Debates of 2 Oct 2014

MR SPEAKER
PRAYERS 2:35 p.m.

VOTES AND PROCEEDINGS AND THE OFFICIAL REPORT 2:35 p.m.

Mr Speaker 2:35 p.m.
Hon Members, Correction of Votes and Proceedings of Wednesday,1st October, 2014.
rose
Mr Speaker 2:35 p.m.
Sorry, Hon Member.
Mr George Kofi Arthur 2:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I was here yesterday but my name has been registered as absent.
Mr Speaker 2:35 p.m.
Very well. [Pause.]
Hon Members, the Votes and Proceedings of Wednesday, 1st October, 2014 as corrected are the true record of proceedings.
Hon Members, there is no Official Report, so, we move to Commencement of Public Business.
Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
Mr Alfred Kwame Agbesi 2:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, there are some Papers to be laid -- 4(b) (ii) (iii), (iv) and (v).
Mr Speaker 2:35 p.m.
Very well.
Hon Members, presentation of Papers by the Chairman of the Finance Committee
PAPERS 2:35 p.m.

Mr Speaker 2:35 p.m.
Hon Deputy Majority Leader, is there any other Paper to be laid for now?
Mr Agbesi 2:35 p.m.
That is all for now, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker 2:35 p.m.
So, what item are we taking now?
Mr Agbesi 2:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, if we can take item number 40 at page 26.
Mr Speaker 2:35 p.m.
Hon Members, item number 40 at page 26.
Chairman of the Appointments Committee.
MOTIONS 2:35 p.m.

Chairman of the Committee (Mr Ebo Barton-Odro) 2:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80 (1), which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Appointments Committee on H.E. the President's nominations for Ministerial appointments may be moved today.
Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr Speaker 2:35 p.m.
Item number 41, Chairman of the Appointments Committee?
Thirteenth Report of the Appointments Committee on H.E the
President's nomination for Ministerial Appointment
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Ebo Barton-Odro) 2:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Thirteenth Report of the Appointments Committee on H. E. the President's nomination for Ministerial appointments.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Ebo Barton-Odro) 2:35 p.m.


Introduction

Mr Speaker, His Excellency President John Dramani Mahama, in furtherance of article 78 of the 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana, on Thursday, 17th July, 2014, communicated to Parliament for prior approval, the nomination of Mr Ekwow Spio-Garbrah as Minister- designate for the Ministry of Trade and Industry. The nomination was subsequently referred by the Rt. Hon Speaker to the Appointments Committee for consideration and report pursuant to Order 172 of the Standing Orders of the House.

Reference documents

The Committee referred to the following documents during its public hearing and subsequent deliberations:

i. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana.

ii. The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.

iii.The curriculum vitae of the nominee.

Procedure

As part of its procedures and in line with the provisions of the Standing Orders of the House, the Committee caused to be published, the name of the nominee in the national dailies for three consecutive times to request memoranda from the general public. The publication also carried the programme of the public hearing for the attention of the general public.

Additionally, the Committee obtained confidential reports with respect to the nominee from the Bureau of National

Investigations (BNI) and the Ghana Police Service. The tax status of the nominee was also obtained from the Ghana Revenue Authority to guide its deliberations.

Public hearing

The Committee held a public hearing on Wednesday, 13th August, 2014 to consider the qualification, eligibility and capability of the nominee for the position to which he has been nominated.

At the commencement of proceedings, the nominee subscribed to the oath of a witness. The Committee then proceeded to ask questions relating to the nominee's citizenship, records of his office and issues connected with the position to which he had been nominated. The nominee also answered questions relating to general issues of national interest.

The nominee's background information

Mr. Ekwow Spio-Garbrah informed the Committee that he was born on 10th September, 1953 in Kumasi in the Ashanti Region. He attended Achimota Secondary School where he obtained the Advanced Level Certificate in July, 1970. He proceeded to the University of Ghana, Legon, where he graduated with Bachelor's Degree in English in 1973. He continued his tertiary education at the same University and received a Graduate Diploma in Journalism and Communication in 1975.

He again attended the Ohio University and graduated with Master of Arts in International Affairs from September, 1978 to 1979. He further attended the New York University where he obtained a Graduate Certificate in International Banking and Finance.

In May, 2001, the nominee was awarded Doctor of Laws (Honoris Causa) by the Middlebury University, USA in recognition of his exemplary services rendered to Ghana and the international community.

The nominee discharged his national service obligation at Adisadel College in Cape Coast where he taught English Language between 1973 and 1974. He then worked at the Ghana Broadcasting Corporation in Accra as TV Talk Show Host and Radio Current Affairs Analyst between 1976 and 1978. He also acted as the Manager and Accounts Supervisor for the Ghana Advertising and Marketing Limited within the same period.

From August, 1979 to January, 1985, the nominee worked with the Hill and Knowlton Incorporated in New York, London, Paris and Geneva as the Chairman and Accounts Supervisor for the Middle East and Africa Group. He then moved to the South Western Bell Publications in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania as the Advertising Sales Executive from February, 1985 to August, 1987 from where he proceeded to the City Federal Savings and Loans in New Jersey in the United States of America from 1987 to 1988.

The nominee was also engaged as the Corporate Relations Officer by the International Finance Company in Washington, USA from August, 1988 to July, 1991. Between August, 1991 and June, 1994, he was appointed as the Head of Communications for the African Development Bank in la Cote d'Ivoire.

In June, 1994, the nominee was appointed as Ghana's Ambassador to the USA and Mexico and held the position until June, 1997. He was thereafter appointed as Chairman for the Public Education Committee for the Re- introduction of the Value Added Tax from July, 1997 to December, 1998 and also doubled as the Acting Chairman for the National Communications Authority within the same period.

The nominee was the Minister for Communications from July, 1997 to December, 1998 and also acted as the Minister for Mines and Energy in 1999. Between January, 1999 and January, 2001, he was again appointed as Minister for Education.

He moved on to private practice and held the position of Chief Executive Officer for Spio-Garbrah & Associates in Accra from January, 2001 to August, 2003. From September, 2003 to September, 2011, he was appointed to the position of Chief Executive Officer of the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation in the United Kingdom. He was also appointed the President of the Dominion University College from January, 2012 to August, 2013 and again as the Chief Executive Officer of Action Chapel International, Accra from October, 2011 to August, 2013.

Mr Spio-Garbrah has served in several positions in different capacities on boards of public and private sector entities. He is currently a member of AngloGold Ashanti and also holds chairmanship positions in the African Business Media, the Cape Coast ICT Park Company, the Centre on e-Governance and the African Cancer Organisation in London.

The nominee is also the current Co- ordinating Consultant for the 50th Anniversary Celebrations of the African Development Bank, Tunisia and has held the position since September, 2013.

Nominee's responses to questions

The following answers were given by the nominee in response to questions posed to him by Hon Members of the Committee at the public hearing:
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Ebo Barton-Odro) 2:35 p.m.


Promoting trade and industry in Ghana

On the question of what policies he would introduce to promote the country's trade and industry, the nominee stated that he did not intend to introduce any new policy but rather focus his attention on the many policies and initiatives designed in the past 15 years to improve the sector. In doing so, he will examine the status of implementation of the existing policies and initiatives in order to chart the best way forward.

He also further stated that he will rely on existing commitments, the 2012 Manifesto of the NDC, assurances given by the President during his State of the Nation Address as well as those determined by the Ministry of Trade and Industry to drive his agenda. He promised to do his best within the shortest possible time by insisting on performance delivery, which in his view, is an essential element that is usually lacking in policy implementation in the country.

Performance as Minister for Education

On how he performed as Minister for Education where he superintended for one year, the nominee pointed to working closely with the university lecturers and teachers in general to ensure the stability and development in the educational sector and the institution of the Ghana Education Trust Fund (GETFund). The nominee stated that he had an excellent working relationship with the leadership of the National Union of Ghana Students (NUGS) and asserted that he was the first Minister to have donated a pick-up vehicle to the organisation.

To this, his attention was drawn to the fact that Flt. Lt. Jerry John Rawlings was the first Government official to have

donated a Peugeot 504 Station Wagon to the cause of the NUGS through the then Secretary of Education in 1979. In other words, Mr Spio-Garbrah could not have been the first Minister of State to have donated a vehicle -- a pick-up to the NUGS. The nominee stated that that was what he was told at the time of the donation.

Measures to curb invasion of retail sector by foreigners

On how he will address invasion of the retail sector by foreigners, the nominee stated that though Ghana is a signatory to the ECOWAS Treaty on Free Movement of People and Goods, that did not mean that nationals of member States could just enter the country and commence any economic activity. He noted that the Ghana Investment Promotion Centre Act, 2003 (Act 865) has reserved some enterprises, such as petty trading for the exclusive participation by Ghanaians and that must be respected by all foreigners.

He added that foreigners had to study the laws of Ghana before venturing into any economic activities in Ghana. He also cautioned that the country should act reasonably in that regard to avoid possible retaliatory measures that may have adverse effects on the activities of Ghanaian nationals abroad. He cited the efforts of the Presidential Task Force constituted to handle aspects of the issue but stressed that we should try to live peaceably with neighbours at all times.

He further noted the perceived connivance of some Ghanaians who registered companies with the ostensible object to carry out a reserved activity and afterwards hand them over to foreigners to operate. He suggested the adoption of an inter-agency approach to tackle the issue. He finally promised to fully support the Presidential Task Force to do its work.

Comments on the controversial “Team B” article

Commenting on his article published in September, 2009 in which he referred to some of the then Ministers of State as “Team B” players, the nominee at the outset stated that he had only intended to bring to the attention of his Government what he had heard people say on public radio. Further, he stated that the statement had been twisted by propagandists and other political activists, thereby generating controversy.

He also refuted the assertion that he intended the publication as a means to secure ministerial appointment since at the time he made the statement he was the Chief Executive Officer of the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation and hence his compensation package was far higher than any Minister in Ghana. After the Committee had directed him to read the relevant portion of the article, he admitted that the relevant constructions in the article did not make it appear that he was just reflecting what majority of Ghanaians were saying.

He also admitted that it was unscientific for any critical analysis to conclude from radio discussions and phone-ins that whatever represented the majority opinion was reflective of that of the general populace. He disclosed to the Committee that he had since then apologised on various platforms to people who felt denigrated by the publication. He further seized the opportunity of the Public hearing and rendered an unqualified apology to persons who felt offended by his remarks.

Transitional arrangements regarding his contract with the African Development Bank

In his response to the question regarding transitional arrangements to end his contract with the African

Development Bank (AfDB) as Co- ordinator for the 50th Anniversary of the AfDB, Mr Spio-Garbrah informed the Committee that his contract with the Bank was due to end in December, 2014. He disclosed that H.E. the President had already held discussions with the President of the bank concerning his nomination to ensure a smooth transition.

He also assured the Committee that he had made arrangements to terminate the contract if he was found worthy by the House. Questioned about whether he had a legal contract with AfDB and he could produce same to the Committee, the nominee insisted that he had a legitimate contract but added that he thought the burden would lie on the Committee to request same from the Bank and not for him to produce it.

Views on the Youth Entrepreneurial Support (YES Fund)

Responding to a question to solicit his views on the YES Fund recently launched by the President, the nominee stated that he endorsed the GH¢ 10 million Fund as it would support the youth to start their own businesses by providing them with the much needed financial support. He observed that a major challenge facing the youth in starting their own businesses was how to write bankable proposals in accessing funds of this nature.

In order to address this challenge to enable the youth secure the Fund, he will offer the necessary support to the various agencies under the Ministry of Trade and Industry to provide adequate business and technical assistance to the youth. He cited the Business Advisory Centres and the National Board for Small Scale Industries established as some of the agencies he would engage to achieve his objectives. He also promised to encourage the youth to venture into agri-businesses
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Ebo Barton-Odro) 2:35 p.m.


under the Fund as well as support them to run efficient enterprises. In addition, he indicated his commitment to bring to bear his international experiences to source additional funds from international sources, such as equity funds to complement this initiative of the State if given the nod by the august House.

Attracting young people into Agribusiness

When asked about his strategies to assist the youth into agribusiness, the nominee noted that agriculture is the mainstay of the economy and for that reason, adequate measures should be put in place to promote growth in the sector. He said the excessive importation of food products, especially rice and chicken into the country put pressure on the Ghanaian currency and therefore, contribute partly to economic difficulties.

He was of the view that the difficulty in attracting the necessary investments into the sector was due to the fact that most people did not know about the immense potential of the agricultural sector. He, therefore, promised that he would devise appropriate strategies to attract people engaged in short-term ventures to move to long-term investments in the agricultural sector. He referred to the successful story of the “Operation Feed Yourself” policy but wondered why successive Governments had failed to continue with the policy to sustain interest in agriculture.

He, however, recognised efforts being made by Government in tasking districts to select agricultural products of comparative advantage for promotion as a way of promoting rural industrialisation.

With respect to revamping the poultry industry, he lauded the decision by Government to select the poultry industry for revitalisation and stated that such an initiative would help create jobs. As a result of the high risk involved in the poultry industry, the nominee further suggested that day old chicks be supplied by Government to farmers at subsidised rates as part of measures to revamp the industry.

Views on the Economic Partnership Agreement

In answering a question on his views on the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) which may be signed between Ghana and the European Union, the nominee alluded to the concerns expressed by many groups including civil society groups. He also agreed with a suggestion that if Ghana signs the Agreement, the country stands to benefit from capacity building programmes. Asked whether he would support the idea that Ghana should sign the Agreement, he stated that he would support any external Agreement which had favourable terms to help the country to industrialise, provide knowledge and the technical skills and enhance product quality.

He stated that such criteria would guide the consideration of the EPA when it comes up for signing. He paid homage to the Ministers for Trade and Industry across the sub-region, chief negotiators and international experts who played various roles negotiating the Agreement.

To ensure that Ghana benefited fully when the EPA is signed, he was of the view that we should critically scrutinise the EPA to ascertain the terms that would inure to the country's benefit and take full advantage of such terms.

He further disclosed that about 60,000 Chinese companies were due to go out of business in China by September, 2014 and Ghana could take advantage of the situation by attracting such investors to boost domestic production in order to benefit under the EPA when signed.

Measures to promote rural industria- lisation

In response to strategies he would adopt to promote rural industrialisation when given the nod, the nominee noted that a lot of work had already been done but also admitted that much more work remained to be done. He cited, for example, efforts being made by Government to extend the free zones policy to Kumasi and Sekondi and other areas yet to be identified for possible expansion of the policy.

He disclosed that the free zones in the Greater Accra Region employed about 8,000 persons apart from their contribution to the growth of the economy. In this regard, he hinted that he would encourage industries to take advantage of the 25 per cent rebate available to companies situated outside district capitals as provided under the Ghana Investment Promotion Centre Act.

In addition to these measures, he would harness the technical expertise of the over hundred business centres in the various districts across the nation to develop bankable proposals on specific products of comparative advantage to them in the bid to establish cottage industry to create jobs for the rural folks.

Promoting made -in- Ghana products

The nominee stated that he would promote made-in-Ghana products and in that regard, repeatedly challenged the House to set the example by procuring

made-in-Ghana furniture to furnish the JOB 600 Office Complex, to which suggestion, his attention was drawn to the fact that the procurement process has just commenced. The nominee was informed that it was almost impossible for any local producer to have the quality of the same hardwood to furnish the entire block.

Mr Spio-Garbrah commended Govern- ment's efforts in promoting made-in- Ghana products by conscientising Ghanaians to buy local products. He referred to the sacrifice made by the people of Japan to patronise their own rice, which propelled the development of Japan. He explained that by buying local products, the Ghanaian currency will be strengthened.

Initiatives to address trade deficits

The nominee stressed that he was not going to re-invent the wheel but will seek to implement existing commitments and assurances through teamwork. He promised to offer ideas and experiences acquired through his international endeavours to assist in attracting foreign investors into the country. He explained that when the country is able to boost her domestic production, especially in the area of food processing, excessive food imports into the country would cease.

He emphasised that it was not bad for a country to import goods but what mattered was the kind of products that the country imports. He, therefore, advised that imports should be limited to equipment and machinery to run industries to produce food products for local consumption and export.

The nominee further mentioned the high demand for foreign goods as one of the major challenges affecting the balance of trade deficits. In the light of this, he would intensify public education on the
Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion and to plead with you, that I reserve my own comments for subsequently.
Question proposed.
Dr Matthew Opoku Prempeh (NPP -- Manhyia) 2:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to pass a few comments on the nominee who was observed during the vetting process.
I rise to caution the nominee, if he is around, that he is going into a high Ministerial office and elsewhere, it is considered one of the great offices of State -- Minster for Trade and Industry; and everything he says can have a negative impact on the country even though he is not the Foreign Minister.
Mr Speaker, I am saying this because the Hon nominee, in his previous life as a non-Minister but an NDC member, decided to operate outside the bounds of the NDC's internal party structures, which means, he can operate outside the bounds of the Ministerial code by making statements and describing his own party in very derogatory terms.
Mr Speaker, it was even sad that when the nominee appeared before the House,
the purported statement he tended to be the statement he had written and published, he even denied what was attributed to himself.
Mr Speaker, when he was confronted, he had to admit it. But it is interesting for the House to know that even the statement he produced to the Appointments Committee was not what he published in the dailies. The statement he published had drawn an Hon Member -- a senior member of this country to write a rejoinder profusely. He could not even own up to his own statement he had penned and wanted to attribute it to hearsay.
Alhaji Mohammed-Mubarak Muntaka 2:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, my Colleague as careful as he is trying to be, should be more cautious of his choice of words. To say that with such a character he could go and allow Ghana to be, short-changed, I do not think that he is being fair to the nominee. He may have his resentments and comments but he should not be going that way because the Colleague is not here to respond to some of the things he is saying. I think in fairness, he should be measured in some of the statements that he is making.
Dr Prempeh 2:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I thought my Hon Colleague and a senior Colleague
Mr Joseph Yieleh Chireh (NDC -- Wa West) 2:35 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker, for giving me this opportunity to support the Motion to approve the nominee for the position of Minister for Trade and Industry.
Let me say that we set a record in terms of vetting when we took on the nominee for more than six hours. Some people even say that it is more than six hours and it is
because we wanted to do a thorough job and examine him to see how fit he was for the position of Minister.
As from the Report, much of the consideration of the nomination was on the statement that my Friend earlier related to. What he said, which is important, was that he apologised for those comments. He was publicly addressing this country when he said that.
rose
Mr Speaker 2:35 p.m.
Hon Minority Chief Whip, do you have a point of order?
Mr Daniel Botwe 2:55 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, my Hon Colleague is misleading the House. What we have in the Report is not what he is trying to let the whole world know.

It is different from saying that, “Those of you who feel offended, I apologise; I find nothing wrong with it but if you feel offended, I apologise”. They are two different things, Mr Speaker.
Mr Chireh 2:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, you see, the Report captures a bit of what we did for six hours -- [Interruption] -- and the man spoke to the nation; he spoke to the whole country. He was not just addressing the Committee and therefore, whatever he said, everybody heard him. He had apologised for the comments he made.
Mr Speaker 2:55 p.m.
Hon Members, let us have order in the Chamber.
Mr Chireh 2:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the discussion that we had with him and the vetting we did, he is certainly a team player and I will believe that he will play as a team and make sure that things happen according to the policies of the document.
Mr Speaker, the important thing also is that if you look at his demeanor before the Committee, there is no doubt that this was a very qualified person, who had international experience, who was involved in resource mobilization. And this country, at this point, needs people like him who will network with other people to bring resources to Ghana.
He is very competent and I believe that we should all agree to approve him. He would contribute to the development of this country and support the Government of His Excellency President Mahama.
rose
Mr Speaker 2:55 p.m.
Is that Hon Osei-Owusu? You know why I am surprised to see you?
Mr Osei-Owusu 2:55 p.m.
Yes, Mr Speaker. I am here.
Mr Speaker 2:55 p.m.
Were you the one who signed the leave of absence? Or you have changed your mind?
Mr Osei-Owusu 2:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, no. I actually requested the leave to be filed on my behalf for yesterday. When I got here, I learnt that it had been mistakenly requested for the entire period. So, I have been informed and I am not surprised that you are surprised.
Yesterday was the exact one year anniversary of my mother's death and we had a requiem mass. So, I sought to excuse myself for yesterday and to join the House today.
Mr Speaker 2:55 p.m.
Very well. You have the floor now.
Mr Joseph Osei-Owusu (NPP -- Bekwai) 2:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Report from the Appointments Committee shows that indeed, Hon Members are agreed that the nominee should be approved by the House. Indeed, in the deliberations before the Committee, there were a few misgivings and it is appropriate that some of them are aired before this House.
Mr Speaker, as suggested by the Hon Member who spoke before me, there is no denying the fact that the nominee showed excepts of or a high level of intelligence and brilliance. He put across some very brilliant ideas. But there was something that he should watch. It does appear that the attitude of the nominee, even at the Committee was one that appeared to be bereft of -- [Interruption] -- Bereft of modesty and lack of accommodation for diversity and even differences.
The level of people -- If you are a leader, you must accept that not everybody would be at your level. A major part of leadership is to coach and bring people along, so that you can build a team.
Mr Joseph Osei-Owusu (NPP -- Bekwai) 2:55 p.m.


To be able to succeed in his brilliant ideas, I dare suggest that he would need a core or crop of dedicated public servants who he would be working with.

I suggest to him that if he is finally approved by this House, he must recognise that even those who do not necessarily have his level of intelligence also deserve to be heard and to be respected.

Mr Speaker, notwithstanding the attitude that I find, not exactly a temperament or an attitude which may put people off, he is capable of delivering good things to the country.

I urge the House to approve him but with a caution that attitude can change everything if he does not watch it.

I thank you, Mr Speaker.
Minister for Employment and Labour Relations (Mr Haruna Iddrisu) 2:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, thank you for the opportunity to contribute to the Motion for the adoption of the Thirteenth Report of the Appointments Committee on His Excellency the President's nomination for appointment as Hon Minister for the Ministry of Trade and Industry, Dr Ekwow Spio-Garbrah.
rose
Mr H. Iddrisu 2:55 p.m.
But Mr Speaker, may I refer you to your Committee's Report --
Mr Speaker 2:55 p.m.
Hon Minority Leader?
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 3:05 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I think all of us would want to know the proper designation and title of the nominee.
Mr H. Iddrisu 3:05 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would go with paragraph one of the Committee's Report even though I am aware that he has been conferred some recognition -- [Interruption] -- Some recognition.
Mr Ekwow Spio-Garbrah, Mr Speaker, as I have said, I have known, I worked with him very closely at the level of the party's communication group then and later in my capacity as Hon Minister for Communications when he was Chief Executive of the Commonwealth Telecommunication Organisation.
He thus comes to this portfolio with some inspiring international reputation that would drive the President's vision of structuring our national economy.
Mr Speaker, may I refer you to paragraph 6.13 and in particular page 10 of your Committee's Report on curbing corruption at the country's ports and to urge our Hon Colleague, when he is eventually approved by Parliament, to work assiduously with the Minister for Finance. The ports, we need to be competitive following political and democratic stability in Ivory Coast.
We need to improve our ease of doing business, improve the competitiveness of Ghana's ports in order that we would improve tax collection at these ports, which would be a solution to many of these issues.
Mr H. Iddrisu 3:05 p.m.
Mr Speaker, let me refer to article 78 of the 1992 Constitution, which allows the President or gives him the prerogative to appoint and probably, to borrow somebody's work “to disappoint to disappoint Ministers of State”.
Mr Speaker, what is important is the term “prior approval”, and that this House is discharging an onerous responsibility in making the President as the head of the Executive wing appreciate that it is a shared responsibility in getting Ministers approved.

Mr Speaker, I may probably want to name them. At least, he has five key portfolios dedicated to women -- Hon Hannah Tetteh, Prof. Naana Jane Opoku- Agyeman --
Mr Speaker 3:05 p.m.
Hon Minister, is the nominee a woman?
Mr H. Iddrisu 3:05 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I quoted article 78 and I am commenting on the powers of the President to constitute his Government and Cabinet, and appropriately, I am within relevance.
Mr Speaker, I am saying, for the records -- because there is an enormous public interest and public debate in encouraging the participation in murky politics of Ghana. He has demonstrated it. Both of us, including the New Patriotic Party (NPP) and the National Democratic
Congress (NDC) have to adopt an affirmative action policies that would encourage more women to be able to participate at the level of governance.
Mr Speaker, finally, the nominee will have to work on expanding our export drive in order that we can stablise the cedi. Indeed, the Ministry of Trade and Industry is the Ministry of the economy in many jurisdictions. If you want the President to be successful in his transformation agenda, the Ministry will have to take pride of place in leading this challenge.
Mr Speaker 3:05 p.m.
Hon Members, I thought I had got the sense of the House. I will take one more from each side, and move to the Leaders. This is because the Hon Minority Leader, in seconding the Motion, has reservation of coming back, which the rules of the House allow him to do. He seconded it with liberty to come back.
So, I will call Hon Titus-Glover.
Mr Daniel Nii Kwartei Titus-Glover (NPP -- Tema East) 3:05 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am so grateful for the opportunity to contribute to the Motion to endorse the President's nominee to the Ministry of Trade and Industry.
Mr Speaker, I would want to take you through to page 5 of the Committee's Report on measures to curb invasions to the retail sector by foreigners. Under the GIPC Act 865 of 2003, article 26, where certain jobs are reserved for our people -- and it is on record that foreigners are forcefully competing with our people in these retail business.
Minister of State (Alhaji Abdul-Rashid Pelpuo(MP) 3:05 p.m.
Mr Speaker, may I also comment on the Thirteenth Report of the Appointments Committee on His Excellency the President's nomination for the appointment as Minister of State for Trade and Industry.
Mr Speaker, I am impressed with the fact that many of our Hon Colleagues, especially our Hon Colleagues in opposition are taking it serious because of the comments allegedly made by the nominee.
Mr Speaker, it has reminded me of a profound comment you made yourself, making reference to Justice Akuffo Addo, when he was supposed to have said that if you destroy the Bar and come back for it and it is not there for you, it would be difficult for you to fit in. -- [Interruption] -- I am paraphrasing. I am saying this to give -- [Interruption.]
rose
Mr Speaker 3:05 p.m.
Do you have a point of order?
Mr Samuel Atta Akyea 3:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I have a point of correction.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member is asserting that the statement was allegedly made. It was not allegedly made; it was a positive judicial confession because even on oath, he repeated it. He is not a member of the Committee, and he should know that apart from what was in print, he stated it on oath. So, it is no longer an allegation; it is a positive judicial confession.
Alhaji Pelpuo 3:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am just taking it up from page 5 of the Report; 6.4, in which the nominee himself said that it was twisted by propagandists and that he did not mean what had been allegedly attributed to him.
But the point I would want to make, Mr Speaker, is that, it is true and I do side with many of our people who are concerned by the fact that if you are in a group, you do not destroy the group. I listened to Hon Prempeh; I listened to the Member of Parliament for Bekwai and I think that it is a general position in life that we move along with the people we believe in and agree with.
I do agree also that in this particular instance, the nominee would have been vetted earlier by the people who appointed him, the group he belonged to and now coming back to the group; they may have vetted him and found that he did not actually mean what he said. Either than that the possibility that he is nominated to come back to the same group would not have been there.
rose
Mr Speaker 3:15 p.m.
Point of order?
Mr Opare-Ansah 3:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member on the floor, would it apply to him? I quite remember in his school days, he used to fraternize with the New Patriotic Party (NPP). During his school days, he used to fraternize with the NPP and he did not stay with us. Would that apply to him and many others on his side?
Mr Speaker 3:15 p.m.
Hon Member, you are out of order -- [Laughter.]
Hon Minister, kindly conclude.
Alhaji Pelpuo 3:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am very surprised about the point he has made. For the records, I was the first TAIN President in Ghana in 1992 when the party of the National Democratic Congress (NDC) was formed and my -- [Interruption.]
Mr Speaker, it is important that when we are presenting ourselves as Ghanaian politicians, seeking to advance the cause of this nation, we extend friendship to all sides and all kinds of people. It is important for us to understand that. That is why I believe that Hon Spio-Gabrah may have tried very hard but even in doing so, he can still be objective and critical to his own party. But that criticism may have been taking out of context and as a result, Mr Speaker, I would just want us to give him the benefit of the doubt.
Let me agree with the Hon Member of Parliament for Bekwai, Mr Osei-Owusu, that we should watch him and see what he can bring on board. Ghana has got to a transition where we want a transformation of our trade and a shift in our economy structure; the private sector along with the Trade Ministry are key in doing that. We would encourage him to go beyond the fact that he is seeing a different thing
Alhaji Pelpuo 3:15 p.m.


about how to relate with his fellow Ministers to bring on board a new thinking, a new direction and a reformed attitude towards governance, so that we can see the impact he is going to bring on board.

Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Mr Daniel Botwe (NPP -- Okere) 3:15 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker for the opportunity to make a contribution to the Report.
Mr Speaker, as I tried to make a correction earlier -- we all have to bear in mind that in nation building, all hands should be on deck; it is agreed. It is also important, worldwide practice, it does not always follow that you need to have an expertise in a particular field in order to perform, else Chief Directors and the technical experts in the Ministry should be made Ministers because clearly they are people who have the expertise in that area and have stayed there for many years. But we bring political heads and they work as a team. You attend Cabinet; a Minister brings his memorandum to Cabinet and all members of Cabinet discuss it and make contributions to it.
So, in my view, it is the character of the individual and what the person stands for and his attitude. That is what causes all this corruption, causes malfeasance in the country and the governance system; it is not because people are not experts - - and arrogance and the display of power and abuse thereof.
Mr Speaker, it is important that in vetting Ministers and making State appointments and the responsibility of Members of Parliament to affirm these appointments, we are very clear and send important signals to the society.
rose
Mr Speaker 3:15 p.m.
Do you have a point of order?
Alhaji Sorogho 3:15 p.m.
Rightly so, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker 3:15 p.m.
What is your point of order?
Alhaji Sorogho 3:15 p.m.
My point of order is that, Mr Speaker, he has just made a statement and I think it is not true; he made a statement that in “vetting Ministers”--
Mr Speaker, that is totally wrong; we vet nominees for ministerial positions. So, he cannot say -- and that is totally wrong because we are not vetting Ministers. So, he must withdraw it and say the correct thing -- “in vetting nominees for ministerial appointment”. He is not a Minister yet. So, we are not vetting Ministers. He must check his records and withdraw --
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker 3:15 p.m.
Hon Minority Chief Whip?
Mr Botwe 3:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I respectfully take it on board -- “in vetting nominees”.
Mr Speaker, I am so happy that the person is not even a Minister yet. In vetting nominees and going through the national duty of this august House affirming them, is important. As I was saying, I am surprised that their party system allows that somebody who has spoken about the party --
Mr Speaker, I am a passionate believer in party building and party politics and I would have expected that -- I do not think that the people in the NDC and also Ghanaians, we lack quality people to help in the administration of this country. We do not lack them; we do not lack people and therefore, somebody who cannot say that I said this thing and I believe in it, and I still believe in it that the team that was there was Team B --
That is what I expected from Mr Spio- Garbrah. Even the Report that we are discussing, on page 6, it is clear that the man is not accepting that he made a statement and he apologises for it. But he is saying that those who feel offended --
rose
Mr Speaker 3:25 p.m.
Hon Yileh Chireh?
Mr Chireh 3:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, my point of order is that when we debate issues and seem to be arr iving at consensus, somebody leaves his party matters and jumps into another party's business.
Mr Speaker, I am saying that the Minority Chief Whip has to deal with the issue of character of people but also remember that the National Democratic Congress (NDC) as a democratic party, does not stop anybody from expressing his views.
I know that in the past few weeks, we have seen intolerance in other parties; we do not do that.
Mr Botwe 3:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, it is so important; if he cannot make an apology at this level, he is going to work with a team of people in his Ministry, he is going to interact with other people and it is important that this attribute is not glossed over.
My second point is on paragraph 6.5. Mr Speaker, the Committee's Report says that:
“He also assured the Committee that he had made arrangements to terminate the contract if he was found worthy by the House.”

Alhaji Inusah A. B. Fuseini -- rose
-- 3:25 p.m.

Mr Speaker 3:25 p.m.
Hon Minister for Roads and Highways, do you have a point of order?
Alhaji Fuseini 3:25 p.m.
Yes Mr Speaker. I have risen with reluctance, in view of the fact that he is my good Brother and Friend.
Mr Speaker, my point of order is basically on what he keeps drumming on, that the nominee apologised to people who felt offended.
Mr Speaker, the question is, do you apologise to people who do not feel offended, if you make a statement? You do not apologise to people who do not feel offended. If you make a statement and people are happy about it, do you apologise to them?
Mr Botwe 3:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I was dealing with my second point.
In paragraph 6.5, the Committee tells us that and with your permission, I beg to quote:
“He also assured the Committee that he had made arrangements to terminate the contract if he was found worthy by the House.”
In fact, they have even gone ahead to say that, and Mr Speaker, with your permission, I beg to quote again:
“…H.E. the President had already held discussions with the President of the Bank concerning his nomination…”
I can see quality people sitting in this House who could become Ministers for Trade and Industry. Why is it that someone who wants to serve this nation, is waiting for us to go through this vetting and for the President to go and have discussions with the President of the African Development Bank -- and if this House approves him, before he goes to terminate the appointment?
Mr Speaker, I thought if the other party had a problem with personnel, at least, this side of the House could have lent them some. [Hear! Hear!]. But to say that we are waiting on one person who has described their party, including even the President as “Team B” people, for the President to go and beg the African
Development Bank President and also wait for us until today.
Mr Speaker, so, as I speak now, until this House approves him, he is still working somewhere while others have suffered for this party to come to power -- we are sitting here -- I do not want to mention names. But there are people here who qualify; there are many other people who could become Minister for Trade and Industry --
Mr Speaker 3:25 p.m.
Hon Minority Chief Whip, conclude.
Mr Botwe 3:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, in concluding, I can understand the difficulty of Mr President. I know among other things, the President does not want to show the dwindling fortunes of his party in the Central Region and other places, and he is doing this to bring people together in the party.
Mr Speaker, it is also important that we accept that in political party building, we reward those who have helped, and also do not want to send a wrong message that people have contributed and helped this country. There are people in the party and the populace and persons abound in this House, but we want to bypass them and go to beg people outside who have not even shown remorse to very damaging statements they have made to the party and the country - to go and beg them to become Ministers. It sends a wrong message and it is important we take note of it.
Minority Leader (Mr Osei Kyei- Mensah-Bonsu) 3:25 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to add my voice to this approval process of Mr Ekwow Spio- Garbrah, as Minister-designate for the Ministry of Trade and Industry.
Mr Speaker, I must begin by saying that as a member of the Appointments Committee, I was indeed, very pleased with the thorough and diligent job that the Appointments Committee did on the vetting of the nominee, Mr Ekwow Spio- Garbrah.
Mr Speaker, I believe even though it was late in the day, we succeeded in setting a standard for vetting nominees of the President and I hope and pray that the Committee will follow from now on, the standards that we have set with respect --
Mr Speaker 3:25 p.m.
The six hours?
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 3:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, it is not only the length of time, but the thoroughness of the process; the questions that were asked, and so on and so forth. The issues that were raised and the matters that came out because of the persistence of the Committee members. That is what I am commending.
Mr Speaker, the brilliance, knowledge and highfalutin articulation of the nominee, certainly, is beyond reproach. Mr Speaker, the versatility of Mr Spio- Garbrah is not in doubt, and the President's nomination of the person, certainly, could not be faulted.
Mr Speaker, as a former Minister, he distinguished himself in his own performance; even in Parliament, we were sometimes not pleased with his attitude.
Mr Speaker, beyond the experience that he demonstrated and the knowledge that he exhibited before the Committee, there were a few minuses that we observed and if one should go through the Report, some of them do stand out and as a House, we must transmit this message to the nominee.
Mr Speaker, certainly, one must exude confidence, but over-amplication of one's own successes or even perceived successes, would certainly amount or perhaps, translate to egocentrism, self- conceit and even arrogance.
So, Mr Speaker, we must be careful the way we carry ourselves about.
First, there are little matters that as a House, we should concern ourselves with. This is because the person is going to superintend over a very big Ministry, to which huge allocations would be made every year and if the person is found not to be truthful with little matters, we should be careful, making the person superintend over huge responsibilities.
Mr Speaker, the nominee told the Committee that he entered secondary school at age nine. When we probed further, it came to the fore that the nominee had been repeated in primary school a couple of times. So, it was most untrue what message he transmitted to the House and he himself then acknowledged that indeed, he was repeated a couple of times in primary school.
Certainly, when he indicated to us that he traversed primary school and at some point in middle school, so he could not have entered secondary school at age nine. This may be a minor matter of somebody who is going to be accorded and afforded such responsibility. If a person is found out to be untrue with little matters, it may be dangerous for the purposes of this country
rose
Mr Speaker 3:35 p.m.
Hon Member, do you have a point of order?
Alhaji Fuseini 3:35 p.m.
Yes Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker 3:35 p.m.
What is your point of order?
Alhaji Fuseini 3:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, indeed, as a trained teacher, I need to set the records straight.
Under the old educational system, you needed not to go to middle school before you go to secondary school. You could go to secondary school from primary six. [Interruption.] The point is that the Hon Minority Leader was making allusions to the fact that Hon Spio-Garbrah said he entered secondary school at age nine. I have no problem with that. But in fronting it, he said, if you took the time he went through primary school and then some middle school, then he could not be in secondary school. I am just saying that for the records, under the old --
Mr Speaker 3:35 p.m.
Hon Minister, when you raise a point of order, it should be directed at the person on his feet and speaking at the time. He might have made a statement to which you rose on your feet and raised a point of order.
Alhaji Fuseini 3:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, he breached order -- I think it is 93. Is that right? [Interruption.] In stating the facts, he was misleading the House on the old educational system under which Hon Spio-Garbrah went to school and it is important that this House being a House of records, we set the records straight and indicate to the world that under the system which Hon Spio-Garbrah went to school, it was possible to go to secondary school at that age.
Mr Speaker 3:35 p.m.
Hon Minister, did you take into account the admission by the Hon nominee before the Committee? I thought that was the point which the Hon Minority Leader was saying in terms of
some repetitions or something. That was the foundation of the Minority Leader's statement. So, if that is not the case, then it is a different matter; he can be out of order.
Alhaji Fuseini 3:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, that is not it -- I am not rising on the point of order under repetitions. I am, in fact, not rising on the point of order on the fact that because of the repetitions, he could not have been in secondary school at age nine. I am rising on the point of order which he seems to be suggesting that at the time that Hon Spio-Garbrah went to school, you necessarily had to pass through middle school. That was not the educational system.
Mr Speaker 3:35 p.m.
Hon Minority Leader?
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 3:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am struggling to see the value addition of this labour that my Hon Colleague has indulged himself in.
Mr Speaker, the nominee himself admitted that he entered primary school at age four eventually, got repeated a couple of times. So, is he telling us that he could have entered secondary school at age nine when he got repeated, at least, two times and that is a fact?
Mr Speaker, so, when did he enter secondary school? Let my Hon Colleague take a cue and sit down.
rose
Mr Speaker 3:35 p.m.
Hon Minister, you see, I was expecting you to say that that was not what transpired before the Committee; that was what I was expecting you to say --
Alhaji Fuseini 3:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am not a member of the Committee and I am not taking him on, on the basis of the fact that it could not be probable; I am not taking him on on that. I am taking him on on the
general statement he made in his contribution that if you took primary school and middle school into consideration -- and I am saying that that statement cannot be borne by the fact that at the time that Hon Spio-Garbrah went to school, you did not necessarily have to go to middle school in order to go to secondary school. It is very important.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 3:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, what he has said is very true. The issue I am raising is, the person admits that he went to school at age four. He got repeated a couple of years. Now, what does that mean? And then he said to us that he entered secondary school at age nine; he entered school at class three. I mean, what is this?
Let us be truthful to ourselves. For somebody who is going to be entrusted with such responsibility, Mr Speaker, he needs to be candid and truthful in little matters. He needs to be truthful in little matters; that is the point I am making.
The Hon Minister for Roads and Highways, if he is listening --
Mr Speaker 3:35 p.m.
Hon Members, there are rules in this House relating to maintenance of order. [Pause.] Hon Members, there are rules in this House in keeping order. If Hon Members continue disturbing the House, I will name them and the Marshal will drive them out. This is my last warning.
Hon Minority Leader?
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 3:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, what you have not added is that this is a smaller room, so, it would be very easy to enforce that rule. [Laughter.]
Mr Speaker, the other thing that he said emphatically was that, as a Minister, he was the first to have donated a pick-up vehicle to the National Union of Ghana Students. Mr Speaker, when his attention was drawn to the fact that, way back in the late 1970s, Flt Lt Rawlings had done same, he said. “Well that was what he was told by the students”. But it is a matter of record. You do not come before Parliament boasting about something that is factually untrue. We do not do that.
Mr Speaker, then when an Hon Member suggested to him that perhaps, the statement about the “Team B” players was made to secure a ministerial appointment, his answer was that at the time that statement was made, he was the Chief Executive Officer of the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation and hence, his compensation package was far higher than any Minister in Ghana and because of that he did not need it. That is the sort of person that we are discussing in this House and people see nothing wrong with it. And they are saying to us that his party vetted him and approved of him, so, nobody should comment on that.

Mr Speaker, I am told that that even includes the wise men -- that it is an indictment on the wise men --
Mr Speaker 3:45 p.m.
Hon Minority Leader, we do not have wise men in this House; you are out of order. [Laughter.]
Alhaji Fuseini 3:45 p.m.
None

Hon Minister for Roads and Highways, do you have a point of order?
Mr Speaker 3:45 p.m.
Hon Minister, I thought we had resolved this matter?
Alhaji Fuseini 3:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I can see that --
Mr Speaker 3:45 p.m.
Hon Members, let us have some order.
Alhaji Fuseini 3:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am just on the Report and because we are on the Report; it is a matter of record.
Mr Speaker, as a teacher, I know how many years it took a person to go through secondary school to the university.
Mr Speaker, he completed his degree in 1973; he needed three years to go through the degree. If you had a First University Examinations (FUE), that is a different matter; I cannot speak on that.
Mr Speaker, discount 1973, which is 20 years, with the years he spent in the university. Further discount it by two years of sixth form; discount it by five years of secondary education and tell me that it is not nine years.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 3:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, again, I am struggling to make something out of the struggle of my Colleague. [Laughter]. Mr Speaker, it then goes to
the date that the man has given to us as his date of birth if he wants to go there But Mr Speaker, that is the question that he cannot even appreciate, that the question that the Minister should address this House with.
Mr Speaker, he is asking me to go on with the Report and move away from there. So, he now sees the issue. He himself was wallowing in something that I do not want to call ignorance.
But Mr Speaker, it is important that we apply our minds to these matters and when the Minister's attention is drawn to the statement that he made, then the issue that he related to -- Colleagues who have spoken before me have already articulated. So, Mr Speaker, I would not go on that path, except for a trained professional journalist assuming the comment was even representative of comments made on radio and for him to conclude that that represented the consensual opinion of people in his party, is a tragedy for any person to even arrive at that conclusion. If it comes from a trained journalist, then it is all the more pitiable.
Mr Speaker, finally, the nominee has indicated to us when we wanted to know whether he had abandoned the nomination that was made on the holding of offices of profit. He said to us that if this House approves of his nomination and the President then confers the honour on him, then he would do what is right. Mr Speaker, that is contained in paragraph 6.5 of the Report, when he said to us that when he is assured of his approval, then he would make arrangements to terminate the contract if he was found worthy by the House.
Mr Speaker, article 78 (3) (a) of the Constitution is emphatic on this, about what it is that must be done and I am hoping that if the House approves of him
and the President goes on to confer the position on him, then necessarily, we should activate the relevant processes of enabling the Committee on Members Holding Offices of Profit to summon him immediately before the Committee to purge himself before this Committee.
Mr Speaker, in sum, as an individual, Mr Spio-Garbrah demonstrated before us that he can perform. That he has done jobs of similar nature before and he could do the job that is going to be entrusted with him.
However, a few skeletons that we have pointed out to him and we entreat him, human as he is, to listen and mend his ways. If he does so Mr Speaker, we believe that he is capable of achieving success and by implication, positively affect the governance of this country.
Mr Speaker, I thank you very much for your indulgence.
Mr Speaker 3:45 p.m.
Hon First Deputy Speaker?
Would you want to wind up or I should put the Question?
Mr Ebo Barton-Oduro 3:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I believe you can put the Question.
Mr Speaker 3:45 p.m.
Hon Members, that brings us to the end of the debate. I will put the Question now.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr Speaker 3:45 p.m.
The House has accor- dingly approved the nomination of Mr Ekwow Spio-Garbrah as Minister for Trade and Industry in accordance with article 78 (1) of the Constitution.

Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
Mr Alfred K. Agbesi 3:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, we would want to seek your permission. There are some Papers which should have been laid at the beginning. They are now ready. So, with the indulgence of the House, we would want to lay these Papers.
Mr Speaker 3:45 p.m.
Very well.
Mr Agbesi 3:45 p.m.
Item 4(a) and then (b).
Mr Speaker 3:45 p.m.
Item 4(a). Is it the two; we have (i) and (ii)?
Mr Agbesi 3:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, only item 4(a) (i).
Mr Speaker 3:45 p.m.
And which one?
Mr Agbesi 3:45 p.m.
And 4 (c) (i), (ii) and (iii).
Mr Speaker 3:45 p.m.
Hon Members, with your indulgence, we go back to presentation of Papers. We start with 4 (a) (i); Minister for Finance.
PAPERS 3:45 p.m.

Mr Speaker 3:55 p.m.
We move to item 4 (c) (i), by the Chairman of the Committee.
PAPERS 3:55 p.m.

Mr Speaker 3:55 p.m.
Deputy Majority Leader, can we just take item 6 —
Mr Agbesi 3:55 p.m.
Sorry, Mr Speaker?
Mr Speaker 3:55 p.m.
Item 6 — It will take long.
Mr Agbesi 3:55 p.m.
No Mr Speaker, we forgot to lay the Paper on item 4 (a) (ii) at page 2.
Mr Speaker 3:55 p.m.
But I asked you — did it escape you?
Mr Agbesi 3:55 p.m.
Yes, it is now ready, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker 3:55 p.m.
Very well. Paper to be laid by the Minister for Finance; item 4 (a) (ii)
By the Minister for Finance --
(ii) Request for waiver of taxes, customs duties, Value Added Tax, National Health Insurance Levy, Destination Inspection Fees, Export Development Investment Fund and ECOWAS Levy, withholding taxes and other project related taxes amounting to US$152,028,066.00 on goods and equipment
imported or purchased locally for the Western Corridor Gas Infrastructure Development
(WCGIDP).
Referred to the Finance Committee.
Mr Agbesi 3:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, we can take item 5
Mr Speaker, we would want to seek permission for the Majority Chief Whip to take the Motion number 5 on behalf of the Majority Leader, who is not —
Mr Speaker 3:55 p.m.
Very well. Hon Majority Chief Whip?
MOTIONS 3:55 p.m.

Alhaji Mohammed-Mubarak Muntaka (on behalf of the Majority Leader) 3:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwiths- tanding the provisions of Standing Order 80 (1), which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the approval of the membership of the committee to advise the Speaker on the Appointment of a member to the Parliamentary Service Board may be moved today.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 3:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion, except to say that, the Majority Leader of any Parliament is necessarily the Leader of the House. One does not have to write: “The Majority Leader and Leader of the House” It is waste of ink —[Laughter.]
Mr Speaker 3:55 p.m.
But not paper? — [Laughter.]
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 3:55 p.m.
Both — [Laughter.]
Mr Speaker 3:55 p.m.
Hon Members, Motion moved and seconded. It is for the consideration of the House.
I will put the Question — This is a procedural Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Membership of Committee to advise the Speaker on the appointment of
Members of Parliamentary Service Board
Alhaji Mohammed-Mubarak Muntaka (on behalf of the Majority Leader) 3:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that pursuant to clause (2) (b) of article 124 of the Constitution and section 5 of the Parliamentary Service Act (Act 460), the House is invited to approve the following membership of the Committee to advise the Speaker on the Appointment of members to the Parliamentary Service Board:
i. Hon Dr Benjamin B. Kunbuor
ii. Hon Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu
iii. Hon Alfred K. Agbesi
iv. Hon Hajia Mary Salifu Boforo
v. Hon Papa Owusu-Ankomah.
Mr Speaker, this has become relevant because there is a vacancy on the Parliamentary Service Board and it needs to be filled up, and going by our conventions, we always have committees
Mr Speaker 3:55 p.m.
Hon Minority Leader?— Motion moved —
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 3:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Mr Speaker 3:55 p.m.
Hon Members, Motion moved and seconded. It is for the consideration of the House.
Hon Members, this is a routine kind of — they will bring the Report and then it could be debated.
Question put and Motion agreed to:
Mr Speaker 4:05 a.m.
Hon Members, the House has accordingly approved the following;
i. Hon Dr Benjamin B. Kunbuor
ii. Hon Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu
iii. Hon Alfred K. Agbesi
iv. Hon Hajia Mary Salifu Boforo
v. Hon Papa Owusu-Ankomah
They will advise the Speaker to fill the vacant positions on the Parliamentary Service Board as a result of the appointment of the former member of the Board, the Hon Majority Leader, as Minister for Defence.

Hon Members, when they bring the Report or their recommendation, it will be debated in the House and adopted. [Pause.] The advice will be to the Speaker and I will inform you. [Laughter.]

Very well. Yes, I have been advised.

Hon Members, the truth of the matter is that we all know -- unless we want to depart from the practice -- who is going to be a member of the Board. It is just in fulfilment of the provisions of the Constitution.

Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
Mr Agbesi 4:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, item number 19, page 13.
Mr Speaker 4:05 a.m.
What item?
Mr Agbesi 4:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, item 19 on page 13.
Mr Speaker 4:05 a.m.
Hon Members, item number 19 on the Order Paper -- Motion -- Chairman of the Finance Committee?
MOTIONS 4:05 a.m.

Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 4:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80 (1), which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Finance Committee on the Term Facility Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and BNP Paribas Fortis S.A./N.V.
(as Arranger), Deutsche Bank AG, London (as Arranger), BNP Paribas Fortis S.A./ N.V. (as Original Lender, Structuring Bank and Agent) for an amount of one hundred and seventy million United States dollars (US$170,000,000.00) supported by the Brazilian Official Equalisation Programme (PROEX) for: (i) the construction of one new flyover bridge (Ring Road Central to Feo Eyeo) in Accra; and (ii) additional construction works around the Kwame Nkrumah interchange in Accra may be moved today.
Mr James C. Yanwube 4:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Term Facility Agreement between the Government of Ghana and BNP
Paribas Fortis
Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 4:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Finance Committee on the Term Facility Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and BNP Paribas Fortis S.A./N.V. (as Arranger), Deutsche Bank AG, London (as Arranger), BNP Paribas Fortis S.A./N.V. (as Original Lender, Structuring Bank and Agent) for an amount of one hundred and seventy million United States dollars (US$170,000,000.00) supported by the Brazilian Official Equalisation Programme (PROEX) for (i) the construction of one
new flyover bridge (Ring Road Central to Feo Eyeo) in Accra; and (ii) additional construction works around the Kwame Nkrumah interchange in Accra.
Mr Speaker, in doing so, I present your Committee's Report.
Introduction
The request for the approval of the Term Facility Agreement between the Government Of Ghana and BNP Paribas Fortis S.A./N.V (As Arranger), Deutsche Bank AG, London (As Arranger), B.NP Paribas Fortis S.A/N.V (As Original Lender, Structuring Bank and Agent) for an amount of one hundred and seventy million US dollars (US$170,000,000.00) supported by the Brazilian Official Equalisation Programme (PROEX) for (i) the construction of one new flyover bridge (Ring Road Central to Feo Eyeo) and (ii) additional construction works around the Kwame Nkrumah Interchange in Accra was presented by the Hon Deputy Minister for Finance, Mr Cassiel Ato Baah Forson on behalf of the Hon Minister for Finance on Wednesday, 1st
October, 2014 in accordance with article 181 of the 1992 Constitution.
In accordance with Order 169 of the Standing Orders of Parliament, the Rt Hon Speaker referred the Agreement to the Finance Committee for consideration and report
Mr Speaker 4:05 a.m.
Hon Members, Motion moved.
The First Deputy Speaker to take the Chair.
We are looking at the possibility of exhausting the Reports that are available today, so that if possible, we rise today -- [Murmuring] -- Yes, I will come back. Those Reports that the Committees have made available, if we are able to take them today, we should look at the possibility of rising today.
So, the First Deputy Speaker will take the Chair, the Second Deputy Speaker is available and I may come back to take the Chair depending on the progress on the floor of the House.
Yes, Hon Member, second the Motion.
MR FIRST DEPUTY SPEAKER
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:14 p.m.
Hon Members, any seconder?
Mr James C. Yanwube (NPP -- Tatale/ Sanguli) 4:14 p.m.
Yes, Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion. In seconding the Motion, I have a contribution to make.
The sheer number of documents that we have to go through in this short time span in order to approve these loans is voluminous. so, I would appeal to this House to allow us some time to read the Papers before we approve the loan.
The reason is this; if we do not do that and something important escapes within the loan Agreement, it is going to be an indictment on all of us. So, my appeal is that next time, we would have to allow some time, so that we can appropriately digest the information on the loan document before we approve them.
That is just my comment on this.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:14 p.m.
Very well. Hon Deputy Majority Leader? Hon Deputy Majority Leader, I thought you were up.
Mr Agbesi 4:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, before the start of work, we agreed to take some time for Hon Members to go through the

documents and that is why we started with the Appointments Committee's Report, to give enough time for Hon Members to go over the documents.

Mr Speaker, we have had understanding at the Leadership level that this is what we want to do and we are going by that. Mr Speaker, we have had enough time looking at the documents for us to do meaningful work.

Mr Speaker, I would appeal to my Hon Colleagues on the other side that the Agreement we had before we started work is just what we are going by. So, I wish that Hon Members will understand the situation because we have been called for just three days and tomorrow is likely to be the end of the three days. So, Hon Members should bear with us, so that we can go through this.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:15 p.m.
Yes, Hon Baffour Awuah?
Mr Ignatius Baffour Awuah (NPP - Sunyani West) 4:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to contribute to the Motion on the floor. Mr Speaker, in doing so, I want to draw our attention to a few -- [Interruptions.]
Sorry, Mr Speaker, l hear you want to rule on the proposal from --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:15 p.m.
Hon Members, the point is well taken. It is in good faith; we need to be meticulous and having regard to the circumstances we find ourselves now, we have to try and manage, so that we make good use of the time.
Yes, Hon K.T. Hammond?
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:15 p.m.


We are having problems with the microphone. It keeps going off and it is all Hon Agbesi's fault, Mr Speaker -- [Laughter.] He will not let me continue but I will continue. I promise you, Mr Speaker.

So, the point that is being advanced is that the volumes are so much. Quite a lot of these Agreements; the volumes are such that it is not humanly possible for us to go through, not with a fine- tooth- comb or anything but basically make sense of it. He suggested that it was adjourned for a Ministerial document to be taken.

So, Mr Speaker, the point that is being articulated, essentially, is that, the Papers have been laid; let us take them away. We have got about three or so weeks to come back for a full Meeting. Let us take the Papers away, do a good reading, under-
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:15 p.m.
Hon Members, I will take the last contribution on this issue and then --
Mr Joseph Yieleh Chireh (NDC -- Wa West) 4:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, parliamentary time and public time are such that once we have been recalled, let us also do serious business before we rise.
The fact that our committees have examined these things in detail and are making recommendations to us, should assure us -- this is not the first time and I urge all Hon Colleagues to let us take these ones that are ready through.
It is important for us because if you look at many of the Loan Agreements and the Contract Agreements, they relate to ongoing projects and therefore, we do not want a gap between when the money is approved and the ongoing work. That is why I would urge all of us to support that we finish with what we have to do today.
Thank you very much.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:15 p.m.
Hon Members, I want to rule on this manner, that we continue with the process -- [Interruptions.]
Wherever we get to by the close of day today, we adjourn; if we want to continue tomorrow, we do so.
Hon Baffour Awuah?
Mr Ignatius B. Awuah (NPP--Sunyani West) 4:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to support the Motion on the floor but in doing so, I would want to draw our attention to a few observations that we made.
Mr Speaker, these projects involve additional works on the widening of the Ring Road from Kwame Nkrumah Circle through Obetsebi Lamptey Circle and an additional flyover of the Kwame Nkrumah Circle.
But Mr Speaker, I have a problem. My problem is that, very often, we start a project and then midway within the execution of the project, we come back to the House and ask for additional fees. So, my question is, were the additional works not envisaged at the beginning of the project? Why were they not incorporated in the original project but we had to wait till later before additional funding is found for the project?
That notwithstanding, Mr Speaker, I also have issues with the fees of the loan. For instance, we are told that it will attract an interest of libor of +5.2 per cent.
Mr Speaker, if we add the commitment fee of one per cent (1%) per annum and an arrangement fee of one per cent (1%) flat and a structuring fee of 0.15 per cent, this brings the total cost of the loan to 7.35 per cent, excluding libor.
Mr Speaker, if we are going to pay an interest of 7.35 per cent excluding libor - to date, libor might not be stable but sometimes it can come as low as 0.5 per cent, sometimes it goes beyond 1 per cent.
Assuming we take 1 per cent as the libor, then it means that the cost of this project is going to be 8.35, which in my view, Mr Speaker, is very high. I would like to urge people who negotiate on behalf of our country to be very mindful of the high cost of the facilities that we take because at the end of the day, it is going to impact negatively on the finances of this nation.

Mr Speaker, we do know for a fact that for 2014 alone, Ghana is going to pay over GH¢ 6 billion in servicing of interests on loans; and we are taking additional loans. So, if we do not negotiate on the rate of interest, then invariably, what is going to happen is that most of our internally generated revenues would be used in servicing these loans.

Mr Speaker, the other problem I have with this facility is the term of the loan. We are told that we have a grace period of two years and a repayment period of six years.

Mr Speaker, US$ 170 million loan to be repaid within six years means that the burden of repayment in a particular year is going to be high because this is going to be paid in addition to other loans that we have contracted. These are things that the Ministry of Finance may have to watch, so that even in going for loans, they negotiate for longer terms for repayment so that the incidence of repayment will not be high on the annual budget of the nation.

Mr Speaker, on this note, I support the Motion.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:25 p.m.
Thank you very much.
Minister for Finance (Mr Seth Terkpeh) 4:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, in winding up, I wish to thank the Committee for the work that it has done. I would wish to comment on a couple of issues that were raised.
In the first place, Mr Speaker, we are mindful of the variability of libor and it is for that reason that we brought the memorandum to the House for consideration. The Committee has asked for a feedback on this in order that we can
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:25 p.m.
Can we have some order? Hon Members, order, order!
Yes, Hon Minister?
Mr Terkpeh 4:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, given past experiences where major projects were started without full financing, this project was captured into phases 1 and 2. And until we were sure about the financing for the phase 2, we did not want to come to the House with estimates that would not be fully funded.
I do also agree with the issue for longer tenure. Mr Speaker, you would recall that when we brought the new loan policy, we stated that we would want to go for facilities with a longer tenure. An example, is the ten-year sovereign bond that we did. We hope that we would be able to achieve this also when the Infrastructure Fund becomes fully operational. This is because the purpose of the Fund would be to take projects, particularly commercial ones, and look for long-term financing.
Mr Speaker, with these few words, I thank you very much.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Mr Agbesi 4:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Resolution as captured in item 21 at page 14.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:25 p.m.
Pages 14 and 15.
Yes, Hon Minister?
RESOLUTIONS 4:25 p.m.

Minister for Finance (Mr Seth Emmanuel Terkpeh) 4:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
WHEREAS by the provisions of article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), the terms and conditions of any loan raised by the Government of the Republic of Ghana on behalf of itself or any public institution or authority shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by a Resolution of Parliament;
PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), and at the request of the Government of the Republic Ghana acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has been laid before Parliament the terms and conditions of the Term Facility Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and BNP Paribas Fortis S.A./ N.V. (as Arranger), Deutsche Bank AG, London (as Arranger), BNP Paribas Fortis S.A./N.V. (as Original Lender, Structuring Bank and Agent) for an amount of one hundred and seventy million United States dollars (US$170,000,000.00) supported by the
Brazilian Official Equalisation Programme (PROEX) for (i) the construction of one new flyover bridge (Ring Road Central to Feo Eyeo) in Accra; and (ii) additional construction works around the Kwame Nkrumah interchange in Accra.
THIS HONOURABLE HOUSE 4:25 p.m.

Mr Avedzi 4:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:25 p.m.
Yes, Deputy Majority Leader?
Mr Agbesi 4:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, item 25; Motion on page 17 of the Order Paper.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:25 p.m.
Yes, Chairman of the Committee?
MOTIONS 4:25 p.m.

Chairman of the Committee (Mr James Klutse Avedzi 4:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80 (1), which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Finance Committee on the Commercial Loan Credit Agreement (Brazilian Commercial Contract) between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Societe Generale (as Mandated Lead Arranger, Lender and Agent) for an amount of forty-five million, four hundred and eighty-five thousand, five hundred and fifty-eight United States dollars (US$45,485,558.00) relating to the financing of the Accra Streets Resurfacing Project may be moved today.
Mr James Cecil Yanwube 4:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:25 p.m.
Item 26.
Chairman of the Committee?
MOTIONS 4:25 p.m.

Chairman of Committee (Mr James Klutse Avedzi) 4:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Finance Committee on the Commercial Loan Credit Agreement (Brazilian Commercial Contract) between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Societe Generale (as Mandated Lead Arranger, Lender and Agent) for an amount of forty-five million, four hundred and eighty-five thousand, five hundred and fifty-eight United States dollars (US$45,485,558.00) relating to the financing of the Accra Streets Resurfacing Project.
Mr Speaker, in doing so, I present your Committee's Report.
Introduction
The request for the approval of the Commercial Loan Credit Agreement between the Government of Ghana and Societe Generale (as Mandated Lead Arranger, Lender and Agent) for an amount of forty-five million, four hundred and eighty-five thousand, five hundred and fifty-eight US dollars (US$45, 485,558.00) relating to the Accra Streets Resurfacing Project was presented by the Hon Deputy Minister for Finance, Mr Cassiel Ato Baah Forson on behalf of the Minister for Finance on Wednesday, 1st October, 2014 in accordance with article 181 of the 1992 Constitution.
Mr Speaker referred the Agreement to the Finance Committee for consideration and report in accordance with Order 169 of the Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.
Reference documents
The Committee referred to the following additional documents during the consideration of the Agreement:
The 1992 Constitution of Ghana
The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.
The Loans Act 1970, (Act 335).
Deliberations
The Committee was assisted by the Hon Minister for Roads and Highways, Alhaji Inusah Abdulai B. Fuseini and the Deputy Ministers for Finance and Roads and Highways, Messrs Cassiel Ato Baah Forson and Isaac Adjei-Mensah and other officials from the Ministries of Finance and Roads and Highways. The Committee is grateful to them for their assistance.
Background
The population of Ghana is over 24 million with more than 50 per cent living in the urban areas. Approximately, three million people representing more than fourteen per cent of the national population is believed to be living in Accra. It is estimated that Ghana's urban areas currently contribute over sixty per cent of GNP, illustrating both their importance and potential for contributing further to economic growth.
The city of Accra is growing at four per cent (4%) per year and this means that the population will thus double in sixteen years. The expansion in the city size has made it difficult for the municipal authorities to meet the service demands of its residents. Traffic in Accra is characterized by heavy congestion (particularly, during the peak periods),
weak implementation of traffic manage- ment measures, inadequate facilities for pedestrians and bicyclists and high accidents rates. Traffic flow in Accra is also adversely affected by the poor condition of the major and minor arterials where traffic is heaviest.
The network size in Accra is about 2,296 kilometres with 43 per cent in a good, 6 per cent in a fair and 51per cent in a poor condition. Recent events of high intensity rains over long duration have worsened the condition of the network.
Government recognises that the above challenges will substantially worsen without a strong intervention, especially, with the continuous growth in the urban areas. The intended response, which is mainly focused on high level maintenance activities including asphaltic concrete overlay, among others, is to improve existing infrastructure with an effective combination of traffic management measures, minor rehabilitation and maintenance and improvements in regulatory and enforcement to address congestion and safety issues.
A number of roads are currently being rehabilitated in Accra in the above regard and the proposed roads would com- plement the projects that are currently being implemented as part of Government's policy objective to strengthen the provision of road infrastructure and related facilities and to improve the business environment to sustain broad-based growth in achieving middle-income country (MIC) status by
2015.
It is against this background that Parliament is being requested to approve the credit facility to enable Government implement this intervention.
Project components
The project comprises the following works:
6 cm asphaltic overlay on 76 kilometres of streets
sectional repairs and pothole patching of selected roads in 9 communities;
46 kilometres of minor arterials;
30 kilometres of collector roads; and
execution of road markings and signs
Implementation period/arrangements
The project is estimated to be completed within a period of eighteen (18) months from the commencement date. The Ministry of Roads and Highways will have oversight responsibility for the implementation of the project to be supervised by FAS CONSULT/HANMAC (the Project Consultants), while the implementing agency, Department of Urban Roads (DUR) will co-ordinate all project activities for and on behalf of the Ministry of Roads and Highways.
Project financing
Societe Generale, Paris, is providing a credit facility of US$ 45,485,558.00 for the execution of the proposed project. The summary terms and conditions of the credit facility are shown below:
Facility amount -- US$45,485,558.00 (inclusive of risk mitigation of
US$5,485,558)
Repayment period -- 5 years
Mr Kweku A. Kwarteng (NPP -- Obuasi West) 4:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion and I do so because good condition of roads is always useful for quick economic activities and economic growth. It is the reason maintenance of roads should have been done from domestic sources specifically the Road Fund.
At the Committee, the Hon Minister for Roads and Highways indicated -- And that has been expressed in paragraph 8.2 of the Report -- That “the Road Fund is no more sufficient for this purpose”. This is because as we all know, there is a line in the petroleum price build up, that is the Road Levy Fund and at the time it was set, it was the equivalent of about six cents and now, as a result of the deterioration in our cedi, it is about two cents. That was the Hon Minister's own statement before the Committee.
Alhaji Abdul-Rashid Pelpuo 4:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am coming on a point of order because of the misinformation the Hon Member is spewing out.
Mr Speaker, maintenance culture in this country is often and always relegated to the background. To maintain roads by filling potholes is a necessity; whether we borrow money or generate the money, it is a necessity and it must be done.
Mr Speaker, I would want to draw the Hon Member's attention to the fact that perception that if we borrow money to maintain something it is bad, must not be accepted and he should correct himself, Mr Speaker.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
Hon Member, please, you may proceed.
Mr Kwarteng 4:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I agree that road maintenance is important and should be part of our culture. It is the reason we must use sources of funding that are sustainable. If we are going to have to contract commercial loans to fill potholes, then the country is in trouble
-- 4:35 p.m.

Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
Hon Member, your point is well made; you may continue.
Mr Kwarteng 4:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I was concluding on the point, that unlike the promise that was made to us when the road tolls were being increased, by, in some cases, a thousand per cent, this time round, the money, when contracted at a commercial rate to fill potholes --
Some Hon Majority Members -- rose --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
Hon Members, the Hon Minister will have the opportunity, when he is winding up, to react to some of these things. So,let us make some progress.
Continue, Hon Member?
Mr Kwarteng 4:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am concluding on the point that unlike the case for which a promise was made to us when road tolls were being increased by, in some cases, a thousand per cent, this time, the loan that would be contracted at a commercial rate for the purposes of filling our potholes, would really be used for the purpose.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
Yes, Hon Minister for Youth and Sports?
Mr Mahama Ayariga 4:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, this is a very serious matter --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
Hon Members, order! order!
Mr Ayariga 4:35 p.m.
The Hon Member has the Report of the Committee and he is a member of the Committee. Mr Speaker, I do not see anywhere in the Report, a statement that the loan is for filling potholes; I do not see it anywhere in the Report. Where in the Report is it indicated that this loan is for filling potholes? Mr Speaker, it is very clear that it is for the
construction of interchanges -- [Interruption.] Mr Speaker, there is no provision in the Report that this money is for filling potholes. So, the Hon Member is misleading this House and must withdraw the statement.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
I think it is for “Resurfacing”. That is the description.
Hon Members, can we make some progress?
Yes, Hon K. T. Hammond?
Mr Kobina T. Hammond (NPP -- Adansi Asokwa) 4:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am happy to contribute to the Motion. I am not so sure what the debate is about; “resurfacing” or “filling of potholes”. In my English Language Lexicon is the same as maintenance. So, what is this debate about?
Mr Speaker, in any event, whether it is “resurfacing”, “filling of potholes” or whatever, there is a very serious deficiency in this country we must address our minds to. It is a serious matter, whether we call it “resurfacing” or “filling of potholes”.
Mr Speaker, we have spent so much money in constructing roads in this country and what happens is that within a year, these roads fall into a state of so much dilapidation that one starts to wonder if it is the road that so much billions of cedis were put into.
Mr Speaker, we have no culture of maintenance in this country. I am mounting this platform and appealing to the Ministry responsible for Roads and Highways to look at this matter critically. It is not only Accra; the problem is nationwide. Mr Speaker, just go outside there and look at roads which were constructed two years ago and you will
Mrs Ursula G. EkufuI 4:35 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, I believe that we are all belabouring under certain misappre- hension that the entire project is about “resurfacing”. But I would like to draw the attention of the House to paragraph 8.2, “the current status of roads in Accra and justification for the Project”, where the Hon Minister informed the Committee that some of the roads have developed lots of potholes, while others have not had any period maintenance activities for over long periods of time.
The last sentence says that the Minister added that “current inflows into the Road Fund, however, cover only 60 per cent of the maintenance requirements of the road network and as a result, there is a backlog of maintenance required on the network and therefore, the need for the facility to save the network from the rapid development of potholes and sectional deterioration”. The whole purpose for the contraction of this loan is to fill potholes.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
Hon Member, as far as Hon K. T. Hammond's presentation is concerned, you are completely out of order.
Mr K. T. Hammond 4:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to conclude and make a passionate appeal to those responsible for the maintenance of our roads.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:45 p.m.
Hon Sorogho, please, take your seat.
Hon Members, Orde, order!

Hon Baffour Awuah, you have the floor.
Mr Ignatius B. Awuah 4:45 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
I would want to bring to your attention, the behaviour exhibited by the Hon Sorogho, moving from his side, all the way to the desk of the Hon Member for Obuasi East, Hon Kwaku Kwarteng, and verbally assaulting him, that why is he being academically dishonest.
Mr Speaker, I would want to put on record, that the Hon Member's behaviour, is uncalled for, and it is something, [Interruptions] which is very unparlia- mentary.
Mr Speaker, I call on you to use the powers vested in your office, to make sure that the necessary action is brought against him.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:45 p.m.
Hon Sorogho, can you respond to this allegation?
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:45 p.m.
Hon Member, there is an allegation that you hurled insults at him. What do you say to that?
Alhaji Sorogho 4:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, never! Never!

You could ask him whether I insulted him.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:45 p.m.
Hon Members, let us have some order!
Hon Member for Obuasi, what do you say to that?
Mr Kwarteng 4:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the sound of assault I heard, was on the Hon Mrs Ursula Ekuful. [Uproar.]
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:45 p.m.
Hon Members, let us have some order. Please Hon Kwarteng, resume your seat, since you have said this. It is enough for me.
Hon Members, let us have some order.
I want to plead with Hon Members, that as much as possible, we conduct ourselves with decorum in this Chamber. Hon Members, I want us to conduct the Business of this House in quiet, so that we can make a lot of progress.
Having said that, Hon Sorogho, I will prefer that if you have any point to raise, you catch the Speaker's eye, and you will be given the opportunity to do so, rather than moving over.
Hon Members, can we make some progress?
Yes, Hon K. T. Hammond [Interruptions]- - [Pause]
Hon Members, can we have some order, please?
Hon Members as much as possible, we should try to be accurate in our presentations. This is because I did not see what went on. My attention was drawn to it by a Member, who indicated that the verbal attack or the assault was directed at the Hon Member for Obuasi. That is why I proceeded in that manner.
Now, it turns out that the allegation is rather that, the verbal assault was directed at the Hon Ursula Ekuful.
I will like to hear from the Hon Ursula Ekuful, what really happened.
Mrs Ursula Ekuful 4:45 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
The Hon Sorogho left his seat, in the far left of the Chamber, walked all the way here, like my people would say; “ otoo see” [Interruptions] He walked all the way here, thrust the Report of the Committee in my face, waved it at me in a threatening manner, and then added; “ Are you blind, can you not read?, what is wrong with you?” And started waving his arms and the paper at me, in a very threatening manner, putting me in fear of physical assault. [Uproar.]
Not only that, in the process of that, he scratched the back of my hands as well. [Uproar] Is that the way things are conducted in this House?
And let me add that it was not a friendly tap, but it was a threatening scratch, putting me in fear of further bodily harm - - [Uproar] and for that, I do not think it is an acceptable behaviour for an Hon Member of this House -- and he has to apologise for that behaviour.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
Hon Member, we have heard your point. As I said early on, I want us to behave with decorum in this Chamber. [Interruptions.]
Hon Members, order, order!
Let us not allow emotions to flare up. I have already told you that at the time of the alleged incident, my attention was not in that direction. I am trying as much as possible to hear from both sides, and try to resolve it amicably.
So, as matters stand, Hon Sorogho, I have indicated that you needed not to have gone that far to make your point. All you needed to do was to rise up, catch my eye, and then I will have called you to make your presentation.
In that respect, can you apologise to the Hon Member?
Alhaji Sorogho 4:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would do whatever you want but I would want to make this point very clear, because in this House, all of us are supposed to be noble and truthful to ourselves and God.

We relate to make a point. She is not a member of the Finance Committee. There was no way I could have gone to her because she does not even relate to me on that.

I went to somebody with whom we discussed this thing together and asked if he could read point number five.
Mr First deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
Hon Sorogho, do you remember that she made a presentation?
Alhaji Sorogho 4:55 p.m.
I do not know anything about her. [Uproar.]
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
She did.
Please, apologise and let us make progress.
Alhaji Sorogho 4:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, if you so direct, I apologise. But I would want to say that I never did that -- [Uproar] -- and I would want it to be on record.
Hon K. T Hammond has been crossing; he will cross.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
Yes, Hon K. T. Hammond, have you concluded your presentation?
Mr Hammond 4:55 p.m.
Almost completed, Mr Speaker.
The point I make ultimately is, now that it is settled that the good chunk of the load is for filling of potholes, Tema Motorway has to be filled to the qualitative level that the road was originally constructed. As it is, it is an eyesore and a disgrace to the country.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
Hon Members, I will put the Question. But before then, I will like the Hon Minister for Roads and Highways to respond to some of the issues raised.
Minister for Roads and Highways (Alhaji Inusah A. B. Fuseini) 4:55 p.m.
Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
Let me thank Hon Members of this House for contributing to the Motion on the floor of the House.
Mr Speaker, indeed, Members have raised very important observations and to start from what --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
Can we have some order, please?
Alhaji Fuseini 4:55 p.m.
To start from what Hon K. T. Hammond said. Yes, it is important that when we spend huge sums of money in putting in place road infrastructure, we need to ensure that the quality of work is good; we need to ensure that the construction of the road meets the legitimate expectations of the people of this country that the road lasts for a certain period of time -- [Interruption.]
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
Order! Order!
Yes, Hon Minister, proceed.
Alhaji Fuseini 4:55 p.m.
And so, Mr Speaker, what we have done since assuming office at the Ministry of Roads and Highways, is to strengthen the monitoring and supervision aspect of the Ministry, to ensure that when contractors are given work, they will conduct their activities, perform the contract and execute the work according to specification.
Mr Speaker, we have even established an ad hoc monitoring team at the Ministry to ensure that when the on-site supervisors bring a report, we follow up to confirm or verify the contents of the report.
In addition, Mr Speaker, I have made it a policy to be in the field to see exactly how work is progressing. I do so with the technical team of the Ministry of Roads and Highways
This, I believe, if we are able to sustain this tripartite monitoring system on the construction and the execution of our road contracts, we should be able to ensure some quality of work and value for money for contracts given out for the construction of road infrastructure.
So, I thank you very much and we are taking the monitoring matter serious.
Mr Speaker, but this contract, the US$45,485,558.00 is not about pothole patching; it cannot be about pothole patching. Assuming but not admitting that our roads have developed potholes. The question to ask and legitimately so, is how do roads deteriorate?
Mr Speaker, roads deteriorate when the road begins to give way and there is no other way a road will deteriorate than potholes emerging on it. Now, this contract is going to address that in the first place.
Secondly, this contract is forward- looking, that roads that have got bituminous material, which bituminous material is expected in the normal course of longevity of a road, to last between five and seven years, this project will make the roads more durable to last between 10 and 12 years. It means therefore, that when the road is constructed with this asphaltic concrete overlay, we are going to save a lot of resources which would have gone yearly into the maintenance of those roads.
So, Mr Speaker, this project is forward- looking, being proactive and addressing the concerns of the people of this country.
Mr Speaker, lastly, we are being reminded of road tolls and asked why they are not augmenting the funds that go into the Road Fund Account. It is important to
state that when you go round this country and count the number of road tolls that we have, even if the payment has risen up to 1000 per cent -- we only have 28 toll booths in this country and not all vehicles in this country access road tolls.
That was why in or around 1995, this Parliament and rightly so, decided that they would input road maintenance levy into the petroleum price build up to put that money into a Fund for the maintenance of our roads. What we are doing is to ensure the judicious use of the money in the Road Fund Account.
But in all, let me sincerely and honestly thank all the Members of this House for showing interest in this particular matter and to assure you that when these roads are done and our vehicles traverse them, we would not have fix our bolt joints or weld our exhaust pipes.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
Hon Members, this brings us to the end of the debate.
Yes, Hon Minority Leader?
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 4:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, with respect to the Minister for Roads and Highways, really, because we had to exit, when I came in, he was on his way.
Mr Speaker, I would want to know whether this particular project has the components of reconstructing the drains. Mr Speaker, if roads are made, regardless of how they are made to last and how the lifespan of that is projected to be, if the drains are not properly constructed -- the Minister knows that with the stagnation of rain water on asphalted roads as is the usual thing in Accra, the roads will start exfoliating and that is one of the difficulties in road construction in Accra.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:05 a.m.
Hon Minster, do you want to respond?
Hon Minister, I believe you will take note of the concern raised, so that you can address it.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:05 a.m.
Yes Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
Mr Agbesi 5:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the item 27, the Resolution.
RESOLUTIONS 5:05 a.m.

Minister for Finance (Mr Seth E. Terkpeh) 5:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
WHEREAS by the provisions of article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), the terms and conditions of any loan raised by the Government of the Republic of Ghana on behalf of itself or any public institution or authority shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by a Resolution of Parliament;
PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), at
THIS HONOURABLE HOUSE 5:05 a.m.

Mr James K. Avedzi 5:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, l beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:05 a.m.
Hon Majority Chief Whip.
A l h a j iM oh a mme d - Mub a r a k Muntaka: Mr Speaker, let us come back to item number 10 on page 7, which is the Motion.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:05 a.m.
Very well.
Chairman of the Committee.
MOTIONS 5:05 a.m.

Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 5:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker. I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80(1), which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Finance Committee on the SAIN covered Export Credit Facility Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Deutsche Bank S.A. - Banco Alemão, Sao Paulo (as Arranger), Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas (as Agent, Security Agent and Account Bank), Deutsche Bank AG, New York (as Original Lender), Deutsche Bank AG, London (as Original Lender) and Santander Bank (as Original Lender) with support from the Brazilian Official Equalisation Programme (PROEX) for an amount of one hundred and forty million, five hundred and seventy-six thousand, two hundred and thirty-four United States dollars (US$140,576,234.00) for the design and construction of Kasoa interchange and ancilliary works may be moved today.
Mr James C. Yanwube 5:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Export Credit Facility Agreement the Government of Republic of Ghana and
Deutsche Bank S.A. - Banco Alemao etc.
Chairman of the Committee Mr James K. Avedzo) 5:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Finance Committee on the SAIN covered Export Credit Facility Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Deutsche Bank S.A. - Banco Alemão, Sao Paulo (as Arranger), Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas (as Agent, Security Agent and Account Bank), Deutsche Bank AG, New York (as Original Lender), Deutsche Bank AG, London (as Original Lender) and Santander Bank (as Original Lender) with support from the Brazilian Official Equalisation Programme (PROEX) for an amount of one hundred and forty million, five hundred and seventy-six thousand, two hundred and thirty-four United States dollars (US$140,576,234.00) for the design and construction of Kasoa interchange and ancilliary works.
Introduction
The mentioned Credit Facility Agreements for a total amount of one hundred and seventy-two million, five hundred and seventy-six thousand, two hundred and forty-three US dollars (USD$172,576,243.00) between the Government of Ghana and Deutsche Bank New York Branch and its affiliates for the construction of Kasoa interchange project was presented by the Hon Deputy Minister for Finance, Mr Cassiel Ato Baah Forson on behalf of the Hon Minister for Finance on Wednesday, 1st October, 2014 in accordance of article 181 of the 1992 Constitution.
Mr Speaker referred the Agreement to the Finance Committee for consideration and report in accordance with Order 169 of the Standing Orders of Parliament.

Reference documents

The Committee referred to the following additional documents during the consideration of the Agreement:

The 1992 Constitution of Ghana

The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana

The Loans Act 1970, (Act 335).

Deliberations

The Committee was assisted by the Hon Minister for Roads and Highways, Alhaji Inusah Abdulai B. Fuseini and the Deputy Ministers for Finance and Roads and Highways, Messrs Cassiel Ato Baah Forson and Isaac Adjei- Mensah and other officials from the Ministries of Finance and Roads and Highways. The Committee is grateful to them for their assistance.

Background

It is believed, that approximately three (3) million people representing more than fourteen per cent (14%) of the national population live in Accra metropolitan area and two (2) million in the adjoining Central Region. Forty-seven per cent (47%) of the population of Central Region is also believed to be living in urbanised areas and it is estimated that Ghana's urban areas currently contribute over sixty per cent of GNP which demonstrates both their importance and potential for contributing further to economic growth.

The city of Accra is growing at four per cent per year and this has made it difficult for the municipal authorities to meet the service demands of its residents. The urban sprawl of Accra has impacted

towns such as Kasoa in the Awutu Senya East Municipality in the Central Region which are located on the fringes of the Greater Accra Region. In 1970, Kasoa had a population of 863 but in 1984 and 2000, the population had risen to 2,597 and 34,719 respectively. In 2010, the population grew to 69,384, which clearly indicates that there has been an increase in the population size over the past 40 years. Kasoa is thus, reported to be one of the fastest growing communities in West Africa.

Kasoa is grappling with the effect of rapidly growing population on a limited urban infrastructure especially, limited market space for the growing number of sellers. The major economic and commercial activities are therefore, concentrated on a limited area along the N1 transport corridor. Consequently, traffic congestion has been a major issue which affects not only residents of Kasoa but motorists using the major N1 corridor. Traffic at Kasoa is characterised by heavy congestion (particularly, during the peak periods), weak implementation of traffic management measures, inadequate facilities for pedestrians and bicyclists and high accidents rates. Additionally, the N1 forms part of the trans coastal corridor for the ECOWAS sub-region.

It is, therefore, in recognition of this that the facility is being sought to, among others, improve existing infrastructure with an effective combination of traffic management measures and improvement in the local road system and enforcement to address congestion and safety issues in and around Kasoa in particularly, and Greater Accra and Central Regions in general. The intervention is also to address the subregional programme of developing the trans coastal corridor into a major transit corridor of high standard.

Project components

The project comprises the following:

200 m of Interchange Bridge and related works

Execution of a new roundabout

Construction of a new south bound road of 2300m long

Construction of about 50000 m2 of new roads in the area, with drainage and public lighting

Enhancement and road condition- ing of 2000 m on Accra-Cape Coast Highway
SPACE FOR FACILITY TYPE - 5:05 a.m.

Mr Alexander K. Afenyo-Markin (NPP - Effutu) 5:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion and in doing so, I must say that this initiative of constructing an interchange and other related works is a laudable one. This is because I drive through Kasoa before I get to my constituency and I know that the situation was worse ten years earlier until President Kufuor constructed the dual carriage from Mallam to Kasoa and improved the road network from Kasoa to Winneba and beyond.
However, let me also add that this loan is very expensive --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:05 a.m.
Hon Member, can you hold your breath?
Hon Chairman, looking at the Report, it looks like there are two segments but you moved only one and left the other
one. Could you do us the favour of moving the other one in addition to the earlier one before he seconds the Motion?
Mr Avedzi 5:05 a.m.
Thank you Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker, because we prepared only one Report to cover the two Motions, I will do it that way.
Mr Speaker, then I have to move the procedural Motion, 13 and then move the Motion for the Report at 14.
MOTIONS 5:15 p.m.

Chairman of the Committee (Mr J. K. Avedzi) 5:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80(1), which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Finance Committee on the Term Facility Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Deutsche Bank S.A. - Banco Alemão, Sao Paulo (as Arranger), Deutsche Bank AG, New York (as Agent and Original Lender) for an amount of thirty-two million United States dollars (US$32,000,000.00) with support from the Brazilian Official Equalisation Programme (PROEX) for the design and construction of Kasoa interchange and ancilliary works may be moved today.
P 5:15 p.m.

Mr A. K. Afenyo-Markin 5:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker,
I beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.

Term Facility Agreement between GoG/Deutsche Bank S. A.- Banco Alemao, Sao Paulo (as Arranger)/

Deutsche Bank AG, New York (as Agent and Original Lender)
Chairman of the Committee (Mr J. K. Avedzi) 5:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Finance Committee on the Term Facility Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Deutsche Bank S.A. - Banco Alemão, Sao Paulo (as Arranger), Deutsche Bank AG, New York (as Agent and Original Lender) for an amount of thirty-two million United States dollars (US$32,000,000.00) with support from the Brazilian Official Equalisation Programme (PROEX) for the design and construction of Kasoa interchange and ancilliary works.
Mr Speaker, in doing so, I present your Committee's report.
Introduction
The mentioned Credit Facility Agreements for a total amount of one hundred and seventy-two million, five hundred and seventy-six thousand, two hundred and forty-three US dollars (USD$172,576,243.00) between the Government of Ghana and Deutsche Bank New York Branch and its affiliates for the construction of Kasoa Interchange Project was presented by the Hon Deputy Minister for Finance, Mr. Cassiel Ato Baah Forson on behalf of the Hon. Minister for Finance on Wednesday, 1st October, 2014 in accordance with article 181 of the 1992 Constitution.
Mr Speaker referred the Agreement to the Finance Committee for consideration and report in accordance with Order 169 of the Standing Orders of Parliament.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr J. K. Avedzi) 5:15 p.m.


Reference documents

The Committee referred to the following additional documents during the consideration of the Agreement:

The 1992 Constitution of Ghana

The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana

The Loans Act 1970, (Act 335).

Deliberations

The Committee was assisted by the Hon Minister for Roads and Highways, Alhaji Inusah Abdulai B. Fuseini and the Deputy Ministers for Finance and Roads and Highways, Messrs. Cassiel Ato Baah Forson and Isaac Adjei- Mensah and other officials from the Ministries of Finance and Roads and Highways. The Committee is grateful to them for their assistance.

Background

It is believed that approximately three (3) million people representing more than fourteen per cent (14%) of the national population live in Accra metropolitan area and two (2) million in the adjoining Central Region.

Forty-seven per cent (47%) of the population of Central Region is also believed to be living in urbanised areas and it is estimated that Ghana's urban areas currently contribute over sixty per cent of GNP which demonstrates both their importance and potential for contributing further to economic growth.

The city of Accra is growing at four per cent per year and this has made it

difficult for the municipal authorities to meet the service demands of its residents.

The urban sprawl of Accra has impacted towns such as Kasoa in the Awutu Senya East Municipality in the Central Region which are located on the fringes of the Greater Accra Region.

In 1970, Kasoa had a population of 863, but in 1984 and 2000, the population had risen to 2,597 and 34,719 respectively.

In 2010, the population grew to 69,384 which clearly indicate that there has been an increase in the population size over the past 40 years. Kasoa is thus reported to be one of the fastest growing communities in West Africa.

Kasoa is grappling with the effect of rapidly growing population on a limited urban infrastructure especially, limited market space for the growing number of sellers. The major economic and commercial activities are therefore, concentrated on a limited area along the N1 transport corridor.

Consequently, traffic congestion has been a major issue which affects not only residents of Kasoa but motorists using the major N1 corridor.

Traffic at Kasoa is characterised by heavy congestion (particularly, during the peak periods), weak implementation of traffic management measures, inadequate facilities for pedestrians and bicyclists and high accidents rates.

Additionally, the N1 forms part of the trans coastal corridor for the ECOWAS sub region. It is, therefore, in recognition of this that the facility is being sought to, among others, improve existing infrastructure with an effective combination of traffic management measures and improvement in the local road system and

enforcement to address congestion and safety issues in and around Kasoa in particularly, and Greater- Accra and Central Regions in general. The intervention is also to address the subregional programme of developing the Trans coastal corridor into a major transit corridor of high standard.

Project components

The project comprises the following:

200 m of Interchange Bridge and related works

Execution of a new roundabout

Construction of a new south bound road of 2300m long

Construction of about 50000 m2 of new roads in the area, with drainage and public lighting

Enhancement and Road Condi- tioning of 2000 m on Accra-Cape Coast Highway

Construction of 20 kilometres of local roads within the catchment of the interchange

Enhancement of 1640m of roads towards Nyanyano and Bawjiase

Financing terms and conditions

The project is to be financed by Deutche Bank AG New York Branch and/ or its international affiliates. The facility in the sum of US$172,576,243.00 is supported by two Brazilian agencies: SBCE Export Credit (Seguradora Brasileira de Credito a Exportacao) and PROEX (Brazilian Official Equalisation Programme). Terms and conditions of the credit facility is as follows:

Observations

Justification/ benefits of the project

Justifying the need for the project,t the Minister for Roads and Highways stated that the Accra- Cape Coast Road section of the N1 Trans-Coastal highway has sections which suffer severe traffic congestion that result in a grid lock for long hours on the network.

This situation, the Minister added, is more pronounced on the heavy urbanised sections like Weija, Kasoa and adjoining roads. The Kasoa intersection which carries approximately 95,000 vehicles per day experiences severe congestion almost on a daily basis. The roads from Accra in the east, Winneba in the west, Bawjiase in the north and Nyanyano in the south all converge at the Kasoa intersection.

The current situation, the record indicates, worsens during the weekend when traffic reaches its peak, especially

with heavy traffic in the east-west direction and result in massive congestion.

The problem is compounded as a result of specific environmental factors such as adjacent commercial areas, non-regulatory bus stops for public transport and others. The negative impacts of the current situation were mentioned as follows:

Increased air pollution and delays; which adversely affect the health of motorists through stress and frustration.

High vehicle operation and maintenance costs.

Long waiting time for access to public transport along the route.

The implementation of the project, the Minister stressed, will improve the flow of traffic on the Accra-Cape Coast highway
SPACE FOR FACILITY TYPE - 5:15 p.m.

Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:15 p.m.
Thank you.
Hon Member, now you are going to second the two Motions together and Hon Members, at the end of it, the two Motions, 11 and 14 would be debated together, so that we save time. It is one Report; it is one Report.
rose
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:15 p.m.
Yes, Hon Member, are you up on a point of order?
Mr Opare-Ansah 5:15 p.m.
Exactly so.
Mr Speaker, I find this arrangement very strange. The fact that the supporting Report for the two Motions are in one document does not mean that we have to vary our rules the way we are trying to do. We could use the same Report, move the Motion, complete that one, adopt it and use the same reference document to move the next Motion.
But in a situation where we have moved the Motion, it gets seconded, it is before the House, then we put it aside; move another Motion, get it seconded -- I am at a complete loss what we are doing.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:15 p.m.
We stopped the Hon Member of Parliament seconding the Motion, so that the two could be taken together and then his secondment would be in respect of both of them and then the debate that would flow therefrom would also be in respect of the two Motions, so that we save time.
Yes, Hon Member for Effutu --
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I thank you.
So, like I was saying, Mr Speaker, President Kufuor did Ghana that favour and committed himself to his campaign promise by taking the first step of constructing the Mallam-Kasoa dual carriage and continued to Winneba. So, for this Government to take the initiative in constructing the interchange bridge and other auxiliary works, Mr Speaker, it will help a long way to ease the traffic situation.
However, Mr Speaker, there are some few observations that I have. One -- the cost of the project. Mr Speaker, the loan, I am concentrating on the insurance bit of it. Mr Speaker, we know that insurance premium on such facilities are paid primarily to take care of political risks. But Mr Speaker, Ghana, politically, is stable.
rose
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:15 p.m.
I believe that the negotiations were not properly done in the interest of Ghanaians --
Mr Speaker 5:15 p.m.
Hon Minister, are you up on a point of order?
Mr Terkpeh 5:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise on a point of correction and to draw the attention of the House to the fact that we have come to this House with Agreements including that of the World Bank where country risks as well as continental and project r isk are elements of the Agreements and we have taken insurance on these facilities. The alternative is often guaranteeing off the facility. So, it is erroneous to give the impression that this would be the first loan on which we would be paying insurance.
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, with the greatest respect, I never said so. The point I tr ied to submit for the consideration of all of us was that to be rated as a politically stable country, going for a commercial loan, then we having to commit 12 million dollars plus for insurance guarantees, it covers the lender's risk.
Mr Speaker, I am raising this, so that next time we would not pro rata accept proposals that come from lenders because we are hard up.
I am saying that we can do better as a country because this 12.5 million dollars does not add up any value. It is covering that person's risk and the facility is not for free. It is libor plus 4.75. And Mr Speaker, not only that, we are also required to make a collateral, put together a collateral account of another 20 per cent. These are hard realities --
Mr Terkpeh 5:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I know that we would want to finish this as quickly as possible -- [Interruption] -- but it is important that we put the record right.
Mr Speaker, again, this would not be the first facility on which we have had a collateral account. We have come to this House with various, particularly Brazilian and Chinese facilities with collateral accounts.
Mr Speaker, let me also reemphasise that in many of the Agreements that we have brought to this House, it is the lenders' perception of risk that we are insuring or paying for and that there is nothing extraordinary about the payment of insurance in this instance.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:15 p.m.
Very well.
Hon Member, can you move on to your next point.
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, with the greatest respect, I am making a submission based on the fact presented to us, and it is for the attention of the Hon Minister. He was not up on a point of order. This is because there was no point misleading this House --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:25 p.m.
Hon Member, just proceed.
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am grateful to you.
The Government is setting a very bad precedent because 20 per cent collateral account, that amount that is going to be put there to be blocked, Mr Speaker, it is not a good negotiation and it does not serve the best interest of the Committee -
- 5:25 p.m.

Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:25 p.m.
Yes, Hon Chairman of the Committee?
Mr Avedzi 5:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member made a statement that 20 per cent of the loan's amount would be blocked. That is factually incorrect. The requirement is that, a collection account would be established by the Government of Ghana. And for the total amount that is involved, before the beginning of the payment of the disbursement of the Fund back to the lender, Government would make available 20 per cent of that amount in the account, so that when the amount is due to be paid to the lender, Government would not found itself wanting. That is an assurance. [Interruption.]
Mr Speaker, it does not mean that 20 per cent of the loan amount would be blocked. So, that correction must be taken on board.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:25 p.m.
Very well.
Hon Member for Effutu?
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, whatever way he may want to put it, we are talking about an insurance risk which is almost 10 per cent and another 20 per cent in a collection account. Whichever way he would want to define it, this is a bad negotiation.
Mr Speaker, having addressed the issue of us not getting a better deal, the issue of oversight comes to play. I believe generally all of us have expressed concerns about the way projects are executed and monitored; but Ghanaians are not getting value for money.
I would therefore, urge the Ministry, that we should not kowtow or allow ourselves to be cajoled into accepting this so-called principle of insulating public institutions by not exercising our constitutional mandate of our oversight duty. It is our duty as a Parliament -- it is his duty as a Minister to exercise oversight to make sure that the construction work is properly done; the contractor is monitored.
Mr Speaker, I will not belabour this. But the Hon Papa Owusu-Ankomah, a very experiencd member of this House, in fact, a Barrister at Law, for that matter -- [Hear! Hear!] -- had the occasion of drawing this House's attention to -- our responsibility, et cetera under Order 155 and article 103.
Mr Speaker, I would urge all of us -- looking at the unanimity with which we approached this loan, it is our duty to go every length to monitor and make sure that the work is done and done well.
Mr Speaker, the last but not least point I have before I resume my seat, is that, you will see Arrangement Fee, Commitment fee and all that, 1.25 per cent, 1 per cent. We see them in whatever form, they are always in.
Can we not do a better negotiation? I think going forward -- it is not enough to say that the previous Government did the same thing or with previous loans, there were issues of commitment fee and arrangement fee. So, we will accept it. We have confirmed Ministers to take charge of Ministries to manage and to do things in favour of the country. We do not just get --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:25 p.m.
Hon Member, can you start to conclude?
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am doing that.
We do not put him there to go and accept whatever you get because we want a road to be constructed. No! The Minister is there to exhibit his negotiation skills, so that there would be value for money. That is what I would want to urge the Ministry, particularly the Ministry of Finance, that in future negotiations, they should endeavour.
I am grateful to you, Mr Speaker.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:25 p.m.
Yes, Hon Chairman of the Committee?
Mr Avedzi 5:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member made a statement which is not parliamentary; that they just do not put the Ministers there to go and accept anything. I do not think that should come from a Member of Parliament. I do not think he is indicting the position of the Minister for Finance to accept anything that comes to him. So, he could be honourable enough to polish that statement and put it in the right perspective.
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Minister for Finance made an --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:25 p.m.
Hon Member, let us try to be as polite as possible in our choice of words.
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Minister for Finance made an intervention. He said this is not the first time, and he also said that this is the way the lenders want it. All I said was to draw his attention
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:25 p.m.
That is not what he said.
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:25 p.m.
That is the impression I got.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:25 p.m.
That is your own impression.
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, very well.
However, if the Hon Chairman gets the impression that the use of those words were inappropriate, I honourably withdraw same and want to replace them by saying that the Minister for Finance must not pro rata accept whatever is brought to him during negotiations. He should go the extra mile to negotiate.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:25 p.m.
But Hon Member, you are repeating the same thing?
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, no! I am saying he should go the extra mile -- [Laughter] -- to negotiate.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:25 p.m.
Yes, Hon Minister?
Mr Terkpeh 5:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, at the risk of repeating myself, I remind the Hon Member who is a member of the Finance Committee that there is a context in which we negotiate financial facilities. There is a grant context, there is a concessional loans context and there is a commercial context, and this is the context in which I am saying that whenever we come to this House, one would have to look at the type of loan facility that we are bringing, and put the conditions and terms in which the House is going to approve within one of these three categories.
Mr Speaker, indeed, within these categories, one would have different ranges. For example, what we are considering now is the Banco National de Desenvolvimento Econômico e Social (BNDES), which is similar to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) of the World Bank, with terms like CDB, is not the same as the International Development Association (IDA) of the World Bank.
We have come to the Committee and the House with several of these. So, it is in this context which I am saying that what the Hon Member said is misleading. That, that is to give the impression to Ghanaians that simply because we are taking a commercial loan, we had not negotiated.
Mr Speaker, this is a syndicated facility and the Hon Member who is a member of the Finance Committee knows very well that with all syndicated facilities, we come with arrangement and other fees which are regular and constant features.
Mr Speaker, I do concede the point that we have to negotiate, and we do so for the levels, but not the types of fees and others that are associated with it. So, what I am saying is that, the context is important. We are not dealing with a grant facility at this moment in time, neither are we dealing with a concessional facility. We are indeed, dealing with a commercial facility. This is the N1 highway which the first leg was the Yamoransa-Takoradi road. There is the compact one element and the by- pass. This is a potentially commercial tollable road under our recovery policy, and therefore, there is every justification to go for a commercial facility with generous and good terms to construct the road.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
Hon Member, please, conclude.
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, in concluding, I am wondering why the N1 which was a 14.2 kilometre road joining the Mallam interchange -- it is a three- lane -- could cost US$110,000,000 with all the compensation being paid. And with this project just at Kasoa, you are talking about US$172,000,000. There is no such justification, Mr Speaker. And this is a fair comment; US$110,000,000 for a three- lane road where compensations were paid -- you are not going to pay compensation, yet you are talking about
-- 5:35 p.m.

Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
Hon Member, I believe as an Hon Member of the Committee, you took part in the deliberation?
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, yes. I am saying this to urge them in future negotiations that this is too expensive. I am seconding this Motion subject --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
All right. Please, wind up.
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:35 p.m.
So, Mr Speaker, I am saying that this is a bad facility in spite of the tenable reasons they have given for taking it; they should do better next time. And I insist. N1 US$110,000,000, then just a small --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
Your time is up. Please, resume your seat.
Mr Afenyo-Markin 5:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am grateful to you.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
First Deputy Speaker: Hon Members, with regard to the Resolutions, we will take them separately.
So Hon Minister for Finance?
RESOLUTIONS 5:35 p.m.

Minister for Finance (Mr Seth E. Terkpeh) 5:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
WHEREAS by the provisions of article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), the terms and conditions of any loan raised by the Government of the Republic of Ghana on behalf of itself or any public institution or authority shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by a Resolution of Parliament;
PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), at the request of the Government of the Republic Ghana acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has
been laid before Parliament the terms and conditions of the SAIN covered Export Credit Facility Agreement between the Govern- ment of the Republic of Ghana and Deutsche Bank S.A. Banco Alemão, Sao Paulo (as Arranger), Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas (as Agent, Security Agent and Account Bank), Deutsche Bank AG, New York (as Original Lender), Deutsche Bank AG, London (as Original Lender) and Santander Bank (as Original Lender) with support from the Brazilian Official Equalisation Programme (PROEX) for an amount of one hundred and forty million, five hundred and seventy-six thousand, two hundred and thirty- four United States dollars (US$140,576,234.00) for the design and construction of Kasoa interchange and ancilliary works.
Mr James K. Avedzi 5:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
Yes, Hon Minister?
Term Facility for the design and construction of Kasoa Interchange and
ancilliary works
Minister for Finance (Mr Seth E. Terkpeh) 5:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
WHEREAS by the provisions of article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), the terms and conditions of any loan raised by the Government of the Republic of Ghana on behalf of itself or any public institution or authority shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by a Resolution of Parliament;
PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181 of the Constitution and sections 3 and 7 of the Loans Act, 1970 (Act 335), at the request of the Government of the Republic Ghana acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has been laid before Parliament the terms and conditions
of the Term Facility Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Deutsche Bank S. A. Banco Alemão, Sao Paulo (as Arranger), Deutsche Bank AG, New York (as Agent and Original Lender) for an amount of thirty-two million United States dollars (US$32,000,000.00) with support from the Brazilian Official Equalisation Programme (PROEX) for the design and construction of Kasoa interchange and ancilliary works.
THIS HONOURABLE HOUSE 5:35 p.m.

Mr Avedzi 5:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
Deputy Majority Leader?
Mr Agbesi 5:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, item number 16 on page 11 of the Order Paper.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
Yes, Chairman of the Committee on Roads and Transport?
MOTIONS 5:35 p.m.

Chairman of the Committee (Michael Coffie Boampong) 5:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80 (1), which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Committee on Roads and Transport on the Contract/ Design Build Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S.A., Brazil acting through its branch Construtora Queiroz Galvão S.A. Sucursal Gana for an amount up to one hundred and sixty million United States dollars (US$160,000,000.00) for the design and construction of Kasoa interchange and ancilliary works may be moved today.
Mr Kwabena Owusu-Aduomi 5:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Contract/Design Build Agreement between the Government of the Republic
of Ghana and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S. A., Brazil for Kasoa
interchange and ancilliary works
Chairman of the Committee (Michael Coffie Boampong) 5:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to
move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Committee on Roads and Transport on the Contract/Design Build Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S.A., Brazil acting through its branch Construtora Queiroz Galvão S.A. Sucursal Gana for an amount up to one hundred and sixty million United States dollars (US$160,000,000.00) for the design and construction of Kasoa interchange and ancilliary works.
Introduction
The Contract Agreement between the Government of the Republic Of Ghana (represented by the Ministry of Roads and Highways) and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S. A (acting through its Branch Construtora Queiroz Galvão S.A Sucursal Gana) for the design and construction of Kasoa interchange and ancillary works was laid in the House on Wednesday, 1st October, 2014 and referred by Mr Speaker to the Committee on Roads and Transport for consideration and report in accordance with article 181 (5) of the 1992 Constitution and Order 189 of the Standing Orders of Parliament.
The Committee met with the Hon Deputy Minister for Roads and Highways, Hon Isaac Adjei Mensah, officials of the Ghana Highways Authority and the Department of Urban Roads and considered the Agreement. The Committee presents its Report to the House in accordance with Order 161 of the Standing Orders of the House.
Background
The increasing population growth of the Metropolis of Accra continues to impact on the size and growth of outlying towns and settlements with Kasoa in the Awutu-Senya East Municipality in the Central Region being one of the heavily affected. Population data indicated that Kasoa which had a population of 863 in 1970 had increased to 69,384 in 2010. While the growth in population had stimulated commerce and general economic growth of Kasoa, the activities thereof appear to confound the orderly and efficient flow of traffic on the road infrastructure particularly, the N1 Corridor. Indeed, the vehicular-pedestrian conflict at the intersection of the N1 Corridor, the high incidence of accidents and long delays and safety concerns for motorist and road users are issues that need to be promptly addressed.
To forestall the deteriorating challenges on the afore-mentioned road infrastruc- ture, the Ministry of Roads and Highways intended response is to among other interventions; improve the existing road infrastructure with an effective combination of traffic management measures and improvements through the design and construction of an interchange at Kasoa Intersection.
Consequently, at its Twenty-Fourth Meeting held on Thursday, 11th September, 2014, Cabinet considered and approved the Commercial and Financing Agreements for the project. The Commercial Contract for the Project is one hundred and sixty million United States dollars (USD160,000,000.00) for the
works. The detailed cost components for the project is attached as Annexure A.
Scope of project
The Committee noted that works to be undertaken as part of the project comprise:
(a) Design Phase
The design phase shall address the following:
Preliminary design of the approved option
Detailed engineering design
An interchange at the Kasoa intersection (270m) which would include but not limited to the following:
- A new Corridor Accra-South-East sector
- A one-way branch flyover for the Accra South-East sector
- Improvement of the intersection with a complete remodelling
- Road and drainage improvement works
- Improvement of the pedestrian, cyclist and public transport facilities based on well- developed pedestrian, cyclist and public transport manage- ment plans
- Provision of street lights for night time safety
- Improved streetscape and landscape of the project area
- Transport transit points
- Social facilities.
Chairman of the Committee (Michael Coffie Boampong) 5:35 p.m.


(b) Construction phase

The construction phase is the construction of the Kasoa interchange. The project is scheduled to be executed by Construtora Queiroz Galvão S.A Sucursal Gana within twenty-four (24) months with defects notification period of one year.

Justification for the project

The N1 forms part of the Trans-Coastal Corridor for the ECOWAS sub-region and also an important road infrastructure linking Accra and major agricultural, educational, industrial, and not the least major tourist hubs in the country. The volume of traffic on the said road is quite high. Information on the traffic volume given to the Committee by the Department of Urban Roads indicated that on the average, about 26,000 vehicles ply the Kasoa to Winneba stretch, 18,454 on the Nyanyano stretch, 18,000 on the Kasoa- Bawjiase section and about 42,900 is recorded for the Kasoa-Accra stretch. On festive days and weekends, the Kasoa- Accra portion could record about 90,000 vehicles.

This, therefore, informs the importance of the road infrastructure and the critical need to have the perennial severe traffic congestion which impacts negatively on vehicular running cost, ensuring motorist- pedestrian conflicts and accidents and above all, increase high pollution from auto mobile fumes which adversely affect the health of motorists and residents dealt with promptly.

The implementation of the project which include transport terminals and some social facilities as per the works spelt out in the scope of the project will not only improve traffic flow on the Accra- Cape Coast highway but some road

infrastructure within Kasoa and its environs, ultimately reducing vehicular running cost. Indeed, the implementation of the project will also improve the waiting times for public transport, generally impacting positively on the social and economic wellbeing of the inhabitants of the project catchment area and even beyond.

Observations and recommendations

The Committee is agreeable to the structure and terms of the Contract Agreement but recommends:

i. The re-phrasing of point 8 of the Contract Agreement in page 4 since advance payments are made when projects are in full force. The commencement date specified in the Agreement should be unambiguous.

ii. Section 2: Letter of Acceptance, page 7, line 19. The Committee recommends for the substitution of “Director of Urban Roads” for “Chief Engineer” as the former is deemed more senior and more appropriate to be dealt with for instructions regarding the Department of Urban Roads.

iii. Section 2: Letter of Acceptance, page 7, line 24, substitute “shall” for “may” to be in conformity with the renditions under point 4.2 of particular condition of Contract Performance Security in page 15.

iv. Section 4: Particular Conditions of Contract: ANNEX A:

:PERFORMANCE BANK

GUARANTEE page 32. The Committee recommends that there should be a period of validity for the Guarantee.

Preparation of Property Impact Assessment Report which addresses the inventory of affected properties and payment of compensation to affected property owners are known to unnecessarily drag the commencement and completion of physical works nation- wide. Although the Committee has been assured that these activities will not impact negatively on the commencement and completion of the project, the Committee hopes that the Ministry will effectively collaborate with the Land Valuation Board and other agencies of State to respond to issues that may emerge from the assessment, preparation and payment of due compensation to hasten work for the project.

The road and related infrastructures have a design life span of 20 years, the bridges have a design life of one hundred years (100 years) while the primary and secondary drains have fifty (50) and fifteen (15) year return period respectively. Indeed, the lifespan of the stated facilities are quite high which at a cursory glance give good indication of durability and value for money. But the Committee cautions that these would only be paper specifications if on-site supervision is not enforced to ensure that the works are done in accordance with specification requirements.

Indeed, it is trite knowledge that most of our road infrastructure fail due partly to lack of on-site supervision and the use of inferior materials. Also tied or related to failure of most projects including road infrastructure is poor maintenance culture sometimes blamed on lack of funds for maintenance. The Committee posits that it is high time attitudinal change prises this national canker. The Committee urges the Ministry of Roads and Highways to strongly monitor on-site works including

laboratory and engineering testing of materials that are to be used for the infrastructural works. Site engineers are to ensure that specified materials are also used for the project to ensure longevity and value for money. Conscious efforts are made at the post construction period for the requisite maintenance of the infrastructure.

In view of the dense population of the constructional site, the Committee underscored the need for the contractor to take reasonable measures at the constructional site to prevent chemical spillage, silting, flooding and other activities likely to cause pollution. The Ministry should endeavour at all times to monitor the on-site activities to ensure that Clause 1.31.7.s of the Protection of the Environmentally Sensitive Area under the Contract Agreement is enforced.

Conclusion

The Committee, having carefully examined the Contract Agreement, is of the view that the outcomes would attain the over-all national objective of creating a visibility for Government commitment to provide the needed road infrastructure for ease of accessibility nationwide.

The Committee, therefore, recommends to the House to adopt its Report and approve the Contract/Design Build Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana (represented by the Ministry of Roads and Highways) and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S. A (acting through its Branch Construtora Queiroz Galvão S.A Sucursal Gana) for the design and construction of Kasoa interchange and ancillary works

Respectfully submitted.
SPACE FOR ANNEXURE 5:35 p.m.

Mr Kwabena Owusu-Aduomi (NPP -- Ejisu) 5:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Mr Speaker, on the Accra-Cape Coast highway, there are sections that suffer severe traffic congestion and that has consequently reduced significantly the level of service that this highway is supposed to provide for road users and as a result increasing travel times.
One of such sections is the approaches to the intersection at Kasoa; this congestion is as a result of increased traffic flow and also commercial vehicles making U-turns at the intersection.
Last but not least, is unapproved parking of vehicles within the neighbourhood of the intersection. The situation worsens during the weekends when travels to Winneba, Cape-Coast, and Sekondi-Takoradi and beyond increases the traffic and reaches its peak. It has been estimated that over 95,000 vehicles use this intersection per day.
The Kasoa intersection is one of the important nodal points on the Accra-Cape Coast-Takoradi highway. It is part of the popular N1 Highway but its efficiency at the intersection has significantly been reduced.
Mr Speaker, there are a number of negative impacts that this congestion has on the people who live around the area. The increase in air pollution within the intersection and its approaches, especially within the commercial areas affects the health of the people who live around there.
There is also reduction of health by the motoring public. This is because you have to be in traffic for many hours and
the stress and frustration alone adds a bit of a toll to the health of the motoring public. There is waste of fuel as a result of being in traffic for very long hours and also there is an increase in travel time and so on and so forth.
Mr Speaker, to get out of all these challenges -- in terms of business frustration, health hazards, increase in operating our vehicles and so on and so forth, a great separation intersection has been proposed at Kasoa, and this is the interchange.
Mr Speaker, but the problem at the Kasoa intersection is a very complex one. It is not just putting the interchange at Kasoa that will solve the problem. We need to ensure that the vehicles that leave the intersection move as quickly as possible from the section, so that there is no backflow of traffic into the intersection.
Mr Speaker, in that situation, this project consists of a number of roads that would be improved within the neighbourhood of the intersection to ensure that traffic flow is as fast as possible.
Mr Speaker, if you look at the components of this project, we have about 20 kilometres of local roads that would be done within the Kasoa area. There is also the Kasoa-Obom-Amasaman road, which is about 33 kilometres that would also be rehabilitated. There is also the need to dual the portion of the road from the interchange to Bawjiase and then the interchange to Nyanyanor. Mr Speaker, it is important that the Obom junction also have a flyover. So, Mr Speaker, this project involves a lot, and not only the intersection at Kasoa.
Mr Speaker, there are also community enhancement projects that would be done; boreholes, schools and others, that would be given to the people in the area.
Mr Speaker, the Committee was also asked to look at the form of agreement, the conditions of contract, specification requirements, and so on and so forth. There were a few recommendations that we made.
The first one was that, Mr Speaker, the commencement date on page 4, bullet number 8 of the form of agreement needs to be looked at. This is because, Mr Speaker, no engineer or employer would make advanced payment without the contract coming into full force. Therefore, we would advise the Ministry to ensure that that commencement date is made unambiguous.
In the same way, Mr Speaker, in the letter of acceptance, on page number 7, paragraph (3) ought to be the Director of Urban Roads. The contractor is supposed to see the Chief Engineer, Maintenance, anytime any situation on this project is required. But we recommended that no, that Chief Engineer responsible for Maintenance is responsible to the Director of Urban Roads and therefore, it is proper that the contractor sees the Director of Urban Roads before the Director of Urban Roads issues any further instructions to him.
Mr Speaker, we also looked at the particular conditions of contract. Mr Speaker, clause 4.2 on page 15 specifies a bank guarantee as the form of performance security. Mr Speaker, it was realised that there was no validity period for the guarantee of that agreement, and we recommended to the Ministry that it should have a validity period starting from the date of commencement to the time that the completion certificate is issued to the contractor.
So, Mr Speaker, all in all, the Committee assessed the commercial agreement that was put before us and we were of the opinion that it would offer a better facilitation for the execution of this project.
I thank you, Mr Speaker, for giving me this opportunity.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:45 p.m.
Thank you very much.
Hon Members, I was minded to put the Question.
rose
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:45 p.m.
Yes, let us hear from you.
Ms Ursula Ekuful (NPP-- Ablekuma West) 5:45 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker, much as the justification for this project is laudable, I am a bit concerned that the Committee has had to consider and present their Report on this large volume of documents in less than 24 hours. Much as they may have the competence, the skill -- and I am not knocking anything, I am a little concerned that we do not have any -- at least, I have not heard anything about the urgency for undertaking this exercise in 24 hours, the House being recalled from recess to pass these laws.
Mr Speaker, with the haste in which we are conducting this exercise, we may overlook certain pertinent issues not out of advertence, but inadvertently. This is because we have not had the time to consider the documents that have been put before us and that is the source of my worry. That while doing all this to facilitate the acquisition of these loans, we may be short-changing ourselves as a nation and not undertaking our oversight responsi- bility the way we should.
rose
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:45 p.m.
Yes, Hon Minister, do you have a point of order?
Alhaji Fuseini 5:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am surprised at this comment coming at this time. This is because the Commercial Agreement speaks to the construction or execution of the project, and that requires technical expertise. That was sent to the Committee and a pictorial or visual presentation was made to the Committee on how the construction would be like, and what would go into it.
Mr Speaker, I do not see how a Committee which was given the visual representation of what would appear at Kasoa would miss. So, I find this comment and contribution totally out of place and unnecessary.
Thank you.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:45 p.m.
Very well.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:45 p.m.
The Hon Deputy Second Deputy Speaker will take over the Chair.
MR SECOND DEPUTY SPEAKER
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:52 p.m.
Hon Dan Botwe, I wonder why you are laughing. Is there a joke? [Interruption.]

We have had our two minutes of fun. Now, let us do some work.

Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
Mr Agbesi 5:55 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker, we have just had item number 17, and the Motion was carried. We are to take the Resolution contained in item 18 as captured on page 12 of the Order Paper.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
Item number18, the Resolution. Minister for Finance or the Minister for Roads and Highways?
Hon Minority Leader, I have been advised that it has always been the Minister for Finance who moves these financial matters. Do you agree? Should we --
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, yes. This is because it involves a Loan Agreement, and the Minister responsible for Finance could do it. [Interruptions.]
It is an Agreement; it is a contract. Mr Speaker, in that case, it has to be the Minister for Roads and Highways.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
Minister for Roads and Highways?
Alhaji Fuseini 5:55 p.m.
Respectfully Mr Speaker, I beg to move --
rose
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
Hon Prempeh, do you have a point of order?
Dr Prempeh 5:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I thought I would hear from my Hon Majority Leader, the circumstance of this extended Sitting. We started at 12.00 noon and we have gone pass 2.00 p.m., which is the normal four hours in the Standing Orders.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
We started at 2.00 p.m. -- we did not start at 12.00 noon. At 12.00 noon, what happened was not part -- It was a committee meeting. We started at 2.00 p.m.
Dr Prempeh 5:55 p.m.
Committee of the Whole --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
It was a committee meeting --
Mr Prempeh 5:55 p.m.
Committee of the Whole?
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
Committee of the Whole is still a committee meeting.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, with respect to my Hon Colleague, what we had was a joint caucus meeting and not a committee meeting.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
Thank you very much.
So, it means that we started Sitting at 2.00 p.m. and we agreed yesterday that we will start at such.
So, from 2:00 p.m. to this time, about 5.00p.m. -- we have not even scratched the surface. We are going till 12.00 midnight.
Thank you.
Hon Minister for Roads and Highways? [Interruption] -- Yes?
Alhaji Fuseini 5:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
Sorry, one minute, please --
When you go to several Parliaments, there are about three people there who are conducting business. So, if it is left with three of us, we will conduct business. [Interruption] --
Let us go to the main -- [Interruption] -- All right.
Mr Avedzi 5:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to draw your attention to the point that it is true this is a Commercial Agreement under the Ministry of Roads and Highways and that was why we would want the Minister for Roads and Highways to move the Motion. But the purpose of this is under article 181(5), which is an International Financial Agreement and for that matter, I believe that it should rather be done by the Finance Minister and not the Minister for Roads and Highways. So, I would want to draw your attention to that.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
We will not drag this issue. So, between the Minister for Finance and the Minister for Roads and Highways, I put it to your election.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, in these matters, it is the Minister designated by the President to do it -- If it is the Minister responsible for Roads and Highways, so be it. I do not see any splitting of hairs in this matter. But by convention and practice, we have done this. So, the Minister -- both of them are here; either of them can do it. I do not think we have to split hairs over this.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
Thank you. Let us proceed. [Pause] -- Sorry, I will take this advice now that the Minister for Finance will do it. If you look at the text of the Resolution, it states;
“Pursuant to the provisions of the said article 181(5) of the Constitution, and at the request of the Government of Ghana acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has been laid before Parliament…”
So, the Minister for Finance should do it. His name appears in the text of the Resolution. Minister for Finance -- [Interruption] -- Look at the second paragraph of the Resolution numbered 18(2), the first three lines -- Minister for Finance? -- [Pause ]-- Minister for Roads, move it, please --
RESOLUTIONS 5:55 p.m.

Minister for Roads and Highways (Alhaji Inusah A. B. Fuseini) 5:55 p.m.
Respectfully, Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
WHEREAS by the provisions of article 181(5) of the Constitution, the terms and conditions of any international business or economic transaction to which the Govern- ment of Ghana is a party shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by Parliament by a Resolution supported by the votes of a majority of all Members of Parliament;
PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181(5) of the Constitution, and at the request of the Government of Ghana, acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has been laid before Parliament the terms and conditions of a Contract/Design Build Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S.A., Brazil acting through its branch Construtora Queiroz Galvão S.A. Sucursal Gana for an amount up to one hundred and sixty million United States dollars (US$160,000,000.00) for the design and construction of Kasoa interchange and ancilliary works.
THIS HONOURABLE HOUSE 5:55 p.m.

Mr Michael C. Boampong 5:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion. [Interruption]
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
Pardon, Hon Member?
Mr Frederick Opare-Ansah 5:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Minister said he was moving that the Motion be taken. What exactly does that mean? Does he want this House to adopt the Motion or the Motion be taken or the Resolution? What exactly is he trying to do? [Interruption.] -- The Minister says he is moving that the Motion be taken --
rose
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
Hon Minister, I understood what you said. Thank you -- [Interruption.] -- I also understand yours but do not worry. So, who is seconding the Motion?
Mr Boampong 5:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion -- [Interruption.] -- Motion number 18 --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
What is the Motion for?
Mr Boampong 5:55 p.m.
Sorry, it is Resolution number 18 --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
So, you second that we should do what? --
Mr Boampong 5:55 p.m.
And urge Hon Members to assist in approving the whole thing -- [Uproar] --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
I am being asked to put the Question but I must understand what I am doing.

Question put and Motion agreed to.

Resolved accordingly.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
So where are we now?
Mr Alfred K. Agbesi 5:55 p.m.
Item 22
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
Item 22 -- Motion -- Chairman of the Committee?
MOTIONS 5:55 p.m.

Chairman of the Committee (Mr Michael Coffie Boampong) 5:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80 (1), which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Committee on Roads and Transport on the Contract/Design Build Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S.A., Brazil acting through its branch Construtora Queiroz Galvão S. A. Sucursal Gana for an amount up to one hundred and seventy million United States dollars (US$170,000,000.00) for the design and construction of Ring Road Flyover, Accra may be moved today.
Mr Kwabena Owusu-Aduomi 5:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
Motion
23?
Mr Agbesi 5:55 p.m.
Yes, Mr Speaker, 23.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
Chairman of the Committee?

Contract/Design Build Agreement between Government of Ghana and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S.A

(Ring Road Flyover)
Mr Michael C. Boampong (Chairman of Committee) 6:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Committee on Roads and Transport on the Contract/Design Build Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S.A., Brazil, acting through its branch Construtora Queiroz Galvão S.A. Sucursal Gana for an amount up to one hundred and seventy million United States dollars (US$170,000,000.00) for the design and construction of Ring Road Flyover, Accra.
In doing so, I wish to present your Committtee's Report.
Introduction
The above Contract Agreement was laid in the House on Wednesday, 1st October, 2014 and referred to the Committee on Roads and Transport for consideration and report in accordance with article 181 (5) of the 1992 Constitution and Order 189 of the Standing Orders of Parliament.
The Committee met with the Hon Deputy Minister for Roads and Transport, Mr. Isaac Adjei-Mensah, officials of the Ghana Highways Authority and the Department of Urban Roads and considered the Agreement. The Committee presents its Report to the

House in accordance with Order 161 of the Standing Orders of the House.

Background

The population of Ghana is increasing rapidly with approximately three (3) million people living in Accra metropolitan area alone, representing more than fourteen (14) per cent of the national population. It is estimated that Accra is growing at four (4) per cent per year and can be extrapolated to double in sixteen (16) years. The growth, characterised by heavy vehicular congestion (particularly during the peak areas), weak implementation of traffic management measures, inadequate facilities for pedestrians and cyclists and high accidents rates.

The intended response, among others is to improve existing road infrastructure with an effective combination of traffic management measures and improvement in regulatory enforcement to address congestion and safety issues.

The Flyover would complement other rehabilitation works currently being implemented in Accra as part of the policy objective to strengthen the provision of road infrastructure and related facilities and to improve the business environment to sustain broad-based growth in achieving middle-income country (MIC) status by 2015.

The project which is estimated at US$170,000,000.00 (detailed breakdown of physical works as per Annexure A) is for the design and construction of a new interchange from Ring Road Central through New Times Corporation/Feo Eyeo junction crossing over the Kwame Nkrumah Circle to complement the current construction at the Kwame Nkrumah Circle in providing a solution for the complex interaction of traffic and pedestrian movement in the project area.

Project objectives

The objective of the project is to facilitate socio-economic development of the country through improved, efficient and cost effective road transport system with enhanced road safety standards that integrate economic centres, contributing to poverty alleviation and improvements in the standards of living.

Project scope

The project is scheduled to be completed within eighteen (18) months and would have the following components:

(i) 925 metres length of Interchange bridge and related road works.

(ii) Replacement of the current bridge over the Odaw River and associated works.

(iii)Widening of the Ring Road from the Kwame Nkrumah Circle to Obetsebi Lamptey Circle.

(iv) Improvement of the Feo Eyeo/ New Times Corporation Road.

(v) Pavement of the lorry stations and the access roads.

(vi) Construction of 300 metres of ramps and 200 metres of loops.

(vii) Construction of a Flyover and a roundabout at Feo Eyeo / New Times junction.

(viii) Construction of a third bridge over Odaw River.

(ix)The construction of a Kwame Nkrumah Monument Park and related ancillary works.

The project is scheduled to be executed by Construtora Queiroz Galvão S. A. Sucursal Gana.

Justification for the project

The road constitutes a major link to the network of four major arterial roads that links suburban areas of Accra to the Central Business District.

Congestion on this arterial road is created by the current level railway crossing, the narrow bridge over the Odaw River, the intersection at New Times Corporation area and the numerous transport terminals.

Improving this arterial road would greatly enhance performance capacity and grossly reduce travel time, congestion and stimulate local economic growth.

The Ring Road flyover has significant improvements with the aim of providing adequate traffic conditions up to the horizon of 2035.

Observations and recommendations

The Committee finds the technical specifications and the general structure of the Design Build Agreement acceptable. It observed that the project will complement the Kwame Nkrumah Circle project and will address congestion, the perennial flooding challenge of the Odaw River.

Another challenge which the project would address is the numerous transport terminals dotted along the project area. The contractor will engage the services of a planner to facilitate a comprehensive rationalisation of all transport terminals in the project catchment area.

The Committee observed that the project will not require any major re- alignments, land acquisition or destruction of structures. The potential adverse environmental and social impacts could be limited to site specific and will be mitigated in compliance with our environmental legislation.

The Committee was assured that the Ministry will effectively collaborate with the Land Valuation Board and other agencies of State to respond to issues that

may emerge from the assessment, preparation and payment of due compensation to hasten work for the project.

The project catchment area is noted for intense commercial activities and to some extent, high crime rate among others. The Committee, therefore, lauds the incorporation of a new police post and an Ambulance and Fire Service stations which would be located at special locations under the Ring Road overpass.

In addition, the provision of Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park and landscaping will aesthetically add to the otherwise drab area.

The Committee recommends to the Ministry to consider incorporating “green spaces” such as parks and relaxation centres in future as part of social intervention aspect of projects to add beauty and modernity to the Accra metropolis and other cities in the country.

The Obetsebi Lamptey Circle is a natural link to the proposed Ring Road flyover. As the Kwame Nkrumah interchange and the Ring Road flyover are being implemented, there should be an urgent need to begin the process of addressing the Obetsebi Lamptey interchange to be linked to the Mallam junction. This initiative will completely erase the potential traffic at the Obetsebi Lamptey and on the Kaneshie - Mallam road.

The Committee strongly suggested to the Ministry of Roads and Highways to urgently consider the decongestion at Obetsebi Lamptey Circle through to Kaneshie Market and if possible, tie it with this project.

Conclusion

In view of the importance of the project to resolve vehicular traffic and safety of motorists and pedestrians, the Committee, having satisfied itself of the Structure and Commercial Contract Agreement, recommends that the House approves the Contract Agreement for the project.

Respectfully submitted.
Mr Michael C. Boampong (Chairman of Committee) 6:05 a.m.


SPACE FOR ANNEXURE ‘A' -

PAGE 8 - 6.05P.M.
Mr Owusu-Aduomi 6:05 a.m.
-- that links Adabraka and Kokomlemle.
Mr Speaker, in addition to solving this traffic congestion --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
Sorry, Hon Member.
You do not turn your back -- I do not want to name and shame but do not turn your back -- sit down; I am seeing you. Do not do that [Laughter.] There will be contempt of Parliament soon.
Hon Member, continue?
Mr Owusu-Aduomi 6:05 a.m.
Thank you Mr Speaker.
In addition to solving the traffic congestion problem at the Nkrumah Circle,
roads within the area had to be improved by widening and making good the surface condition in order to increase the capacities of these roads.
Mr Speaker, the traffic congestion at the Kwame Nkrumah Circle is also as a result of the numerous vehicular stations within the Nkrumah Circle area. We have the Very Important Personality (VIP) Station, we have the Neoplan Station; there are a number of stations there and it is important that this project looks at these stations and possibly improve them and also improve the pavement of these stations.
Mr Speaker, it is also important that the drainage situation within the Kwame Nkrumah Circle area is improved, and as a result, the existing bridge over River Odaw will be demolished and a bigger one will be reconstructed to ensure that the flooding that we have periodically for that area is also reduced.
Mr Speaker, these notwithstanding, the severe traffic congestion that we have at the Obetsebi Lamptey Circle through to the Kaneshie Market ought to be considered although it is not part of the project. Mr Speaker, if the traffic from the Obetsebi Lamptey Circle through to the Kaneshie Market is not solved, these improvement lines that are being done at Kwame Nkrumah Circle and its immediate environs, would not live long.
Mr Speaker, it is important that the Ministry of Roads and Highways, as a matter of urgency, looks at solving the traffic congestion problem at the Obetsebi Lamptey Circle.
Mr Speaker, when these projects are completed, they will ensure free flow of traffic within the catchment area of the Kwame Nkrumah Circle.
Mr Speaker, the Committee also looked at the form of Agreement, the conditions
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
Yes, Hon Kofi Frimpong?
Mr Kofi Frimpong 6:05 a.m.
Thank you Mr Speaker --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 a.m.
Sorry, I will take the Majority side before I come to you.
Hon Member?
Mr Theophilus Tetteh Chaie (NDC -- Ablekuma Central) 6:05 a.m.
Thank you very much for the opportunity.
I beg to support the Motion and in doing so, I would also urge all Members to support it being discussed on the floor.
Mr Speaker, on the construction of the Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park Monument, it is a very important aspect of the construction that is taking place.
We all know that currently, with the demolition of the Kwame Nkrumah Circle roundabout, there was a particular monument that reflects the history of this country, Osagyefo Dr Kwame Nkrumah [Hear! Hear!] and we were all wondering whether that particular monument would be replaced at the site that it was previously. We thank God that with this particular Agreement before us, that particular project is well featured and we thank the Government for at least, continuing to remember the memory of Osagyefo Dr Kwame Nkrumah.
Aside that, we all know how busy the area is and for Government to include a police post, fire station and ambulance station within the project area, I think that is also very laudable. It will help in times of emergency.
Mr Speaker, after the construction of these flyovers, there is going to be another traffic congestion at Obetsebi Lamptey Circle, which is a boundary in my constituency and I believe that the Minister will take that particular project also on board.
If that is not addressed, what we want to solve as a nation, would not be solved. This is because currently, when you drive through any part of Accra through to the Obetsebi Lamptey Circle, we all see the traffic congestion over there and with the construction of these new flyovers, traffic is now going to be mounted at that particular section.
So, I would want to plead with the Minister, that they should take that particular project very urgent and ensure that another flyover is constructed along that particular stretch.
Mr Speaker, with these few words, I support the Motion.
Mr Frimpong Kofi (NPP -- Kwabre East) 6:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to associate myself with the Motion on the floor and draw our attention to some serious policy statements that were made in this year's budget and the previous State of the Nation Address.
Mr Speaker, it would be recalled in the State of the Nation Address, the President said that he was putting a moratorium on new projects and loans. It may also be recalled that in the budget, the Minister for Finance stated that there would be no new loans and projects.
Mr Speaker, when we were being recalled, I thought we were going to consider issues pertaining to maybe, the nomination of the Minister for Trade and Industry (Mr Ekwow Spio-Garbrah), not knowing that of the forty-two items, about ninety per cent of them are on loans.
Mr Speaker, this raises an integrity issue —
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
Are you against the Motion?
Mr Frimpong 6:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, no. But I am drawing our attention to the failure of Government policy and the integrity of us as politicians in the eyes of the people of Ghana —
rose
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
Hon Minister for Roads and Highways?
Alhaji Inusah Fuseini 6:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, Hon Frimpong is a senior teacher and a very diligent Hon Member of this House, and knows that when statements of such nature are made, they ought to be
supported with evidence, especially referring to the State of the Nation Address and the Budget Statement.
Mr Speaker, I do not recall the President saying that there would be a moratorium on new projects. The President swore an oath to deliver projects that would meet the legitimate expectations of the people of this country and that includes new projects.
Mr Speaker, if you would be kind enough —
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
Hon Minister, I will give you an opportunity at the end of the day to make your contribution.
With regard to whether the President or the Minister said whatever, do not let us split hairs, please. I am not supposed to partake in the debate and so, if that is the case, let us accept it and move on. But if not too, let us point it out that that was not the case. I am not the — but I will let Mr Frimpong round up.
Mr Frimpong 6:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, to buttress what the President said -- The President said that he had ordered even the MMDAs to stop awarding new contracts — [Hear! Hear!]— and to finish the existing ones before awarding new ones and that was why the moratorium came in.
Mr Speaker, when we were asked to come back, I did not know that we were going to take new loans — I never thought of that. These loans that we are taking are quite unprecedented in quantum.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
They are quite what?
Mr Frimpong 6:15 p.m.
Unprecedented— [Laughter.]—Very huge ones, and they are coming from the President.
Mr Speaker, my plea is that, we must try as much as possible to walk our talk, so that the citizens of Ghana will have confidence in us as politicians. If for any reason, the President thinks that we must lift that moratorium issue, he must come back to us as the people's representatives and tell us that, this time because of this and that, this moratorium on loans and projects has been lifted, and that he has changed his mind. But this time, we have been taken unaware. I do not know what I am going to tell my people when I meet them —
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
But are you against the Motion?
Mr Frimpong 6:15 p.m.
No —
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
You are for the Motion, so—
Mr Frimpong 6:15 p.m.
I thought that part of the loan would be used to finish the Suhum loan and part to construct my Kenyasi-Antoa road —
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
Thank you very much for that wonderful contribution.
Mr Frimpong 6:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, with these few words, I rest my case.
Dr Kwabena Donkor (NDC -- Pru East) 6:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to support the Motion and in doing so, I would want to reiterate the economic significance of a number of these roads, especially this road.
It is estimated that the cost to the economy in fuel usage by Ghanaian motorists being stuck in traffic for so long is a major drag on our economy.

Ms Sarah Adwoa Safo -- rose —
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
Hon Member, do you have a point of order?
Ms Sarah Adwoa Safo 6:15 p.m.
Very well Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member keeps giving us some statistics of the economic implications or the cost for motorists who are stuck in traffic and I wonder where he is getting his figures from — this is a House of record and he ought to give us the source —
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
Thank you very much — One of the first things I learnt in primary school is that, what is good for the goose is good for the gander.
I did not ask for the source from Hon Kofi Frimpong, and so, Hon Dr Kwabena Donkor, continue — I will not ask for your source.
Dr Donkor 6:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, my case has been well made and I thank you for the opportunity -- [Interruption]
rose
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
Last one and then the Minister — two minutes.
Mrs Gifty Klenam (NPP-- Lower West Akim) 6:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am a bit surprised — when I went through the —
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
Do you rise to support the Motion?
Mrs Klenam 6:15 p.m.
Yes I do but I have a little contribution to make.
Mr Speaker, in July, the Eastern Region Chiefs went on road inspection. Despite the concern and outcry of the people of the Eastern Region, we cannot find anything of the Eastern Region's roads here.
Mr Speaker, I would want to find out from the Minister —
Is the Hon Minister concerned about the Eastern Region roads? —
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
The Hon Member knows how and when to ask that question, and so, let us take Greater Accra for now. Later on, we will go to other places.
Hon Minority Leader?
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:15 p.m.
Mr Speaker, having listened to the Ranking Member on the Roads and Transport Committee, I am convinced and persuaded by the forces of his arguments, that these projects —
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
You are convinced by what — the forces of?
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:15 p.m.
The forces of his own arguments —
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:15 p.m.
All right. But not of darkness?
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:15 p.m.
Not of darkness —[Laughter]— that this project is very important — [Interruption]
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
Order! Order!
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I have a few issues to raise with the projects and perhaps, the Minister may be able to address them.
Mr Speaker, first of all, this project is for the design and construction of a ring road flyover in Accra at the Kwame Nkrumah Circle. We are told the cost is US$170,000,000.00; one would want to know the cost of the original project plus its ancillary works. This is because it is the same project we are talking about; this is just an enhancement of it. What is the total cost coming up to?
Mr Speaker, this will really help us determine whether as a nation, we have value-for-money for this project.
I am asking this because I am looking at the intricacy of the design of the flyover and I know for sure that the interchange at Prempeh College is more intricate than this one being proposed for the Circle flyover. I am not talking about the comprehensive project, it is just the flyover.
Mr Speaker, I am asking that we get further education on this, because the total cost thus far of the one at Sofoline is US$38,000,000. This component alone is US$170,000,000 and I am really shocked; it is US$38,000,000 -- [murmuring] -- Please, I am talking about what exists now. It is dollar- rated, it is not Ghana cedis.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
Minority Leader, please, address the Speaker.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, he is trying to be a thorn in my neck --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
I know. It is good you did not mention his name, just “he”. So, the records will not show it.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
So Mr Speaker, we need to juxtapose this because the dollar has not been changed since it keeps urging and I ask, when was this project awarded? We need to probe into this.
Mr Speaker, in my view, as much as I agree that this project is necessary, we must go beyond it and probe into the cost of it.
Mr Speaker, I would want to believe that the Finance Committee has not done this House a good service, not at the time that you are talking about the debt to Gross Domestic Product (GDP) ratio, debt sustainability and indeed, debt servicing; how much you are paying as a nation. We thought that the Finance Committee would educate this House on the impact of this facility on these things.
The remit of the Finance Committee includes reporting to us when such loans and Agreements are referred to them, the impact of such loans and Agreements on the economy. They just come to tell us about the terms and conditions and then they want us to rise --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
What is the relevant order, please?
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, Order 169.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
Read it.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
Order 169, if my memory serves me right. Let me just check -- [Pause.] -- Yes. So, Mr Speaker, at the time the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has been with us and these issues have become very critical issues to us as a nation --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
I agree with you but the Report -- I must say, Minority Leader, that personally, I think that there are reports that we take here -- sometimes know our views on these
matters -- sometimes we have the template and we just fit it in, and I agree with the issues that you are raising that the report must reflect some of these issues. But it is not in Order 169. I have read Order 169 and it is not there. I agree with what you are saying and that was why I asked you -- Today, we did not have time but perhaps, the Finance Committee going forward --
There seems to be a certain template in this House; that all the committees -- We considered the 1992 Constitution; they have about five things that they write and when they finish, they put certain headings on the template --
Order 169, the technical staff are advising me but I am refusing to take their advice.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I do not know which orders you are using but there
‘[ is this --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
Continue.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
In my Orders, it is 169. But Mr Speaker, as I said, I agree that it is a project that is necessary. But we should look at the cost, the implication and impact of these Agreements on the economy and the issue relating, as I have said to debt GDP ratio, debt sustainability and debt serving. We should, once we are considering these things, juxtapose these facilities with other facilities that are under construction in this country in order for us to know whether we are going to have value for money.
Mr Speaker, the end should not always justify the means. This is because at the end of the day, it is the nation that is going to have to service these and pay for these loans.
Thank you.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
Chairman of the Finance Committee, I have called you, I want to address you.
The Minister for Roads and Highways will have the opportunity of responding and have the last word. Chairman of the Committee, do you not think that perhaps, we should have a register of Financial Agreements, so that it is easy to check?
Do we have something like that? Just a register, so that you know that you approved a ten kilometre road and it costs US$10.00, so that if somebody brings a ten kilometre road which costs US$40.00, then you may want to know why.
I am not saying that every ten kilometre road should cost US$10.00; there may be more bridges and issues. Then what he is raising, would not arise.
Hon Benjamen Kunbuor?
Dr Benjamin B. Kunbuor 6:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, we definitely must be looking for value for money. But you do not take one project and another project as a basis for doing value-for-money as placement. The location and time of a project can fundamentally be different and you can even have a road that is on a particular gradient; 100 kilometres and it will cost less than one third of that road on a gradient that is a bit more challenging.
There is a process for doing value for money assessment and the competent authorities like Crown Agents, have always used those ones that are internal and specific to the particular project. I agree that value for money assessment needs to be done but it is not done by comparing one project to the other.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
I agree with you but has Crown Agents -- who has come in here? I will not prolong the issue.
Are you through?
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker,
the former Majority Leader -- I will not describe him as extinct Majority Leader but he is the former Majority Leader --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
Because he can be resurrected --
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
He can be resurrected at any time.
Mr Speaker, the issue that he has raised is really germane but I was not just comparing the two. I was saying that we must go beyond this and really conduct our own due diligence. Parliament should have the capacity to do that.
Mr Speaker, I am aware of what he is alluding to. He is talking about gradient and even the structure of the subsoil and even where to ferry the aggregate from; all these things are to the cost; we know that. That is why it is important to have that due diligence conducted and for the Finance Committee to advise us.
We do not just come with terms and conditions; that is the point I was making. I know that if you have to do the eastern corridor road, for instance, you have to come as far down as maybe, the Shai Hills to ferry your aggregates or perhaps, as far down as Matsrikasa.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
Thank you.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
As far as down as Matsrikasa to ferry the aggregates for the construction of the eastern corridor roads; we know that and so, they will certainly add to the cost. But we do not take them for granted; it is for them to advise us and that is the point that I am making, so that when we come to this determination, Parliament would have made --
Hon Member: Please, we cannot hear you. Speak into the microphone.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:35 p.m.
I am doing that.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
Who is that? Who did that? Have you taken over from me -- staged a coup d'état? Who did that? I am prepared to overlook this one but please, do not do --
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, just to assure him that I know what I am about. The Finance Committee should help us better in these matters. This is because the times for consideration of those things are very short and we just cannot come and constitute ourselves into a rubber-stamp and be rolling over these things in the manner that they appear before us.
Mr Speaker, I thank you.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
But Leader, you have raised very serious issues -- because not just for this time but I mean the Roads Committee, the Finance Committee, do they have much time; do they have the supporting expertise to really review the Agreements? And you know, because we are talking about an Agreement that is coming from a Ministry, Ministry of Roads and Highways, with all the structures of engineers and so on, who can give the Minister who is a lawyer technical advice. When you were talking, I saw that you went to seek technical advice; parliamentary committees do not have that capacity. So, Hon Minister, try and do something about this --
But going forward, we need to have that capacity in one way or the other.
Mr Daniel Botwe 6:35 p.m.
-- rose --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
Yes, Hon Daniel Botwe?
Mr Daniel Botwe 6:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, since the Minister has rounded up and the whole project is about Greater Accra roads, one was wondering why the Deputy Majority Leader is here, he has been championing this. You remember that demonstration in Ashaiman sometime ago? Ashaiman roads have not been captured.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
Thank you. Today, you have a lawyer, Deputy Majority Leader. Hon Daniel Botwe is setting the pace for you.
Hon Daniel Botwe, thank you.
Mr Agbesi 6:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, it is excellent that the Minister had brought these Loan Agreements to Parliament for the construction of various roads in Accra. However, Mr Speaker, I would want the Minister for Roads and Highways to specifically answer this question.
Dr Kunbour 6:35 p.m.
-- rose --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
Hon Minister for Defence, do you have a point of order?
Dr Kunbour 6:35 p.m.
Yes, Mr Speaker.
I am a bit taken aback. The Hon Member that is leading Government's Business here, if he wants to withdraw the Government's Business, he should go ahead and do so. But to tell us that he wants an explanation on a matter that is his business -- because now that the
Majority Leader is not here, it is his business to see it through.
If he wants some clarification from the Minister, he can invite the Minister to his office and deal with the implementation problem. As a matter of procedure, I guess that, let us be cautious on it.
Mr Agbesi 6:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, if the former Majority Leader had allowed me, he would have followed my argument.
I am saying that the previous three Ministers of Roads and Highways had always given the undertaken that there was an underpass linking Ashaiman to Accra. Anytime they have Loan Agreements, that would be captured. I would want him to let me know why in this particular loan, it has not been captured. That is my point. It is not because I am sitting in as a Leader, I should not ask questions which must be answered.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
Hon Acting Majority Leader, you know that we wear various hats; I am a Member of Parliament and I am also a Deputy Speaker.
There are issues that come up, that I want to comment. If they talk about Kasoa -- when you create this flyover, you will create traffic in my hometown Winneba. But I did not comment on it because there are ways in which -- so, please, you are now the Leader of the House --
I know that as a Member of Parliament, you feel strongly about this thing but this
is something that you should discuss in chambers with your Minister.
Alhaji Inusah A.B. Fuseini 6:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I thank Members for their various contributions.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
Once I asked you, we want to bring proceedings to an end. I disqualified the question on Eastern Region. I parried the question on Ashaiman, then in your first answer, you said there is a comprehensive programme in dealing with roads all over the country. Then, answer the Eastern Region and the Ashaiman questions or just focus on the loan -- focus on this one.
Alhaji Fuseini 6:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, that was not my intention to answer the previous inquiries about roads; I was just seeking to assure -- Mr Speaker, I take guidance from you.
Mr Speaker, the issue has been raised as to the cost of the flyover at the Kwame Nkrumah interchange and particularly the additional works and compared same to the flyover or interchange at Sofoline.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
Do we have any such interchange in Ghana?
Alhaji Fuseini 6:35 p.m.
Yes, Mr Speaker. That is what --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
Is that what we used to call “Sankara Overpass”? It has three layers. Is that not it? Ako Adjei interchange now?
Alhaji Fuseini 6:35 p.m.
Yes, Mr Speaker. Ako Adjei interchange. That is what is at Ako Adjei interchange.
This interchange at the Kwame Nkrumah Circle will be more complex and you will understand that the Ako Adjei interchange is mostly like a bridge across. But this is going to be an interchange that will have ramps and exit routes to ensure that people who are travelling to other places can exit the interchange. Unlike Ako Adjei interchange, it is not so. So, you cannot compare them.

Mr Speaker, and at the time that the Sofoline interchange was awarded at GH¢99 million, that was the equivalent of about US$100 million.
Mr Kofi Frimpong 6:35 p.m.
-- rose --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
Those of you on your feet, do you have a point of order? I will be very strict about it because our time is up.
Mr Kofi Frimpong 6:35 p.m.
Exactly so, Mr Speaker.
The Minister is telling us that the loan that we are taking is for the last stage of the Kwame Nkrumah interchange. That is
what the loan that we are taking is intended for; but he is comparing the whole complex Sofoline interchange. They are therefore, two incomparable --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
By the time he finishes, you will know. We have taken your point.
But Minister, respond to that.
Do you have a point of order?
Hon Minister, continue.
Alhaji Fuseini 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am saying that the time Sofoline interchange was awarded, that was GH¢ 99 million -- and indeed, my technical men have just advised that at that time, that was the equivalent of US$110 million -- [Interruptions]
Mr Speaker, the first phase --
rose
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
Hon Dan Botwe?
Mr Botwe 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Minister will have to give us the time -- whether this was in 2008, 2009 or 2006.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
What year, Hon Minister?
Alhaji Fuseini 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, Sofoline Interchange was awarded in 2006.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
Hon Minister, I do not usually do what I am going to do. But please, they have set a trap and you have walked into it. I am not going to allow you to compare Sofoline and this one. It is 7 o'clock or 8 o'clock; it is dark. Conclude Hon Minister --
because when you proceed on that line, we will never finish. Conclude!
Because people will raise counter issues. So, just -- What is the dollar rate? Just conclude. But that sentence you brought, if I were sitting there, I would have about thirty questions to ask you. So, conclude Minister.
Let me remind you that Hon Benjamin Kunbuor as well as the Minority Leader said that it is difficult for us to compare projects. I also made the point -- I saw you nodding your head; so, on that basis, there is a certain agreement. Why do you not just in two lines, conclude?
Alhaji Fuseini 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, thank you for extricating me from the trap and only to conclude that the Kwame Nkrumah interchange will be a gargantuan project.

Question put and Motion agreed to.
Mr Agbesi 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Resolution captured in item 23.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
Item 23.
Chairman of the Committee.
Mr Boampong 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, item 28 on page 18 and 19 -- [Interruption]
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
Chairman of Committee, one minute, please.
Mr Agbesi 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, item 24. It was a mistake.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
Item 24; Hon Minister?
RESOLUTIONS 6:45 p.m.

Minister for Roads and Highways (Alhaji Inusah A. B. Fuseini) 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
WHEREAS by the provisions of article 181(5) of the Constitution, the terms and conditions of any international business or economic transaction to which the Govern- ment of Ghana is a party shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by Parliament by a Resolution supported by the votes of a majority of all Members of Parliament;
PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181(5) of the Constitution, and at the request of the Government of Ghana acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has been laid before Parliament the terms and conditions of a Contract/Design Build Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S.A., Brazil acting through its branch Construtora Queiroz Galvão S.A. Sucursal Gana for an amount up to one hundred and seventy million United States dollars (US$170,000,000.00) for the design and construction of Ring Road Flyover, Accra.
THIS HONOURABLE HOUSE 6:45 p.m.

Mr Michael C. Boampong 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion on page 16 captured as item 24 and urge Members to adopt the Resolution as discussed.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr Agbesi 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, we have item
28.
rose
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
Yes, do you have a point of order?
Mr Afenyo-Markin 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, respectfully, a clarification.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
We are adopting it.
Mr Afenyo-Markin 6:45 p.m.
I am grateful, Mr Speaker.
Mr Agbesi 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, item 28; Motion on the Report of the Roads Committee on Roads and Transport.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
Item 28?
Mr Agbesi 6:45 p.m.
Item 28, page 18.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
Chairman of Committee?
MOTIONS 6:45 p.m.

Chairman of the Committee (Mr Michael Coffie Boampong) 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80 (1), which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Committee on Roads and Transport on the Contract/Build Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S.A., Brazil acting through its Branch Construtora Queiroz Galvão S.A. Sucursal Gana for an amount up to forty million United States dollars (US$40,000,000.00) relating to the Accra Streets Resurfacing Project may be moved today.
Mr Kwabena Owusu-Aduomi 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
Yes, Deputy Majority Leader?
Mr Agbesi 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, item 29.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
Chairman of the Committee?
Contract/Build Agreement between the Government of Ghana and
Construtora Queiroz Galvao S.A Brazil Relating to Accra Streets
Resurfacing Project
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Michael Coffie Boampong) 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Committee on Roads and Transport on the Contract/ Build Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S.A., Brazil acting through its Branch Construtora Queiroz Galvão S.A. Sucursal Gana for an amount up to forty million United States dollars (US$40,000,000.00) relating to the Accra Streets Resurfacing Project.
Mr Speaker, in doing so, I present your Committee's Report.
Introduction
The Contract Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana (represented by the Ministry of Roads and Highways) and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S.A (acting through its Branch Construtora Queiroz Galvão S.A Sucursal Gana) for the Build Agreement for Streets in Accra was laid in the House on Wednesday, 1st October, 2014 and referred by the Mr Speaker to the Committee on Roads and Transport for consideration and report in accordance with article 181 (5) of the 1992 Constitution and Order 189 of the Standing Orders of Parliament.
The Committee met with the Hon Deputy Minister for Roads and Highways, Hon Isaac Adjei- Mensah, officials of the Ghana Highways Authority and the Department of Urban Roads and considered the Agreement. The Committee presents its Report to the House in accordance with Order 161 of the Standing Orders of the House.
Background
The city of Accra has a road network size of about 2,296 kilometres classified variously as 43 per cent good, 6 per cent fair and 51per cent poor. Per this classification, one could easily deduce that efforts need to be made to improve the existing poor roads to substantially meet the growing population which is deemed to have doubled within the last sixteen (16) years.
Accra being the national capital also attracts lot of people from the other regions on short-term business transactions on daily basis which add to the already gridlocked vehicular congestion ultimately affecting the cost of transacting business due to high man hours spent in traffic. Coupled with the inefficient road infrastructure, transacting business in the Metropolis becomes a disincentive which phenomenon needs to be urgently dealt with.
The Ministry of Roads and Highways has therefore, identified major and arterial road networks within the Metropolis: Adabraka, Adenta, Agbogba, Chorkor, Dansoman, Haatso, Kanda (North and South), Korle-Gonno, Kpehe, La, Laterbiokorshie, New Town, Nungua, Madina, Mamprobi, Sukura, and Teshie, to be rehabilitated with asphalt overlay to stem the flow of vehicular traffic within the metropolis.
Consequently, at its Twenty-Fourth Meeting held on Thursday, 11th September, 2014, Cabinet considered and approved the Commercial Contract for the construction of selected streets resurfacing in Accra. The Commercial Contract for the project is forty million United States dollars (USD 40,000,000.00). The detailed cost component and list of beneficiary communities of the project are attached as Annexures A and B.
Purpose of project
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Michael Coffie Boampong) 6:45 p.m.


As earlier indicated, the ever growing vehicular traffic in the metropolis of Accra makes it worrisome and expensive in transacting business among others. The Committee noted the overall objective of the project is to facilitate socioeconomic development of the country through improved road infrastructure. It is expected that this singular activity could assist in the reduction of maintenance cost of roads, vehicular emissions which are inimical to human health, travel time and cost and also vehicular operating cost.

Project scope

Selected major roads and minor arterial roads (about 76 km) will be rehabilitated with 6 cm of asphalt in Adabraka, Adenta, Agbogba, Chorkor, Dansoman, Haatso, Kanda (North and South), Korle-Gonno, Kpehe, La, Laterbiokorshie, New Town, Nungua, Madina, Mamprobi, Sukura, and Teshie. Essentially, all the roads will have road markings and the required road signs or furniture.

Justification for the project

The rehabilitation works on the selected roads will generally compliment ongoing road works in Accra to enhance mobility and safety in the communities. While adding to the aesthetically modern appeal to the Accra metropolis, the rehabilitation of the selected roads will improve congestion, high vehicle operating cost and reduction in travel time and ultimately, stimulating commerce and economic growth within the metropolis.

Observation and recommendation

The Committee is agreeable to the Contract Agreement but sadly observed that no extensive drainage works were

incorporated in the contract. The Committee notes that a major destructive element of roads in the country especially asphalt roads is surface run offs by rain or waste water from households. Most of the drainage systems in the beneficiary communities are known to be old shallow and choked or damaged by turbulent surface run offs. The Committee recommends to the Ministry of Roads and Highways to take a critical look at the state of affairs and immediately get underway a project to revamp the drainage systems to get value for money for the proposed project under review.

While commending the Ministry of Roads and Highways and in particular the Government for the model rehabilitation of selected roads in the Metropolis, the Committee recommends that same should be replicated for the other cities in the country: Kumasi, Sunyani, Bolgatanga, Wa, Sekond-Takoradi, Tema, Ho, Koforidua and Tamale.

The Committee recognises the huge investments being made on road infrastructure and caution beneficiary communities and the citizenry to desist from the wanton destruction asphaltic roads through careless spillage of fuel and other chemicals on the roads. Stealing of road furniture by few unscrupulous people is on the ascendency and it is high time this malfeasance is nipped in the bud.

Similarly, the practice of dumping refuse and other solid waste onto the drainage systems should be discounted.

Conclusion

The Committee, having carefully examined the Contract Agreement, recommends to the House to approve its Report on the Contract Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Ghana (represented by the Ministry of Roads and Highways) and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S.A (acting through its Branch Construtora Queiroz Galvão S.A
Mr Kwabena Owusu-Aduomi 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion and in doing so, I would want to make some few comments.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
Order! Order!
Mr Owusu-Aduomi 6:45 p.m.
They have had their pavements severely weakened for long period of use.
Mr Speaker, in this project that we are considering, the suburbs of Kanda North, Kanda South, Adabraka, Mamprobi, Madina /Adenta and others -- these roads were constructed many years ago.
I inspected the roads in Kanda North and South and I was surprised to see drainage structures that were shallow, which cannot even take a shovel for desilting --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:45 p.m.
As shallow as what, Hon Member?
Mr Owusu-Aduomi 6:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, as shallow as 30 centimetres at the top width, which cannot even take a shovel for desilting of such drains.
Mr Speaker, the weakening of these pavements is not only as a result of long period of use but it is also as a result of neglect of maintenance. Early --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
The Hon Members on my right -- the last few on my right are engaged in their own debate. The Hon Member directly opposite me is also engaged in some -- I do know whether it is a lecture or -- I do not know what it is. I have not mentioned your name but you know. You are scratching your face now. Mr Speaker wants to come back. Let us finish this and --
Mr Owusu-Aduomi 6:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the weakening of this road pavements --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
The Members on my right hand side of the House are still talking.
Mr George Arthur 6:55 p.m.
On a point of Order.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member said that he inspected the road. He is the Ranking Member and this is a new contract we are working on --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
You were not listening to him. What he said was that the roads in these places -- he mentioned Sekondi-Takoradi have been there for a long time. He said that he was surprised when he inspected the roads, especially the roads in Kanda, some of them were very shallow and he used his hand to show how shallow. His hand is not captured in the Hansard. So, I asked him how shallow and he said 30 cm.
Even though those Hon Members on my right hand side of the House were having their own discussions and I was looking at them, I was multi-tasking; I was
Mr Owusu-Aduomi 6:55 p.m.
: Mr Speaker, it is imperative for me as a Ranking Member, for me to know the roads that we are approving these loans for --
Mr Owusu Aduomi 6:55 p.m.
And I did that on my own and I do not think it is wrong for doing that, so that I would be able to contribute on the floor of this House.
Mr Speaker, it is long neglect of maintenance that has caused most of our roads to fail. Mr Speaker, it is therefore, necessary to strengthen our road pavements by providing asphaltic concrete overlays.
Mr Speaker, I have to sound a note of caution to the Ministry of Roads and Highways, that it is not the provision of asphaltic concrete surface that will solve the problem on our roads.
Mr Speaker, if you remember in the olden days, in the National Democratic Congress (NDC) era, I think during former President Rawlings's time, Ahwiankwanta- Nyamoransa road was constructed with asphaltic concrete surface; it failed at the time that it was opened to traffic. So, asphaltic concrete surfacing is not a panacea to the problems that we have.
Mr Speaker, what we need to do in this project, is to ensure that the asphalt that we are going to put as an overlay, is well designed, prepared and even at the time that we are laying it, the engineers would be there to supervise it as critically as possible.
Mr Speaker, it is believed that in these areas, these suburbs of Accra that I have mentioned, a total kilometres of 76 -- if
the surface condition is improved, the inhabitants will save cost in maintaining their vehicles. Those who have been going through potholes here and there and breaking shocks absorbers and others, will have the cost of maintenance of their vehicles saved.
Mr Speaker, the project that we are considering now, if you move on the roads, we need to have a thorough drainage system analysis. Mr Speaker, most of the sections of the roads need reconstruction of drains; some of them will need thorough maintenance of drains. Unfortunately, these were not part of the contract and the Hon Minority Leader earlier asked this when the Finance Committee was on the floor of the House on this same project.
Mr Speaker, it is important that we take drainage systems along these roads serious otherwise, after providing the overlay, it would not take time for these roads to fail.
Mr Speaker, maintenance is important. If we are putting these asphaltic concrete surface; because we believe it is stronger than the ordinary surface dressing and therefore, we would not take maintenance as serious as required. Mr Speaker, the asphalt can roll over like a mat when a strong water run-off in the gutters move on the road.
So Mr Speaker, I urge the Ministry of Roads and Highways to include as early as possible thorough drainage systems along these roads that have been selected for asphaltic concrete surfacing.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
Thank you.
Mr Owusu-Aduomi 6:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, routine maintenance is important --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
Hon Member, you have a last point to make.
Mr Owusu-Aduomi 6:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, all that I would want to reiterate is that maintenance on our roads, not only in Greater Accra -- maintenance of our roads have been relegated to the background. Even cutting of grass along our roads is not being done. Mr Speaker, if the Government owes the ordinary persons who cut grass along the road in arrears of about 15 months, then you will see the danger that the nation is going through. Somebody was trying to justify that neglect of maintenance is part of our culture. Mr Speaker, it is never true. The situation was different between the years of 2001 and 2008 [Interruptions.]
So, Mr Speaker, they should be careful. Even at that time that the road tolls were not increased, maintenance was being critically done.
Mr Speaker, there was also a mention of the fuel levy; it is not only the fuel levy that is low but when the fuel levy gets to the Consolidated Fund, it takes too long a time for that amount to be released to the Road Fund to undertake the maintenance works --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
In conclusion?
Mr Owusu Aduomi 6:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I urge the Hon Minister for Finance to take note of this and release the fuel levy component of the Road Fund to the Fund, so that maintenance activities can go on smoothly.
Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
Thank you. I will put the Question. All the issues dealing with roads --
Question put and Motion agreed to.
RESOLUTIONS 6:55 p.m.

Minister for Roads and Highways (Alhaji Inusah A. B. Fuseini) 6:55 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
WHEREAS by the provisions of article 181(5) of the Constitution the terms and conditions of any international business or economic transaction to which the Govern- ment of Ghana is a party shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by Parliament by a Resolution supported by the votes of a majority of all Members of Parliament;
PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181(5) of the Constitution, and at the request of the Government of Ghana acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has been laid before Parliament the terms and conditions of a Contract/Build Agreement between the Govern- ment of the Republic of Ghana and Construtora Queiroz Galvao S.A., Brazil acting through its Branch Construtora Queiroz Galvão S.A. Sucursal Gana for an amount up to forty million United States dollars (US$40,000,000.00) relating to the Accra Streets Resurfacing Project.
THIS HONOURABLE HOUSE 6:55 p.m.

Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 7:05 p.m.
Mr Speaker, what appears on pages 19 and 20 are not “Resolution 30” --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
What is it, please?
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 7:05 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Minister knows what is right.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
Minority Leader, help us.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 7:05 p.m.
Item number
30.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
Minority Leader, it is Resolution item number 30. Hon Papa Owusu-Ankomah, that is correct, I believe?
Papa Owusu-Ankomah 7:05 p.m.
Yes.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
Hon Papa, after six you tend to agree too quickly.
Alhaji Fuseini 7:05 p.m.
Mr Speaker, thank you very much.
Mr Michael C. Boampong 7:05 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion and in so doing, I urge Hon Members to second the Resolution.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved accordingly.
Mr Agbesi 7:05 p.m.
Mr Speaker, we have come far with the Business of the day, and we would leave the rest in your capable hands.
MR SPEAKER
Mr Speaker 7:07 p.m.
Hon Minority Leader, are you ready with the tribute?
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 7:07 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I hope you could give us a few minutes because the tribute is on its way.
STATEMENTS 7:07 p.m.

Papa Owusu-Ankomah (NPP -- Sekondi) 7:07 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I must say that it is with a heavy heart that I pay tribute to the memory of the late Hon Mrs Gladys Asmah, former Member of Parliament for Takoradi, former Minister for Women and Children's Affairs, and former Minister for Fisheries.
Mrs Gladys Asmah was born in Cape Coast on the 16th October, 1939, and died in Accra, a couple of months ago, on June 24th 2014.
Mrs Gladys Asmah was an entrepreneur. During the early part of her life, she was in the United Kingdom. She specialised in dressmaking -- and even at that time, was selling petty coat, which she manufactured herself in Birmingham. On her return to Ghana, she set up a partnership, where she made clothing and sold them to department stores, particularly the then United Trading Company (UTC) and Kingsway.
Mr Speaker, Mrs Gladys Asmah was a very socially conscious woman, who even in those early days, was very much interested in the development of women.
She, on her own initiative, trained young women who had no entrepreneurial skills in dressmaking. For many years, she was the Board Chairman of the Takoradi Women's Institute, which was an institute, which trained women in various skills.
Mr Speaker, before she even entered political life, she had contributed a lot to her society. She was a member at one time of the Board of Fijai Secondary School, and together with her, we served on the Board of Ahantaman Rural Bank, which was one of the early rural banks in the Western Region.
In 1979, she was actively involved with Dr Bilson's Third Force. In 1992, together with my humbleself, were pioneers of the New Patriotic Party (NPP) in the Western Region. Also in 1992, we were both parliamentary candidates -- I, a candidate for Sekondi and Mrs Gladys Asmah, the candidate for the NPP in Takoradi. I dare say that, had the NPP not boycotted the parliamentary elections, we may have found ourselves in this House on the 7th of January, 1993.
Mr Speaker, in the religious sphere, she was an active member of the Anglican Church of Ghana, and at various times, served as a member of its Synod for the province of West Africa. She was one of the leading lights in the establishment of the Anglican Church at Takoradi Beach Road, and I believe that is where the funeral service would be held.
Mrs Gladys Asmah served as the first woman Deputy Minority Leader in the Parliament of the Fourth Republic, and she was very robust and aggressive in the articulation of her views. At one time, I described her as “a combative combatant” because, she made her views known rather
strongly. I recall that during one of those days, the former First Lady made some references to her, which aroused her irate, and made her respond in her characteristically forceful manner.
Being a woman very much interested in the development of women, it was no wonder that when President Kufuor assumed office as President, she was the first person to become the Minister for Women and Children's Affairs. A Ministry which she had to set up from scratch and now, it has become a very important Ministry in the governance of this country.
Mrs Asmah, at the time, after the 2008 elections, felt she had to give way and it was at a time when the applause was loudest. I believe many Members of Parliament will take a cue from her political life and step out when the applause is loudest.
Mr Speaker, of course, she was a royal. Her father was the Omanhene of the Asebu Traditional Area in the Abora-Asebu- Kwamankese Constituency of this country and she may be described as a matriarch in her family.
Even after she exited Parliament, she still played an active role in the politics of this country, particularly regarding that of the New Patriotic Party (NPP) of which she was a member of the Council of Leaders and gave counsel and advice where crises or problems were faced by the Party.
Of course, the foundation she laid as Member of Parliament for Takoradi, which is being built upon by the Hon Kwabena Okyere Darko-Mensah, who was mentored by her and also cut his political teeth at the Sekondi-Takoradi Metropolitan Assembly, where he became the head of the Finance Committee and from there,
Papa Owusu-Ankomah (NPP -- Sekondi) 7:15 p.m.
progressed into Parliament. That is the way we should always be seen to be mentoring others to take over from us.
Mr Speaker, as we pay tribute to this great woman, I believe one of her attributes which we should all endeavour to emulate is that of service. She did not only get involved in politics because she was interested in it but she entered politics to use it as an avenue to serve the people of this country, as she was doing before she entered politics.
Mr Speaker, I believe on the 30 th October, 2014, they will keep wake in Takoradi and on the 1st November, 2014, there will be church service at Ascension Anglican Church, Takoradi Beach Road.
I expect that probably, all the Bishops of the Anglican Church in Ghana and even some from outside Ghana will be present at the burial as a tribute to the role she played in the Anglican Church.
As we pay this tribute, let us all as Members of Parliament endeavour to serve our country to the best of our ability. We serve not because we are extra- ordinary but we undertake normal services extraordinarily.
Mr Speaker, it is my prayer that the Good Lord will accommodate Mrs Gladys Asmah in His bosom and that she will rest peacefully there.
May Mrs Gladys Asmah rest in perfect peace and rise in glory in the company of the Saints.

Hajia Mary Salifu Boforo (NDC -- Savelugu): Mr Speaker, it is unfortunate we were not informed that Mrs Gladys Asmah's tribute would be made today.

In fact, if we want to talk about Mrs Gladys Asmah, it will take us the whole day to do that. She was a woman of integrity and of different colours. Although she was on the other side of the political divide, she was always with those of us on the National Democratic Congress (NDC) side.

Mrs Asmah was the first person -- I remember in 2001, she walked to me -- that was the first time I went out of the country. She walked to me and said, “Mary, would you like to go to the United States of America (USA)?” I said, yes. She asked whether I had a passport and I said, yes. She then asked me to bring my passport and told me she would see to it that I went to the USA.

For five years in Parliament, I did not travel. She was the first person who took me out of -- [Hear! Hear!] or who actually gave me the permission to go to the USA. Indeed, Ghana has lost a great woman. The Women Caucus here in Parliament, will be going to her funeral to tell the whole world the sort of person she was.

On behalf of the Women Caucus in Parliament, I say Damirifa due to her. We also wish her a final rest in peace and pray that the angels of the Lord will guide and take her to Heaven and she will be there to see to it that in 100 years time, we will also join her there in harmony.
Mr Kwabena Okyere Darko-Mensah (NPP -- Takoradi) 7:15 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to add my voice to the Statement made by the Hon Member for Sekondi and the tribute to Hon Mrs Gladys Asmah, my predecessor and Member of Parliament for Takoradi Constituency from 1997 to 2009.
Mr Speaker, Mrs Asmah was a woman of substance. The name “Mrs Asmah” was
always resonating with the name Takoradi Constituency and whenever her name was mentioned all over the country, every- body knew she came from the Western Region.
Mr Speaker 7:15 p.m.
Hon Members, let us have order in the Chamber.
Mr Darko-Mensah 7:25 p.m.
Mrs Asmah was appointed an Assembly Member in the Sekondi-Takoradi Metropolis, where she participated in a lot of activities.
One of the landmark issues that is associated with Mrs Asmah in Takoradi is the movement of women from the Takoradi market circle, where she championed for women's rights, right to water, right to toilet facilities and the right to security at the new Apremdo market.
Mr Speaker, Mrs Asmah, apart from her political career, was also a business woman. She had started her professional career with the Ghana Railway Corporation, moved on to what today, we would have called the British American Tobacco, and then also set up her own business called Anabel Creatives and became the President of the Western Regional Association of Ghana Industries.
So, apart from politics, Mrs Asmah believed in entrepreneurship. It is for this reason that when she became the first woman Minister for the Ministry of Women and Children's Affairs, she encouraged the then Government to put into circulation a lot of small loans for
women all across the length and breadth of this country, irrespective of their political affiliation.
Mr Speaker, what she started is what we would call Micro Finance and Small Loan Centre (MASLOC) today, and I believe that is worth emulating. It shows that she worked not only for Takoradi, but also for the country.
She was politically active throughout her life. In fact, the last time I met her was at the NPP Regional Elections at the Takoradi Polytechnic, and at an advanced age of 78, she came to cast her vote.
Mr Speaker, Mrs Asmah is an example of a successful woman. She cared for a lot of children, her own and those of the larger Ghanaian family. She was a woman of strength. She spoke boldly about her convictions and she was prepared to defend this country wherever she found herself.
She was a great woman, and the people of Takoradi and this country would forever remember.
Mr Speaker, prior to her demise, she was admitted to the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, where she stayed for some time before her demise. She is dead and gone but I know that the lives of great men leave behind footprints in the sands of time.
On this note, Mr Speaker, I would like to inform the House that the funeral comes off on 31st October, 2014. The family will gather in Takoradi on 1st October, 2014, which is a Saturday and on Sunday there will be a thanksgiving service.
On this note, I thank you, Mr Speaker for the opportunity.
Mr Speaker 7:25 p.m.
Hon Patricia Appiagyei. Then after her, we move to the Leaders.
Ms Patricia Appiagyei (NPP -- Asokwa) 7:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to contribute to the number of contributions made by my Hon Colleagues and it is with a deep heart that I pay this tribute to my Hon mother, Mrs Gladys Asmah.
Mr Speaker, Mrs Asmah was indeed, a woman of many parts. I believe that is the reason most of us are here in Parliament. She inspired us by her courage, strength and character. She was such a disciplinarian and would not allow anybody to misbehave at any point in time.
As a Minister for Fisheries, Mrs Asmah exhibited her character of business strength. As a business woman, she went to all the regions in Ghana and tried to encourage women to engage in fish farming. She was the first woman to go round in search of women to be in politics. She did so by advising us and encouraging those of us who had the strength and courage to do that, to ensure we had the necessary resources to participate in politics.
As a disciplinarian, she never encouraged any woman to dishonour men, even though women were seriously fighting for certain rights. She believed that we must not at any time dishonour our husbands or brothers.
Mr Speaker, Mrs Asmah as we all know, was a woman who had deep faith and as rightly said by the Hon Member for Sekondi, she was a woman who did not discriminate. She believed that every woman had a potential and with that potential and faith in Christ, we would be able to do what men can do.
With this, I wish her a peaceful rest. Thank you.
Mr Alfred K. Agbesi (NDC -- Ashaiman) 7:25 p.m.
Mr Speaker, it is with a heavy heart that I pay tribute to Mrs Gladys Asmah.
I came to meet her in Parliament and saw the qualities that she was made of. She was a lady who rose to become Minster for Fisheries. She was a lady who was concerned about development and progress of other women. That was a woman who was a shining example to other women to emulate.
Mr Speaker, as I knew her, she was not a person who threw her weight round but someone who wanted to live a landmark for other women to learn from. Her life after Parliament was one which we the young ones need to learn from.
After Parliament, Mrs Asmah was not only reserved to herself, but was still involved in the affairs of her party and wherever it mattered, she was seen advising the up and coming politicians. She played her role and had a Christian life, which tells us that we as politicians, do not only have to play politics, but we need to also look up to God in whatever we do.
Mr Speaker, this was a woman who also rose to become the Hon Deputy Minority Leader, a feat which many women are yet to achieve.
Mr Speaker, this Parliament owes a lot to Mrs Asmah and I would ask us the young ones to -- [Interruption] -- take after her and learn the way she rose to become Hon Deputy Minority Leader.
Mr Speaker, to become the head of the Finance Committee of Parliament is no mean an achievement and she played that role effectively until she left Parliament.
I recommend to all of us that we should see the roles she played while on this earth
and to say Mrs Asmah, may God be with you and “Hede nyuie; Mawu na no kpli wo, akpe.”
Mr Joe Ghartey (NPP -- Esikadu/ Ketan) 7:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I do not fall into the category of young men that was just described by the Hon Deputy Minority Leader, but I must say that in 2004, when they created the Esikadu/Ketan Constituency, I was indeed, a young man. People have talked about Mrs Asmah's life and I do not intend to bore you by repeating it. I associate myself with everything that they have said.
But Mr Speaker, I had the occasion to review some of the pictures I took from that time up till present day, some time ago. And Mr Speaker, in every single picture, Mrs Asmah was there.
Indeed, when I was made a Parliamentary candidate of the New Patriotic Party in 2004, she raised my hand. For the three terms that I have come to Parliament Mr Speaker, by God's grace, I had gone unopposed for the primaries, and every time, the person who had raised my hand was Mrs Asmah.
Mr Speaker, it is being suggested by the Hon Member for Suhum that indeed, if Mrs Asmah had been alive, I might have won the presidential primaries -- [Laughter] -- This is because she was there every time and raised my hand.
Mr Speaker, the good thing about Mrs Asmah was that, while she was dealing with the bigger things of State, while she was Hon Deputy Minority Leader, she was Minister, she was an important person in our party, she found time for an insignificant, young, aspiring Hon Member of Parliament such as me.
Mr Speaker, when you are a young Member of Parliament or an aspiring
Member of Parliament and you organise a programme and no “big person” attends, then you are in trouble -- Hon Papa Owusu-Ankomah was always there too. But it was half of his constituency and as they say, familiarity can breed contempt. So, there had to be another heavy weight who came and Mrs Asmah was always there for me. 2012, she was still there for me.
So, I rise to associate myself with what every Hon Member has said but also to remind all of us that as we find time for the big things, we should also remember the small things. We should remember the small people; we should remember the people that we meet on our way up because when we die, those are the people who will stand up and pay tribute to us - - Somebody like me.
Today, I rise to pay tribute to a lady who had been very much part of my entire political career and I pray that the Good Lord Himself keeps her in perfect peace.
Thank you very much.
Minority Leader (Mr Osei Kyei- Mensah-Bonsu) 7:35 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise with a saddened spirit to eulogise Mrs Gladys Asmah.
Mr Speaker, a member of the New Patriotic Party (NPP)'s pioneer caucus in the Fourth Republic, Mrs Asmah was really a charismatic figure in her own right. She was a very hard working Hon Member of Parliament and belonged to several committees. She was part of the leadership of the parliamentary group of the New Patriotic Party in 1997. She was indeed, the Hon Deputy Leader to the venerable Joseph Henry Mensah.
As a leading light in the effort to offer a positive alternative government to the administration of the National Democratic Congress (NDC) at the time, Mrs Asmah undertook the organisation of the women affairs in the New Patriotic Party and she was the person credited with the
Mr Speaker 7:45 p.m.
Hon Members, I can confirm all that has been said about the late Mrs Gladys Asmah. I had the privilege of working with her in the Leadership of this House when I joined the Leadership in 1997. As it has been indicated, she was then the Deputy Minority Leader and I was the then Minority Chief Whip. And I can confirm that by all standards, she was a great and principled woman who stood for what she believed in.
Hon Members, let us observed a minute's silence in her memory.
Mr Speaker 7:45 p.m.
May her soul rest in perfect peace.
CLOSING REMARKS 7:45 p.m.

Mr Speaker 7:45 p.m.
Hon Members, in consultation with the Leadership of the House, I have directed that the Ministers for Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration and Health should meet the Select Committee on Health and brief it on the United Nations Emergency Response Centre for handling the Ebola epidemic. The Ministers are also to brief the Select Committee on Ghana's preparedness for any eventualities in that regard.
This has become necessary because yesterday, when the Hon Member for Manhyia South raised the issue, we thought that our Sitting was going to
extend to tomorrow, but that will not be possible since we have exhausted the main items that brought us here. On that basis and in consultation with the Leadership and the Hon Member for Manhyia South, I have directed that the Ministers should meet the Select Committee. Flowing from the briefing, Leadership will decide whether we have to call them here when the House reconvenes at the end of this month or early November.
Hon Majority Leader?
Deputy Minority Leader (Mr Dominic Bingab Aduna Nitiwul): Mr Speaker, because you mentioned the Majority Leader and I am not the Majority, I have to say that I am the Deputy Minority Leader although I know you know it.
Mr Speaker, let me on this occasion of the special recall of Parliament, thank the Minority Leader for the opportunity he has given me to give the Closing Remarks as he is personally here --
Mr Speaker 7:45 p.m.
He has taken the advice of the Hon Member for Sekondi, that we should start mentoring people. -- [Laughter.]
Mr Nitiwul 7:45 p.m.
Mr Speaker, precisely that, but I do not think that you are insinuating something.
Mr Speaker, I would like to have observed that the positive response of our Hon Colleagues to this special recall is very legendry. This is because you can see the numbers that have showned up in this difficult economic situation that we find ourselves. But Hon Members are still here in their numbers to attend the urgent recall that the nation, through you, bestowed on them.
Mr Speaker, we all know it was very short. That is why I am commending Hon Members highly and commending you as well. We considered many things, particularly the loans that we had to consider and that is precisely the angle that I would want to come from and say that it is good, and that it is going to be used for development. As we all know, we have a huge infrastructural gap as a nation to fill. So any government which would want to fill that gap, then any Parliament would be eager to ensure that that gap is filled.
Mr Speaker, but as a nation, although we would want to have that, we also want to ensure that whatever that we do, there is value for money. And as Parliament, we do not want in future anybody to blame this Sixth Parliament because of value for money. I am glad that at the end of the day, the proposals from Government, especially with regard to loans have been approved.
Mr Speaker, the issues that I believe we would want to comment and concentrate on are the issues that are emanating from what we did today. The loans that we looked at were huge; if you put them together, they were huge. The issues that were involved were varied and many and the infrastructural projects were huge; whether it is that of Kasoa or it is the Kwame Nkrumah Circle flyover, they are huge projects.
Mr Speaker, we would have expected the Executive to at least, give Parliament enough time to look at these issues critically and examine them, particularly the Committees on Roads and Transport and Finance and more particularly, the Committee on Roads and Transport, which is looking at the Commercial Agreement, to juxtapose it with the amount and make serious due diligence.
Mr Nitiwul 7:45 p.m.


Mr Speaker, it is not too late to start that practice but I believe it is a concern that the Minority side is sharing, that in future, we should take that into consideration when we are planning some of these things. It is just for the sake of the nation that when one or two Hon Members raise those issues, the Minority has to sit with the Majority as Leadership to see what we could do to move Parliament forward. That was why we did what we did. But we think in future, we have to ensure that the right thing is done and done properly.

Mr Speaker, we hope that the work which is being done in the Chamber is done quickly. Just look at the way the entrance and exit of this facility are. I think security wise, it is a big challenge. It is a big challenge to Hon Members and in the era of Boko Haram, although it is not in Ghana -- [Uproar] -- we cannot for one minute compromise the security of Members of Parliament.

That is not to say it is but it is a concern that we are raising, that we should look at it properly and move out of this place or redesign it, if we want to continue to sit here for a longer time.

Mr Speaker, I have already commended you and I still would want to commend you for calling us here to do the nation's job. I would want to commend your staff; they have been very supportive to Members of Parliament, even when we are on break, they do whatever they have to do to support us.

The media is all over here. I can see the television crew and everybody making sure that our voices are heard outside. I would want to commend them seriously and hope that as partners, we would continue to work together to ensure that we develop this nation.

Mr Speaker, finally, to my Hon Colleagues, as we go back to face our constituents, we know the difficulties that they faced when they were there for the last one or two months. We know the difficulties, and we would go back and face those difficulties, but these are the hazards of the work. We hope that they would hasten slowly to ensure that we come back here in peace either at the end of the month, as Mr Speaker said or the first week of November.
Mr Speaker 7:55 a.m.
Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
Deputy Majority Leader (Mr Alfred Kwame Agbesi): Mr Speaker, thank you for this Meeting and I highly commend Hon Members for responding to the call to come and undertake this important assignment.
From the delivery of my Hon Colleague, we came upon your call to do an important national assignment, one of it being the Kasoa Interchange Programme. It is so dear to the lives of all Ghanaians and I would want to urge the Ministry concerned to take a critical look at it and execute that to the best of their ability, so that the problems that we face at Kasoa will be a thing of the past.
Mr Speaker, though we came to approve a number of Loan Agreements, I would want to say that these must go to better the lives of Ghanaians, so that the commitment of our Government to see to the interest of the people of Ghana will be realised.
It is important also to say that our coming to do this special business is not for nothing. Members of Parliament have the interest of Ghana at heart and even though they were called at short notice, they came and did what Parliament wanted them to do.
Mr Speaker 7:55 a.m.
Hon Members, we have come to the end of this emergency Meeting. I thank all of you for your support and cooperation.
I thank Members of Parliament (MP), especially for their quick response to this recall. Indeed, when the decision was taken to recall this House, we looked at the calendar and other parliamentary activities and programmes and the only space that we got was this week. I was wondering whether sufficient notice would have gone to Hon Members.
The day that I signed the recall, I was at the airport to see somebody off and I met two MPs who were planning to travel outside the jurisdiction and they promised that they would be back to attend upon the House and indeed I saw them here and they have responded. [Hear! Hear!] I have never been very proud of this House with regard to this particular response by Hon Members.
I think that we should continue this way and this country should recognise our call to duty.
I thank my two deputies, the Leadership of the House, the Clerk and his staff, the Parliamentary Press Corps and everybody who made this Meeting successful.
The Hon Deputy Minority Leader has raised an issue with regard to the loans that we have approved; it is the

Hon Members, I also thank the administrators of the Accra International Conference Centre for making this place available to us for our Sittings.

Hon Members, the Parliamentary Service Board and Management is doing everything possible -- As I indicated yesterday, our Chamber will be available by the end of this month. [Hear! Hear!] It is part of the agreement that was entered into with the contractor, that he delivers it by the end of this month.

With regard to those publications, I am not in the mood to engage the media, but the truth will stand at the end of the day. There is no way that somebody can go and write that they do not know the figure; there is no way the Public Procurement Authority (PPA) will approve something without knowing the figure.

The figure therefore, cannot be a secret because they approved it with a figure and the decision to sole source was based on a recommendation from the in-house consultant who was not appointed by the Speaker but appointed as far back as 2008.

It was based on a recommendation to the Board and the Board took a decision. All the records are there for those who want to publish the truth to go and find

out. There is no decision that has been taken single-handedly by me; the records are there. When the quantities were prepared, another independent quantity surveyor issued a certificate to support it and these were submitted to the PPA before the approval was given.
Some Hon Members 7:55 a.m.
The offices! Job
600!
With regard to Job 600 -- [Hear! Hear!] -- The Board has cancelled an earlier decision taken to do restrictive tendering and we have gone in for open tender. It is at the technical evaluation stage and if the Report is ready today, I will call an emergency Board meeting tomorrow to have those things awarded.
I believe in open tender, competitive tendering and we have to go in for sole sourcing only when it is absolutely necessary and it can be defended.
Hon Members, I wish all of you travelling mercies and God's guidance.
ADJOURNMENT 7:55 a.m.