaker, the issue is that, we are crossing a milestone. As we indicated, even in the 2015 Budget, it was tested on the pilot of the budget module. This is very important, and it is going to strengthen it.
Besides the strengthening of the budget module, the other element is that the phase 2 of this system would integrate the budget and financial accounting. That is where the budget control comes in. This is because, for the first time, we are going to have the annual estimates; the Parliament would approve interfacing with the disbursements which are made through the warrants, and the limits would be set electronically. If in fact, we are practising some of these already.
So, that is the major development of this system. Mention was also made of procurement. There would be procurement interface, building on the contract database and the accounts payable model. So, again, what is going to help -- The accounts payable model was not part of the BPEMS. This is going to track arrears and accounts payable and complement the contract database, which
we have set up for all contracts. As we speak, we know about contracts in the system.
Mr Speaker, finally, it is important also to take note that, the integration would involve the payroll and therefore, very important element of this is the Human Resource (HR) system that we are putting in place in conjunction with the Public Services Commission. The issue of the payroll is not just accounting. It has to do with the lack or ineffectiveness of an HR system.
Therefore, the current audit that was done by Ernst and Young and the draft report is ready and it shows that, it takes 18 to 24 months for the recruitment of a teacher or health worker and for their personal data to be inputted by the relevant MDAs before it gets to the financial clearing stage. Then, immediately it gets to the financial clearing stage, it is taken as a failure of the Controller and Accountant-General or the Ministry. We are setting up HRMI system as part of this Phase II, to interface with the payroll electronically.
Mr Speaker, similar to what is being done now, where statements are being checked electronically and we are no longer issuing paper statements to employees; we will move to the situation where applications for employment, transfers, and even retirement, would be done electronically and this would significantly improve this interface.
Mr Speaker, with these few words, I would want to thank Hon Members for their contributions and I urge that they support the Resolution.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.
Thank you very much.
The Leadership would want to make some inputs?
Very well.
Hon Minority Leader?
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.
Thank you very much.
The Leadership would want to make some inputs?
Very well.
Hon Minority Leader? Minority Leader (Mr Osei Kyei-Men-
sah-Bonsu): Mr Speaker, I thought the Hon Minister was going to wait to hear us before attempting to conclude, but he did
not have the patience. So, I do not know what his reactions might be after we speak to some of these issues.
Mr Speaker, I think in principle, the Motion is worth supporting and we agree that the GIFMIS tool is going to support the process as the Hon Minister has al- luded to.
Mr Speaker, the worry of earlier con- tributors had been the ownership of the process. It has been quite difficult to get the various organs of State -- Ministries, Departments and Agencies to migrate to the platform. And related to that is the in- built slowness of the process.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Minister was alluding to the fact that, it was being pi- loted at the time. Parliament, as an arm of Government, has suffered the brunt of this pilot scheme and on countless occasions, it has become very difficult for us to access what otherwise is due Parliament.
The other MDAs complain of the same slowness in-built of the system. So, we are supportive of this scheme to the extent that, it is going to engender transparency and greater accountability. But we need to trim the edges and ensure that, not only do we properly own the scheme and the sys- tem, but to ensure also that the outputs are delivered timeously and very efficiently.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Minister has alluded to the improvement that it would engender in financial accounting. What perhaps, needs to be added, is value for money compares. How are we to ensure that this would find expression in or on that platform? This is because it is a matter that should be dear to us in Parliament. It really is not only tracing and tracking but also, ensuring and assuring ourselves that the expenditures are expenditures --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.
Hon Members, with regard to the state of pro-
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.


ceedings, I direct that we Sit beyond the stipulated time for business.

Thank you.
Minority Leader (Mr Osei Kyei- Mensah-Bonsu) 2 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I thought the Hon Minister was going to wait to hear us before attempting to conclude, but he did not have the patience. So, I do not know what his reactions might be after we speak to some of these issues.
Mr Speaker, I think in principle, the Motion is worth supporting and we agree that the GIFMIS tool is going to support the process as the Hon Minister has alluded to.
Mr Speaker, the worry of earlier contributors had been the ownership of the process. It has been quite difficult to get the various organs of State -- Ministries, Departments and Agencies to migrate to the platform. And related to that is the in-built slowness of the process.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Minister was alluding to the fact that, it was being piloted at the time. Parliament, as an arm of Government, has suffered the brunt of this pilot scheme and on countless occasions, it has become very difficult for us to access what otherwise is due Parliament.
The other MDAs complain of the same slowness in-built of the system. So, we are supportive of this scheme to the extent that, it is going to engender transparency and greater accountability. But we need to trim the edges and ensure that, not only do we properly own the scheme and the system, but to ensure also that the outputs are delivered timeously and very efficiently.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Minister has alluded to the improvement that it would engender in financial accounting. What perhaps, needs to be added, is value for money compares. How are we to ensure that this would find expression in or on that platform? This is because it is a matter
that should be dear to us in Parliament. It really is not only tracing and tracking but also, ensuring and assuring ourselves that the expenditures are expenditures --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.
Hon Members, with regard to the state of proceedings, I direct that we Sit beyond the stipulated time for business.
Thank you.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2 p.m.
Mr Speaker, there are expenditures that would yield good value for the money that we spend. The issue that the Hon Minister related to -- relating to nurses and teacher trainees who are recruited into the system -- Just this morning, I had complaints that as many as about 200 newly recruited nurs- es over the past six months have not had anything.
Teachers, and I had one complaint from a former product of Wesley College, that for the past three months, they have not had anything and yet they have been posted to the remotest of villages.
We want them to go and work there and three months after they have posted them there, they still have to depend on their parents. That is not good enough and we should ensure that whatever the hindrances are, the migration is done as early as possible, in order for them to reap the benefits of their training.
Mr Speaker, finally, we are borrowing for almost everything. As I said on another platform yesterday, we are getting too steeped in borrowing.
Any country that is steeped in bor- rowing, indeed, has lost control over its financials. And any country that loses control over its financials, loses control over its destiny. We appear to be rudderless in everything; we have to go aborrowing. That certainly cannot be good for the health of this country.
Mr Speaker, we have alluded to ave- nues for corruption in the first one. Not only are we insisting on ownership of this process by Ghanaians this time, but we should also ensure that at every step, the little that is trickling in, we have judicious use of the amount and that, people do
not line their pockets, pretending to have drunk tea and taking some bits and pieces of chicken here and there at meetings, which do not yield much results.
Mr Speaker, once bitten, they say, twice shy. We have been bitten more than once on this journey and we need to ensure greater transparency and probity in the use of the limited funds that are available to us as a nation.
Mr Speaker, I thank you for the op- portunity.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2 p.m.
Mr Speaker, there are expenditures that would yield good value for the money that we spend. The issue that the Hon Minister related to -- relating to nurses and teacher trainees who are recruited into the system -- Just this morning, I had complaints that as many as about 200 newly recruited nurses over the past six months have not had anything.
Teachers, and I had one complaint from a former product of Wesley College, that for the past three months, they have not had anything and yet they have been posted to the remotest of villages.
We want them to go and work there and three months after they have posted them there, they still have to depend on their parents. That is not good enough and we should ensure that whatever the hindrances are, the migration is done as early as possible, in order for them to reap the benefits of their training.
Mr Speaker, finally, we are borrowing for almost everything. As I said on another platform yesterday, we are getting too steeped in borrowing.
Any country that is steeped in borrowing, indeed, has lost control over its financials. And any country that loses control over its financials, loses control over its destiny. We appear to be rudderless in everything; we have to go aborrowing. That certainly cannot be good for the health of this country.
Mr Speaker, we have alluded to avenues for corruption in the first one. Not only are we insisting on ownership of this process by Ghanaians this time, but we should also ensure that at every step, the little that is trickling in, we have judicious use of the amount and that, people do not line their pockets, pretending to have drunk tea and taking some bits and pieces of chicken here and there at meetings, which do not yield much results.
Mr Speaker, once bitten, they say, twice shy. We have been bitten more than once on this journey and we need to ensure greater transparency and probity in the use of the limited funds that are available to us as a nation.
Mr Speaker, I thank you for the opportunity.
Dr A. A. Osei 2 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want the Hon Majority Leader to address himself to the last paragraph of page 5. This is because it deals with Parliament being part of the project [Interruption] --
Please money is being spent for us and we do not know where it is. [Interruption] Do we not want to know? That is what I am saying, just to be sure. I am just re- minding him.
Majority Leader (Mr Alban S. K. Bagbin) 2:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, we definitely en- courage Hon Members to be very critical about requests that come from the Exec- utive, and then after approval, to follow up to make sure that what we have approved is what is implemented.
Mr Speaker, the initial facility that took place around 1997 for Public Fi- nancial Management Reform Project (PUFMARP) was implemented from 1997 to 2003.
Mr Speaker, the programme was defi- nitely a very ambitious one. It was meant to do so many things, and the amount did not measure up to what the programme was supposed to do.
Mr Speaker, when after the year 2000, our Hon Colleagues took over the man- agement; the process yielded a number of outcomes, and in fact, this House had
the opportunity to streamline the legal and regulatory framework of the country.
That was what led to the passage of the Financial Administration Act, 2003, the Financial Administration Regulation, 2004, the Public Procurement Act, 2003, and many others including the Ghana Revenue Authority Act.
We had to, through that facility, stream- line all these things. So, the impression should not be created that that facility did not yield results. It actually did. But what it was meant to achieve was far more costly than the facility itself, and so, we had to continue with this process until the Ghana Integrated Financial Management Information System (GIFMIS).
What we need to look at is whether in
the case of this facility, the programme is also not too ambitious. I think that the World Bank, which is supporting this pro- gramme would at the end of the day, make sure that if the facility is insufficient, they would have to provide more to see to the full completion of the programme.
It is important for Hon Members to let Ghanaians know that, as my Hon Colleague said, when we talk about own- ership -- and most of the time, we have to depend on somebody to cough out the money -- the person would actually be there to oversee that his money is properly utilised. And so, we have the World Bank officials -- we have the other develop- ment partners shadowing and overseeing to make sure that is done, and that is why when it is not implemented properly, we lose another facility.
So, the issue of ownership is when we own the resources ourselves, and then we can be in full control. But where we have to depend on others, then others have an interest, others have a stake. And this is where we need to look within as a country.
And I am sure we have the capacity - we have the resources, we are not look- ing deeper enough. That is why we are depending on the outside agencies.
Mr Speaker, if I may share an experi- ence with you on this issue about employ- ees. It is something that struck me when I had the opportunity to be the Minister for Health.
The issue of the nurses, the teachers and the rest. When the approval is given by the Ministry of Finance for a sector to do recruitment, after the recruitment, the department would have to give input, and they do that manually by taking forms, filling the name of the person, when the person reported to work and all those documents on the forms, and then send them through the regions, the national and to the Ministry.
In the Ministry, they have an office where they have young people -- boys and girls with computers who make the input. I am told that every month, the Controller and Accountant-General's Department gives only four days for all the Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs), Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies (MMDAs) to struggle to make inputs into their central control. Only four days. After the four days it is shut, and they have to now try to make that into the payroll.
These are things that take a long time I had the opportunity to call them and asked whether it was not possible for us to get, at least, for the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Health that same system, so that they could move the inputs and then send them to the Controller and Ac- countant-General's Department. I was told that it could be done. We only needed the money to buy those machines and systems. That would solve this problem.
Until that is done, we would continue to
Dr A. A. Osei 2 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want the Hon Majority Leader to address himself to the last paragraph of page 5. This is because it deals with Parliament being part of the project [Interruption] -
- 2 p.m.

rose
Majority Leader (Mr Alban S. K. Bagbin) 2:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, we definitely encourage Hon Members to be very critical about requests that come from the Executive, and then after approval, to follow up to makesure that what we have approved is what is implemented.
Mr Speaker, the initial facility that took place around 1997 for Public Financial Management Reform Project (PUFMARP) was implemented from 1997 to 2003.
Mr Speaker, the programme was definitely a very ambitious one. It was meant to do so many things, and the amount did not measure up to what the programme was supposed to do.
Mr Speaker, when after the year 2000, our Hon Colleagues took over the management; the process yielded a number of outcomes, and in fact, this House had the opportunity to streamline the legal and regulatory framework of the country.
That was what led to the passage of the Financial Administration Act, 2003, the Financial Administration Regulation, 2004, the Public Procurement Act, 2003, and many others including the Ghana Revenue Authority Act.
We had to, through that facility, streamline all these things. So, the impression should not be created that that facility did not yield results. It actually did. But what it was meant to achieve was far more costly than the facility itself, and so, we had to continue with this process until the Ghana Integrated Financial Management Information System
(GIFMIS).
What we need to look at is whether in the case of this facility, the programme is also not too ambitious. I think that the World Bank, which is supporting this programme would at the end of the day, make sure that if the facility is insufficient, they would have to provide more to see to the full completion of the programme.
It is important for Hon Members to let Ghanaians know that, as my Hon Colleague said, when we talk about ownership -- and most of the time, we have to depend on somebody to cough out the money -- the person would actually be there to oversee that his money is properly utilised. And so, we have the
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
Hon Member, I will give you the opportunity after he has --
Dr A. A. Osei 2:20 p.m.
On a point of order.
He says Parliament is involved, and he wants to know the details.
The question is that, the details should have come from him.
Mr Bagbin 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I did say that Parliament has the Parliamentary Service, led by the Parliamentary Service Board. We have Hon Members of Parliament, and the Hon Members of Parliament are serviced by the Parliamentary Service Board. All the technical work is done by the Service, and the Hon Members, as we know, come here mainly as advocates of their constituents.
In playing that role, we then make the laws, oversee the Executive and then we also articulate the views of our constit- uents.
The link between Parliament and the Ministries, structurally, is the Service, and so, when the Service is doing some of these things, it is important that Hon Members are factored in, so that we could get the various systems of Members of Parliament, like committee sittings and the rest supported, to be able to enhance their capacity.
Dr A. A. Osei 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I see where my Hon senior Colleague is going. But if he would advert his mind to page 7. They mentioned specifically, the Public Account Committee, and the Finance Committee to enable them exercise oversight.
The point is that, no one I know of, on either one of the committees knows anything about this.
Mr Bagbin 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I did say that Parliament has the Parliamentary Service, led by the Parliamentary Service Board. We have Hon Members of Parliament, and the Hon Members of Parliament are serviced by the Parliamentary Service Board. All the technical work is done by the Service, and the Hon Members, as we know, come here mainly as advocates of their constituents.
In playing that role, we then make the laws, oversee the Executive and then we also articulate the views of our constituents.
The link between Parliament and the Ministries, structurally, is the Service, and so, when the Service is doing some of these things, it is important that Hon Members are factored in, so that we could get the various systems of Members of Parliament, like committee sittings and the rest supported, to be able to enhance their capacity.
Mr Bagbin 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, he is em- phasising the issue I am raising. This is because I said, in doing that, there is the need for the Parliamentary Service to link the structure of the Hon Members of Parliament with the committees. That is why there is a missing link.
The Parliamentary Service cannot re- flect on our interest without consulting us. So, there is that missing link there.

It is because these things are not properly done. That is why we have Hon Members make certain statements on the floor. This is because they must be involved in the oversight.

Mr Speaker, there is also the need to

beef up the capacity of the Parliamentary Service. We have a few competent ones among the Parliamentary Service Staff and from my experience, I see they are over- burdened. There is the need for additional hands. So, this is a notice to the Ministry and the other organisations that Parliament would definitely need to recruit more able hands to support us.

Today, for example, with the dumsor (the power outage), we had to crosscheck to know, why? I can tell you the difficulty we met with the technical team was not the best, which raises issues of capacity.

Mr Speaker, what the public see and

know is Hon Members of Parliament. So, when there is any problem, they start lashing at the Hon Members of Parlia- ment, when the Members of Parliament themselves do not even know anything because it is not in their domain. It is in the domain of the Parliamentary Service.

For example, even the furniture here, Hon Members were bashed when they did not take part in the procurement of the chairs.

So, I think that, we need to take the op- portunity when we are doing this debate to educate the public about governance and Parliament, so that Ghanaians understand what they have chosen and therefore, properly channel their criticisms and in- puts to improve governance.

This is a facility that nobody can op- pose; we definitely support it. At the end of the day, Parliament is restructuring; we are changing our Standing Orders.

We would set committees, which would be in charge of the economy, planning,

intelligence -- not just Defence and the Interior -- We need to have a committee, which is in charge of long-term develop- ment planning, so that together, we can probe further.

The Finance Committee as we have, is so much inundated with loans and other things. Therefore, they cannot perform, even the role assigned them by the Con- stitution.

So, Mr Speaker, I hope and pray that all Hon Members would come on board for us to do that, so that we can be effec- tive in overseeing the implementa-tion of Government's programmes.

With this, Mr Speaker, I support the Motion.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
Thank you
very much Hon Members.
I will put the Question now.
rose
Mr Bagbin 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, he is emphasising the issue I am raising. This is because I said, in doing that, there is the need for the Parliamentary Service to link the structure of the Hon Members of Parliament with the committees. That is why there is a missing link.
The Parliamentary Service cannot reflect on our interest without consulting us. So, there is that missing link there.
Even the budget, the Hon Members must be fully involved -- [Interruption.] It is because these things are not properly done. That is why we have Hon Members make certain statements on the floor. This is because they must be involved in the oversight.
Mr Speaker, there is also the need to beef up the capacity of the Parliamentary Service. We have a few competent ones among the Parliamentary Service Staff and from my experience, I see they are overburdened. There is the need for additional hands. So, this is a notice to the Ministry and the other organisations that Parliament would definitely need to recruit more able hands to support us.
Today, for example, with the dumsor (the power outage), we had to crosscheck to know, why? I can tell you the difficulty we met with the technical team was not the best, which raises issues of capacity.
Mr Speaker, what the public see and know is Hon Members of Parliament. So, when there is any problem, they start lashing at the Hon Members of Parliament, when the Members of Parliament themselves do not even know anything because it is not in their domain. It is in the domain of the Parliamentary Service.
For example, even the furniture here, Hon Members were bashed when they did not take part in the procurement of the chairs.

So, I think that, we need to take the opportunity when we are doing this debate to educate the public about governance and Parliament, so that Ghanaians understand what they have chosen and therefore, properly channel their criticisms and inputs to improve governance.

This is a facility that nobody can oppose; we definitely support it. At the end of the day, Parliament is restructuring; we are changing our Standing Orders.

We would set committees, which would be in charge of the economy, planning, intelligence -- not just Defence and the Interior -- We need to have a committee, which is in charge of long-term development planning, so that together, we can probe further.

The Finance Committee as we have, is so much inundated with loans and other things. Therefore, they cannot perform, even the role assigned them by the Constitution.

So, Mr Speaker, I hope and pray that all Hon Members would come on board for us to do that, so that we can be effective in overseeing the implementa- tion of Government's programmes.

With this, Mr Speaker, I support the Motion.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
No! Hon Members, we could go on and on.
I think we have had enough debate on
this issue.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
Thank you very much Hon Members.
I will put the Question now.
Mr Bagbin 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, we can now take item number 12, which is a Resolu- tion. After that, the Finance Committee would move to consider the supplemen- tary budget.
rose
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
Very well -- Hon Minister for Finance?
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
No! Hon Members, we could go on and on.
I think we have had enough debate on this issue.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
RESOLUTIONS 2:20 p.m.

Mr Bagbin 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, we can now take item number 12, which is a Resolution. After that, the Finance Committee would move to consider the supplementary budget.
Minister for Finance (Mr Seth E. Terkper) 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
WHEREAS by the provisions of article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), the terms and conditions of any loan raised by the Government of the Republic of Ghana, on behalf of itself or any public institution or authority, shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by a Resolution of Parliament;
PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), at the request of the Government of the Republic Ghana, acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has been laid before Parliament the terms and conditions of a Financing Agreement between the Govern- ment of the Republic of Ghana and the International Development Association (IDA), for an amount equivalent to thirty-two million, seven hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights (SDR32,700,000 [equivalent to US$45 million]) to support the Public Financial Man- agement Reform Project.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
Very well -- Hon Minister for Finance?
RESOLUTIONS 2:20 p.m.

THIS HONOURABLE HOUSE 2:20 p.m.

HEREBY RESOLVES AS FOL- 2:20 p.m.

Minister for Finance (Mr Seth E. Terkper) 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
WHEREAS by the provisions of article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), the terms and conditions of any loan raised by the Government of the Republic of Ghana, on behalf of itself or any public institution or authority, shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by a Resolution of Parliament;
PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), at the request of the Government of the Republic Ghana, acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has been laid before Parliament the terms and conditions of a Financing Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and the International
Development Association (IDA), for an amount equivalent to thirty- two million, seven hundred thousand Special Drawing Rights (SDR32,700,000 [equivalent to US$45 million]) to support the Public Financial Management Reform Project.
Mr James K. Avedzi 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
Mr Bagbin 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, inasmuch as I would want us to take the Reports of the Public Accounts Committee, I plead that we should deal with the Millennium De- velopment Authority (Amendment) Bill, 2014. It has been pending for some time now. There are just a few amendments and we need to pass that Bill for the Compact II to lock in. It is urgent. I believe we should take that now.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Hon Ma- jority Leader, we have an Order Paper Addendum, and I do not know whether you would want to look at that one.
We also, I believe, have not dealt with the Votes and Proceedings.
Mr Bagbin 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, inasmuch as I would want us to take the Reports of the Public Accounts Committee, I plead that we should deal with the Millennium Development Authority (Amendment) Bill, 2014. It has been pending for some time now. There are just a few amendments and we need to pass that Bill for the Compact II to lock in. It is urgent. I believe we should take that now.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader, we have an Order Paper Addendum, and I do not know whether you would want to look at that one.
We also, I believe, have not dealt with the Votes and Proceedings.
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am aware of the Votes and Proceedings, the Order Paper Addendum and the other matters. But I think this is quite critical and I would want us to take it now. Then we can do
-- [Interruption] -- So, Mr Speaker, I propose we deal with item number 20 at page 10 of the Order Paper.
Mr Speaker, I have been briefed and I think I would take a cue from your advice. We would lay the Reports first. We would start from item 4 (f) and 4 (h), and then the Order Paper Adddentum.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Very well -- Item numbered 4 (f)?
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am aware of the Votes and Proceedings, the Order Paper Addendum and the other matters. But I think this is quite critical and I would want us to take it now. Then we can do -- [Interruption] -- So, Mr Speaker, I propose we deal with item number 20 at page 10 of the Order Paper.
Mr Speaker, I have been briefed and I think I would take a cue from your advice. We would lay the Reports first. We would start from item 4 (f) and 4 (h), and then the Order Paper Adddentum.
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we laid item number 4 (f); it is the ratification of tax exemption - [Interruption] -- Has it not been laid?
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Has that been dealt with?
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we should lay item number 4(h) and deal with the Order Paper Addendum.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Hon Mem- bers, 4 (h).
Chairman of the Special Budget Com- mittee.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Hon Members, 4 (h).
Chairman of the Special Budget Committee.
PAPERS 2:30 a.m.

Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Hon Ma- jority Leader, do we move to the Order Paper Addendum?
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we would
want to do the Presentation and First Reading of Bills, which are on the Order Paper Addendum.
PAPERS 2:30 a.m.

Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Which number is that?
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the Ghana Civil Aviation (Amendment) Bill, 2015.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader, do we move to the Order Paper Addendum?
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we would want to do the Presentation and First Reading of Bills, which are on the Order Paper Addendum.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Very well.
Hon Members, Order Paper Addendum -- Presentation and First Reading of Bills. Ghana Civil Aviation (Amendment) Bill,
2015.
Hon Minister for Transport?
BILLS -- FIRST READING 2:30 a.m.

Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Which number is that?
Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I appreciate the ritual that the Hon Minister has applied herself to, by rising and bowing in respect of the Pres- entation and First Reading of the Bill. But given the shortness of time, could the Hon Minister apply herself to Standing Order 75 (2), by giving us a short explanatory statement of this Bill? [Pause]
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the Ghana Civil Aviation (Amendment) Bill, 2015.
Mrs Dzifa Aku Attivor 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the object of this Bill is to amend the
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Very well.
Hon Members, Order Paper Addendum -- Presentation and First Reading of Bills. Ghana Civil Aviation (Amendment) Bill,
2015.
Hon Minister for Transport?
BILLS -- FIRST READING 2:30 a.m.

Mrs Dzifa Aku Attivor 2:30 a.m.


Ghana Civil Aviation Act, 2004 (Act 678) to make further provisions in respect of civil aviation matters and for connected purposes.

The Ghana Civil Aviation Act was passed by Parliament, and assented to by the President on 11th November, 2004. Over the years, it has become necessary to amend the Act to make Civil Aviation Authority comply with the necessary rules and guidelines of the International Civil Aviation Organisation, as well as incorporate relevant Conventions ratified by the Republic into the Act.
Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I appreciate the ritual that the Hon Minister has applied herself to, by rising and bowing in respect of the Presentation and First Reading of the Bill. But given the shortness of time, could the Hon Minister apply herself to Standing Order 75 (2), by giving us a short explanatory statement of this Bill? [Pause]
Mrs Dzifa Aku Attivor 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the object of this Bill is to amend the Ghana Civil Aviation Act, 2004 (Act 678) to make further provisions in respect of civil aviation matters and for connected purposes.
The Ghana Civil Aviation Act was passed by Parliament, and assented to by the President on 11th November, 2004. Over the years, it has become necessary to amend the Act to make Civil Aviation Authority comply with the necessary rules and guidelines of the International Civil Aviation Organisation, as well as incorporate relevant Conventions ratified by the Republic into the Act.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I appreciate it. I saw that she was copi- ously reading from the memorandum. [Laughter.] -- But that is understood and I appreciate it.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I appreciate it. I saw that she was copiously reading from the memorandum. [Laughter.] -- But that is understood and I appreciate it.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Very well.
Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, that is the au- thoritative source. She could not have been reading from any other document apart from the memorandum. [Interruption.]
If we look at the Standing Orders, she could have opted not to. This is because it is when the Hon Member laying the Report pleases. But I drew her attention that, it was necessary for the edification of the House. This is because it has just come in through an Order Paper Addendum, as the Hon Minority Leader stated. So, she definitely had the authoritative source, which is the memorandum and she read it. That is alright.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Hon Ma- jority Leader, I will like you to find out from the Hon Minister, whether this is of an urgent nature, so that we will know what steps we have to take.
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, that is the authoritative source. She could not have been reading from any other document apart from the memorandum. [Interruption.]
If we look at the Standing Orders, she could have opted not to. This is because it is when the Hon Member laying the Report pleases. But I drew her attention that, it was necessary for the edification of the House. This is because it has just come in through an Order Paper Addendum, as the Hon Minority Leader stated. So, she definitely had the authoritative source, which is the memorandum and she read it. That is alright.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Hon Majority Leader, I will like you to find out from the Hon Minister, whether this is of an urgent nature, so that we will know what steps we have to take.
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, from the brief that I had, it is of an urgent nature. We would pray that the Committee can - the Committee has been involved in the whole preparation of this Bill. This is because, in performing their oversight, the attention was drawn to the difficulties that Civil Aviation Authority was facing.
Mr Speaker, I had the opportunity of chairing the Civil Aviation Board and I can testify to some of the challenges. So, I believe that the Committee would be given the opportunity to go and consider it. [Interruptions]—
The Speaker threw a question, which I am answering. Please, my submissions here are not binding on the Committee. [Laughter]. I make available information as the Leader of Government Business [Laughter] and not as Minister -- No! That is a different regime.
So, Mr Speaker, I pray that they would be able to submit a report. If we, looking at their recommendation, say it is of an urgent nature and we have the time and the capacity to do it, between tomorrow and the next day, then so be it. If not, then I am not too sure that we can extend the Sitting of Parliament after Friday. I am not too sure but definitely, we would need to try our best.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:30 a.m.
Very well.
Hon Members --
Yes, Hon Minority Leader?
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, from the brief that I had, it is of an urgent nature. We would pray that the Committee can - the Committee has been involved in the whole preparation of this Bill. This is because, in performing their oversight, the attention was drawn to the difficulties that Civil Aviation Authority was facing.
Mr Speaker, I had the opportunity of chairing the Civil Aviation Board and I can testify to some of the challenges. So, I believe that the Committee would be given the opportunity to go and consider it. [Interruptions]—
The Speaker threw a question, which I am answering. Please, my submissions here are not binding on the Committee. [Laughter]. I make available information as the Leader of Government Business [Laughter] and not as Minister -- No! That is a different regime.
So, Mr Speaker, I pray that they would be able to submit a report. If we, looking at their recommendation, say it is of an urgent nature and we have the time and
the capacity to do it, between tomorrow and the next day, then so be it. If not, then I am not too sure that we can extend the Sitting of Parliament after Friday. I am not too sure but definitely, we would need to try our best.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to believe that the submis- sion of the Hon Majority Leader is not an application to fast track the work in this House. This is because, I have seen the fatness of the document that he is holding and I would just plead that you refer it to the relevant Committee and let them peruse it. After all, it is not meant for the
edification of the Committee alone but the generality of this House which would be called upon to vote.
Before we vote, we must understand the contents of the Bill and where it is likely to take this nation to. That is why the entire House should be properly apprised of the contents. But I have listened to the Hon Minister, and there appears to be some justification.
Whether there is an urgent need, I cannot tell. It is for the Committee to so determine and they would come to advise us. If they are able to go through this whole document in 24 hours, then they will come to advise us. But let us leave it to them. I believe that I would want to trust the good judgement of the Committee. They would come, to properly brief and inform us, then we would take it from there.
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I have never been intimidated by size, and I would want to call on my Hon Colleagues not to be intimidated by the size of the Act. After all, my good friend, the Hon Mi- nority Leader, is fond of using the word “transmobilification” which just means change. So, it is possible that in spite of this size, much of the material here have already been approved by the House -- the Conventions, which are part of it.
So, I know that I have not put in an application to fast track it. I just shared information and the Committee definitely has the mandate to do what is permitted by the law and the Standing Orders of this House.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to believe that the submission of the Hon Majority Leader is not an application to fast track the work in this House. This is because, I have seen the fatness of the document that he is holding and I would just plead that you refer it to the relevant Committee and let them peruse it. After all, it is not meant for the edification of the Committee alone but the generality of this House which would be called upon to vote.
Before we vote, we must understand the contents of the Bill and where it is likely to take this nation to. That is why the entire House should be properly apprised of the contents. But I have listened to the Hon Minister, and there appears to be some justification.
Whether there is an urgent need, I cannot tell. It is for the Committee to so determine and they would come to advise us. If they are able to go through this whole document in 24 hours, then they will come to advise us. But let us leave it to them. I believe that I would want to trust the good judgement of the Committee. They would come, to properly brief and inform us, then we would take it from there.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Very well.
Hon Members, the Committee will
inform us in their Report after consider- ing the Bill, whether they deem it urgent enough for us to apply Standing Order 119 to deal with it.
Yes Hon Majority Leader?
Mr Bagbin 2:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I have never been intimidated by size, and I would want to call on my Hon Colleagues not to be

intimidated by the size of the Act. After all, my good friend, the Hon Minority Leader, is fond of using the word “transmobilification” which just means change. So, it is possible that in spite of this size, much of the material here have already been approved by the House -- the Conventions, which are part of it.

So, I know that I have not put in an application to fast track it. I just shared information and the Committee definitely has the mandate to do what is permitted by the law and the Standing Orders of this House.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Very well.
Hon Members, the Committee will inform us in their Report after considering the Bill, whether they deem it urgent enough for us to apply Standing Order 119 to deal with it.
Yes Hon Majority Leader?
Mr Bagbin 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am just trying to get the sense of the House. I have got messages calling for suspension for Hon Members to be able to refill and then come back.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Is it refill or refuel or both?
Mr Bagbin 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am just trying to get the sense of the House. I have got messages calling for suspension for Hon Members to be able to refill and then come back.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Is it refill or refuel or both?
Mr Bagbin 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, because I did not want to use fuel - [Laughter.] that is why I said “refill”. This is because fuel could raise some other issues, knowing my friends on the other side of the House. So, I propose we take a suspension for just an hour. [Interruption.] Mr Speaker, it is 2.40 p.m., so, by 3.30 p.m., we should be here.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Hon Members, Sitting is accordingly suspend- ed for one hour. When we resume, the Hon Second Deputy Speaker will take over the Chair.
2.43 p.m. -- Sitting suspended.
4:50 p.m. -- Sitting resumed.
Mr Bagbin 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, because I did not want to use fuel - [Laughter.] that is why I said “refill”. This is because fuel could raise some other issues, knowing my friends on the other side of the House. So, I propose we take a suspension for just an hour. [Interruption.] Mr Speaker, it is 2.40 p.m., so, by 3.30 p.m., we should be here.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Hon Members, Sitting is accordingly suspended for one hour. When we resume, the Hon Second Deputy Speaker will take over the Chair.
2.43 p.m. -- Sitting suspended.
4:50 p.m. -- Sitting resumed.
  • [MR SECOND DEPUTY SPEAKER IN CHAIR]
  • [MR SECOND DEPUTY SPEAKER IN CHAIR]
  • Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I propose we move to item number 23, which is Committee of the Whole to be briefed by the National Development Planning Commission (NDPC).
    Mr Speaker, I am informed -- I verified and it is true that the Commission, led by its Chairman, Dr Kwesi Botchwey and the Director-General, Dr Nii Moi Thompson are available to brief the House.

    So, with your kind permission, if you could reconstitute the House into the Committee of the Whole and give them the opportunity for about 30 minutes to give us a briefing and a few minutes for question time, then we could move to the rest of the business for the day.

    This is my plea, Mr Speaker.

    4.51 p.m. -- Committee of the Whole

    5.55 p.m. -- Sitting resumed.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader?
    Hon Members, Order! Order!
    Mr Bagbin 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I propose we move to item number 23, which is Committee of the Whole to be briefed by the National Development Planning Commission (NDPC).
    Mr Speaker, I am informed -- I verified and it is true that the Commission, led by its Chairman, Dr Kwesi Botchwey and the Director-General, Dr Nii Moi Thompson are available to brief the House.
    So, with your kind permission, if you could reconstitute the House into the Committee of the Whole and give them the opportunity for about 30 minutes to give us a briefing and a few minutes for question time, then we could move to the rest of the business for the day.
    This is my plea, Mr Speaker.
    4.51 p.m. -- Committee of the Whole
    5.55 p.m. -- Sitting resumed.
    Mr Bagbin 2:40 p.m.
    Please, resume your seats.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Please, those of you who are standing, resume your seats. We are back in plenary.
    Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 2:40 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    I propose we take item number 20, Millennium Development Authority (Amendment) Bill, 2014. We have a few amendments and with your leadership, I am sure we will definitely finish with this on time.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Hon Members, item number 20, Millennium Development Authority (Amendment) Bill, 2014 at Consideration Stage.
    BILLS--CONSIDERATION 2:40 p.m.

    STAGE 2:40 p.m.

    BILLS--CONSIDERATION STAGE 2:40 p.m.

    Chairman of Committee (Mr Mag- nus Amoatey) 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, clause 2, paragraph (b), delete and insert the following:
    “(b) to secure the proper and effec- tive utilisation of funds granted to Ghana under each Compact and any other relevant agree- ment.”
    Question put and amendment agreed to.
    Clause 2 as amended ordered to stand part of the Bill.
    Chairman of Committee (Mr Magnus Amoatey) 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, clause 2, paragraph (b), delete and insert the following:
    “(b) to secure the proper and effective utilisation of funds granted to Ghana under each Compact and any other relevant agreement.”
    Question put and amendment agreed to.
    Clause 2 as amended ordered to stand part of the Bill.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Question that you put related to clause (b) of section 2. But Mr Speaker, my understanding of what is being done --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    What is advertised is clause (b).
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we are amending section 2 of the principal enactment. We are amending clause (a) first by what is in the Bill, but we are further amending the amendment which has been proposed in (b). So, I thought that we would agree to the amendment in (a) first. We have not done that.
    You are seeking to further amend (b) and that is the Question that you have put. But (a) is being amended.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we are amending section 2 of the princi- pal enactment. We are amending clause (a) first by what is in the Bill, but we are further amending the amendment which has been proposed in (b). So, I thought that we would agree to the amendment in (a) first. We have not done that.
    You are seeking to further amend (b) and that is the Question that you have put. But (a) is being amended.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    So, Hon Minority Leader, it means that the (a) --
    Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we are working on the Bill not on the Act. The proposal is to amend clause 2 (b) of the Bill, which means that we are not amending clause 2 (a). It is when he looks at the Act that the issue he has raised becomes relevant. But that issue is not relevant here. This is because when you put the whole clause, clause 2 stands part of the Bill and we accept it; it means that the amendment that has been rendered on the Bill of section 2, has been accepted. And so, it is covered.
    You have done the right thing. This is because we are dealing with the Bill and not the Act.
    Mr Bagbin 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we are work- ing on the Bill not on the Act. The proposal is to amend clause 2 (b) of the Bill, which means that we are not amending clause 2 (a). It is when he looks at the Act that the issue he has raised becomes relevant.
    But that issue is not relevant here. This is because when you put the whole clause, clause 2 stands part of the Bill and we accept it; it means that the amendment that has been rendered on the Bill of section 2, has been accepted. And so, it is covered.
    You have done the right thing. This is because we are dealing with the Bill and not the Act.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, on face value, what the Hon Majority Leader is saying is right except that what obtains in the Bill seeks to amend the parent Act that has been put before us. So, Mr Speaker could have drawn attention, maybe, aided by the Chairman of the Committee, to subclause (a), that this one amends the original and this is the import of it. This is the purpose for this amendment.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speak- er, on face value, what the Hon Majority Leader is saying is right except that what obtains in the Bill seeks to amend the parent Act that has been put before us. So, Mr Speaker could have drawn atten- tion, maybe, aided by the Chairman of the Committee, to subclause (a), that this one amends the original and this is the import of it. This is the purpose for this amendment.
    As it is, nobody knows anything and then you are amending the subclause (b) of the amendment. That is what we are seeking to do, which Question has been put by Mr Speaker. We are just saying that if our minds are not drawn to it, we will not even understand what we are doing. That is the point that I am making.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Hon Minority Leader, when we have a Bill that is seeking to amend an Act, what is advertised in the Order Paper is the amendment to the Bill. This is because if there was no amendment to the Bill, we would just say clause 1, 2, 3 and we will be done. So, what we draw attention to, is what has been advertised. That is my understanding.
    What is in the Bill, there is a certain presumption that you have read and have agreed. If you do not agree, then you propose an amendment, either by an Hon Member or by the Committee and then that is what is advertised. That is why I
    put the Question. Is that not the position?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:40 p.m.


    As it is, nobody knows anything and then you are amending the subclause (b) of the amendment. That is what we are seeking to do, which Question has been put by Mr Speaker. We are just saying that if our minds are not drawn to it, we will not even understand what we are doing. That is the point that I am making.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that is why I said that technically, what you did is right except that this whole Bill which has been referred to by the relevant Committee which is supposed to lead the discussion at this stage in the House, is to get the House properly informed about what is happening at this stage. But they are telling us that they brought something to us and they are proposing to amend that. What is the basis for that and what is the position of the original amendment? We do not know.
    It is not only for the education of the Committee members but for the entirety of all of us in plenary. That is the point that I was making.
    Technically, if you put the Question on the amendment to the amendment, you are right, but how does the entire House follow what is going on? It is for you to lead us. That is the point that I am making for the Committee to lead us.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:40 p.m.
    Hon Minority Leader, when we have a Bill that is seeking to amend an Act, what is advertised in the Order Paper is the amendment to the Bill. This is because if there was no amendment to the Bill, we would just say clause 1, 2, 3 and we will be done. So, what we draw attention to, is what has been advertised. That is my understanding.
    What is in the Bill, there is a certain presumption that you have read and have agreed. If you do not agree, then you propose an amendment, either by an Hon Member or by the Committee and then that is what is advertised. That is why I put the Question. Is that not the position?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that is why I said that technically, what you did is right except that this whole Bill which has been referred to by the relevant Committee which is supposed to lead the discussion at this stage in the House, is to get the House properly informed about what is happening at this stage. But they are telling us that they brought something to us and they are proposing to amend that. What is the basis for that and what is the position of the original amendment? We do not know.
    It is not only for the education of the Committee members but for the entirety of all of us in plenary. That is the point that I was making.
    Technically, if you put the Question on the amendment to the amendment, you are right, but how does the entire House follow what is going on? It is for you to
    lead us. That is the point that I am making for the Committee to lead us.
    Mr Bagbin 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the prin- cipal enactment which is Act 702 was passed to cover Compact I. That was the purpose of that Act. After the successful implementation of Compact I, we had the opportunity of being supported to do Compact II. Therefore, the need to amend the principal enactment is not only to deal with Compact I but now, Compact II and any other future development assistance that we may get in that direction.
    The intention is also to include the proper and effective utilisation of those moneys and that is what has occasioned this proposed amendment on the Order Paper.
    I am a member of the Committee and part of the team that went through the Bill and so, I had this information and think that is why the Minority Leader is
    Mr Bagbin 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the principal enactment which is Act 702 was passed to cover Compact I. That was the purpose of that Act. After the successful implementation of Compact I, we had the opportunity of being supported to do Compact II. Therefore, the need to amend the principal enactment is not only to deal with Compact I but now, Compact II and any other future development assistance that we may get in that direction.
    The intention is also to include the proper and effective utilisation of those moneys and that is what has occasioned this proposed amendment on the Order Paper.
    I am a member of the Committee and part of the team that went through the Bill and so, I had this information and think that is why the Minority Leader is requesting for us to draw the attention of Hon Members to the reason behind this proposed amendment. It was properly put and your Question was properly tabled and answered and we can now move on.
    Mr Bagbin 6:05 a.m.


    requesting for us to draw the attention of Hon Members to the reason behind this proposed amendment. It was properly put and your Question was properly tabled and answered and we can now move on.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
    Majority Leader, are we on clause 2? The Question now is clause 2 as amended ordered to stand part of the Bill.
    Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:05 a.m.
    Clause 2 (b) that the Chair referred to relates to securing the proper and effective utilisation of the funds granted to Ghana under this Compact and any other relevant agreements.
    Mr Speaker, the Long Title not only relates to the utilisation but to the effective management of the resources, in this case, funds. Why would you not add the
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:05 a.m.
    Clause 2 (b) that the Chair referred to relates to securing the proper and effective utilisation of the funds granted to Ghana under this Compact and any other relevant agreements.
    Mr Speaker, the Long Title not only relates to the utilisation but to the effective management of the resources, in this case, funds. Why would you not add the “effective management and utilisation” just to reflect the amendment that we just did in the Long Title?
    Mr Amoatey 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I believe that the amendment that was put as the Leader said is only seeking to expand the object of the Bill, and it is specifically referring to the Compact. If you would recall, the Compact came with an agreement and I believe that management issues were contained in that document. Therefore, I pray that we accept the proposal that the Committee is recommending.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Chairman, when you add “management”, it does not take anything away from it - Majority Leader, does it? The Minority Leader just wants to add “secure the proper and effective management and utilisation”.
    Dr Stephen N. A. Arthur 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker,
    I believe that utilisation falls within management. In looking at the holistic aspect of it, it is better to use “effective management” than “effective utilisation” because utilisation would be part of management.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Chairman, when you add “management”, it does not take anything away from it -- Majority Leader, does it? The Minority Leader just wants to add “secure the proper and effective management and utilisation”.
    Dr Stephen N. A. Arthur 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I believe that utilisation falls within management. In looking at the holistic aspect of it, it is better to use “effective management” than “effective utilisation” because utilisation would be part of management.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
    So, is there anything wrong with saying - Mr Chairman, this is friendly and harmless - “management and utilisation”.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
    So, is there anything wrong with saying -- Mr Chairman, this is friendly and harmless -- “management and utilisation”.
    Mr Amoatey 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, we would take a cue from -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
    There are people who are strongly opposed to the use of both words.
    Mr Amoatey 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, we would take a cue from --
    Mr Amoatey 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the suggestion now is to say that “to secure the proper and effective utilisation of …”
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
    I will put the Question.[Interruptions]The Question is the only one that is there. The Question is, as the amendment is suggesting and has been advertised. I am putting that Question and if it fails, I will put the other Question, then we will go forward.
    Question put, and amendment agreed to.
    Clause 2 as amended ordered to stand part of the Bill.
    Clause 3 - Section 3 of Act 702 amended.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
    I will put the Question.[Interruptions]The Question is the only one that is there. The Question is, as the amendment is suggesting and has been advertised. I am putting that Question and if it fails, I will put the other Question, then we will go forward.
    Question put, and amendment agreed to.
    Clause 2 as amended ordered to stand part of the Bill.
    Clause 3 -- Section 3 of Act 702 amended.
    Mr Amoatey 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker I beg to move, clause 3, paragraph (b), delete and insert the following:
    “(b) provide programmes and projects as determined by the Board within the terms of the applicable agreement.”
    Alhaji Ibrahim D. Abubakari 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, we know that the function of the Board is more to determine policies. So, why did they add programmes, projects and policies? This is because policies too may be necessary for the Board.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
    When there is an existing agreement, there is no policy. The policy has been determined by the agreement. You are implementing the programmes and projects as within the terms of the applicable agreement. I do not know.
    Mr Bagbin 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, we have passed the stage of policy and through the policy, we have now curved out programmes and then from programmes, we cut out projects and the Authority is to see to the implementation of these programmes and projects. That is why the term facilities is a wrong terminology to use there and we are now substituting that with programmes and projects. This is the Board and it is implementing. We have passed the issue of Government policy and the Board is implementing programmes and projects and that is why this proposed amendment is made without policy. It is now not the time for policy formulation; we have passed that.
    Mr Bagbin 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, we have passed the stage of policy and through the policy, we have now curved out programmes and then from programmes, we cut out projects and the Authority is to see to the implementation of these programmes and projects. That is why the
    term facilities is a wrong terminology to use there and we are now substituting that with programmes and projects. This is the Board and it is implementing. We have passed the issue of Government policy and the Board is implementing programmes and projects and that is why this proposed amendment is made without policy. It is now not the time for policy formulation; we have passed that.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
    It was the policy that drove the agreement. So, once the agreement has been passed --
    Hon Member, I will put the Question.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
    It was the policy that drove the agreement. So, once the agreement has been passed -
    Hon Member, I will put the Question.
    Alhaji Abubakari 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, can I make my point?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
    Is it a different point or the same point?
    Alhaji Abubakari 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, if it is programmes and projects, unless you tell me the Board of Directors are responsible for implementation. If management is
    responsible for implementation, then they will be responsible for projects and programmes and the Board of Directors will be responsible for policy. Unless you tell me that their responsibility is Board of Management. Otherwise, let us change it to Board of Directors responsible for policies and the management under them would be responsible for implementation and that is, projects and programmes.
    Alhaji Abubakari 6:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, if it is programmes and projects, unless you tell me the Board of Directors are responsible for implementation. If management is responsible for implementation, then they will be responsible for projects and programmes and the Board of Directors will be responsible for policy. Unless you tell me that their responsibility is Board of Management. Otherwise, let us change it to Board of Directors responsible for policies and the management under them would be responsible for implementation and that is, projects and programmes.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
    The Act that we are seeking to amend, what is the role of the Board?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, nothing in this construction should indicate to my Hon Colleague that it is the Board that is executing the programmes and projects. It says “provide pro-grammes and projects as determined by the Board.” It is not the Board that is doing the execution of the project. The execution is in the hands of another group. So, I guess my Hon Colleague understands it that way.
    Question put and amendment agreed to.
    Clause 3 as amended ordered to stand part of the Bill.

    Clause 4 - Section 7 of Act 702 amended.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, nothing in this construction should indicate to my Hon Colleague that it is the Board that is executing the programmes and projects. It says “provide pro-
    grammes and projects as determined by the Board.” It is not the Board that is doing the execution of the project. The execution is in the hands of another group. So, I guess my Hon Colleague understands it that way.
    Question put and amendment agreed to.
    Clause 3 as amended ordered to stand part of the Bill.

    Clause 4 -- Section 7 of Act 702 amended.
    Mr Amoatey 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, clause 4, subclause (1), paragraph (a), sub-paragraph (iv), delete and insert the following:
    “(iv) one representative from the private sector elected by the Private Enterprises Foundation.”
    Mr Speaker, the idea here, is to specifically give the power of represen- tation to be nominated by the Private Enterprises Foundation.
    Mr Amoatey 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, clause 4, subclause (1), paragraph (a), sub-paragraph (iv), delete and insert the following:
    “(iv) one representative from the private sector elected by the Private Enterprises Foundation.”
    Mr Speaker, the idea here, is to
    specifically give the power of represen- tation to be nominated by the Private Enterprises Foundation.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker,
    I am a bit lost. The section 7 that he is seeking to amend - “The Governing Body of the Authority.” Usually, it would begin like this: “The Governing Body of the Authority is a Board”. There is no such thing here. It just begins:
    7. (1) “The Board is composed of
    …”
    I do not have the Act with me and so, I am not able to follow it properly. Otherwise, the usual construction is: “The Governing Body of the Authority is a Board composed of…”. But it is not here, and so, I do not know what is intended to be done.
    I thought maybe, the attention of the Hon Chairman should be drawn to that first. Otherwise, it is not properly captured.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am a bit lost. The section 7 that he is seeking to amend -- “The Governing Body of the Authority.” Usually, it would begin like this: “The Governing Body of the Authority is a Board”. There is no such thing here. It just begins:
    7. (1) “The Board is composed of
    …”
    I do not have the Act with me and so, I am not able to follow it properly. Otherwise, the usual construction is: “The
    Governing Body of the Authority is a Board composed of…”. But it is not here, and so, I do not know what is intended to be done.
    I thought maybe, the attention of the Hon Chairman should be drawn to that first. Otherwise, it is not properly captured.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
    Hon Chairman, when you say, “one representative of private sector elected by the Private Enterprises Foundation is denominated.” The Private Enterprises Foundation, however, chooses the person if there are elections and internal elections. After they have elected the person, then they nominate the person to a Board. And why the Private Enterprises Foundation?
    Dr Matthew .O.Prempeh 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if one looks at the amendment they are proposing and the original rendition in the Bill, it is far better. Maybe, the Leadership would have to look at it again.

    - Yes, election is a form of selection. “Election” is a bigger word and “selection” is the better word in this instance. And even, the rephrasing, probably, is not correct.

    How is the Private Enterprises Foundation going to elect somebody from the private sector? So, the construction is wrong and apart from that when one goes into the Bill -- I think it is a better rendition than they are seeking to amend.
    Dr Matthew .O.Prempeh 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if one looks at the amendment they are proposing and the original rendition in the Bill, it is far better. Maybe, the Leadership would have to look at it again.
    Mr Speaker, “one representative from the private sector elected by the Private Enterprises Foundation”, -- [Interruption] -- Yes, election is a form of selection. “Election” is a bigger word and “selection” is the better word in this instance. And even, the rephrasing, probably, is not correct.
    How is the Private Enterprises Foundation going to elect somebody from the private sector? So, the construction is wrong and apart from that when one goes into the Bill -- I think it is a better rendition than they are seeking to amend.
    Mr Bagbin 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the principal enactment has not been properly captured by the Bill and that is what has created the problem. This is because section 7 (1) of the principal enactment says:
    7. (1) “The governing body of the Authority is a Board composed of the following members:”
    And so, that is how it should start. Not “The Board is composed of”. “The Governing Body of the Authority is a Board, composed of the following members.” And then the amendment follows.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
    This is a proposal to amend section 7 (1) and so, let me take that. And the amendment is to delete - we do not want to amend section 7(1) of the Act.
    Hon Chairman, what the Hon Majority Leader is suggesting and let me telecast my point, I agree with him.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
    This is a proposal to amend section 7 (1) and so, let me take that. And the amendment is to delete -- we do not want to amend section 7(1) of the Act.
    Hon Chairman, what the Hon Majority Leader is suggesting and let me telecast my point, I agree with him.
    Mr Amoatey 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I very much agree with it. But if I look at the interpretation section, clause 26 of the Act, it has defined “Board” and “Board” means “Governing Body of the Authority”, provided under section A. And so, there is no need putting “Governing Body” there.
    Mr Kwabena O. Darko-Mensah 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I believe that the amendment
    proposed by the Committee should stay. This is because I believe that it is coming about because they are looking at the difficulties surrounding the nominated persons for such Boards. If we take the Bill that came, it is talking about selection by a transparent process. And so, I believe that the Committee thought that the best transparent process we could ever have is an elected position.
    And therefore, I think we need to keep it because, the Private Enterprises Foundation is made up of other federations like the Association of Ghana Industries (AGI), National Board for Small Scale Industries (NBSSI), Employers Associa- tion and therefore, I believe that in the selection process over the period, if they are having their own difficulty as to who should represent this Board or that
    I believe that maintaining “elected” is key to ensuring that it would be fair. So, anybody we put there would go to the Board of the Millennium Development Authority (MiDA) through an elected process, which is more transparent than any other nomination in any other nominated form. And so, I think we should keep the amendment that the Committee brought.
    Mr Kwabena O. Darko-Mensah 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I believe that the amendment proposed by the Committee should stay. This is because I believe that it is coming about because they are looking at the difficulties surrounding the nominated persons for such Boards. If we take the Bill that came, it is talking about selection by a transparent process. And so, I believe that the Committee thought that the best transparent process we could ever have is an elected position.
    And therefore, I think we need to keep it because, the Private Enterprises Foundation is made up of other federations like the Association of Ghana Industries (AGI), National Board for Small Scale Industries (NBSSI), Employers Associa-
    Mr Yaw .F. Addo 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have noticed something here. There is nothing like the ‘Private Enterprises Foundation' now. It is “Private Enterprise Federation”. And so, they should effect the change in accordance with the new designation of the company.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Chairman, we are being told that the Private Enterprises Foundation has ceased to exist. It is now known as “Private Enterprise Federation (PEF).”
    Mr Yaw .F. Addo 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have noticed something here. There is nothing like the ‘Private Enterprises Foundation' now. It is “Private Enterprise Federation”. And so, they should effect the change in accordance with the new designation of the company.
    Mr Yaw .F. Addo 6:15 p.m.
    It is no longer a Foundation,it is a Federation.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Chairman, we are being told that the Private Enterprises Foundation has ceased to exist. It is now known as “Private Enterprise Federation (PEF).”
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
    Are you aware of it?
    Mr Yaw .F. Addo 6:15 p.m.
    It is no longer a Foundation,it is a Federation.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
    Are you aware of it?
    Mr Amoatey 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we are not too sure. But we know the old terminology was “Foundation”. We would check and come back during the Third Reading.
    Mr Amoatey 6:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we are not too sure. But we know the old terminology was “Foundation”. We would check and come back during the Third Reading.
    Mr O.B. Amoah 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think it is a bit strange for members of a Federation to decide to go for elections just to get a representative on a Board. After all, they even have executives. Are they saying that they cannot nominate one person to serve on the Board, but they have to hold election to get one person to serve on the Board? The Bar Association has to hold an election before they get a represen- tation for the Media Commission?
    I do not think we should stretch this thing that far. We should just state, “nomination” by PEF to that Millennium Challenge Account Board, than to say that there should be elections to elect. It is too cumbersome and it is far stretched.

    Mr Second Deputy SpeakerYes, Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Committee was informed that the implementation of Act 702 met some problems with terms such as, “selection”. The representations of those organislations had issues of authority. This is because some members were trying to claim that they did not participate in the selection and they were questioned.
    And so, our partners insisted on “election”. That is what they insisted on, so that there would be no problems with this at all. This is because this time, there would be evidence, that this voted for this
    Mr O.B. Amoah 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think it is a bit strange for members of a Federation to decide to go for elections just to get a representative on a Board. After all, they
    even have executives. Are they saying that they cannot nominate one person to serve on the Board, but they have to hold election to get one person to serve on the Board? The Bar Association has to hold an election before they get a represen- tation for the Media Commission?
    I do not think we should stretch this thing that far. We should just state, “nomination” by PEF to that Millennium Challenge Account Board, than to say that there should be elections to elect. It is too cumbersome and it is far stretched.

    Mr Second Deputy SpeakerYes, Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Committee was informed that the implementation of Act 702 met some problems with terms such as, “selection”. The representations of those organislations had issues of authority. This is because some members were trying to claim that they did not participate in the selection and they were questioned.
    And so, our partners insisted on “election”. That is what they insisted on, so that there would be no problems with this at all. This is because this time, there would be evidence, that this voted for this or voted against.
    Mr Speaker, it is not like the Leaders here deciding that MP “A” should go and represent MP “X.” But when we elect, then we all know that we authorised them and that is why they decided that we should use “elect”. I was in the meeting and we thought that there was nothing wrong with the Foundation electing a member.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    We are told that it is “Federation” but not “Foundation.”
    Mr Amoatey 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we have checked and confirmed that it is “Federation” and so, I am making a further amendment that we delete “Foundation” and insert “Federation.”
    Mr Mohammed-Mubarak Muntaka 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have no problem with bringing in a person or being elected from the private sector but he specifically mentioned one particular organisation. It is problematic for me, and I thought we could say that the private sector would elect one person to be here, so that how they do it, it is for the organisation to be able to do it. But when we mention specific organisations, and I want to believe that, when we are talking about the private sector even in Ghana, we have the Ghana Association of Industries, and so many organisations [Interruption.]
    Mr Speaker, I am told that they have come together to form the Federation and so, I think it is alright.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu rose
    Mr Mohammed-Mubarak Muntaka 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have no problem with bringing in a person or being elected from the private sector but he specifically mentioned one particular organisation. It is problematic for me, and I thought we could say that the private sector would elect one person to be here, so that how they do it, it is for the organisation to be able to do it. But when we mention specific organisations, and I want to believe that, when we are talking about the private sector even in Ghana, we have the Ghana Association of Industries, and so many organisations—[Interruption.]
    Mr Speaker, I am told that they have come together to form the Federation and so, I think it is alright.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu—rose—
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    Hon Minority Leader, before I recognise you, let me first recognise Hon Isaac Osei, please.
    Mr Isaac Osei 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am very happy that the Chairman has accepted the “Private Enterprises Federation”. But in any case, the “Private Enterprises Foundation” was wrong. It has always been “Private Enterprises Federation”.
    On the point made by the Majority Chief Whip, I think if you look further down, there is also an amendment in relation to the Association of Ghana Industries, but the Majority Chief Whip mentioned “Ghana Association of Industries”, which is not correct. It is actually “Association of Ghana Industries”. It is indicated here that they also have to elect one private sector person in spite of the fact that they are also members of the Private Enterprises Federation (PEF).
    Mr Isaac Osei 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am very happy that the Chairman has accepted the “Private Enterprises Federation”. But in any case, the “Private Enterprises Foundation” was wrong. It has always been “Private Enterprises Federation”.
    On the point made by the Majority Chief Whip, I think if you look further down, there is also an amendment in relation to the Association of Ghana Industries, but the Majority Chief Whip mentioned “Ghana Association of Industries”, which is not correct. It is actually “Association of Ghana Industries”. It is indicated here that they also have to elect one private
    sector person in spite of the fact that they are also members of the Private Enterprises Federation (PEF).
    Alhaji Abubakari 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker,
    why do we not just make it “one person from the private sector, maybe, elected by the Government” [Uproar] How can we eliminate the involvement of the Government?
    Alhaji Abubakari 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, why do we not just make it “one person from the private sector, maybe, elected by the Government” —[Uproar]— How can we eliminate the involvement of the Government?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    Hon Member, how do we do that?
    Alhaji Abubakari 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the private sectors are so many -- even the industry associations are private sectors.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    Who is a private sector? Do you know the members of the Private Enterprises Federation?
    Alhaji Abubakari 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I do not know them.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    All right. Let me tell you. They include the Association of Ghana Industries, Ghana National Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Ghana Employers Association, the Federation of Association of Ghanaian Exporters, the Ghana Association of
    Bankers, the Ghana Chamber of Mines, the Ghana Chamber of Telecommunica- tions, the Ghana Insurers Association, the Association of Oil Marketing Companies, the Liquefied Petroleum Gas Operators, and at the last count, that was the membership, and this was from 2012.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    All right. Let me tell you. They include the Association of Ghana Industries, Ghana National Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Ghana Employers Association, the Federation of Association of Ghanaian Exporters, the Ghana Association of Bankers, the Ghana Chamber of Mines, the Ghana Chamber of Telecommunica- tions, the Ghana Insurers Association, the Association of Oil Marketing Companies, the Liquefied Petroleum Gas Operators, and at the last count, that was the membership, and this was from 2012.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am not too sure where we are now. Have we put the Question on clause 1 — the operative (1) —?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am not too sure where we are now. Have we put the Question on clause 1 the operative (1) ?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    “The Board is composed of...?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    No! We did not put the Question because we were told by the Chairman that the Board is defined in the interpretation section.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    No! We did not put the Question because we were told by the Chairman that the Board is defined in the interpretation section.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, when we have established the Board, we would thereafter be using the Board. We would not be talking about the Board of Governors. We only refer to the Governing Board as the “Board”. So, whenever “Board” is mentioned, it refers to that Board, which is given that definition. But in the preamble, we have to establish that the Governing Body of the authority is the Board. That is how we have constructed our Acts. I am surprised at this. That is what has always been done.
    Mr Speaker, let us establish that principle first before we move on. That is for the clause 1. As for the clause 4, I think I agree with what explanation has been given and I guess we can go with that.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    Hon Chairman of the Committee, I think that when you look at the previous Act, we have followed this format, establishing first, that the Governing Body of the authority is the Board. Let us stick to clause 7 (1) of the original Act.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, when we have established the Board, we would thereafter be using the Board. We would not be talking about the Board of Governors. We only refer to the Governing Board as the “Board”. So, whenever “Board” is mentioned, it refers to that Board, which is given that definition. But in the preamble, we have to establish that the Governing Body of the authority is the Board. That is how we have constructed our Acts. I am surprised at this. That is what has always been done.
    Mr Speaker, let us establish that principle first before we move on. That is for the clause 1. As for the clause 4, I think I agree with what explanation has been given and I guess we can go with that.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    Hon Chairman of the Committee, I think that when you look at the previous Act, we have followed this format, establishing first, that the Governing Body of the authority is the Board. Let us stick to clause 7 (1) of the original Act.
    Mr Amoatey 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we would
    concede.
    Mr Amoatey 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we would concede.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    All right. If you concede, then it means that your amendment starts from clause 4, subclause (1), paragraph (a)?
    Mr Amoatey 6:25 p.m.
    That is so, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    All right. If you concede, then it means that your amendment starts from clause 4, subclause (1), paragraph (a)?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    And your amendment also includes another amendment to (IV) to delete “Foundation” and insert “Federation.” Look at the Bill -- or even if you look at what you have advertised, you are changing “Foundation” to “Federation”. Am I correct?
    If you look at what you have advertised, it reads:
    “(iv) one representative from the private sector elected by the Private Enterprises Foundation”
    And you are changing the “Foundation” to “Federation”?
    Mr Amoatey 6:25 p.m.
    That is so, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    And your amendment also includes another amendment to (IV) to delete “Foundation” and insert “Federation.” — Look at the Bill -- or even if you look at what you have advertised, you are changing “Foundation” to “Federation”. Am I correct?
    If you look at what you have advertised, it reads:
    “(iv) one representative from the private sector elected by the Private Enterprises Foundation”
    And you are changing the “Foundation” to “Federation”?
    Mr Amoatey 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that is so.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    So, the amendment is that, clause 4 (1) we are not taking what you are proposing as an amendment; we are taking the original.
    Hon Chairman of the Committee, you have to propose an amendment to clause 4 (1) by the deletion of clause 4 (1) as contained in the Bill.
    Mr Amoatey 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that is so.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    So, the amendment is that, clause 4 (1) —we are not taking what you are proposing as an amendment; we are taking the original.
    Hon Chairman of the Committee, you have to propose an amendment to clause 4 (1) by the deletion of clause 4 (1) as contained in the Bill.
    Mr Amoatey 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, clause 4 (1) to read:
    “The Governing Board of the authority is a Board composed of the following members.”
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    What you have proposed is already in the Act. So, just propose that clause 4 (1) be deleted. This is because if it is deleted, then what is in the Act
    Minority Leader, am I right?
    Mr Amoatey 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, clause 4 (1) to read:
    “The Governing Board of the authority is a Board composed of the following members.”
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    What you have proposed is already in the Act. So, just propose that clause 4 (1) be deleted. This is because if it is deleted, then what is in the Act—
    Minority Leader, am I right?
    I will put the Question.
    Question put and amendment agreed to.
    I will now put the Question on clause 4 as advertised with the further amendment which reads: delete “Foundation” and insert “Federation”.
    Question put and amendment agreed to.
    Mr Amoatey 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, clause 4, subclause (1), paragraph
    (a), sub-paragraph (v), delete and insert the following:
    “(v) one representative elected by relevant non-governmental organisations.”
    Mr Amoatey 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, clause 4, subclause (1), paragraph (a), sub-paragraph (v), delete and insert the following:
    “(v) one representative elected by relevant non-governmental organisations.”
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    Hon Member, this is a change from civil society to non-governmental.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    Hon
    Member, this is a change from civil society to non-governmental.
    Dr Prempeh 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am cautioning this House to be very careful in the subtle inclusion of civil society organisations and non-governmental organisations in these Boards. The whole purpose of this was to operate indepen- dently of Government institutions, so that they can criticise and offer different platforms.
    Now, they are sitting at the table and then who is going to do that oversight work that they are supposed to be playing independently? I do not know, if we do not have to be saying two private sector interests instead of civil society and non- governmental.
    I am just cautioning the Committee on in this proposal. I thought the Committee Members were going to offer us an enlightened position, that a civil society organisation or non-governmental organisation stay outside, look at what we are doing and if we are not doing it correctly, they can criticise us. Now, when they sit at the table, how do they criticise? So, maybe, we should go and increase the number of private sector people to (2) rather than bring civil society organisations and non-governmental organisations. The whole purpose for which they were formed was to offer an independent critique on Government processes.
    Mr Amoatey 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if we look at the proposed amendment, we used the
    phrase relevant non-governmental organisations.” We agree and accept that each Compact comes in a very specialised area; Compact I adds the object of improving agriculture and infrastructure. Compact II has another focus altogether, which is energy. That is the reason we are proposing that when it used to be agriculture, you may need a relevant agricultural NGO to be represented on the Board.
    Today, that it is energy; we would need a specialised NGO in that related area to be represented on the Board. That is the reason we are making this composition, that we should have a relevant NGO to be represented on the Board rather than leaving it to any NGO.
    Dr Prempeh 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am cautioning this House to be very careful in the subtle inclusion of civil society organisations and non-governmental organisations in these Boards. The whole purpose of this was to operate indepen- dently of Government institutions, so that they can criticise and offer different platforms.
    Now, they are sitting at the table and then who is going to do that oversight work that they are supposed to be playing independently? I do not know, if we do not have to be saying two private sector interests instead of civil society and non- governmental.
    I am just cautioning the Committee on in this proposal. I thought the Committee Members were going to offer us an enlightened position, that a civil society organisation or non-governmental organisation stay outside, look at what we are doing and if we are not doing it correctly, they can criticise us. Now, when
    they sit at the table, how do they criticise? So, maybe, we should go and increase the number of private sector people to (2) rather than bring civil society organisations and non-governmental organisations. The whole purpose for which they were formed was to offer an independent critique on Government processes.
    Mr Amoatey 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if we look at the proposed amendment, we used the phrase relevant non-governmental organisations.” We agree and accept that each Compact comes in a very specialised area; Compact I adds the object of improving agriculture and infrastructure. Compact II has another focus altogether, which is energy. That is the reason we are proposing that when it used to be agriculture, you may need a relevant agricultural NGO to be represented on the Board.
    Today, that it is energy; we would need a specialised NGO in that related area to be represented on the Board. That is the reason we are making this composition, that we should have a relevant NGO to be represented on the Board rather than leaving it to any NGO.
    Dr A. A. Osei 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the first compact did not have this complication at all. The composition of the Board was not concerned about what he is getting into. The first Compact did not deal with that problem. This new Compact is an imposition on us. So, let us be careful. Do not make reference to the first Compact with respect to specialisation on the Board. It will not happen. The first Compact was fairly straightforward and it worked very well. This new one is specific to impose certain things on us. So, we have to be careful how we craft it.
    Mr Joseph Y. Chireh 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if you look at the Act itself, it talked about one representative of NGOs. I think if they say relevant, it is important that we put the “relevant” there. But the sector this new Compact is coming to deal with, I do not know whether there are any NGOs there. And if there are no NGOs, we could have just left it “non-governmental”. But if you say “relevant” then we must now look at the ones that deal in the power sector.
    Mr Joseph Y. Chireh 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if you look at the Act itself, it talked about
    one representative of NGOs. I think if they say relevant, it is important that we put the “relevant” there. But the sector this new Compact is coming to deal with, I do not know whether there are any NGOs there. And if there are no NGOs, we could have just left it “non-governmental”. But if you say “relevant” then we must now look at the ones that deal in the power sector.
    Alternatively, if there was none, I would have been suggesting that we look at the sub-professional groups if we do not already have a professional group. But to say that it is “non-governmental organisation”, I think because we have the one in the previous Bill The Bill is always such that it is conditional to the things and they have to agree.
    The system now is that we should always include an NGO in what we are doing [Interruption] Yes, on the Board because they have to go and tell people what is going on they are agitators. So, it is even easier for them and they can do anything there and they cannot talk again.
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Act 702 included in the provisions.
    “One representative of non- governmental organisations”
    Which was so wide that the representative from the NGO was not technically suited for the Compact. That is the reason they are now putting “relevant NGOs” --
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Act 702 included in the provisions.
    “One representative of non- governmental organisations”
    Which was so wide that the representative from the NGO was not technically suited for the Compact. That is the reason they are now putting “relevant NGOs” -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    But Hon Majority Leader, the feeling of some Hon Members is that there should not be any --
    Hon Member, answer that question.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    But Hon Majority Leader, the feeling of some Hon Members is that there should not be any -
    Hon Member, answer that question.
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, from the very beginning, one governmental organisa- tion has been part of it and the reason being that, the governance of these programmes, the implementation and everything should be inclusive. That is why even in the original one, they also talked about good persons from the private sector and also they talked about one representative nominated by District Assemblies and all those things.
    So, in the Bill, they wanted “civil society” -- “civil society” is so wide and so, we argued out to remove that but relevant NGO in the energy sector. We know for example, African Centre for Energy Policy (ACEP) -- [Interruption] -- I know ACEP; I know the boy.
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, from the very beginning, one governmental organisa- tion has been part of it and the reason being that, the governance of these programmes,
    the implementation and everything should be inclusive. That is why even in the original one, they also talked about good persons from the private sector and also they talked about one representative nominated by District Assemblies and all those things.
    So, in the Bill, they wanted “civil society” - “civil society” is so wide and so, we argued out to remove that but relevant NGO in the energy sector. We know for example, African Centre for Energy Policy (ACEP) - [Interruption] - I know ACEP; I know the boy.
    Some Hon Members 6:35 p.m.
    You know the boy?
    Some Hon Members 6:35 p.m.
    You know the boy?
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Yes, I know the boy who is heading ACEP [Laughter].
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Yes, I know the boy who is heading ACEP-- [Laughter].
    Yeboah — rose Yeboah — rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    Hon Member, do you want to take a point of order against the Majority Leader?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    Hon Member, do you want to take a point of order against the Majority Leader?
    Dr Assibey-Yeboah 6:35 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker.
    Dr Assibey-Yeboah 6:35 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    What Order?[Pause.]
    All right, make your point.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    What Order?[Pause.]
    All right, make your point.
    Dr Assibey-Yeboah 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in making his submission, the Majority Leader said “I know ACEP” and he added later that “I know the boy”-
    Dr Assibey-Yeboah 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in making his submission, the Majority Leader said “I know ACEP” and he added later that “I know the boy”--
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    He has not finished.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    He has not finished.
    Dr Assibey-Yeboah 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Chief Executive Director of ACEP is Dr Amin Mohammed Anta, a former Deputy Regional Minister, and here, we have the Majority Leader referring to him as “the boy” [Laughter]. I think he has to withdraw it and apologise to Dr Amin Mohammed Anta.
    Dr Assibey-Yeboah 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Chief Executive Director of ACEP is Dr Amin Mohammed Anta, a former Deputy Regional Minister, and here, we have the Majority Leader referring to him as “the boy” --[Laughter]. I think he has to withdraw it and apologise to Dr Amin Mohammed Anta.
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, is he a girl? [Laughter]. What is the definition of a “boy”? [Laughter].
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, is he a girl? [Laughter]. What is the definition of a “boy”? [Laughter].
    He is a male human being - [Interrup-
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Hon Member for Suhum, do you have a point of order?
    Mr Frederick Opare-Ansah 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, boys are the gender type of the human species like the Hon Majority Leader. He is a boy. The Hon Majority Leader is a boy -- [Interruption.] -- That boy -- [Laughter.]
    Mr Frederick Opare-Ansah 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, boys are the gender type of the human species like the Hon Majority Leader. He is a boy. The Hon Majority Leader is a boy -- [Interruption.] - That boy [Laughter.]
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    But the Hon Majority Leader asked “is he a girl?” You have not answered that question.
    Mr Bagbin 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I know Dr Amin --
    Mr Bagbin 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I know Dr Amin -
    Mr Opare-Ansah 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Majority Leader was asking for who a “boy” is, and I was just telling him a “boy” is like him -- an organisation cannot be defined as a “boy” -- [Laughter].
    Mr Opare-Ansah 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Majority Leader was asking for who a “boy” is, and I was just telling him a “boy” is like him -- an organisation cannot be defined as a “boy” - [Laughter].
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Hon Chairman of the Public Accounts Committee and Member for Dormaa Central, are you a boy? [Laughter].
    Mr Agyeman-Manu 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I was advising the Hon Majority Leader to stop arguing and defending the indefensible. How can the Hon Second Deputy Speaker in the Chair be a boy? -- [Laughter] -- Hon E. T. Mensah --[Interruption.]
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Hon Member for Dormaa Central wanted to say something to me for a long time -- [Laughter] --and now, he has the opportunity. I beg you; do not add me. I am not a boy and I am not a girl; I am a Deputy Speaker.
    Mr Agyeman-Manu 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I was advising the Hon Majority Leader to stop arguing and defending the indefensible. How can the Hon Second Deputy Speaker in the Chair be a boy? - [Laughter] - Hon E. T. Mensah -[Interruption.]
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Hon
    Member for Dormaa Central wanted to say something to me for a long time - [Laughter] -and now, he has the opportunity. I beg you; do not add me. I am not a boy and I am not a girl; I am a Deputy Speaker.
    Mr Agyeman-Manu 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, by his definition, it would imply that almost everybody here is a boy. But so far as we know in this House, there is no boy here.
    How can the Hon Majority Leader himself be a boy? Mr Speaker, at best, he could describe the man he is talking about as a young man but definitely, not a boy. So, let him move away and withdraw that -- [Interruption] --
    Thank you, Mr Speaker. How can I be a “boy?”
    Mr Agyeman-Manu 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, by his definition, it would imply that almost everybody here is a boy. But so far as we know in this House, there is no boy here. How can the Hon Majority Leader himself be a boy? Mr Speaker, at best, he could describe the man he is talking about as a young man but definitely, not a boy. So, let him move away and withdraw that [Interruption] -
    Thank you, Mr Speaker. How can I be a “boy?”
    Dr Richard W. Anane 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I do not want to bring any medical terminologies but I just would want to refer us to some dictionary definition of what a boy is.
    Sometimes, what the Hon Majority Leader said could also apply but I would want to give you the other meanings.
    In the www.dictionary.com, one, a “boy” is a male child, from birth to full growth, especially one less than 18 years of age. Two, a “boy” is a young man who lacks maturity, judgement, et cetera. I hope that is not what the Hon Majority Leader was using -- [Laughter] -- And the third one, which saves him is that, informally, you can use a “boy.”
    But we are on a formal platform. However, informally, you can use a “boy” to mean a grown man, especially when referred to familiarly. So, in his case, even though we are on a very formal platform, he was attempting -- because he knew the Mr Anta, he thought he could still refer to him as such.
    But on this platform, I do not think that the Hon Bagbin can use that. So, what he has to know is that the formal definition of a “boy” is a male child less than eighteen years, which by our law, is also that of a child.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Dr Richard W. Anane 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I do not want to bring any medical terminologies but I just would want to refer us to some dictionary definition of what a boy is.
    Sometimes, what the Hon Majority Leader said could also apply but I would want to give you the other meanings.
    In the www.dictionary.com, one, a “boy” is a male child, from birth to full growth, especially one less than 18 years of age. Two, a “boy” is a young man who lacks maturity, judgement, et cetera. I hope that is not what the Hon Majority Leader was using - [Laughter] - And the third one, which saves him is that, informally, you can use a “boy.”
    But we are on a formal platform. However, informally, you can use a “boy” to mean a grown man, especially when referred to familiarly. So, in his case, even though we are on a very formal platform, he was attempting -- because he knew the Mr Anta, he thought he could still refer to him as such.
    But on this platform, I do not think that the Hon Bagbin can use that. So, what he has to know is that the formal definition of
    a “boy” is a male child less than eighteen years, which by our law, is also that of a child.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    The Hon Majority Leader is on his feet, so, he would continue taking into account all that has been said.
    Mr Bagbin 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I thank you very much.
    Consideration Stage is the informal stage of the consideration of a Bill and that is why the Mace is tilted. As I stand here, I often describe myself as a boy. [Interruption] - Iron boy too is there and they all know him. But the first definition of a “boy” would be substituted enough for a child in our laws. That is what we have done now. So, the “boy” applies to all of you including myself - [Interruption] - I am a boy.
    But Mr Speaker, this is on a lighter side.
    The discussions we had with the Authority and other stakeholders is to include such relevant organisations and that is why there is this proposal to restrict the non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to the governmental organisa- tions in the sector. They are relevant.
    So, the focus actually was to look at NGO's like ACEP because they could make meaningful contributions to the deliberations of the Board. That is why that proposal is made.
    Mr Darko-Mensah 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I do believe that we are making an amendment to an original Act. Therefore, I believe that the inclusion of NGOs or civil society organisations (CSOs) should be taken up. Otherwise, when you put them there, we are going to keep them mute --
    Mr Darko-Mensah 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I do believe that we are making an amendment to an original Act. Therefore, I believe that the inclusion of NGOs or civil society organisations (CSOs) should be taken up. Otherwise, when you put them there, we are going to keep them mute
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    We are going to?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    We are going to?
    Mr Darko-Mensah 6:45 p.m.
    Keep them mute from oversighting the work that the Board would be doing. [Interruption] -- I am using the word “critique”. For instance, MiDA is an authority. It is not just any ordinary --[Interruption.]
    rose
    Mr Darko-Mensah 6:45 p.m.
    Keep them mute from oversighting the work that the Board
    would be doing. [Interruption] - I am using the word “critique”. For instance, MiDA is an authority. It is not just any ordinary -[Interruption.]
    Mr Richard Quashigah rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Hon Quashigah, do you have a point of order?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Hon Quashigah, do you have a point of order?
    Mr Quashigah 6:45 p.m.
    Rightly so, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Quashigah 6:45 p.m.
    Rightly so, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Order? [Interruption.]
    Hon Quashigah, make your point.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Order? [Interruption.]
    Hon Quashigah, make your point.
    Mr Quashigah 6:45 p.m.
    Thank you so much, Mr Speaker.
    I am just a bit worried about the concern being raised about the inclusion of NGOs in the Bill. Now, the fact is that, we have different kinds of NGOs. NGOs are not the same as -
    Mr Quashigah 6:45 p.m.
    Thank you so much, Mr Speaker.
    I am just a bit worried about the concern being raised about the inclusion of NGOs in the Bill. Now, the fact is that, we have different kinds of NGOs. NGOs are not the same as --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Hon Member, this is not a point of order. You will contribute, so do not worry.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Hon Member, this is not a point of order. You will contribute, so do not worry.
    Mr Quashigah 6:45 p.m.
    All right.
    Mr Quashigah 6:45 p.m.
    All right.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Yes, I will let you contribute. A member is making a submission and has not completed and you are raising a point of order.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Yes, I will let you contribute. A member is making a submission and has not completed and you are raising a point of order.
    Mr Darko-Mensah 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, NGOs, by their own name, means they are not part of Government. MiDA is an Authority of Government. Therefore, I believe that if we would want to make use of their services, it can be co-opted like any other association or expertise that can be co-opted to work with the Board. So, I believe that we need to remove it because we are actually amending an Act and if now, we feel that it was wrong previously, then currently, it is also wrong.
    Even if you take the rationale of bringing the word “relevant”, it meant that the NGOs on the first Board that had passed for MiDA I, were not relevant. They just did not work. Therefore, if we are making a new amendment, I believe
    that it is proper we delete that whole clause from it, so that they can critique the Authority when they do their work.
    I believe that, that would give the public the confidence in them rather than putting them there for it to be a case of silencing them to critiqe Government. I believe that that would not be good --
    Mr Darko-Mensah 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, NGOs, by their own name, means they are not part of Government. MiDA is an Authority of Government. Therefore, I believe that if we would want to make use of their services, it can be co-opted like any other association or expertise that can be co-opted to work with the Board. So, I believe that we need to remove it because we are actually amending an Act and if
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Loh -- [Interruption] -- Sorry, Hon Quashigah before Hon Loh.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Loh - [Interruption] - Sorry, Hon Quashigah before Hon Loh.
    Mr Quashigah 6:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I believe strongly that NGOs perform different roles and they are not limited to monitoring. If we are specifically talking about groups that are limited to monitoring for which reason we would say that their performance would not be felt and that they would become mute if they are part of the Authority, would become civil society organisations (CSOs), largely because those groups are focussed more on actually monitoring and reporting and ensuring that things are done right.
    Now, we have NGOs that are specialised with some expertise and they bring on board some knowledge that obviously can help galvanise the forward march of the entity.
    Apart from that, if we say NGOs are non-governmental, for which reason they should not be included, then we might as well say that private entities that are being proposed are also not part of Government and also ought not to be part of the Authority.
    So, I think that it is very appropriate and apt that we allow NGOs that are specialised and have expertise in a particular area to be part of this Authority in order to enrich the performance of it.
    Mr Speaker, I think that with the introduction of the word “relevant”, is a matter of narrowing the scope, such that at the end of the day, any representative of an NGO on the Authority would be somebody who can actually contribute effectively to the forward march of the Authority.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr O. B. Amoah 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, going by the logic of Hon Quashigah, he is recommending that we can put the Centre for Democratic Development (CDD) on the Parliamentary Service Board because they can help in the running of parliamentary affairs. That should not be the logic.
    If his logic is that they would help in running the Authority because they have specialisation -- For instance, if it is about electricity and energy and ACEP talks about energy, so they should be the authority. That is the logic he wants to bring. Then CDD and all these political groups should be part of theParliamentary Service Board because they critique the work of Parliament. How can we stretch this issue?
    That should not be the logic. He should rather convince us that they would play a role, that --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    Hon O. B Amoah and then Hon Loh.
    Mr O. B. Amoah 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, going by the logic of Hon Quashigah, he is recommending that we can put the Centre for Democratic Development (CDD) on the Parliamentary Service Board because they can help in the running of parliamentary affairs. That should not be the logic.
    If his logic is that they would help in running the Authority because they have specialisation - For instance, if it is about electricity and energy and ACEP talks about energy, so they should be the authority. That is the logic he wants to bring. Then CDD and all these political groups should be part of theParliamentary Service Board because they critique the work of Parliament. How can we stretch this issue?
    That should not be the logic. He should rather convince us that they would play a role, that -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    Hon Member, is CDD a political group?
    Mr O. B. Amoah 6:55 p.m.
    No! That was not --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    Hon
    Member, is CDD a political group?
    Mr O. B. Amoah 6:55 p.m.
    No! That was not -
    Mr Quashigah 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, CDD is not an NGO but a CSO.
    Mr O. B. Amoah 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, whatever it is, it is not governmental. This logic cannot hold because if he is saying that certain NGOs may have certain specialisations and for that reason, they should be the authority, then I am giving the example of where we have the Parliamentary Service Board, then we should bring these institutions on it --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    STAR Ghana.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    STAR Ghana.
    Mr O. B. Amoah 6:55 p.m.
    Yes, thank you, Mr Speaker --[Laughter.]
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    Let me just make a small point before we move on.
    When you look at article 201 of the Constitution, for example, the Police Council includes a lawyer from the Ghana Bar Association and a representative of the Retired Senior Police Officers Association. So, even in our Constitution, we have included entities that are not part of Government in certain governing bodies. [Interruption] -- It is not the same though, but anyway --
    Mr O. B. Amoah 6:55 p.m.
    Yes, thank you, Mr Speaker [Laughter.]
    Mr George Loh 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would just want to reiterate the point generally made, that it is not for nothing that these have been included. We have had extensive deliberations at the level of the Committee, and interacted with the partners. Indeed, they had a representative who flew all the way from the United States of America (USA) and the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) to meet us and explain why they want some of these things put in there.
    Mr Speaker, it is true and I agree that we have two options, which is either to act within the time context or after. If we have relevant NGOs in the energy sector on the Board, I do not agree that it silences
    other NGOs on raising a red flag, should the need arise. Rather, they provide expertise to the Authority, so that the Board would take into consideration some of these things when fashioning out policies and other relevant issues. Hence, we do not need to go the full hog only for the NGOs to come and we would have to reverse some of the terms. They enrich the Board, as a result of that I believe that there is nothing wrong.
    I am very grateful to Mr Speaker, that even by the example of the Police Council, he has demonstrated that our laws allow us to robe in whoever would enrich our governance process.
    So, I believe that we should keep the amendment as it is.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    Let me just make a small point before we move on.
    When you look at article 201 of the Constitution, for example, the Police Council includes a lawyer from the Ghana Bar Association and a representative of the Retired Senior Police Officers Association. So, even in our Constitution, we have included entities that are not part of Government in certain governing bodies. [Interruption] - It is not the same though, but anyway -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    Also, let me make the point that if you look at our Petroleum Legal Regime, we put the CSOs in there to make it different. So, we have both models. I have said one is for this module and I have to say one for the other. It is up to you to choose which model you would want to use now.
    I will take the Hon Member for Nsawam Adoagyire and then Hon Yieleh Chireh.
    Mr George Loh 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would just want to reiterate the point generally made, that it is not for nothing that these have been included. We have had extensive deliberations at the level of the Committee, and interacted with the partners. Indeed, they had a representative who flew all the way from the United States of America (USA) and the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) to meet us and explain
    why they want some of these things put in there.
    Mr Speaker, it is true and I agree that we have two options, which is either to act within the time context or after. If we have relevant NGOs in the energy sector on the Board, I do not agree that it silences other NGOs on raising a red flag, should the need arise. Rather, they provide expertise to the Authority, so that the Board would take into consideration some of these things when fashioning out policies and other relevant issues. Hence, we do not need to go the full hog only for the NGOs to come and we would have to reverse some of the terms. They enrich the Board, as a result of that I believe that there is nothing wrong.
    I am very grateful to Mr Speaker, that even by the example of the Police Council, he has demonstrated that our laws allow us to robe in whoever would enrich our governance process.
    So, I believe that we should keep the amendment as it is.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    Also, let me make the point that if you look at our Petroleum Legal Regime, we put the CSOs in there to make it different. So, we have both models. I have said one is for this module and I have to say one for the other. It is up to you to choose which model you would want to use now.
    I will take the Hon Member for Nsawam Adoagyire and then Hon Yieleh Chireh.
    Mr Frank Annoh-Dompreh 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have a little concern with the amendment proposed:
    “(v) one representative elected by the relevant non-governmental organisations.”
    I have heard the concerns on whether to include NGOs, but my concern really has to do with the word “relevant”, as the Hon Leader of the House has said, that the Authority, this time, would focus on energy provisions.
    Now, who determines which of the CSOs or NGOs is relevant?
    I would want to know if the Hon Leader of the House could educate us on that.
    Mr Frank Annoh-Dompreh 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have a little concern with the amendment proposed:
    “(v) one representative elected by the relevant non-governmental organisations.”
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 9 p.m.
    Hon Members, I think that a matter of grave concern has been brought to my attention.
    The Bill that we are seeking to amend is Act 702, which has been amended by Act 709. But our Bill has no reference to Act 709. So, how could we be amending Act 702 when it has been amended by Act 709? If there is anything at all, we should look at the amendments viz a viz Act 709 and not Act 702. So, we cannot proceed today.
    The truth of the matter is that, I am very happy that we are here because I was watching television during the break, and the Media was happy on the fact that the lights went off. I know sometimes people would think that when the lights went off, we went home.
    But now, look at us, more than half of us are here. We are very serious parliamentarians. It is a few minutes to 7.00 p.m and I am sure we are prepared to go to

    But we cannot continue with the Bill that says we amend Act 702, when there is Act 709. I do not know how we are going to --

    Unless the Hon Majority Leader convinces me, otherwise --
    Mr Bagbin 9 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the principal enactment is Act 702. Act 709 amends some portions and sections of Act 702 -- [Interruption]-- No! This is a Bill. So, we are right. The only error we committed is in connection with section 7 (1), where the Hon Chairman was insisting that we accept what is on the Bill as:
    “7. (1) The Board is composed of…”
    But my Hon Colleague, the Hon Minority Leader, raised the point that it is not how we have been framing the section, and brought in:
    “The governing body of the Authority is a Board composed of…”
    Mr Speaker, that is the correct phrase. But that is contained in Act 702, which has been amended by Act 709. So, in that case, if we are amending the current Bill, then we would be capturing Act 709, which is not properly framed.
    So, that is an area we would have to come back to at a Second Consideration Stage because I think that we were misled with that one. The principal enactment is Act 702. So, the Bill is right.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    Hon Members, I think that a matter of grave concern has been brought to my attention.
    The Bill that we are seeking to amend is Act 702, which has been amended by Act 709. But our Bill has no reference to Act 709. So, how could we be amending Act 702 when it has been amended by Act 709? If there is anything at all, we should look at the amendments viz a viz Act 709 and not Act 702. So, we cannot proceed today.
    The truth of the matter is that, I am very happy that we are here because I was watching television during the break, and the Media was happy on the fact that the lights went off. I know sometimes people would think that when the lights went off, we went home.
    But now, look at us, more than half of us are here. We are very serious parliamentarians. It is a few minutes to 7.00 p.m and I am sure we are prepared to go to 9.00 p.m.
    But we cannot continue with the Bill that says we amend Act 702, when there is Act 709. I do not know how we are going to -
    Unless the Hon Majority Leader convinces me, otherwise --
    Mr Bagbin 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, you are right, that it is amended but it is not all the sections that have been amended; it is not completely deleted and replaced; they added the definition of “Authority” and I think “Board” but the section is still relevant. It is still there. [Interruption]-- [Pause.]
    Mr Bagbin 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the principal enactment is Act 702. Act 709 amends
    some portions and sections of Act 702 [Interruption]- No! This is a Bill. So, we are right. The only error we committed is in connection with section 7 (1), where the Hon Chairman was insisting that we accept what is on the Bill as:
    “7. (1) The Board is composed of…”
    But my Hon Colleague, the Hon Minority Leader, raised the point that it is not how we have been framing the section, and brought in:
    “The governing body of the Authority is a Board composed of…”
    Mr Speaker, that is the correct phrase. But that is contained in Act 702, which has been amended by Act 709. So, in that case, if we are amending the current Bill, then we would be capturing Act 709, which is not properly framed.
    So, that is an area we would have to come back to at a Second Consideration Stage because I think that we were misled with that one. The principal enactment is Act 702. So, the Bill is right.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    Hon Members, I am being advised by the Clerks-at-the-Table, that the Act 702 as it is, incorporates the Act 709 amendments. I disagree with them and the reason is because of Statute Law Revision.
    The amendments that were made before Statute Law Revision, before we passed the Resolution that created the new Act of Ghana, it incorporated all the amendments. The Act 2006 -- I stand corrected, Hon Chairman, it was made after this. Was it not? This was up to --
    Hon Chairman, do you get the point I am making?
    That before the revised Statutes, [Pause] -- Hon Members, the laws of Ghana Revised Edition amendment Act 2006 substituted 2004 for 1998, so that when the revised edition comes into force, the Legislation Incorporated and enacted between 1999 and 2004 would have been incorporated in the revised edition. What it means is that, all the laws and amendments that were made before 2004 are incorporated into one law, post 2004, that has not happened.
    So, the Millennium Development Authority (Amendment) Act 2006, Act 702 stands alone and Act 709 stands alone. Act 709 has not been incorporated into Act 702. That happened before 2004.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    Let me give you another example. When we look at page 6 of the Bill, one of the headings there is:
    “Section 26 of Act 702 amended”.
    Section 26 of Act 702 has already been amended by Act 709. It has already been amended; it is here.
    I have Act 709 with me -- page 6 of the Bill -- the last amendment proposed there is that section 26 of Act 702 amended. Section 22 of Act 702 has already been amended by Act 709.
    Mr Chireh 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think that there are two issues that we should look at. At this time that we are considering the Bill, we are all tired. So, there is a lot of confusion.
    Secondly, the Act that has amended Act 702 is supposed to have been incorporated and if we had the practice of re-prints, it means that we would not have Act 709, we would have only Act 702. So, anybody who would have been drafting this amendment Bill, should have the two Acts together and any amendments he or

    she is making, he or she would need the two. If in one case, the thing was deleted; it would have been deleted if there was a re-print. So, one cannot be amending that one, but where one has 20 (a), as you are trying to explain; it means that it continued with Act 702 and not standing alone.

    So, all the principal enactments as the Hon Majority Leader is saying is the Act 702 and all the other amendments being made here would have to take account of Act 709 but nobody would be drafting amendments to Act 702 without looking at Act 709. That is why if there is any error, it should have been coming from the drafting section and not from us. This is because we are still doing one thing. So, Act 709 is one different thing from Act 702 by the principles of --
    Mr Bagbin 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, you are right, that it is amended but it is not all the sections that have been amended; it is not completely deleted and replaced;
    they added the definition of “Authority” and I think “Board” but the section is still relevant. It is still there. [Interruption]-- [Pause.]
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    So, you are seeking -if I follow you, to amend the Millennium Development Authority Act and the amendments we are seeking, are what have been advertised and what are contained in the Bill. So, whether it changes Act 709 or Act 702, it does not matter. If what we say changes Act 709, then the draftsperson should amend accordingly. That is the position.
    Yes, Hon Alhaji Muntaka, then Hon Opare Asare -- Sorry Hon W.O. Boafo, I will recognise you.
    Hon W.O.Boafo?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    Hon Members, I am being advised by the Clerks-at-the-Table, that the Act 702 as it is, incorporates the Act 709 amendments. I disagree with them and the reason is because of Statute Law Revision.
    The amendments that were made before Statute Law Revision, before we passed the Resolution that created the new Act of Ghana, it incorporated all the amendments. The Act 2006 -- I stand corrected, Hon Chairman, it was made after this. Was it not? This was up to -
    Hon Chairman, do you get the point I am making?
    That before the revised Statutes, [Pause] -- Hon Members, the laws of Ghana Revised Edition amendment Act 2006 substituted 2004 for 1998, so that when the revised edition comes into force, the Legislation Incorporated and enacted between 1999 and 2004 would have been incorporated in the revised edition. What it means is that, all the laws and amendments that were made before 2004 are incorporated into one law, post 2004, that has not happened.
    So, the Millennium Development Authority (Amendment) Act 2006, Act 702 stands alone and Act 709 stands alone. Act 709 has not been incorporated into Act 702. That happened before 2004.
    Mr W. O. Boafo 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it appears that the Bill recognises the existence of Act 709 because it seeks to repeal certain sections of Act 709 like sections 19 (a) and 20 (a). So, the Bill was not prepared in ignorance of Act 709.
    Mr Speaker, it is not too late for us to add new clauses to the Bill, which seek to repeal certain portions of Act 709, which has been affected by the Bill like section 7 and so on. It is not too late.
    Mr Chireh 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think that there are two issues that we should look at. At this time that we are considering the Bill, we are all tired. So, there is a lot of confusion.
    Secondly, the Act that has amended Act 702 is supposed to have been incorporated
    and if we had the practice of re-prints, it means that we would not have Act 709, we would have only Act 702. So, anybody who would have been drafting this amendment Bill, should have the two Acts together and any amendments he or she is making, he or she would need the two. If in one case, the thing was deleted; it would have been deleted if there was a re-print. So, one cannot be amending that one, but where one has 20 (a), as you are trying to explain; it means that it continued with Act 702 and not standing alone.
    So, all the principal enactments as the Hon Majority Leader is saying is the Act 702 and all the other amendments being made here would have to take account of Act 709 but nobody would be drafting amendments to Act 702 without looking at Act 709. That is why if there is any error, it should have been coming from the drafting section and not from us. This is because we are still doing one thing. So, Act 709 is one different thing from Act 702 by the principles of -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Hon Alhaji Muntaka?
    I thought that when you are amending an Act, you amend the latest one. This incorporation, Hon Yieleh Chireh said that if we were re-printing, then it may be automatic but we do not re-print.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    So, you are seeking if I follow you, to amend the Millennium Development Authority Act and the amendments we are seeking, are what have been advertised and what are contained in the Bill. So, whether it changes Act 709 or Act 702, it does not matter. If what we say changes Act 709, then the draftsperson should amend accordingly. That is the position.
    Yes, Hon Alhaji Muntaka, then Hon Opare Asare - Sorry Hon W.O. Boafo, I will recognise you.
    Hon W.O.Boafo?
    Mr W. O. Boafo 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it appears that the Bill recognises the existence of Act 709 because it seeks to repeal certain sections of Act 709 like sections 19 (a) and 20 (a). So, the Bill was not prepared in ignorance of Act 709.
    Mr Speaker, it is not too late for us to

    add new clauses to the Bill, which seek to repeal certain portions of Act 709, which has been affected by the Bill like section 7 and so on. It is not too late.
    Alhaji Muntaka 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is very worrying and I think this strengthens the arguments for many of us who believe that Parliament should have a drafting office.
    Mr Speaker, it is very unfortunate that we have to say this and it has to be captured in our official records. The Attorney-General's Department (AG), especially the drafting unit is very weak and our over-reliance on them is problematic.
    This problem is coming from the drafting office. I am sorry to say that we have seen so many laws in this House, where after amendments, they still keep the number and it is stated as amended. After some amendments, the Act keeps the number and it is just said, “as amended”. Now, you see why we are --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    Hon Akoto Osei, do you have a point of order?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Hon Alhaji Muntaka?
    I thought that when you are amending an Act, you amend the latest one. This incorporation, Hon Yieleh Chireh said that if we were re-printing, then it may be automatic but we do not re-print.
    Dr A. A. Osei 7:05 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker, I have a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, relying on the AG's Office is fine but at the end of the day, it is our due diligence that must check that. They can bring us garbarge and if we allow it to go, we cannot blame them. So, please, we need a drafting office. I agree but ultimately, we must hold ourselves responsible and I think it is very important.
    Alhaji Muntaka 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is very worrying and I think this strengthens the arguments for many of us who believe that Parliament should have a drafting office.
    Mr Speaker, it is very unfortunate that we have to say this and it has to be captured in our official records. The Attorney-General's Department (AG), especially the drafting unit is very weak and our over-reliance on them is problematic.
    This problem is coming from the drafting office. I am sorry to say that we have seen so many laws in this House, where after amendments, they still keep the number and it is stated as amended. After some amendments, the Act keeps the number and it is just said, “as amended”. Now, you see why we are --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    Hon Akoto Osei, do you have a point of order?
    Dr A.A.Osei 7:15 p.m.
    If they bring you garbage and you accept it, then you go and blame them. We are responsible; let us accept the blame, just like this night, we are tired and we are trying to make amendments; maybe, we should rest and go back to do proper due diligence. [Interruption]- This is because as we are reading now, we are finding all kinds of mistakes --
    Dr A. A. Osei 7:05 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker, I have a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, relying on the AG's Office is fine but at the end of the day, it

    is our due diligence that must check that. They can bring us garbarge and if we allow it to go, we cannot blame them. So, please, we need a drafting office. I agree but ultimately, we must hold ourselves responsible and I think it is very important.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    But that is what we are doing, is that not it?
    Mr Bagbin 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is true that the drafting department of the AG's Department has been overburdened; that, I would accept.
    Mr Speaker, they do not bring us garbage. The issue under consideration, if one looks at the memorandum, they have captured the issues that we have raised, particularly paragraph 4 is clear.
    “Although the Authority is mandated under Act 702 to carry out functions as required by subsequent investments programmes, some provisions of Act 702 and the Millennium Development Authority (Amendment) Act, 2006 (Act 709) are tailored to enable the Authority perform its functions in relation to Compact I only, and therefore, does not provide entirely for the Authority to deliver the terms expected under Compact II or any such programme.”
    Dr A.A.Osei 7:15 p.m.
    If they bring you garbage and you accept it, then you go and blame them. We are responsible; let us accept the blame, just like this night, we are tired and we are trying to make amendments; maybe, we should rest and go back to do proper due diligence. [Interruption]- This is because as we are reading now, we are finding all kinds of mistakes
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader.
    Mr Bagbin 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is true that the drafting department of the AG's Department has been overburdened; that, I would accept.
    Mr Speaker, they do not bring us garbage. The issue under consideration, if one looks at the memorandum, they have captured the issues that we have raised, particularly paragraph 4 is clear.
    “Al though the Author i ty i s mandated under Act 702 to carry out functions as required by subsequent investments programmes, some provisions of Act 702 and the Millennium Development Authority (Amendment) Act, 2006 (Act 709) are tailored to enable the Authority perform its functions in relation to Compact I only, and therefore, does not provide entirely for the Authority to deliver the terms expected under Compact II or any such programme.”
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Let us continue.
    Mr Bagbin 7:15 p.m.
    So, they have taken notice of Act 709.
    Dr A. A. Osei 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think that we have to be careful. I did not say that they bring garbage -- [Interruption.]
    No, please --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Akoto Osei?
    Dr A. A. Osei 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think that we have to be careful. I did not say that they bring garbage - [Interruption.]
    No, please -
    Mr Bagbin 7:15 p.m.
    But I did not say you said that.
    Mr Bagbin 7:15 p.m.
    But I did not say you said that --
    Dr A. A. Osei 7:15 p.m.
    You said they do not bring garbage.
    Mr Bagbin 7:15 p.m.
    But I did not say you said that -
    Dr A. A. Osei 7:15 p.m.
    Trying to quote me. My point was that we must exercise due diligence. I never said that they brought us garbage.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Alhaji Muntaka 7:15 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    So, my worry is that, it looks as though this particular amendment was being brought in to just create an opportunity for the current Compact to be dealt with. Not a permanent law to be able to deal with any other Compact that may come.
    At the Committee level, it was decided that we needed to have a law that may be able to stand the test of time, so that we do not have to becoming to Parliament and be changing it anytime there is a Compact. I thought there should have been redrafting and that would have saved us all this pain. So, if we would want to proceed, what is going to happen is that we would need to have both laws -
    Mr Bagbin 7:15 p.m.
    You are saying that even if they bring garbage, it is for us, and I said that they have not even brought garbage. I am not saying that you said they have brought garbage. I have not said that.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    All right!
    Hon Members, let us proceed. This automatic revision without a reprint, that we do not mention Act 709 but we mention Act 702 alone in the body, I do not know what to say about it. But let us proceed.
    Alhaji Muntaka 7:15 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    So, my worry is that, it looks as though
    this particular amendment was being brought in to just create an opportunity for the current Compact to be dealt with. Not a permanent law to be able to deal with any other Compact that may come.
    At the Committee level, it was decided that we needed to have a law that may be able to stand the test of time, so that we do not have to becoming to Parliament and be changing it anytime there is a Compact. I thought there should have been redrafting and that would have saved us all this pain. So, if we would want to proceed, what is going to happen is that we would need to have both laws
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Act 709 and Act 702?
    Mr Frederick Opare-Ansah 7:15 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    It is very clear what is happening. Clause 14 of the Bill is trying to amend section 26 of Act 702, which according to section 13 of Act 709, has been completely
    replaced. There are no parts of the old section 26 as stands in Act 702 still standing. So, the new Bill cannot purport to be amending section 26 under Act 702.
    My fear is, how many of such have we already missed in the parts that we have already done and what is yet to be missed ahead of us?
    Mr Speaker, we have the famous winnowing committee, which I do not know whether it is standing, ad hoc or a transient committee. But there is a group that does winnowing and I would urge that they sit, probably, very early tomorrow morning and scan through this document.
    If there is time situation here, then they probably have to burn midnight oil to get it done with, so that we would have a Bill that is taking into consideration all the sections of both Act 709 and Act 702. Then we can be sure that we are on the right track instead of this going back and forth and we are not even sure. So, the ones that we have already missed, they should prepare them for a second Consideration Stage.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Alhaji Muntaka 7:15 p.m.
    Both Act 702 and Act 709. Whereas in some, Act 702 has been amended by Act 709. Now, we are proposing further amendments to what has already been amended and we are only making reference to Act 702.
    I know that the starting point is the Act 702 which was developed into Act 709 and now, we are further developing it into a permanent Act. But let us admit it that Act 709 was lost to us mid-way. So, I would want to urge that in order to make progress, we could continue from where we are, having in mind the two, so that when we get to the tail-end, those that we have already considered, sometimes it is created for a second Consideration Stage for it to be looked at and to be sure that it is consistent with what we want to do with both Act 702 and Act 709. Then at the end of the day, when we finish, we are sure that we are truly doing what we intend to do.
    Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Opare-Ansah, I intend to proceed.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    I was going to recognise the Hon Minority Leader because his silence has been deafening.
    Hon Minority Leader, you have been noisy in your silence. I have not heard you and I think that I will want to hear you on this matter.
    But I will hear Hon Amoako-Attah.
    Hon Members, before Hon Amoako- Attah comes in, I must be frank with you -- my view and it is not a ruling.
    My view is that, I am not too comfortable with the fact that even though Act 709 is recognised here, in what is advertised, et cetera, there is no reference to Act 709.
    I do not know whether the Committee looked at Act 709 because the last point that has been made, for example, whether the Committee looked at the new section 26 or they only looked at section 26 as it is stated in Act 702. Because if they looked at section 26 as it is stated in Act 702, then it does not exist. It has been amended by Act 709.
    Hon Chairman of Committee, did you address your mind to Act 709? Did you have the opportunity of examining Act 709? And I must confess that I am a member of that Committee but I was not at the committee meeting.
    Mr Frederick Opare-Ansah 7:15 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    It is very clear what is happening.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    So, Hon Chairman of the Committee, if you looked at Act 709, why -- [Pause]
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    I was going to recognise the Hon Minority Leader because his silence has been deafening.
    Hon Minority Leader, you have been noisy in your silence. I have not heard you and I think that I will want to hear you on this matter.
    But I will hear Hon Amoako-Attah.
    Hon Members, before Hon Amoako- Attah comes in, I must be frank with you - my view and it is not a ruling.
    My view is that, I am not too comfortable with the fact that even though Act 709 is recognised here, in what is advertised, et cetera, there is no reference to Act 709.
    I do not know whether the Committee
    looked at Act 709 because the last point that has been made, for example, whether the Committee looked at the new section 26 or they only looked at section 26 as it is stated in Act 702. Because if they looked at section 26 as it is stated in Act 702, then it does not exist. It has been amended by Act 709.
    Hon Chairman of Committee, did you address your mind to Act 709? Did you have the opportunity of examining Act 709? And I must confess that I am a member of that Committee but I was not at the committee meeting.
    Mr Amoatey 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in view of the memorandum attached, we looked at Act 709 as well. We looked at Act 702 and Act 709.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    So, Hon Chairman of the Committee, if you looked at Act 709, why [Pause]
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, on that one -- that is the section 7, we appear a bit stuck. But there are many areas that we may soon confront ourselves with.
    You related to section 26 of Act 702, which indeed, according to Act 709 --
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, on that one - that is the section 7, we appear a bit stuck. But there are many areas that we may soon confront ourselves with.
    You related to section 26 of Act 702, which indeed, according to Act 709 -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Hon Members, Order! Order!
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Hon Members, there are two meetings both on the Minority and Majority sides, which are ongoing, and I would be grateful if those meetings come to an end. I do not want to mention names because they are all my Hon Friends.
    Yes, Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am saying that even from there, if you climb up to section 20 (a) of Act 702, I would want to relate it to what the Hon Member for Wa West indicated, that if perhaps, there had been a re-print, it would have followed.
    But when he says section 20 (a) of Act 702 is repealed, there is no section 20 (a) in Act 702. Really, it is section 20(a) in Act 709. That is why I am saying that in that case, what the Hon Yieleh Chireh said is correct. If there is indeed, a re-print, then that would properly situate it. But when you say that section 20 (a) of Act 702 is repealed, there is no section 20 (a) in Act 702. Rather it is section 20 (a) of Act 709. That further compounds the problem.
    Now, if you come to section 19(a) of Act 702, there is no such thing in existence. There is no section 19 (a) of Act 702. It is rather section 19 (a) of Act 709. And so because there is no re-print, it becomes difficult to follow it.
    And so, Mr Speaker, if you do not mind -- and if the Hon Majority Leader and the Hon Chairman of the Committee would indulge, I would plead that we have a re- look in order that we do not compound the problem. It is intended to amend certain sections, but in the process, we might be compounding the problems for ourselves and confuse the situation, even though the intention is clear.
    Mr Speaker, if you do not mind, I would plead that we stand further consideration of this down and do a proper sweeping. Maybe, I guess tomorrow, we could attend to it since the amendments are not too many. If we are able to reconcile, in 30 minutes, we should be able to deal with this.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, Hon Azumah has become a centre for generating noise and he must be called to order. He is not even minding us.
    Mr Bagbin 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what Act 709 did, is to make further provisions for Act 702. And so, in Act 709, there are only 13 sections, and what it did was to amend Act 702 by adding to it. [Interruption]- - It is only in Act 702 that we have section 20. In Act 709, there is no section 20. So, what it is saying is that, I am adding section 20 (a) to section 20 in Act 702.
    So, Mr Speaker, with your permission, I beg to read Act 709;
    “AN ACT to amend the Millennium Development Authority Act, 2006 (Act 702) to make further provisions for the implementation of the terms of the Compact.”
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    Hon Members, there are two meetings both on the Minority and Majority sides, which are ongoing, and I would be grateful if those meetings come to an end. I do not want to mention names because they are all my Hon Friends.
    Yes, Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am saying that even from there, if you climb up to section 20 (a) of Act 702, I would want to relate it to what the Hon Member for Wa West indicated, that if perhaps, there had been a re-print, it would have followed.
    But when he says section 20 (a) of Act 702 is repealed, there is no section 20 (a) in Act 702. Really, it is section 20(a) in Act 709. That is why I am saying that in that case, what the Hon Yieleh Chireh said is correct. If there is indeed, a re-print, then that would properly situate it. But when you say that section 20 (a) of Act 702 is repealed, there is no section 20 (a) in Act 702. Rather it is section 20 (a) of Act 709. That further compounds the problem.
    Now, if you come to section 19(a) of Act 702, there is no such thing in existence. There is no section 19 (a) of Act 702. It is rather section 19 (a) of Act 709. And so because there is no re-print, it becomes difficult to follow it.
    And so, Mr Speaker, if you do not mind -- and if the Hon Majority Leader and the Hon Chairman of the Committee would indulge, I would plead that we have a re- look in order that we do not compound the problem. It is intended to amend certain sections, but in the process, we might be compounding the problems for ourselves and confuse the situation, even though the intention is clear.
    Mr Speaker, if you do not mind,
    I would plead that we stand further consideration of this down and do a proper sweeping. Maybe, I guess tomorrow, we could attend to it since the amendments are not too many. If we are able to reconcile, in 30 minutes, we should be able to deal with this.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader, so once Act 709 is enacted, it becomes redundant? It would automatically go to add to Act 702.
    Mr Bagbin 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what Act 709 did, is to make further provisions for Act 702. And so, in Act 709, there are only 13 sections, and what it did was to amend Act 702 by adding to it. [Interruption]- It is only in Act 702 that we have section 20. In Act 709, there is no section 20. So, what it is saying is that, I am adding section 20 (a) to section 20 in Act 702.
    So, Mr Speaker, with your permission, I beg to read Act 709;
    “AN ACT to amend the Millennium Development Authority Act, 2006 (Act 702) to make further provisions for the implementation of the terms of the Compact.”
    Mr Bagbin 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, this is where the issue raised by the Hon Yieleh Chireh becomes relevant, that they should have compiled a new Act with section 20 (a) and the rest. But they left it in Act 709, and that is what is causing the confusion.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader, so once Act 709 is enacted, it becomes redundant? It would automatically go to add to Act 702.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Thank you. But I so much like your last word “confusion”, and on the basis of your last word, I would want to urge that having regard to the “Interpretation Act” and the weight that is put on parliamentary debate this time, and sometimes, also having regard to the fact that this is also a House of record, if there has been a re-print, we
    would not have the problem. In fact, there are several Acts that there is a re-print, then one would see the section 20 (a). One would know it. But now that there is no re-print, and we have Acts 709 and 706. I do not know but I am suggesting to you whether you would not suggest that perhaps, we can clean it up.The other alternative is that we go through, and then we would agree at the second Consideration Stage. Whether we agree that we have a second Consideration Stage, tomorrow or the choice is yours.
    Hon Amoako-Attah, do you want to contribute?
    Mr Bagbin 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, this is where the issue raised by the Hon Yieleh Chireh becomes relevant, that they should have compiled a new Act with section 20 (a) and the rest. But they left it in Act 709, and that is what is causing the confusion.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    Thank you. But I so much like your last word “confusion”, and on the basis of your last word, I would want to urge that having regard to the “Interpretation Act” and the weight that is put on parliamentary debate this time, and sometimes, also having regard to the fact that this is also a House of record, if there has been a re- print, we would not have the problem. In
    Mr Bagbin 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in the circumstances, I believe it is time for us to take a bow. We are entirely in your good hands. We could reconvene to continue after we have reconciled some of these issues.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Akoto Osei?
    Dr A. A. Osei 7:15 p.m.
    That we should put clauses that would make the Act like a permanent Act, like the Criminal Code Act and so on. MiDA is a transient provision. So, we cannot think about any permanency. We may be thinking about a sunset clause that this Act is only relevant for the period of that Compact. This is because the MCC can change at any time. So, we should not be thinking about permanent provisions. But they may want
    to consider a sunset clause that says that the Act only remains in force for the duration of the Compact. This is because if the Compact comes in for a period, we would be making a mistake.
    Dr A. A. Osei 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Majority Chief Whip made a recommenda- tion that we should be thinking about a permanent for the MiDA; it is not possible.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    We should think about what?
    Dr A. A. Osei 7:25 p.m.
    That we should put clauses that would make the Act like a permanent Act, like the Criminal Code Act and so on. MiDA is a transient provision. So, we cannot think about any permanency. We may be thinking about a sunset clause that this Act is only relevant for the period of that Compact. This is because the MCC can change at any time. So, we should not be thinking about permanent provisions. But they may want to consider a sunset clause that says that the Act only remains in force for the duration of the Compact. This is because if the Compact comes in for a period, we
    would be making a mistake.
    Prof George Y. Gyan-Baffour 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if that is the case, then we do not have to describe it as”Millennium Development Authority”, but just “Development Authority”. This is because “Millennium Development Authority” is actually limited to overseeing the “Millennium Development Compact”.
    Mr Bagbin 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the proposal is to put in place, a law that would live beyond the life of Compact II. There is a proposal for Government to move beyond Compact II to other arrangements. That was why there was a proposed amendment, which we have taken here. It is there in clause 2 (b):
    “to secure the proper and effective utilisation of funds granted to Ghana under each Compact and any other relevant agreement.”
    Mr Speaker, this was the discussion because they said the country could take advantage of the nature of the Compact and the way the Authority has been structured to source financing for them to be implementing specified projects after Compact II. That was the discussion, not only from the US but from other places. And so, what we need to do is that, if we see that there is any difference, just tinker with this Act and make it relevant like we are doing. That is all.
    Dr Prempeh 7:35 p.m.
    On a Point of Order.
    Mr Speaker, the Long Title of Act 702, which we are amending, stipulates and with your kind permmission, I would want to read:
    “AN ACT to establish the Millennium Development Authority to oversee and manage the implementation of the Ghana programme under the Millennium Challenge Account for the sustainable reduction of
    poverty through growth, as contained in the agreement between the Government of Ghana and the Millennium Challenge Cooperation, acting for and on behalf of the Government of the United States of America and to provide for other related matters.”
    Mr Speaker, this cannot apply to the foreseeable Compact in Japan, neither can it apply to any other Compact apart from this Millennium Challenge Account set up by the United States.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    So, in effect, we want to create a statutory special purpose vehicle through which funds can be used to execute projects.
    Prof George Y. Gyan-Baffour 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if that is the case, then we do not have to describe it as”Millennium Development Authority”, but just “Development Authority”. This is because “Millennium Development Authority” is actually limited to overseeing the “Millennium Development Compact”.
    So, it is not something that we can say it would be in perpetuity. It is just a Compact. But if we want it in perpetuity, then we have to drop “Millennium” from the whole law.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:35 p.m.
    Thank you, Hon Members.
    I think that tomorrow Leadership would do well to advise us on how to proceed.
    That brings us to the end of the Consideration Stage for today.
    ADJOURNMENT 7:35 p.m.

    Dr Prempeh 7:35 p.m.
    On a Point of Order.
    Mr Speaker, the Long Title of Act 702, which we are amending, stipulates and with your kind permmission, I would want to read:
    “AN ACT to establish the Millennium Development Authority to oversee and manage the implementation of the Ghana programme under the Millennium Challenge Account for the sustainable reduction of poverty through growth, as contained in the agreement between the Government of Ghana and the Millennium Challenge Cooperation, acting for and on behalf of the Government of the United States of America and to provide for other related matters.”
    Mr Speaker, this cannot apply to the foreseeable Compact in Japan, neither can it apply to any other Compact apart from this Millennium Challenge Account set up by the United States.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:35 p.m.
    Thank you, Hon Members.
    I think that tomorrow Leadership would do well to advise us on how to proceed.
    That brings us to the end of the Consideration Stage for today.
  • The House was adjourned at 7.38 p.m. till Thursday, 23rd July, 2015 at 10.00 a.m.
  • ADJOURNMENT 7:35 p.m.

  • The House was adjourned at 7.38 p.m. till Thursday, 23rd July, 2015 at 10.00 a.m.
  • SPACE FOR TABLE - PAGE 7:38 p.m.

    SPACE FOR TABLE - PAGE 7:38 p.m.