Debates of 18 Jul 2014

MR SPEAKER
PRAYERS 10:40 a.m.

VOTES AND PROCEEDINGS AND THE OFFICIAL REPORT 10:40 a.m.

  • [No correction was made to the Votes and Proceedings of Thursday, 17th July, 2014.]
  • [No correction was made to the Official Report of Monday, 14th July, 2014.]
  • Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
    Hon Deputy Majority Leader, can we defer the Business Statement for now, or you want to take it?
    Mr Alfred Kwame Agbesi 10:40 a.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
    Let us defer it. I want to have it deferred. I would want to move to Questions, if the Hon Minister responsible for Roads and Highways is here.
    Hon Deputy Minister, are you here?
    Mr Agbesi 10:40 a.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker, please, move to Questions.
    Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
    Who is answering the Questions Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Agbesi 10:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, we want the Hon Deputy Minister to answer the Question. We are seeking the permission of the Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
    Very well.
    Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 10:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I thought the Hon Deputy Majority Leader would be seeking the indulgence of the House to enable the Hon Deputy Minister answer the Question, but he emphatically states that “we want him to answer the Question.”
    Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
    Hon Minority Leader, that was why I called you.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 10:40 a.m.
    So, Mr Speaker, I would want to know his prayer. What is his prayer to the House?
    Mr Agbesi 10:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, with the indulgence of the House and your permission, we would want the Hon Deputy Minister to answer the Question on behalf of the Hon Minister for Roads and Highways.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 10:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, that should be the sequel, but we do not have any objection provided he has the competence to answer the Question. I would want to believe that he has some competence.
    Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
    Very well.
    Hon Members, we start with the Urgent Question standing in the name of the Hon Member for Kwabre East.
    Mr William Owuraku Aidoo 10:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, Hon Kofi Frimpong is indisposed and he has asked me, to seek your permission, to ask the Question on his behalf.
    Mr Speaker 10:40 a.m.
    Hon Member, where is Hon Kofi Frimpong?
    Mr W. O. Aidoo 10:50 a.m.
    I believe he got stuck in traffic somewhere; he just called and asked me to ask the Question on his behalf.
    Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
    Is he indisposed or stuck in traffic?
    Mr W. O. Aidoo 10:50 a.m.
    Both are indisposition.
    Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
    Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 10:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Member went on official assignment and has just come.
    Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
    I am aware that he was on official assignment to Abuja.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 10:50 a.m.
    He has just come and is not feeling well.
    Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
    Yes, I have granted permission for him to go for an official assignment to Abuja, Nigeria, so when I heard first that he was indisposed, I did not know whether it happened in Abuja or -- [Laughter.]
    Mr W. O. Aidoo 10:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the word indisposition means unavailable. I had a call from somebody --
    Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
    Yes, Hon Member?
    Mr Kwabena Mintah Akandoh 10:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, in the situation we find ourselves now, I doubt if indeed the Hon Member has asked Hon Aidoo to ask the Question on his behalf. I doubt it.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 10:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, a cocoon plays in the place where he finds himself. There is no way of breaking the barrier to know whether there has been some communication or not. Hon Member, remain in your shelf. We know what is happening here. [Laughter.]
    Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
    Hon Member, please, ask the Question on his behalf.
    Mr W. O. Aidoo 10:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I take a little exception to what Hon Akandoh --
    Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
    They have responded to that issue. Please, carry on and ask the Question.
    Mr W. O. Aidoo 10:50 a.m.
    I would carry on and ask the Question, with your permission.
    URGENT QUESTIONS 10:50 a.m.

    MINISTRY OF ROADS AND 10:50 a.m.

    HIGHWAYS 10:50 a.m.

    Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
    Hon Deputy Minister?
    Deputy Minister for Roads and Highways (Mr Isaac Adjei Mensah) (MP): Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker, the Kenyasi-Antoa road forms part of the Kumasi (Buokrom Junction) - Kenyasi-Abirem-Antoa - Bonwire feeder road which is 16.10km long.
    A section of the road was awarded on contract in two phases for tarring and sectional patching including resealing in
    2007.
    Current programme
    Phase I is a 3.4km road from Kumasi through Antoa to Bonwire including the provision of 0.4km branch road (access road to the Garden City University) and is completed. Phase II km (3-11.4) is 54 per cent complete but the continued delay of the contractor in the execution of the work
    Mr W. O. Aidoo 10:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would like to ask the Hon Minister whether he has indeed travelled on that road in recent past. This is because I have been on that road --
    Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
    Please, you have asked the Question.
    Hon Minister?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 10:50 a.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker. I travelled to Mampong through Bonwire and I saw the state of the road.
    Mr W. O. Aidoo 10:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, when the Hon Minister was giving his Answer, he said “future” and that is very elastic. I would like to know exactly when the contract is due to begin.
    Mr Adjei Mensah 10:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the section which is phase 2 is being repackaged for award. Indeed, the procurement process has commenced so as soon as possible, when things have been done, work would commence on the road and I presume that all would be factored into the 2015 Budget for execution.
    Mr W. O. Aidoo 10:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would like to ask the Hon Deputy Minister what steps are being taken by the Ministry in the mean time to make that road motorable since it is almost impassable as I talk to you.
    Mr Adjei Mensah 10:50 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I did say in my Answer that routine mainte- nance would be carried on this road this year and as soon as the rains subside, we would commence work on the road accordingly.
    rose
    Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
    You have exhausted your three supplementary Questions.
    Hon Members, we have a lot of work to do today, so, I would want to leave constituency Questions to the Hon Members in whose names they stand.
    So, we move on to Question number 139 -- Hon Member for Afram Plains South.
    ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS 10:50 a.m.

    MINISTRY OF ROADS AND 10:50 a.m.

    HIGHWAYS 10:50 a.m.

    Mr Boateng 10:50 a.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    When do you anticipate the signing of the Subsidiary Agreement?
    Mr Speaker 10:50 a.m.
    Hon Deputy Minister?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think I left some reasonable information for him that necessitated this Question. I would want to answer that area so that this Question can also be appropriately answered.
    Ekyi Amanfrom - Dedeso- Donkorkrom
    Background
    Ekyi Amanfrom - Dedeso- Donkorkrom is an inter-district road by functional class which it is 103.3km long. The first 55km is already tarred but requires resealing. The
    road links Afram Plains South District (Ekyi Amanfrom) to Afram Plains North (Donkorkrom)
    Current programme
    The road has been awarded in phases for bituminous surfacing to nine contractors under the Eastern Corridor Multi-Modal Transport Project (ECMMTP). These contracts are to be funded under the China Development Bank (CDB) facility. The Ministry is awaiting the signing of the Subsidiary Agreement for the commencement of the works.
    If I should go to his Question, Mr Speaker, he asked when the contract would be signed. The contract has been signed and we are waiting for funds to be executed. As soon as the finality is ascertained, the appropriate action would be taken on the road.
    Mr Boateng 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, would you consider maintenance while we wait for the commencement of the main project?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, yes please. Routine maintenance works would be undertaken on the road and this will commence as soon as the rains stop.
    Mr Boateng 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, what would be the alternative source of funding if the China Development Bank (CDB) facility fails?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, we believe the funding under the CDB will come to fruition, but when it fails, which I do not think it would, appropriate steps would be taken to factor the construction of the road as appropriate.
    Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
    Hon Members, let us proceed with Question number 140-- Hon Member for Tano North.
    Ms Freda A. Prempeh 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, my name is not correct on the Order Paper. Freda Prempeh is my maiden name; I am surprised it was published as “Mrs Freda Prempeh.”
    Mr Dan Botwe 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I was wondering why -- [Interruption] -- whether you have detected any mistake in the name.
    Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
    I know the family very well -- [Interruption] -- I know the brothers and the sisters.
    Mr Botwe 11 a.m.
    Is it the title or --
    Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
    Are you worried? [Laughter.]
    Ms Prempeh 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the title is wrong; I am “Miss Freda Prempeh”.
    Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
    In fact, it is for the record. We want to make sure that our records are correct. The records, it is “Miss Freda Akosua Oheneafrewo Prempeh.”
    Some Hon Members 11 a.m.
    ‘Miss', you say ‘miss' -- [Interruption.]
    Ms Prempeh 11 a.m.
    But I am not free so nobody should try to slip in any note.
    Duayaw Nkwanta-Asukese, etc Feeder Roads
    (Rehabilitation)
    Q.140 Ms Freda Akosua Prempeh asked the Minister for Roads and Highways when the following feeder roads would be rehabilitated: (i) Duayaw Nkwanta - Asukese - Bomaa (ii) Bomaa -
    Subonpang (iii) Duayaw Nkwanta - Adagyamamu/Santase.
    Duayaw Nkwanta- Asukese- Bomaa
    Background
    Deputy Minister for Roads and Highways (Mr I. Adjei Mensah): Mr Speaker, Duayaw Nkwanta-Asukese- Bomaa is a connector feeder road by functional class. It is 14.5km long and located in the Tano North District of the Brong Ahafo Region. The first 9.5km stretch of the road is tarred and the remaining 5km is a gravelled road in poor condition.
    Current programme
    The remaining 5.0km will continue to be maintained (rehabilitated). Routine maintenance will be carried out on the entire 14.5 km section this year.
    Future programme
    The road will be awarded on contract for rehabilitation in 2015.
    Bomaa- Subonpang
    Background
    The Bomaa- Subonpang-Tepa feeder road is 8.0 km and is located in the Tano North District of the Brong Ahafo Region. It is a gravelled road in poor condition.
    Current programme
    The road was awarded for spot improvement under COCOBOD funding in August 2012. The road which was expected to be completed in June 2013 is behind schedule due to the slow pace of work by the contractor. We have therefore initiated a termination process after a series of warning letters to the contractor.
    The project would be re-awarded after the termination process has been completed.
    Duayaw Nkwanta-Adagyamamu/Santase (Susano-Santase)
    Background
    Duayaw Nkwanta-Adagyamamu/ Santase is a 25.9 kilometres long road and is located in the Tano North District of the Brong Ahafo Region. It is a gravelled road in poor condition.
    Current programme
    The entire stretch has been awarded for routine maintenance this year.
    Future programme
    Engineering studies have been carried out on the 9.8km stretch and we will continue to maintain it to a motorable state.
    Ms Prempeh 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, in the Hon
    Minister's response, he stated here that 11 a.m.
    “The remaining 5.0 km will continue to be maintained.”
    I would want to find out from the Hon Minister if currently, there are some works going on on that particular stretch of road because, for the past 6 years, nothing has been done on that road.
    Mr Speaker, it will interest you to know that, recently, there was a woman in labour at Bomaa Hospital, they called for an ambulance in Duayaw-Nkwanta, the ambulance got stuck on the road and they had to carry that woman on their shoulders to where the ambulance was. The road is in a very serious deplorable situation.
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, that is why the road will be maintained and rehabilitated in line with his request. As soon as the rains recede, action would be taken on the road.
    Ms Prempeh 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I had the opportunity to visit the road I am talking about with the Roads Engineer from Brong Ahafo Region. Mr Speaker, all the estimates, packaging and everything have been done. I am reliably informed that they are only waiting for the Ministry to award this road on contract.
    I am pleading with the Hon Minister to take serious action on this particular road. On Tuesday, the youth embarked on serious --
    Ms Prempeh 11 a.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker, they embarked on a demonstration against the Omanhene , even though he is not responsible.
    Mr Speaker 11 a.m.
    Your Question, Hon Member.
    Ms Prempeh 11 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to find out from the Hon Minister, in the interim, what can be done to help the situation.
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, in the interim, the road would be maintained, that would mean that immediately after the rains recede, work would continue.
    Ms Prempeh 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Minister said the road from Bomaa to Subonpang was awarded on contract in 2012, I would want to find out who the contractor is because, up till now nobody is working on that road.
    Also, when the contract was awarded and what has happened?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am waiting for the details regarding which contractor was awarded the contract. As soon as I get it, I would accordingly announce it.
    Ms Prempeh 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, can the Hon Minister tell us when he can furnish the House with the details?
    Mr Speaker 11:10 a.m.
    He said he is waiting for it today.
    Yes, Hon Deputy Minister?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the name of the contractor is M. S. Alexboam Company Limited.
    Mr Speaker 11:10 a.m.
    Hon Members, the next Question is Question number 141 standing in the name of the Hon Member for Adansi Fomena.
    Feeder Roads in the Adansi Fomena Constituency (Rehabilitation)
    Q. 141 Mr Daniel Kingsley Atta-Boafo asked the Minister for Roads and Highways what plans the Ministry has for the rehabilitation of the feeder roads in the Adansi Fomena Constituency, especially the road from Kyeaboso to Akrokerri, Fomena to Ayasi, and Dompoase to Adokwai.
    Mr I. Adjei Mensah 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, Adansi Fomena constituency forms part of the Adansi North District. The district has a number of feeder roads that have been identified as a major source of access within the district. These are:
    1. Kyeaboso - Akrokeri (9.50km)
    2. Fomena - Ayasi (3.5km)
    3. Dompoase - Adokwai (9.0km)
    Kyeaboso - Akrokerri
    Background
    Kyeaboso -Akrokerri feeder road is 9.5km and is located in the Adansi North District of the Ashanti Region. It is a gravelled road in fair to poor condition.
    Current programme
    The road has been programmed for routine maintenance works this year after the rains.
    Future programme
    Engineering design studies have been completed and we will continue to rehabilitate the road periodically.
    Fomena - Ayasi
    Background
    Fomena -Ayasi feeder road is 3.5km and is located in the Adansi North District of the Ashanti Region. The road is a gravelled surface in poor condition.
    Current programme
    The Fomena-Ayasi road has been programmed for bitumen surfacing in phases. The phase 1 contract covering 1.80km was awarded in June 2014. The contractor is mobilising to site. The remaining length will be awarded for routine maintenance after the rains.
    Dompoase to Adokwai
    Background
    Mr Speaker, Adokwai feeder road is 9.0km and is located in the Adansi North District of the Ashanti Region. It is a gravelled road in poor condition. There is a partially collapsed culvert between Old Adokwai and Adokwai.
    Current programme
    The partially collapsed culvert will be fixed this year.
    Future programme
    Engineering studies will be carried on the road, and subject to availability of funds, the appropriate intervention will be carried out.
    Mr Atta-Boafo 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, in his answer to the Question on the Kyeaboso to Akrokerri road, he said his Ministry has completed the engineering designs; my question is, when is his Ministry going to do the bitumen surfacing on this very road?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I understand his question to mean rehabilitation of the roads, and that is exactly what I have answered. If he is requesting for the road to be tarred, we can come back with appropriate information for him, but for now and going forward, the road would be placed on the appropriate rehabilitation and mainte- nance programme.
    Mr Atta-Boafo 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, on the Fomena to Ayasi road, he assured the House and my constituents that the contractor is mobilising to site; can he tell us when the contractor would be on site?
    Mr Speaker 11:10 a.m.
    Hon Deputy Minister?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the good news is that, the road has been awarded on contract in June this year, and in August or by the end of August, the contractor would have mobilised to site.
    Mr Atta-Boafo 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, in the Hon Minister 's Answer on the collapsed culvert, he indicated that, he would
    definitely award it to the contractor; I would want him to assure this House whether the contract has been awarded.
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, our information is that, the culvert has been in distress for some time. That is, half of the culvert has been in a problem, therefore, we have instructed the Regional Officer for the Department of Feeder Roads to ensure that appropriate safety measures are taken in connection with that broken stretch. As soon as the rains are over, appropriate action would be taken to fix it.
    Mr Speaker 11:10 a.m.
    We would move to the next Question, which is Question numbered 142 standing in the name of the Hon Member for Ahafo Ano South West.
    Wansamire -Wioso -Tepa Junction Road (Percentage of work executed)
    Q.142. Mr Johnson Kwaku Adu asked the Minister for Roads and Highways what percentage of work had been executed in respect of the road construction from Wansamire-Wioso- Tepa Junction.
    Mr I. Adjei Mensah 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker,the Wioso-Wansamire feeder road is an inter- district road and is 36.8km long. It traverses the Ahafo Ano South District and the Atwima Mponua District of the Ashanti Region.
    Current programme
    The first 12.4km was programmed for bituminous surfacing in two phases. Phase I km (0-7) has been completed. Phase II km (7-12.4) is 65 per cent complete. The project has been recommended for termination due to non-performance and will be re-awarded after termination. The remaining 12.4 - 36.8km together with other roads were awarded as variation order to an ongoing contract for

    rehabilitation. The percentage of works done stand at 57 per cent. The project is behind schedule since it should have been completed in February 2014. The contractor has been warned to expedite the progress of work to ensure early completion of the work.
    Mr Kweku Adu 11:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Deputy Minister in his response stated that the phase II project has been recommended for termination due to non- performance. Is it not possible for the Ministry to assist in resolving all the challenges the contractor might be facing for the contract to continue rather than terminating the whole contract since this might further delay the project and also raise cost?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11:20 a.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker, yes, the Ministry can assist but it is appalling and disappointing that the project which was awarded in 2007 is not completed as of now. Therefore, we need to take action to get the situation arrested; that is why we are taking this action.
    Mr Adu 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, what is the Ministry doing to facilitate early completion of the phase III (three) project since the Minister himself alluded to the fact that the project is already behind schedule?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, because of the fact that the contractor or the works are behind schedule, we have commenced action to warn him to go to
    site and complete the works. The expectation is that, as soon as he gets there, he would mobilise resources and get the road finalised or completed.
    Thank you.
    Mr Adu 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, is the Ministry aware that teachers in six communities of the most affected portions of the road have threatened to embark on a sit-down strike due to the bad nature of the road? What immediate action is the Ministry taking to avert the situation?
    Mr Adjei-Mensah 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Ministry is not aware that teachers there have threatened to go on demonstration. If they want to do that, they probably would want to seek the appropriate authorisation.
    But Mr Speaker, the road is of importance to Ghana and indeed to the Ministry, so we would take appropriate steps to ensure that it is fixed and fixed properly.
    Mr Adu 11:20 a.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 11:20 a.m.
    Hon Members, the next and final Question for the day stands in the name of the Hon Member for Afigya Sekyere East.
    Wiamoase town roads (tarred)
    Q. 143. Mr Hennric David Yeboah asked the Minister for Roads and Highways when the Wiamoase town roads would be tarred.
    Mr Speaker 11:20 a.m.
    Hon Deputy Minister?
    Background
    Mr I. Adjei Mensah 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, Wiamoase is located in the Sekyere South District of Ashanti Region.
    Current programme
    Engineering studies would be conducted on the road after which the necessary intervention would be carried out as appropriate.
    Mr Yeboah 11:20 a.m.
    I am aware that during the rehabilitation of the Agona-Wiamoase road, the tarring of the Wiamoase town roads was to be included. Why was it not done?
    Mr Speaker 11:20 a.m.
    Hon Deputy Minister?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, technically, one would want to conduct engineering studies on the road before one can determine the appropriate cause of action, that is, tarring, grading and culvert works and so on. That is why we think that if we are allowed to conduct the appropriate engineering studies, we would determine the appropriate intervention after the results.
    Thank you.
    Mr Yeboah 11:20 a.m.
    Hon Deputy Minister, are you sure your engineers are giving you the r ight answer about the current situation of Wiamoase town roads?
    Mr Speaker 11:20 a.m.
    Hon Member, rephrase the Question.
    Leave the engineers out; he is before you. So, rephrase the Question.
    Mr Yeboah 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the reason I am saying that --
    Mr Speaker 11:20 a.m.
    Please, you can ask the same Question but rephrase it?
    Mr Yeboah 11:20 a.m.
    I would want the Hon Deputy Minister to tell me if the right information was given to him by the engineers about the Wiamoase town roads?
    Mr Speaker 11:20 a.m.
    It is still not -- but Hon Deputy Minister?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11:20 a.m.
    When engineering studies have been completed, we would know the real picture of the situation. Therefore, if it is finished, we would know, whether it should be tarred or it has to be graded or some culverts would have to be fixed.
    So, let us allow the engineering studies to complete and then appropriate action would be taken to alleviate the situation.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Yeboah 11:20 a.m.
    I am aware that the Wiamoase town roads have been gravelled. The good citizens, the chiefs and the Wiamoase people have done the gravelling of the streets. Are you aware?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, this would come out properly after the engineering studies have been completed. That is why we should allow the engineering studies to be finalised so that we would determine whether the road is suitable for tarring or not. Of course, availability of funds would also be an issue.
    Thank you.
    Mr Yeboah 11:20 a.m.
    The people want the tarring so when is the Report coming?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Member is a member of the District Assembly.
    Mr Yeboah 11:20 a.m.
    So, when? When?
    Mr Speaker 11:20 a.m.
    Hon Member, you have exhausted your Supplementary Questions. I even gave you a bonus of one -- yes.
    Mr Yeboah 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, he did not answer my Question -- when is the Report coming?
    Mr Speaker 11:20 a.m.
    Hon Deputy Minister?
    Mr Adjei Mensah 11:20 a.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker. As soon as possible.
    As soon as possible because the Wiamoase road lies in a District Assembly, therefore, it is impossible, due to financial constraint, to tar all village roads.
    That is why I am saying that, if he could allow us to conduct that study, as soon as the results are ready, the determination would be made to tar that village road -- there are many village roads, therefore, we think that we would have the basis for supporting the village tarring.
    Thank you.
    Mr Speaker 11:20 a.m.
    Hon Deputy Minister, we thank you for attending upon the House to respond to Questions from Hon Members.
    Thank you very much.
    Hon Majority Leader, I would want to have the Papers laid first before I take the Statements.
    Dr Benjamin B. Kunbuor 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, Item 7 (b) (ii).
    Mr Speaker 11:20 a.m.
    Is (b) (i) ready?
    Dr Kunbuor 11:20 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, (b) (i) is not ready.
    The Chairmen and Ranking Members are in a meeting so, I would seek your indulgence to allow the Vice Chairman to lay item 7(b) (ii) on behalf of the Chairman.
    Mr Speaker 11:30 a.m.
    Hon Members, presentation of Papers by the Vice Chairman of the Finance Committee; item 7b (ii) on the Order Paper.
    PAPERS 11:30 a.m.

    Dr Kunbuor 11:30 a.m.
    Item 7 (d).
    Mr Speaker 11:30 a.m.
    Very well, item 7d (i) on the Order Paper.
    By the Vice Chairman of the Committee --
    (i) Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, and Sahara Energy Fields Ghana Limited for the Exploration for, and Development and Produc- tion of Petroleum in respect of the Shallow Water Cape Three Points Block, Offshore of the Republic of Ghana.
    (ii) Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, GNPC Exploration and Produc- tion Company Limited, A-Z Petroleum Products Ghana Limited and Eco Atlantic Oil and Gas Ghana Limited for the Exploration for, and Develop- ment and Production of Petroleum in respect of the South-West Cape Three Points Block, Offshore of the Republic of Ghana.
    (iii)Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, GNPC Exploration and Production Company Limited, UB Resources Limited, Royalgate Ghana Limited and Houston Drilling Management (Ghana) Limited for the Exploration for, and Develop- ment and Production of Petroleum in respect of the Offshore Cape Three Points South Block.
    Mr Speaker 11:30 a.m.
    Hon Majority Leader, is there any other Paper that is ready to be laid now?
    Dr Kunbuor 11:30 a.m.
    No, Mr Speaker, we would hold on. We are waiting to hear from the Chairmen of the Committees.
    Mr Speaker 11:30 a.m.
    Very well.
    Hon Members, I have admitted one Statement today which is a tribute in memory of the late Paul Victor Obeng.
    Hon Minister for Trade and Industry?
    STATEMENTS 11:30 a.m.

    Minister for Employment and Labour Relation (Mr Haruna Iddrisu) (MP) 11:30 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, thank you for the opportunity to make a Statement and to pay tribute in memory of the late Paul Victor Obeng.
    Mr Speaker, it is with great sadness and a heavy heart that I rise to eulogise and pay tribute to a towering political figure, Paul Victor Obeng; Chairman of the National Development Planning Commission (NDPC) and a Senior Presidential Adviser.
    Mr Speaker 11:30 a.m.
    Have you been reading the book of Isaiah?
    Mr Iddrisu 11:30 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I do.
    Mr Speaker 11:30 a.m.
    I see. That is instructive.
    Mr Iddrisu 11:30 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to quote :
    “The righteous perish, and no one ponders it in his heart; devout men are taken away, and no one understands that. The righteous are taken away to be spared from evil. Those who walk uprightly enter into peace; they find rest as they lie in death.”
    Mr Speaker, Uncle P.V. or Sir P.V. as he was affectionately called, was an iconic political figure of our age.
    He would be fondly missed by Asanteman, the National Democratic Congress (NDC) and the country at large.
    He would be remembered as a champion of equitable national develop- ment and a convincing politician. He was a magnificent political figure, an eloquent speaker and a brilliant analyst with the strong record of public and political service to Ghana.
    Hon Members, Mr P.V. Obeng was born in August 1947 and had his secondary education at the Opoku Ware Secondary School in Kumasi. Mr P.V. Obeng was a proud product of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology where he earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering in
    1971.
    Before entering politics, he worked with top engineering companies in executive positions in the private sector: United African Motors, Mankoadze Fisheries among others.
    Mr Speaker, he served as the Chairman of the Committee of Secretaries under the Provisional National Defence Council (PNDC) regime from 1982 to 1992.
    Between 1986 and 1992, he was appointed member of the PNDC in addition to his role as the Chairman of the Committee of Secretaries then, now the Committee of Ministers.
    At the commencement of the Fourth Republic, with President Jerry John Rawlings' successful election as the President of the Republic of Ghana, Mr P.V. Obeng was appointed as the Presidential Adviser on Governmental Affairs.
    Between 1997 and 2008, he left Government and went back into the private sector. He was the Chairman of the Ningo Salt Limited and had keen interest in sports, especially football.
    He was the Chairman of Asante Kotoko Football Club between 2003 and 2006. He was working to establish a youthful football academy in Ghana. Unlike other football enthusiasts, he had a team he supported in every other country: Asante Kotoko in Ghana, Liverpool in England, Barcelona in Spain, and Bayern Munich in Germany. Oh death!
    Mr Speaker, we are comforted by the memory of his long and full dedicated and inspiring life, and proud of his service to the country.
    His demise leaves a void in our lives which would be impossible to fill. His death robs our nation of one of its greatest talents. The brightest light has gone out.
    I was with him at Senchi for the discussion on the state of Ghana's Economy and its future. The reconciler and consensus builder that he was; he relished the absence of the Minority.
    He immensely contributed in making our investment climate competitive. He helped build a strong partnership between government and private sector operators.
    He was very religious and a devout Catholic who supported leprosariums as a welfare undertaking, and his contribu- tion in helping the vulnerable and the poor in society.
    He undoubtedly was a legendary figure of the NDC Party and Government.
    Mr Speaker, the debate on national issues would be duller with his passing. There was never a boring moment listening to him. He was sharp as ever in mind; he had a restless mind in search of solutions to national development problems.
    He was a reservoir of informed opinions and a fountain of insightful views. He had clarity of expression and beamed with smiles at all times even as he engaged his adversaries. He was regarded with good degree of affection from the opposite end of the political spectrum.
    Mr Speaker, even on May 17, 2014 as the tragedy happened, it was the Minority Leader of Parliament who sent me a text message, followed subsequently by a phone message to confirm whether what he was hearing about the passing on of Sir P.V. was true. The political divide had enormous respect for his brilliance and passion, and his commitment to the development of our country.
    He was regarded and honoured internationally. He was a proud recipient of 1986 State Award by the Republic of Bulgaria, the 1986 State Award by the former German Democratic Republic, 2007 State Award by the Republic of Ghana; the Companion of the Order of the Volta and the 2009 Knighthood of Saint Gregory the Great, awarded by His holiness the Pope. He was a devout Catholic and Christian. His legacy would speak for itself.
    May the soul of our beloved and colourful politician, Sir P.V., Uncle P.V., rest in perfect peace.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 11:40 a.m.
    Yes, Hon Member for Subin?
    Mr Isaac Osei (NPP -- Subin) 11:40 a.m.
    I wish to associate myself with the Statement which has been ably made by the Hon Minister.
    Mr Speaker, my earliest recollection of the late P.V. Obeng was in the late 1960s, when as an Engineering student at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, he became the National President of the National Union of Ghana Students.
    His eloquence and his analytical skills, I believe were honed in those early days. P. V. Obeng in later life gave credibility to the PNDC regime by reaching out to others who were outside his immediate political circle by providing a channel for the ventilation of views in a very difficult political atmosphere.
    He was one of the few politicians that I encountered who would concede a point and cleverly internalise that point and present, using his great gift of oratory to ensure acceptance by all.
    Mr Joseph Yieleh Chireh (NDC -- Wa West) 11:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, thank you very much for me to be given this opportunity to pay tribute to Paul Victor Obeng.
    When Paul Victor Obeng was contesting elections as a student leader, he said that ‘PV' is equal to a constant and those of you who have done science know that the product of Pressure and Volume is always a constant. That ‘PV is a constant' resonated throughout his life; he was constantly on the move to make sure that things happened.
    I met P.V. Obeng in the year 1983 -- [Interruption] -- and I have not regretted for the type of personality that he had; the kind of things he could do and the energy in him.
    Indeed, one distinguishing thing about him is the fact that, he was consensual. P. V. Obeng would always make sure he listens to people but makes a decision that when it is opposed, he would find a way of talking to who opposed it.
    He was very willing to serve his nation and partisanship was not too much of what is important. He was committed and he made sure that wherever a national cause was available for us to do something, he would rise to the occasion.
    We have lost a great man. P. V. Obeng may not have had series of letters before his name but he has touched the lives of so many people; he has touched the lives of people that he has interacted with, either in official capacity or in social sectors. This is the type of leader we must all be emulating; the one who wants Ghana to move forward irrespective of what the situation is.
    Of the heady days of the PNDC, this was one person who could meet with so many groups in a day, despite his ailment and we all got to know about it, he was always available to move the PNDC meetings to very reasonable grounds and we took decisions. That is why under the PNDC, so many things were done for this country. He was the engine behind all this and we have lost a man that we should all praise today.
    The family; you have my condolences and on behalf of all of us, the young ones who joined him at that time, we pay him tribute and hope that next time round -- the cadres, in fact, they know, if any time there was cadres meeting and P. V. Obeng entered the hall, everybody resonated with the kind of language he was going to pour out to them.
    He made sure he motivated people by his speeches and this great man today has fallen. Let us all give our sincere thanks to God for having given P. V. Obeng to Ghana.
    On this note, thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 11:40 a.m.
    Hon Dan Botwe?
    Mr Daniel Botwe (NPP -- Okere) 11:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I also rise to associate myself with the Statement in honour of the memory of the late P. V. Obeng.
    On the occasion of the death of the former Vice President, Alhaji Aliu Mahama, we gave tributes here and I remember in my contribution I said that, it is important to give this tribute but it is also equally important that we learn something from it.
    The greatest tribute we can pay to these people that we honour and cherish so much is to let their lives influence us and influence our politics.
    As for these ceremonial speeches, we would make them. We talk of people and I would want to quote from the Hon Member who made the Statement:
    “He was a reconciler and a consensus builder”
    Again he says;
    “He was regarded with a good degree of affection from the opposite end of the political spectrum.”
    We pay all these tributes to people especially when they pass on but the issue is, whether all that we say influence our lives and our politics afterwards.
    Mr Speaker, it is possible to do competitive partisan politics in the country to pursue programmes and policies that would go to upgrade the quality of life of our people without disrespecting and insulting each other. I believe that is why we are trying to talk about the late P. V. Obeng; that is it. I do not think anybody remember hearing P. V. Obeng insult people, yet we would pay tribute and after wards, that type of our politics would still go on.
    It is important that we remember them for this and let their lives influence us. That is the greatest tribute that we could pay. He has been in active student politics and those of us who were very fortunate to attend the Kwame Nkrumah University
    of Science and Technology -- I would want to believe that the plaque is still at the Students Representative Council (SRC) office; you would see P. V. Obeng, 1969, SRC President and we read about him; we listened to him.
    Mr Speaker, I became the National Secretary of National Union of Ghana Students from KNUST in 1982. That was the time that the -- I do not know whether I should still say the revolution had happened in the country and as has been said by a former cadre, Mr Yieleh Chireh, even though many of us did not support the revolution and in actual fact, fought against it, it was still clear that he was a shining star in the midst of the revolutionists. -- [Interruptions].
    When NUGS was on strike against the revolution and even when we had to meet Government to talk in negotiations, it was always so easy, because maybe he had been a former leader, he understood our point; to deal with him, calm things down and still get consensus and move back.
    He appreciated our point; he knew we were against the Revolution, he knew that we were part of a different set of political opinion but it was still easy to deal with Mr P.V. Obeng. Even in spite of the age difference, it was still very easy to deal with him. No wonder he has contributed so much; under President Kufuor's NPP, he still contributed and nobody had a problem that P.V. Obeng was with you and you were discussing even partisan politics.
    In contributing to his memory, it is important and I would want to repeat what I said that, the greatest tribute we can pay to the memory of such people is to continue the race where they left off. But more importantly, all the good attributes that we say, should not just be an issue of ceremonial speeches but that it will go to influence our lives and our politics.
    Mr Speaker 11:50 a.m.
    Hon Member for Assin Central?
    Mr Ken Ohene Agyapong (NPP -- Assin Central) 11:50 a.m.
    Thank you -- [Interruption] --Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 11:50 a.m.
    You speak; I will take two from the other side at a go to balance it.
    Mr Agyapong 11:50 a.m.
    Indeed, Mr P.V. Obeng has been a very good Friend of mine and he deserves every praise and everything we do in his honour. We have a small base in Tema, my Friend over there knows, that we meet; NDC, NPP and we do not do politics.
    An Hon Member 11:50 a.m.
    What do you do there?
    Mr Agyapong 11:50 a.m.
    We discuss matters of mutual interest that would help this country. At one point, my good Friend suggested that, look, we can do something to make a difference in this country; that is, you and I seem to be extreme politicians from two political parties. If we set up a business, then others will realise that politicians are not enemies as it is perceived to be in this country.
    I remember him for one thing: he was a staunch Catholic and anytime we met, he had a concoction for us. He would take whisky, coke and mix it then he will come up with something -- Anno Dominos, take it, drink it and let us see. [Laughter.] He
    was such an affable man; very nice and it is unfortunate that when it happened, I was not in the country. I, probably, would have been one of the first people to go to his house.
    I remember his 62nd birthday; I was the one who proposed the toast for everybody to enjoy the Champaign.
    When it comes to politics, you will realise he has served this country and I would quote Hon Yieleh Chireh's son, who was a school prefect at SOS-Hermann Gmeiner International College and when we met at their graduation, I was sitting behind his father and that young man said
    “The Revolutionarist, at the end of the revolution, becomes a democrat.”
    Hon P.V. Obeng indeed helped the Provisional National Defence Council (PNDC); he contributed tremendously but the latter part -- when you engage him in a conversation, you would realise he was a very liberal man who only seeks the interest of our country. I would say at the initial stages, he was a revolutionarist, the latter part, he was a democrat and that was Hon P.V. Obeng for us.
    An Hon Member 11:50 a.m.
    You learnt from him.
    Mr Agyapong 11:50 a.m.
    I have learnt from him -- [Laughter]-- why not?
    It is only a fool who would not change his mind. [Laughter.] So, I say God bless his soul.
    Thank you.
    Dr Kwabena Donkor (NDC -- Pru East) noon
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to add my voice to the Statement.
    P.V. Obeng as I knew him as the PNDC Co-ordinating Secretary at the PNDC Secretariat was a man who loved his country above all else. Not only did he love his country but P. V. Obeng took a number of us, thus the young revolutionarists, the cadres under his tutelage. So magnanimous was he that on one occasion, I was given an assignment and when I came up with my report, unfortunately, his name was mentioned in the Report.
    P. V. Obeng called me aside and said Kwabena, you are a young man; you are growing in politics, when you are given assignment by the powers that be, be careful how you craft your report. The very people will go and discuss the Report and you may turn out to be the young man to be watched.
    I learnt so much under P.V. Obeng. His stature cannot be disputed. He was a Statesman above all else. He loved Ghana, when intellectuals or the intelligentsia refused to mingle with those of us they called the riff-raffs, P.V. Obeng stood out and put the interest of Ghana first. Today, this country is grateful to P.V.Obeng. He was human; he might have had his faults but even in his humanity, his weakness became a strength.
    P.V. was so accommodating that even for people who labelled against him in those days, P.V. served as a bridge in the national interest. Wherever P.V is today, I believe he can proudly look back and say that he helped nurture a crop of Ghanaian revolutionarists who were democratic centralists and today, we are here. The revolutionarists believed in democratic
    centralism; we had our own intra-party debates, we had our descents, but once the collective decided, we were all bound by the decision of the collective.
    P. V., today, I say may you rest in peace. You have served Ghana and served Ghana well.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity.

    Deputy Minister for Food and Agriculture (Dr Ahmed Yakubu Alhassan): Thank you very much, Mr Speaker for the opportunity to associate myself with the Statement made by the Hon Member of Parliament for Tamale South to eulogise a great man who towered so well in Ghanaian politics and society.

    I encountered Mr P. V. Obeng the first time in Tamale when I was Master of Ceremonies (MC) for an occasion to do a fundraising ceremony for the NDC party shortly before the 1996 elections. Thereafter, I encountered him more as soon as I became a Member of Parliament in this House.

    I found him a very friendly person with a lot of witty intelligence and his friendship cuts across all generations.

    Mr Speaker, I dare say he related more with those who were younger, because he believed that young people needed to be influenced positively, so that they could make their contributions to society in a more progressive manner.

    Mr Speaker, he was an inspiration to me and many of my generation and this is somebody whose name was so huge, but when you encountered him physically, one could find him to be a very simple individual to approach.

    Mr Speaker, this is a person whose first instinct was to find solutions to any problem that was put to him— a true scientist indeed.
    Mr Speaker noon
    Hon Members, I would take one each and then come to Leadership.
    I would call Hon Titus-Glover and the Hon Minister for Upper West.
    Daniel Nii Kwartei Titus-Glover (NPP--Tema East): Mr Speaker, I am so grateful for the opportunity to make a contribution on the tribute made by my senior Minister Hon Haruna Iddrisu.
    Mr Speaker, I have known the late P.V. Obeng for the past thirty-five years. He was a very close Friend to my late uncle Daniel Lartey, popularly called “Dan La”; proprietor of Faith Chemist at Site 10, Community 1.
    Mr Speaker, these were the days when he was the Engineer at Tema Oil Refinery as well as Mankoadze Fisheries. He was very affable, so friendly, easy going and very compassionate.
    Mr Speaker, I recall my last engagement with late P. V. Obeng on 11th May, 2014, when he invited me home. What he said was that; “Nii Kwartei, I am looking for the opportunity where the three Members of Parliament in Tema and the Mayor would look at the general development of the Tema Metropolis.”
    Mr Speaker, this engagement was very striking, because looking at the way the population of Tema is growing now, there is the need for us to take a critical look, as the political players, to see how best we could harness our strengths together. It was in this same deliberation that I brought to his attention the boundary dispute between Tema and Kpone.
    Mr Speaker, I recall at that time, the former Minister for Local Government and Rural Development called him on phone and drew his attention to what Prof. Bennett was doing with regard to this boundary dispute and all that.
    Mr Speaker, that was the time when he was also going to close the workshop for Chief Executives at Ghana Institute of
    Management and Public Administration (GIMPA) and he told me that he was on his way to Kumasi for the akwasidae festival.
    Mr Speaker, Tema, the nucleus family, the extended family, the nation, and the Catholic community have lost a great son.

    Mr Speaker, it is so striking, and I believe that both, in this Chamber and outside, we are yet to find one —
    Mr Speaker 12:10 p.m.
    Why do you think that it should come from this side and not from your side? [Laughter.]
    Nii Kwartei Titus-Glover: Mr Speaker, we need to have something in place of late P.V. Obeng in memory of his good works and I would suggest; in Tema, the three of us; myself, Hon Kofi Brako and Hon Irene Naa Torshie Addo would suggest to the Assembly for something memorable to be named after him, regardless of that, for the nation at large something good can also be done in remembrance of the late P.V. Obeng for what he has done for this country.
    Thank you so much.

    Upper West Regional Minister (Alhaji Amin Amidu Sulemani) : Mr Speaker, I rise to add my voice to the numerous condolences being expressed over the death of our senior Presidential Adviser, Mr P. V. Obeng.

    Mr Speaker, I was privileged to know P. V. Obeng at the age of 25 when I was appointed the Deputy Regional

    Secretary--Upper West. We worked closely until 1983 when I had to work directly under him in the Office of the President, Castle.

    Mr Speaker, the late P.V. Obeng happened to be a Mechanical Engineer and when he realised that I was also a Mechanical Engineer, we bonded so well and worked so closely. What one would observe about him was his immense knowledge on every issue that came before him, be it the Sciences, the Arts, whatever area, he was in the position to contribute.

    Mr Speaker, late P.V. Obeng would walk in without a written speech and pick up the issue and would let you know exactly why you are there. This was a man who contributed so immensely during the PNDC era and into our democratic regime as the Presidential Adviser under His Excellency, President Jerry John Rawlings until he left in 1986.

    Mr Speaker, even when he was out of Office, we still met and at times, we met when he was doing his consultancy. He came around to the regions, particularly Upper East, where I was also serving again as a Minister, we had occasion to work together.

    Mr Speaker, late P.V. Obeng in his last position as Senior Presidential Adviser, was also responsible for co-ordinating most of the activities of the infrastructure Ministries, and we had the occasion to be with him to share with us the directions we can take to make Ghana a better place.

    Certainly, Mr P. V. Obeng has contributed his bit to the development of Ghana starting from the early days of the revolution to the day that our Lord asked for him. I remember my last interaction with him was at Senchi. When I stepped into Senchi, he was the first person I met and
    Mr Speaker 12:10 p.m.
    Leadership?
    Minority Leader (Mr Osei Kyei- Mensah-Bonsu) 12:10 p.m.
    Thank you very much, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity.
    Mr Speaker, I also rise to associate myself with the eulogy delivered in memory of the late Paul Victor Obeng, by the Hon Haruna Iddrisu.
    Mr Speaker, the late P. V. Obeng has been one of the longest lasting PNDC activists. He was indeed a foundation member of the PNDC who contributed in most profound manner to the successful execution of the December 31st, 1981 coup, which ushered the revolution that we saw in this country, post- December 31st, 1981.
    He struggled through political terrains -- the PNDC/NDC II.
    For a person who was acclaimed as the Prime Minister of the PNDC regime, it was rather strange to observe that he took a
    backseat in the NDC era. But that was as fate will have it.
    An engineer by training and profession, he demonstrably executed a prowess in almost every subject matter, the generalist as he was. Indeed, he was Ghana's version of “the great commu- nicator” that America bestowed on former President Ronald Regan. He was a very sharp brain who could turn on the tip of a needle on the spur of the moment, an exceedingly versatile personality.
    In the blood and tender days of the revolution, he was one person who worked assiduously to douse the tension that often followed the proclamations of “report without fail” or “report in 48 hours in your own interest.” Perhaps, for the distilling and stabilising role of people like P. V. Obeng and our own former Speaker, Rt. Hon Justice Daniel Francis Annan in those tumultuous days, the nation could have been thrown onto a cliff-hanger of “the Peoples versus the Citizens”.
    The late P. V. Obeng latterly assumed the chair-ship of the NDPC, a position which I personally believed suited his abilities and competencies. He was a one person conglomerate and following after the work that had been done by the venerable J. H. Mensah and the illustrious Mrs Chinnery Hesey. P. V. Obeng it was who recommenced the effort to reposition the NDPC. One can only hope that the effort that he started will not be allowed to be interred with him. He was a keen sports enthusiast and administrator and indeed carried his versatility to the sporting terrain.
    Mr Speaker, it is significant to observe that the greatest award bestowed on Mr P.V. Obeng -- the 2007 State Award by the Republic of Ghana, the Companion of the Order of the Volta -- a meritorious
    achievement without doubt was done to him by President John Agyekum Kufuor. Kufuor and indeed the NPP recognised that this nation belonged to all of us, that the politics of exclusivism should give way to inclusivity.
    The nation has indeed lost a pillar. The nation indeed mourns. We are not shedding crocodile tears and it speaks volumes of a person about whom this eulogy has been composed.
    Mr Speaker, we shed tears today as a nation together with the family that he has left behind, acknowledging that the tears of the family will not be enough to ferry this illustrious son to the great beyond.
    Mr Speaker, we comfort the family and urge them to have faith in the Maker of P.V. Obeng who, we believe, loves P.V. better than all of us do love him.
    May his soul rest in perfect peace.
    Mr Speaker, I thank you.
    Mr Speaker 12:10 p.m.
    Hon Members, before I call on the Hon Majority Leader, my attention has been drawn to the fact that, we have in the House the family members of the late P.V. Obeng and I duly recognise them. We also have representation from the NDPC who are also in the House to listen to the tribute being paid in his memory.
    Hon Members, a special application has just come to me and I think that I have to do that: A former Director-General of the NDPC, who is now an Hon Member of this House, I will give him three minutes. Then the Hon Chief Whip also three minutes to balance the equation.
    Hon Finance Minister, do you want to contribute?
    Mr Seth E. Terkpeh 12:10 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker.
    Prof. George Y. Gyan-Baffour (NPP -- Wenchi) 12:20 p.m.
    Thank you very much for this opportunity. I am sorry, I got in late.
    Mr Speaker, I have known Mr P. V. Obeng since 1964 when I was in Form 1 at Opoku Ware Secondary School. He was then in Form 5 and we were in the same house.
    Mr Speaker, P. V. as we affectionately called him, was a devout Christian -- a devout Catholic.
    Mr Speaker, he was a science student yet PV was a great debater in politics and on current affairs. When we were younger, we were wondering how somebody who was debating so much could be so great in Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry. He was a very intelligent man and a great academician at that time.
    I met PV again when he became the Co-ordinating Secretary of the PNDC. He was deeply political then but very open- minded about it.
    I remember I went to him one day at the Castle to report about the activities of a company that I do not want to mention here, and I told him:
    “Senior, the activities of this company are so bad that if you allow them to stay on without any action by the PNDC and any new govern- ment comes in, they cannot handle it.”
    His retort was, “which new Govern- ment?” I said: “I am sorry, Sir; I am talking about the fact that you are the one who can actually solve problems like this.” This is to show how deeply he believed then, in the ongoing revolution and thought then that, the revolution was the best for this country.
    Mr Speaker, in 2009, when the NDC came into power and after we had all parted ways and met again, I realised that he had
    Mr Speaker 12:20 p.m.
    Hon Member, please wind up.
    Prof. Gyan-Baffour 12:20 p.m.
    He was a consensus builder, a senior of mine in school, a friend, a patriotic Ghanaian, a great thinker and a great tactician.
    Mr Speaker, may his soul rest in perfect peace and thank you for giving me the opportunity.
    Alhaji Mohammed-Mubarak Muntaka (NDC -- Asawase) 12:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to also pay tribute to one of the greatest sons of our land.
    In particular, for those of us in the NDC in the Ashanti Region, Mr P.V. Obeng was a very great pillar in our region with regard to so many things that we did in the region, in particular, party activities.
    Mr Speaker, so many things have been said about him and I do not intend to repeat them. But very pronounced was one activity that he carried out that I believe this country will forever remain grateful to him for. That was in 2009 -- during the transition process. There were a lot of difficulties but Mr P. V. Obeng stood his ground and he would be able to look into your eyes and politely tell you “no, we cannot do this,” “and yes, we have to do this.”
    This is something that many people did not know, that he did a lot to prevent this country from seeing some excesses. Earlier, a colleague mentioned his humility. If my memory serves me right, when our
    uncle P.V. was in government, especially at the time that he was the Chairman of the Committee of Secretaries, some of us were children and we were in school. We saw him high up there but when the opportunity came for us to work closely with him, sometimes you got amazed at the way he treated us. He was like a father to many of us. When he was talking to you, he would hold you, put his hands around your neck and make you feel very comfortable.
    Mr Speaker, I remember one time, I had a programme as a young person and I decided to call most of the Senior Colleagues in our region just to mention it to them so that they do not hear it and be surprised. When I mentioned it to him, he said, “Muntaka, do not worry, I will come”. I said; Uncle, it was not for you to come, it was just to tell you so that you will know of it.”
    To my surprise, Uncle PV was in my house and I was shocked; I could not sit, I did not know where to place him, not because, with the greatest respect, he was some extraordinary person, but the humility for someone like me to invite such a big icon. Yet, he honoured it and came to my house. That was very instructive, and I think as politicians, even as we lead our people and occupy great positions, if we can learn the lessons from the life of Uncle PV; to be humble; to look at people who are far below us with great respect, it would help this country tremendously.
    I must say, the Ashanti Region has lost a great icon. To the family, we sympathise with them and promise to be with them throughout this difficult moment.
    Damrifa due to our Uncle P. V. Obeng, may his soul rest in perfect peace.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity.
    Minister for Finance (Mr Seth E. Terkpeh) 12:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to speak in two respects.
    As the last speaker indicated, I beg to speak on behalf of a number of young people whom the late PV mentored when he was in a very senior and high profile position. That was when I happened to have started my working relationship with the late PV.
    When I say “started working relations with the late PV”, I am talking about young people, me included, who were just emerging from national service and were entering the Public Service at the time, in my case, working with the National Revenue Secretariat under Mr Ato Ahwoi, who later became head of the Structural Adjustment Programme Secretariat. It is against this background that, I also pay respect to P.V. for his contributions.
    On the economic side of the nation, most contributors allude to his contributions to politics. But what few also know is that in his role back then as the de facto Prime Minister, he had a lot to do with the Economic Recovery Programme or Structural Adjustment Programme at the time.
    It was in this capacity that when I worked in the Structural Adjustment Programme Secretariat in a monitoring role, I came into very close, indeed, fairly contact with the late P.V. Obeng.
    A lot has been said about his humility, because even at that level in governance, P.V. would relate to those of us who were doing very routine jobs and would be with us and offer advice. He would visit the Secretariat which was then under the late Dr Kofi Frimpong and Miss Sena Gabianu.
    Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
    Majority Leader/Minister for Government Business in Parliament (Dr Benjamin B. Kunbuor) 12:30 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for giving me the opportunity to make one or two comments on this Statement that has been made, as part of the celebration of the life of Mr P.V. Obeng by the Hon Member for Tamale South Mr Haruna Iddrisu.
    Since the death of P.V. Obeng till today, I have listened to the tributes that people have paid to him. Sometimes you would wish that people could ask the good Lord after death, to let them come back for a week just to come and see how things have changed suddenly.
    When Justice Annan died, that was the first time I started thinking deeply about
    public life. I think that thought became deeper when I heard of the death of Mr P.V. Obeng. For those of us, as other colleagues have said, who have had the opportunity of working closely with Comrade P.V. Obeng, can attest to the fact that we are the better for having had that experience.
    I certainly do not intend to belabour the point. This is because, as we say in my village, no matter how many words you use, the price of a horse is always fixed; the length of time you talk, would not reduce the price of a horse.
    One of the greatest things we should do, as ably said by a number of Hon Members here, is that, the best way to celebrate the life of P.V. Obeng is to continue with the type of political astuteness and the legacy that he has left behind.
    But Mr Speaker, Mr P.V. Obeng was not just unique in the sense of being a consensus builder. He had a number of very unique human qualities that has kept this country together for many years, and the only way one can appreciate this, in my view, is to share just one or two with you.
    Mr Speaker, P.V. Obeng was the first person who made me make a distinction between a clever person and an intelligent person, because he combined both. Quite often, you have a lot and many more clever people but certainly, you do not have many intelligent people, and if an individual combines both being clever and intelligent, he indeed, always becomes an icon.
    P.V. had a way of turning very serious and irritating circumstances into very light environments for those who encountered him.
    I remember at a funeral one day, I was standing with him when one of his contemporaries came, and the first statement was, “P.V. are you still a
    socialist? You know what he said? He said when you are twenty-one years and you are not a socialist, then you have a problem and that when you are forty and you are still a socialist, then you have a problem.
    P.V. Obeng's response was, “being a socialist at forty is not a problem because you would then be a matured socialist.”
    Another experience that I had was when there was an interview being conducted to send students to the Isle of Youth in Cuba. Any time I meet the one who made that statement, my mind always went back to P.V. Just to convince P.V. why his son must be given a place to go to the Isle of Youth, he said:
    “P.V., you do not know that the very day they delivered this son of mine, he was speaking like Che Guevara.”
    And what I remember P.V. say was: “Was it in English or Spanish? It became clear that, this person noticed that P.V. in a very shy way, would have recognized his exaggeration just to give the son an advantage.
    There are so many of these instances normally associated with P.V. One uniqueness of his that I found was his ability to listen to very divergent, irritating and opposing views and you thought that in that type of meeting, there would not be a middle way. But anytime P.V. was summarising the issues, you would always find a middle way on the contesting parties.
    There is not much more that we can say, the good Lord has called him home. This country has lost a political icon, the NDC has lost one of their greatest comrades, and I guess that society is the worse for it. We can only pray that the good Lord gives him a peaceful resting place and grants the family all the courage to accept this loss.
    May his soul rest peace.
    Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    Hon Members, in line with the practice of this House, we observe a minute's silence in his memory.
    Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    May his soul and the soul of the departed rest in perfect peace. Amen.
    Hon Members, I would want to suggest that we wait for the Finance Committee to bring their Report on the Supplementary Estimates so that we can debate item numbers 10 and 11 together and at the conclusion, I would put two separate Questions on both.
    Hon Majority Leader, that is what I am proposing.
    Dr Kunbour 12:30 p.m.
    Very well, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    Hon Minority Leader?
    Item number 8.
    Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
    Hon First Deputy Speaker?
    MOTIONS 12:40 p.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Mr Ebo Barton-Odro) 12:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to move that this Honourable House adopts the Twelfth Report of the Appointments Committee on the nominations of H. E. the President for Ministerial and Deputy Ministerial appointments.
    Introduction
    In fulfilment of articles 78, 79 and 256 of the 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana, His Excellency, President John
    Mr Sekyere also had vocational training from 2001 to 2002 12:40 p.m.
    Pre-Volunteer Training Manchester (2001), Manchester 2002 Commonwealth Games Authority Assistant (M202 CGA Assistant) Training (2002) and Level 3 in Advice and Guidance from Open University (2002).
    He worked as a National Service Person at Sunyani Secondary School teaching geography and English from 1979 to 1980. In 1988 he was elected as the Chairman of the Finance Committee of PSWU of Trades Union Congress of Ghana till he handed over in 1992. In addition he worked as Inspector of Taxes at the Internal Revenue Service (Ghana) between 1985 and 1992.
    From 1988 to1993 he was the Eastern Regional Organising Assistant of the Committees for the Defence of the Revolution (CDR). In 1993 he became Deputy Eastern Regional Minister till his tenure ended in 1997. He became the Planning Analyst for the National Development Planning Commission in Ghana.
    From 2004 to 2006 he worked as an Assessor for the National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) Level 3 &4 in Advice and Guidance at Manchester College of Art and Technology (MANCAT). He moved to join SOVA and HMP Forest Bank as the Employment and Training Co- ordinator from November 2002 to August 2006. He then took up the responsibilities of a Lecturer in Advice and Guidance at MANCAT from September, 2006 to January, 2007.
    During the Presidential campaign of the late former President, H.E John Evans Atta Mills, 2007-2009, Hon Sekyere held the position of Chief of Staff at the Campaign office. He was also a member of the Government Transition Team as a Secretary in 2009.
    The nominee is currently the Deputy Minister of Employment and Labour Relations since April, 2009.
    Labour unrest/disregard for Labour Act
    The nominee concurred with the observation that, professional staff within essential services category that were
    exempted from going on strike disregard provisions within the Labour Act. According to the nominee, the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations has no mandate to stop striking unions except to refer them to the National Labour Commission (NLC).
    He also alluded to the fact that, the implementation of the Single Spine Salary Pay Policy (SSSPP) has also contributed to the increased labour unrest among professionals, especially, among unions that do not have bargaining certificates. He said the NLC has initiated a number of court actions to deter other professional bodies, yet the phenomenon is persistent. He averred that as a country, we must change our attitudes and insist that the law works.
    Status of labour offices
    The nominee concurred to the assertion that, the offices of the Labour Commission were not in good shape. He told the Committee that the Former Minister of Employment and Labour Relations, Hon E.T. Mensah had initiated a project of putting up an office complex to house all Labour related offices and Secretariat such as the Fair Wages and Salary Commission, Labour Commission and Factory Inspectorate Division of the Ministry among others.
    The project was mentioned by the Late President, H.E. Prof. J.E.A Mills and reiterated by H.E. President John Mahama on May Day celebrations in 2012 and 2013 respectively. He however indicated that the project has been put on hold for the meantime due to unavailability of funds.
    Alignment of GYEEDA to Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations
    Even though the intention was stated in a Memorandum, GYEEDA according to the nominee, was currently undergoing
    restructuring, therefore the process would have to be completed for other policy directives regarding GYEEDA to be undertaken.
    Moratorium on public sector wages
    On government's proposal to implement a moratorium on public sector wages for the next three years, the nominee indicated to the Committee that, he fully supports the policy proposal. He noted that despite the fact that the macro-economic indicators such as interest rates, depreciation of the cedi and inflation rates were not favourable and hence might negatively impact the cost of living and standard of living and thus push Organised Labour to demand increase in wages, the current arrangement whereby wages are increased on average 20 per cent annually was not sustainable.
    He stated that, it was important for the process to be slowed down. He indicated that this accounted for the resort to the Cost-of Living Allowance (COLA) rather the base pay agreed on in 2014. He explained further that, it was important to consider government's ability to pay higher remuneration among factors under consideration for wage increases since government as an employer, would find it difficult to borrow to pay wages.
    Revenue generation at the district level
    The nominee noted that IGF represents a key source of funding for development at the distr ict level, therefore its generation must be consistent and extensive. However, according to the nominee, very few people living in the districts pay taxes leading to low levels of IGF's. Given the nod, he would encourage District Assemblies to expand their tax net and also design effective mechanisms to enable many people pay their taxes.
    Mr Sekyere also had vocational training from 2001 to 2002 12:40 p.m.
    The nominee also stated that, he would assist the Sector Minister to encourage telecommunication companies to adopt co-sharing of facilities to help speed up extension of telephone services to rural areas.
    Ensuring the provision of quality customer service by telecommunication companies
    The nominee mentioned that, quality service delivery is underpinned by ensuring sufficient mobile network coverage, proper planning by the Telecommunication providers (Telecos) and always ensuring that customers were well informed on challenges ahead of time.
    He assured the Committee that if his nomination is approved by the House, he would work closely with the National Communications Authority (NCA) to ensure that these issues among other industry standards agreed upon are adhered to by the Telecos. Quite apart from these measures, he would assist his Hon Minister to encourage assets (i.e. masts) sharing and domestic travels roaming services.
    Recommendation
    The Committee by consensus recom- mends that the House approves the nomination of Mr. Ato Sarpong as the Deputy Minister for Communications.
    Mr Alexander Percival Segbefia -- Deputy Minister-Designate for Defence
    Background
    Mr Alexander Percival Segbefia was born on 1st January, 1963. He had his basic education at the Christ the King School in Accra and progressed to the Achimota Secondary School from 1973 to 1980 from where he left for the UK and continued at the Davis College in London between

    The nominee further acquired the Higher Court Advocacy Qualification in London, UK in October, 2001. Between June, 2008 and September, 2008, the nominee received legal training at the Ghana School of Law and was called to the Ghana Bar in October, 2008.

    He commenced his legal career in the United Kingdom as a Crown Prosecutor between 1989 and 1990 from which he progressed to become the Senior Crown Prosecutor (SCP) from 1990 to 1992. Between 1993 and 1996, the nominee further progressed to the position of the Borough Crown Prosecutor (BCP) Level D and thereafter rose to become the Branch Court Prosecutor Unit Head Level E from 1997 to 2007. He also acted as the District Crown Prosecutor from 2000 to

    2007.

    Mr Alexander Segbefia served as the Deputy Chief of Staff (Operations) of the Republic of Ghana at the Office of the President from March, 2009 to January,

    2013.

    Controversies relating to the distribution of confiscated vehicles

    Commenting on the controversies which surrounded the distribution of confiscated cars during his tenure as the Deputy Chief of Staff, the nominee stated that he never allowed anybody to take money from any individual on his behalf and mentioned that at all times, he advised people who came to him for assistance to

    go through the due process. He explained that, to obtain confiscated vehicle, an applicant had to obtain a chit after which he was required to deal with the Chairman of the Confiscated Vehicle Committee to be shown the vehicles were available for allocation.

    After this, he stated that when the applicant accepted the car shown to him, he was required to proceed to the Customs Office where the car was to be valued and payment made. He reiterated that, at no point within the process at his office did any money change hands.

    In an answer to a question about the rightness or wrongness in the policy of confiscating vehicles imported into the country, the custom duties and other charges of which cannot be paid by the importers and the Confiscated Vehicle Committee ending up selling the vehicles to other people often below the original duty imposed or even the purchase value of the vehicles, the nominee conceded that the practice is not the best and must be reviewed.

    Involving the Military in developmental activities

    On whether he endorsed the proposal to involve the military in developmental activities such as construction of roads and participation in rural developmental activities, the nominee answered in the affirmative. According to him, the combat role of the military was changing across the world and that more emphasis was now being placed on how to engage the military in other aspects of national development.

    In this regard, he stated that, he preferred the deployment of the skills of officers in the Armed Forces to help in the

    developmental areas of the country. This, according to him would enable the military to bring their experiences to bear in the development agenda of the country.

    Combating cross-border terrorist threats

    In reference to the Communique issued by the ECOWAS Heads of States at the recent Summit in Accra, the nominee acknowledged that the threat of cross border terrorism was real and hence there was the need to strengthen security geared towards sharing of information regarding movement of small arms and terrorist activities.

    He said given the complex mode of operation of terrorist groups, it was crucial that, the Community became mindful of communications relating to terrorist groups yet placed more emphasis on development strategies with other countries within the West Africa sub- region to combat terrorism. He assured the Committee of his readiness to perform any function to be assigned by the Sector Minister to help protect the territorial integrity of the country.

    Ensuring equitable recruitment into the Ghana Armed Forces

    On whether he was aware of a perceived imbalance in the recruitment into the Ghana Armed Forces, the nominee stated that he did not know of any such situation since recruitment is now done regionally. He however informed the Committee that, what may possibly account for any such imbalance was the fact that some applicants may fail to meet the medical examination in the course of the exercise.

    He emphasised that, ensuring regional and ethnic balance in the recruitment into the Armed Forces was critical to meeting the constitutional requirement and to further help foster unity between the
    Minority Leader/ Ranking Member (Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu) 12:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    Question Proposed.
    Mr Speaker 12:50 p.m.
    Hon Members, I have taken note that this is a consensus Report so, I would take only one or two comments and I would put the Question.
    Several Hon Members -- rose --
    Mr Speaker 12:50 p.m.
    Hon Members you have brought report to us, so let us debate it for you. Very well I would take Hon Dominic Azumah and Dr Matthew Prempeh and I would put the Question.
    Mr Dominic A. Azumah (NDC -- Garu) 12:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to support the Motion on the floor of the House and to make just a few comments about the 11 nominees who we are asked to approve on the floor of the House.
    Mr Speaker 12:50 p.m.
    Hon Member I thought this thing had been dealt with in the Committee's Report.
    Mr D. A. Azumah 12:50 p.m.
    I am trying to explain something Mr Speaker and he exhibited himself very clearly to explain everything to the satisfaction of the Committee.
    Mr Speaker, what one can say about this Report is that, we urge the House to give its full support and we urge the nominees, if approval is granted by this House, to help contribute to the advancement of the Agenda of the Government.
    The country has got to a stage that we need people who must come to sacrifice and move the Agenda forward, not people who must come in their own self-interest and I believe these 11 members are coming in at the right time to help move the country forward.
    On that note, Mr Speaker, without wasting the time of the House, I urge the House to support the Motion for the approval of these 11 nominees.
    I thank you so much, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 12:50 p.m.
    Hon Member for Manhyia South.
    Hon Member, earlier, I referred to him as Napo and I want it to be expunged from the records.
    Dr Matthew O. Prempeh (NPP -- Manhyia South) 12:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if you expunge it, it would come back again so let it stay there, it does not really matter much. Mr Speaker you would say it again. [Laughter.]
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the approval of these nominated persons for the various positions by His Excellency the President of the Republic.
    Mr Speaker, interestingly I have stayed on the Appointments Committee for some time and the knowledge demonstrated by these persons in their respective categories was indeed heartwarming. Most of them demonstrated in-depth knowledge of the fields and you begin to wonder why they were not nominated earlier to ably assist their Hon Ministers in their various portfolios.
    The Deputy Minister nominated for the Ministry of Communications demon- strated an in-depth knowledge of the telecommunication sector which would inure to the benefit of Ghana and dovetailed very well into my good friend Hon Haruna Iddrisu when he came for appointment in the previous Parliament. Mr Speaker, it was indeed heartwarming. The Hon Deputy Minister nominated for Health, demonstrated tremendous knowledge in policy planning and implementation in the Ministry.
    Mr Jonny Osei Kofie, Mr Speaker, also demonstrated the relation between research and industry and we hope that in that Ministry he would be able to translate a lot of the research that has been done into practice.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to put on record that, the Hon nominee for the Central Region demonstrated practical knowledge, he deserves to be commended,
    in the Fisheries and Aqua Culture Sector and it was heartwarming when you have a fellow Member of Parliament (MP) demonstrate such knowledge.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Deputy nominee for Defence, I think at the end of the day he had learnt that he would have to be careful with some utterances he made because they would always come back to hunt him. In that regard I would say that we should approve by consensus as we have said, the nominations so done.
    Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
    Hon Members, that concludes the debate.
    Yes, Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, as the Hon Members who spoke before me have said, my own view is that most of the people -- [Interruption.]
    Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
    Hon Members, let us have some order in the House.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1 p.m.
    Most of the people that came before the Appointment's Committee indicated by word and deed that, they have something to offer this country.
    Mr Speaker, my little worry however is that, the Constitution appears to be very clear on the appointments of Ministers and Deputy Ministers. The Constitution in article 79 provides:
    “The President may, in consultation with a Minister of State, and with the prior approval of Parliament, appoint one or more Deputy Ministers to assist the Minister in the performance of his functions.”
    Mr Speaker, what it means is that, if a Deputy Minister is to be appointed to a particular Ministry, there ought to be a Minister who must be consulted because he is going to assist that Minister in the performance of that Minister's role or functions in that Ministry.
    Mr Speaker, when we have a situation where the President himself has announced that the Minister encumbering that office is being shuffled out and we have another person nominated to go to that Ministry, that person is to come before us and then a Deputy Minister is nominated for that Ministry before that Minister appears before the Appointments Committee.
    Mr Speaker, clearly, there is a Constitutional problem and I think that going forward, this House must send the signal to the President that, that arrangement cannot be right. So, there are lessons that we got from this exercise that have not been the best, and I think that we should send the signal to the President.
    I noticed that the Deputy Regional Minister for the Northern Region is up. If I may yield to him, maybe, he has some communication from the President. --
    Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
    Hon Minority Leader, continue.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is just the point that I wanted to register, that going forward, we should be careful about this. Those of them who appeared before us indeed indicated to us that they have acquired some competence to help run this country efficiently.
    Mr Speaker, I think I have a particular observation on the Hon Thomas Aquinas Quansah; a Member of Parliament and a former Deputy Minister nominated as the Regional Minister for Central Region.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1 p.m.


    Mr Speaker, I think he has learnt some useful lessons in this House and has acquired some knowledge in the place where he served.

    On this, Mr Speaker, I want to end, and say that we approve of the nominees of the President.
    Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
    With regard to article (79) that you referred to, you would recall that in the case of the nomination of Dr Kwaku Agyemang-Mensah, it came separately. I did not come together with his Deputy. But again, if you look at the whole principle of reshuffle within what we are practicing now, that is where the problem might be, because we would even nominate you for a particular appointment and Parliament would approve you for that.
    Immediately after your swearing in, they can even decide to reshuffle you to a different Ministry. So we have to look at this article (79) with regard to the recognition of the Presidential system and then the whole concept of the West- minster system.
    I think that it is a point that we need to interrogate further with regard to the general practice in this country, since the
    inception of this Constitution and the Constitutional rule in this country.
    Hon Members, I would now put the Question.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    The House has accordingly approved the following nominees for appointment as Ministers and Deputy Ministers, in accordance with articles 78 (1), 79 (1), and 256 (1, 2) of the 1992 Constitution.
    1. Nii Osah Mills
    2. Mr James Zuuga Tiigah
    3. Mr Aquinas Quansah
    4. Mr Antwi Boasiako-Sekyere
    5. Hon Dela Sowah (Mrs)
    6. Dr Victor Asare Bampoe
    7. Mr Jonny Osei Kofi
    8. Mr Alex Segbefia
    9. Mrs Mona Quartey
    10. Mr Ato Sarpong
    11. Dr Kwaku Agyeman-Mensah

    Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Alfred K. Agbesi 1 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, there is item number 9; the Motion on the Report -- [Interruption]
    Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
    Hon Members, let us have order in the House.
    Mr Agbesi 1 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, item number 9 on the --
    Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
    Hon Member, if you have any other Report, we can take Item 9 subsequently.
    Do we not have any of the --
    Mr Agbesi 1 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, some of the Reports are ready but item number 9 is for the Deputy Speaker, and it is a short -
    - 1 p.m.

    Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
    Any Member of the delegation to the Pan-African Parliament can take that one.
    Mr Agbesi 1 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, Item 30; for the Minister for Energy -- [Pause]
    Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
    Hon Members, Item 30 on the Order Paper.
    MOTIONS 1 p.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 1 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80(1) which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, and Sahara Energy Fields Ghana Limited for the Exploration for, and Development and Production of Petroleum in respect of the Shallow Water Cape Three Points Block, Offshore of the Republic of Ghana may be moved today.
    Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
    Any seconder?
    Mr Kobina T. Hammond 1:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Petroleum
    Agreement by and among GoG/ GNPC/ Sahara Energy Fields Ghana Ltd.
    Chairman of the committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 1:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, and Sahara Energy Fields Ghana Limited for the Exploration for, and Development and Production of Petroleum in respect of the Shallow Water Cape Three Points Block, Offshore of the Republic of Ghana.
    Mr Speaker, in so doing I present your Committee's Report.
    Introduction
    The Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation and the Sahara Energy Fields Ghana Limited in respect of the Shallow Water Cape Three Points Block Offshore of the Republic of Ghana was laid in Parliament on Thursday, 17th July, 2014 by the Hon Minister of Energy and Petroleum, Mr Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah in accordance with article 268 of the 1992 Constitution.
    The Petroleum Agreement was referred to the Select Committee on Mines and Energy for consideration and report

    pursuant to Orders 156 and 188 of the Standing Orders of Parliament.

    Deliberations

    The Committee met with the Hon. Minister for Energy and Petroleum, Mr. Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah and his deputy, Mr. Benjamin Kwaku Dagadu to consider the Agreement. Officials of the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum and the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC) were in attendance to assist in the Committee's deliberations.

    The Committee is grateful to the Officials for their attendance and for offering clarifications on issues raised at the meeting.

    Reference documents

    The Committee referred to the under- listed documents during its deliberations:

    i. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana;

    ii. The Standing Orders of Parliament;

    iii. The Ghana National Petroleum Corporation Law, 1983 (PNDCL

    64);

    iv. The Petroleum (Exploration and Production) Law, 1984 (PNDCL

    84);

    v. The Petroleum Income Tax Law,

    1987 (PNDCL 188);

    vi. The Petroleum Commission Act, 2011 (Act, 821);

    vii. The Environmental Protection Agency Act, 1994 (Act 490);

    viii. The Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, 1999 (L.I. 1652); and

    ix. The Petroleum (Local Content and Local Participation) Regula- tions, 2013 (L.I. 2204).

    Background information

    The Sahara Energy Fields Ghana Limited (SEGFL) signed a Seismic Agreement with the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation on 3rd December, 2008, to acquire and interpret 1,000 sq. km of 3D Seismic over a portion of the open Shallow Water Cape Three Points (SWCTP) Block.

    The area covers 1,500 sq. km. the 3D data was acquired by the Geco Emerald of Western Geco between 17th March and 3rd May, 2009.

    Under the terms of the Seismic Agreement, SEFGL is entitled to a first right of refusal for the award of exploration rights over the SWCTP Block.

    Having satisfied the obligations of the Agreement, the SEFGL exercised its option right by applying for exploration and production rights over the Block in 2010.

    After the approval of the application by the Minister in July 2012, the Government Negotiation Team thereafter commenced negotiations in September, 2012 and concluded negotiations in July,

    2014.

    Background information of the applicant

    Sahara Energy Fields Ghana Limited

    (SEFGL)

    The Sahara Energy Fields Ghana Limited (SEFGL) BVI is owned by the Sahara Group of Nigeria. The Sahara Group of Nigeria was incorporated in 2003 in the British Virgin Islands and has portfolio of assets in the Niger Delta. The

    SEFGL holds considerable equity in the Group's Nigerian exploration licences ranging from 24 per cent in OPL 286 to 100 per cent in OPL 274 and 228. SEFGL is a partner in four non-operated offshore blocks and also an operator of two onshore blocks in Nigeria. All the Blocks have prospecting licences.

    The SEFGL is an upstream exploration and production arm of the Sahara Group. The core business is to explore and develop oil and gas assets in established and emerging frontiers. It was established in 2003 and began operations in 2004. The Company has interest in the following assets as either an operator or partner:

    i. OPL 274 western onshore Niger Delta -- 100 per cent

    ii. OPL 286 in deep water Nigeria -- 26 per cent

    iii. OPL 284 in deep water Nigeria -- 45 per cent

    iv. Tsekelewu marginal field (OML 40) -- 45 per cent

    The Ghana National Petroleum Corporation

    (GNPC)

    The GNPC is a Public Corporation established by the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation Act, 1983 (PNDCL 64). By virtue of the PNDCL 84, the Corporation is authorised to undertake exploration, development and production of petroleum either alone or in association with other Exploration and Production Companies.

    Share structure of the parties

    The shareholding structure of the parties is as follows:

    i. Sahara -- 85 per cent

    ii. Sapholda -- 5 per cent

    iii. GNPC -- 10 per cent

    The contract area

    The proposed contract area lies within the Offshore Cape Three Points Sub-Basin which is the eastern extension of the Tano- Cote d'Ivoire Basin located in the western part of the offshore sedimentary basin as per the attached Map. The Shallow Water Cape Three points Block has an area of approximately 1,500sq. Km. The water depth within the Block ranges from about 10m to about 110m.

    Duration of the contract

    The Petroleum Agreement will become effective for twenty-five (25) years if commercial discovery is made (Article 23 of the Agreement).

    Exploration periods and work programme

    The Agreement provides for the Exploration Period of seven (7) years (Article 3 of the Agreement). The subdivision of the exploration period and the accompanying Work Programme and Minimum Expenditure Obligations are as follows:

    Initial exploration period (1 year and 9 months)

    During Initial Exploration period, the contractor has undertaken to conduct geological and geophysical studies on 1,000 sq. km. of 3D Seismic Data and drill one (1) Exploration Well.

    The minimum expenditure obligation to be expended by the contractor to carry out the work in the Initial exploration period is thirty-two million United States Dollars (US$32,000,000).
    Mr Speaker 1:10 a.m.
    Yes, Hon Ranking Member?
    Mr K. T Hammond (NPP -- Adansi Asokwa) 1:10 a.m.
    Thank you very much Mr Speaker. I support the Motion, and in doing so, may I just indicate that this is a suggestion that some of these contracts are not properly thought through. It is not true in all the cases if there is any example at all. Mr Speaker, but I think the case of Sahara Energy Fields Ghana Limited speaks to the point that that contention is far-fetched.
    Mr Speaker, this is an Agreement which first came to the notice of the relevant departments, the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum and also the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC) as far back as 2007 to 2008. Mr Speaker, this application has gone through the mail until recently Cabinet gave approval and of course it has now come to Parliament for ratification.
    Mr Speaker 1:10 a.m.
    Very well, I will take one more and put the Question. [Pause.]
    Yes, Hon Member for Sekondi?
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah (NPP -- Sekondi) 1:10 a.m.
    Thank you very much Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to contribute to this debate. Mr Speaker, I would just want to make a general statement relating to the grant of petroleum rights and the method in which it is done.
    Mr Speaker 1:10 a.m.
    Hon Member for Sekondi, I want to get the submission right. It is a general statement, that does not mean the document before us is tainted with any illegality or unconstitutionality. You have to get the picture and it must be very clear.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 1:10 a.m.
    Yes Mr Speaker, I am making this general statement before I conclude.
    Mr Speaker 1:10 a.m.
    Very well.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 1:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I believe that the present structure does not enable us as a nation, to get value for money for the grant of petroleum rights.
    Mr Speaker 1:10 a.m.
    Hon Member, you see, you should be sending the right signals to the people of this country and indeed the whole world. You are a Senior Member of the House. When you make those statements, and as a former Attorney- General, there is the likelihood that people would think that there is something untoward about what is before us.
    I think that what you should be saying is that, we should take a look at your suggestion. But to say that we should not --
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 1:10 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I will take a cue because you are in the Chair. Once you give an indication that views being expressed could be expressed in a better way, it means that you are reflecting the sentiments of the House, and I take it. I am proposing that government takes a very serious look at the process itself and if possible make it more transparent through the bidding process. I am not the only one who has said this.
    Mr Speaker 1:10 a.m.
    Hon Minister for Energy and Petroleum?
    Mr Buah 1:20 p.m.
    Thank you Mr Speaker. While I take note of the statement made by the Hon Member for Sekondi, it is important that I note that this particular document that we are debating, has been referred to this House under these laws:
    The 1992 Constitution, the GNPC Law 1983, PNDC Law, the Petroleum Income Tax Law 1987, PNDC Law 188, the Petroleum Commission Act, 821, the Environmental Protection Act, 1994, the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulation Act and the Petroleum Local Content Act.
    Mr Speaker, I also would want to say that, the processes that this Agreement has gone through, as had been referred to by the Hon Ranking Member, this application has been in place since 2007. Mr Speaker, it went through the Inter- Ministerial Committee made up of the Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Energy and Petroleum, Attorney-General and Ministry of Justice, we have re-evaluated it, it had gone to Cabinet and it is here before the Committee.
    Mr Speaker 1:20 p.m.
    I think the point he is making is that, we are in post-discovery regime so we should take a look at some of the laws. I think that is the gravamen, therefore, we cannot use pre-discovery regime to deal with post-discovery regime. I think that that is the point that he is making.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 1:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, you put it most succinctly.
    Mr Speaker, having said that too, I would also want to make this major comment as it relates to our processing House. Mr Speaker, indeed, to be fair, this Agreement was laid before this House less than a week ago. It may even have been
    Mr Speaker 1:20 p.m.
    Can you leave me out of our submission?
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 1:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am saying this, not drawing you into this debate but because you have a rich experience from the bottom to the top, on both sides and now you belong to the other side. That places you in a unique position to appreciate the point I am making and I know you appreciate it.
    Mr Speaker, it is not for nothing that during the previous debate, I made the point. It is not for nothing, that it is only under the 1992 Constitution that this House is being given the power to ratify Agreements with respect to the grant of mineral rights. In doing these things, please, let us give ourselves the opportunity to be able to meaningfully exhaust all avenues so that at the end of the day, when we come out with our Reports and we debate them, we can say to ourselves that we have dealt very, very well with the referrals brought before this House.
    Mr Alfred Agbesi 1:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think that the senior Member of the House, who is a member of the Finance Committee and the Committee on Mines and Energy has made a very important submission to this House and urged on the House to take a decision.
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 1:20 p.m.
    On a point of order. Mr Speaker, the Hon Member did mention Hon Papa Owusu-Ankomah as being a member of the Committee on Mines and Energy. It is on record, so I would want to tell him that it is not true. He does not belong to the Committee on Mines and Energy. That is what I wanted to say so that the record would be clear.
    Mr Speaker 1:20 p.m.
    Very well.
    Mr Agbesi 1:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that he does not belong to the Committee on Mines and Energy?
    Mr Speaker 1:20 p.m.
    Yes.
    Mr Agbesi 1:20 p.m.
    Very well. Mr Speaker, I thank him for the correction.
    But what the Hon Member has said is very relevant for our consideration. I think that Committees, as issues are referred to them -- One of the issues that he has raised is necessary that they should deliberate and make recommendations to this House about what he has said. It is in that vein that I say that, his submission is very vital for the consideration of the House. In urging us to support and approve this Motion, I think that his submission needs to be taken on board.
    Dr Matthew Prempeh 1:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have two small points to make. One deep sea block in Brazil was auctioned on a concession lease for 30 years for US$30 billion. Mr Speaker, just imagine those discoveries and we auctioning them, the amount of money that would have accrued to the central Government yearly in those auctions, we would not be chasing the China Development Bank (CDB) and STX.
    That is the relevance of that point that we do not collect the money yearly, we get it in full and it can contribute significantly to our developmental effort. Mr Speaker, as you have said, we have to seriously think about post-discovery and what we do with our oil blocks. That is the point.
    Mr Speaker, my second small point is that, yes, yesterday, I raised this issue and today the Hon Ranking Member has raised it.
    Mr Speaker, my worry about the training and technical support is that, when you read it, the inconsistency in how the moneys are collected per block and the different schedules is rather worrying so we have to look at it. That was why yesterday, I was encouraging Hon Members that, if we could direct that the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum should impress upon GNPC to render an account to his office and this House.
    Mr Speaker, we have three blocks that we are coming to decide on and just look at one item; training and technical support; they collected US$250,00 this year upfront, US$1 million every year for the next seven years, when another one comes it is US$2 million, when another one comes it is US$500,000. It even makes you start thinking about what is really happening?
    What is the technical base you want to train? What is GNPC's future projection as to how many technicians, what fields they want to train?
    Mr Speaker, it is a lot of money to collect US$2 million or US$1 million every year for five years for training and technical support, especially, when we do not know what training they provide, besides the money we give them out of the Petroleum Revenue Fund.
    Mr Speaker, Parliament must be interested that the Hon Minister for Energy and Petroleum, at least, every year, comes to account to the Committee on Mines and Energy, if not the whole House, on how these moneys are being put to use for the Hon Minister's own sake and for good leadership in his own Ministry.
    Mr Speaker 1:20 p.m.
    Do you want to say something?
    Mr A. Buah 1:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the comments that have been made are very important, and I think this House has every right to demand accountability from GNPC or any other state institution.
    I would be happy to ensure that, that happens and to make sure that all training allowances in all these petroleum Agreements are laid bare to the Committee.
    Mr Speaker, it is important I also point out that, we as a country must be determined to build the capacity of the National Oil Company to a point where they are not carried, to a point where they have the capacity to take all these blocks by themselves and discover oil hundred per cent for Ghana, instead of being carried ten per cent here and there. That is the objective, and I believe that if we focus on that we would do that.
    Mr Speaker, let me again point out that the other point made about moving to a different regime is also well noted.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would have wished that I could have made some observations for the Minister to respond to before the question is put. I think, and Mr Speaker, as you do know, I am a firm believer in the Committee System in the House. That should mean that if a Committee does thorough work on a
    Mr Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    I think that they are referring to the parent company which is backing Sahara Ghana Limited, and that is the practice. In the Mines and Energy Committee they get support from a principal company, so they are referring actually not to the Sahara Ghana Limited but the parent company.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I thought that should be the case, but the Report says that --
    Mr Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Is it not well captured in the Report?
    Mr Keyi-Mensah-Bonsu 1:30 p.m.
    Yes, because the Report says that --
    Mr Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Which page are you referring to?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:30 p.m.
    I am talking about pages 2 and 3, that SEFGL is an operator of two on-shore blocks in Nigeria. I thought it is Sahara Group that they are talking about.
    Mr Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Chairman of the Committee, I think that the Minority Leader has a point there.
    Dr Donkor 1:30 p.m.
    Yes he has a point --
    Mr Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Would you correct it to reflect properly?
    Dr Donkor 1:30 p.m.
    It would be corrected, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that is number one. Number two is the minimum expenditure obligation. We are told of initial investments, initial expenditures, the first extensions periods and second extension periods all of which refer to expenditure obligations. Mr Speaker, may I know through what mechanism is the nation to monitor these expenditures? How do we monitor that, indeed these expenditures have been incurred at what phase?
    Mr Speaker, we have some obligations imposed in the phases. Then you tell us that for phase one the contractor is obliged to drill one well. Could it be that, that should be the minimum requirement, or if the contractor is able to drill two he is to be prevented from doing so? If indeed there is a well that is sank, perhaps it yields nothing, but it comes to the attention of the contractor that if a well should be sunk close by, some discovery could be made.
    Is it part of the Agreement to prevent them necessarily from sinking a second one in that phase?
    Mr Speaker, thirdly, we are told that the first phase of the contract period is seven years. and for seven years if exploration is made and no discovery is made, then the contract would be terminated. But I noticed that, for the initial exploration period you granted one year nine months. The second is one and a half years and the third and final is another one and a half years. But the three do not make up to the seven year period that he istalking about. Can the Hon Minister explain further what he mean by this?
    Mr Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Chairman of the Committee?
    Dr Donkor 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the expenditure is minimum expenditure. This is because these companies are bonded, there is a minimal amount of work they are expected to carry out during each particular phase and because of the issuance of an insurance bond or a parent company guarantee we can only ask them for a guarantee for the minimum period agreed in the contract. If they go above the minimum, it is to their credit, then they would not need a seven year period. It is because of the guarantee that the emphasis is on the minimum, but they are encouraged to go above the minimum. The Report is a summary.
    Mr Speaker, the second issue of the wells, and if they can drill more than one, yes they are allowed. But they are not allowed to drill if the contract says they have to drill at least one well.
    Mr Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Chairman of the Committee, before I call the Minister for Energy and Petroleum who wants to make
    a comment, on page seven of his Report, at the observation, he said draft Agreement. This is not a draft Agreement; it is Agreement, because we are exercising our power of ratification, so it should be a done deal before it can be brought to this House. The Chairman of the committee should amend that part of the Report referring to it as a Draft Agreement.
    Dr Donkor 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, deleted.
    Mr Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Hon Minister, do you still want to say something?
    Mr Buah 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker I think, it has been addressed. What I wanted to point out was that, the contract period itself, if oil discovery is made we have reduced that. We have realised the previous Agreements were 30 years. We have brought it down to 25 years in this Agreement, and what we are saying here is that, the company has seven years within which to discover oil.
    We have divided this period into three, and within this initial period you have to spend a minimum amount of money. If you do not meet the minimum work obligation, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC) by law is required to take that money and do that work. That is why the Petroleum Commission has been established as the regulator to make sure that indeed this is strictly enforced.
    Mr Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Hon Members, that brings us to end of the debate.
    Question put and motion agreed to.
    Mr Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Consequential resolution, item number 32 on the order paper.
    Mr Emmanuel A. K. Buah 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
    WHEREAS by the provisions of article 268 (1) of the Constitution, any transaction, contract or undertaking involving the grant of a right or concession by or on behalf of any person or body of persons howsoever described, for the exploitation of any mineral, water or other natural resource of Ghana made or entered into after the coming into force of the Constitution is made subject to ratification by Parliament.
    IN PURSUANCE of the said article 268 (1) of the Constitution, the Government of Ghana has caused to be laid before Parliament through the Minister responsible for Energy and Petroleum the Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, and Sahara Energy Fields Ghana Limited for the Exploration for, and Development and Production of Petroleum in respect of the Shallow Water Cape Three Points Block, Offshore of the Republic of Ghana.
    NOW THEREFORE, this House in accordance with the said article 268 (1) of the Constitution hereby resolve to ratify the said Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, and Sahara Energy
    Fields Ghana Limited for the Exploration for, and Development and Production of Petroleum in respect of the Shallow Water Cape Three Points Bloc, Offshore of the Republic of Ghana.
    Chairman of the Committee ( Dr Kwabena Donkor) 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to
    Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    Item number 33, Chairman of the Committee, is your Report on the Supplementary Estimates ready?
    Mr Avedzi 1:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Report is not ready yet, but we have some other Reports which we can --
    Mr Speaker 1:30 p.m.
    All right, let us just finish with this, and then we move to the Finance Committee.
    MOTIONS 1:40 a.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 1:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move that, notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80(1) which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, GNPC Exploration and Production Company Limited, A-Z

    Petroleum Products Ghana Limited and Eco Atlantic Oil and Gas Ghana Limited for the Exploration for, and Development and Production of Petroleum in respect of the South-West Cape Three Points Bloc, Offshore of the Republic of Ghana may be moved today.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have been raising this issue on almost daily basis. May I ask the Hon Chairman of the Committee, in line with Order 3(2) of our Standing Orders, what is occasioning this request?
    Mr Speaker 1:40 a.m.
    This is because we are rising today.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, with respect, the Chair is not supposed to descend into the arena of debate.
    Mr Speaker 1:40 a.m.
    I agree with you.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:40 a.m.
    Can we please hear from the Hon Chairman?
    Dr Donkor 1:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, we are moving this Motion because we have been informed we are rising today.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am not sure that this is sufficient reason. Shall we suffer any injury, if it is not done today before we adjourn?
    Dr Donkor 1:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the challenge and the urgency of this Agreement to be ratified arises from the fact that, we live in the Gulf of Guinea and our colleagues in La Cote d'Ivoire are very busy giving out blocs and they are attracting the same group of companies to their continental shelve.
    Therefore, we have already had four years of shallow exploration when Ghana
    did not sign any petroleum Agreement. If we want to mitigate the flow to La Cote d'Ivoire instead of Ghana, we would really have to up our game. It is unfortunate we are rising today therefore, I would plead the indulgence of the Chair and the House so that we are not overtaken by our neighbours in La Cote d'Ivoire.
    I thank you Mr Speaker.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, that is really convincing and persuasive. My worry is how come it was not stated on the Order Paper --
    Mr Speaker 1:40 a.m.
    Yes; but you know that by practice we just moved and seconded the Motion. Very well, Hon K. T. Hammond --
    Mr Kobina Tahir Hammond 1:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    MOTIONS 1:40 a.m.

    Chairman of the Commnittee (Dr Donkor) 1:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, GNPC Exploration and Production Company Limited, A-Z Petroleum Products Ghana Limited and Eco Atlantic Oil and Gas Ghana Limited for the Exploration for, and Development and Production of Petroleum in respect of the South-West Cape Three Points Bloc, Offshore of the Republic of Ghana.
    Mr K. T. Hammond (NPP -- Adansi Asokwa) 1:40 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    MR FIRST DEPUTY SPEAKER
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:44 p.m.
    Hon Members, the Motion has been moved and seconded. Yes, Hon Ranking Member --
    Mr Hammond 1:44 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in doing so, I beg to present your Committee's Report. Mr Speaker, there is correction which has to be made. On the first page of the Report, the long title seems to be slightly different from what is on the cover page of the Report itself. So, we ask that the proper parties be captured as we find on page 1 of the Report and not the cover page.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:44 p.m.
    Hon Chairman of the Committee, how do you respond to that?
    Dr Donkor 1:44 p.m.
    I agree Mr Speaker.
    Mr Hammond 1:44 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would also want to add that -- this again is an area which was relinquished by a hearse company. It actually covers an area of about 944 square kilometers.
    Mr Speaker, let me just make a point which again is of general importance. I have been compelled to make this point because of a statement made by the Hon Papa Owusu “Ankama” about whether we should --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:44 p.m.
    I believe the name is “Ankomah”; not “Ankama”.
    Mr K. T. Hammond 1:44 p.m.
    Hon Papa Owusu- Ankomah -- if I mispronounced it forgive me. I do not like people mispronouncing my name at all so forgive me.
    It is about the issue as to whether as a country or as a Parliament, we should recommend to policy makers that we should stick to bidding processes for our blocs. Mr Speaker, we have got to be very, very careful about some of our policies and practices.
    There are various strands of practices in the oil industry and what is applicable to a particular production community or country might not necessarily suit another country. And if it is the case that we think we should go the bidding process, we can have a conference and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of same. But we should not think that maybe as it is, we are getting everything entirely wrong.
    For the last 15 to 20 years, we have been doing what it is that we have been doing now? I am not so sure if we should stampede ourselves into going into the bidding process now. But that is for discussion in another forum. For now, as I said I second this Motion.
    Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on Petroleum Agreement by and among the GoG, GNPC Exploration and
    Production Company Limited, et cetera.
    Introduction
    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabina Donkor) 1:44 p.m.
    The Petroleum Agreement by and among the Govern- ment of the Republic of Ghana, the Ghana National Corporation, GNPC Exploration and Production Company Limited, the A- Z Petroleum Products Ghana Limited and ECO Atlantic Oil and Gas Limited in respect of the Deep-water Cape Three Point West Block Offshore of the Republic of Ghana was laid in Parliament on Thursday, 17th July, 2014, by the Hon Minister for Energy and Petroleum, Mr

    Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah, in accordance with Article 268 of the 1992 Constitution.

    Following this, the Rt. Hon. Speaker referred the Petroleum Agreement to the Select Committee on Mines and Energy for consideration and Report pursuant to Orders 156 and 188 of the Standing Orders of Parliament.

    Deliberations

    The Committee met with the Hon. Minister for Energy and Petroleum, Mr. Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah and Officials of the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum and the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC) were in attendance to assist in the Committees deliberations.

    The Committee is grateful to the Officials for their attendance and for offering clarifications on issues raised at the meeting.

    Reference documents

    The Committee referred to the under- listed documents during its deliberations:

    i. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana;

    ii. The Standing Orders of Parliament;

    iii. The Ghana National Petroleum Corporation Law, 1983 (PNDCL

    64);

    iv. The Petroleum (Exploration and Production) Law, 1984 (PNDCL

    84);

    v. The Petroleum Income Tax Law,

    1987 (PNDCL 188);

    vi. The Petroleum Commission Act, 2011 (Act, 821);

    vii.The Environmental Protection Agency Act, 1994 (Act 490);

    viii. The Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, 1999 (L.I. 1652); and

    ix. The Petroleum (Local Content and Local Participation) Regulations, 2013 (L.I. 2204).

    Background information

    Since the exploration of hydrocarbons in Ghana in the 1890s, successive governments have introduced and implemented policies aimed at ensuring full exploitation of the country's petroleum resources.

    For the purpose of accelerating the pace of exploration of the hydrocarbon resources of the country, the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC) was established in 1983, through the passage of the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation Law, 1983 (PNDCL 64). Subsequent to this, the Petroleum (Exploration and Production) Law, 1984 (PNDCL 84) was enacted to set out the framework for the exploration and production of petroleum resources in Ghana.

    The commencement of petroleum production in 2011 further increased the country's resolve to expand its oil reserves by granting licences to exploration and production companies.

    It is in furtherance of this and in compliance with Article 268 of the 1992 Constitution that the Hon. Minister for Energy and Petroleum laid in Parliament the above mentioned Petroleum Agreement for its ratification.

    Negotiation of the Agreement

    In July 2011, Hess Exploration Ghana Limited, operator for the Deepwater Tano Cape Three Points (DWTCTP) Block, as
    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabina Donkor) 1:44 p.m.


    SPACE FOR TABLE Table 2- PAGE 11 - 1.40P.M.

    Additional Oil entitlements

    In the event of commercial oil discovery, the State will receive Additional Oil Entitlements upon the attainment of agreed Rates of Return under Article 10.2

    of the Agreement as shown in Table 3 as follows:

    The State will receive Additional Oil Entitlement upon the attainment of agreed rates of return as follows:

    SPACE FOR TABLE 3 - PAGE 12 - 1.40 P.M.

    Surface rentals

    The Contractor shall also pay to the State surface in respect of the Contract being applied for as follows:

    SPACE FOR Table 3: Annual surface rentals under the Agreement

    Relinquishment

    Contractor shall take a decision within a year of effectiveness of the Petroleum Agreement to acquire new 3D seismic data which entitles the contractor to two options to the relinquishment in the Initial exploration period. The options are as follows:

    1. Where contractor makes a decision to acquire new 3D seismic in excess of 300sq.km, contractor shall relinquish 20 per cent of the original Contract Area for the Initial Exploration Period.

    2. Where contractor makes a decision not to acquire additional 3D seismic data, the contractor

    shall relinquish 30 per cent of the original Contract Area for Initial Exploration period.

    After the First Extension Period, Contractor shall relinquish twenty per cent (20%) of the remaining contract area and at the end of the Second Extension period the Contractor shall be required to relinquish the remaining contract area except for any discovery and/or development and production area.

    Decommissioning and environmental management fund

    Provision is made in the Petroleum Agreement for the establishment of a decommissioning and environmental

    management Fund which would be managed by the contractor and GNPC. A portion of the revenues from the production from the field would be set aside to build up fund to be used in financing the decommissioning plan and any environmental accidents that may occur in the course of petroleum operations.

    As further security, in case the monies accrued in the Decommissioning and Environmental Management Fund is not adequate to cover the cost of decommis- sioning or any environmental incident that may occur, the contractor is required to take an insurance cover to cater for any shortfall in the Decommissioning Fund.

    Performance bond

    The contractor in demonstrating its financial capability, shall within ninety (90) days after ratification of the Petroleum Agreement, furnish GNPC with a Perfor- mance Bond/Guarantee from an entity with an Investment Grade credit rating acceptable to GNPC. The credit rating should be from Moody's Standard & Poor's (S&P), or Fitch. The Performance Bond/ Guarantee shall have a value of sixty-five million United States Dollars (US$65,000,000) for the minimum expenditure obligation for the Initial exploration period.

    Training and technical support

    To ensure the establishment of programmes to train Ghanaians for work in petroleum operations and also for transfer of management and technical skills required for efficient conduct of petroleum operations, the contractor has committed to make two payments to the GNPC for the stated purpose.

    A one-time payment of two million United States Dollars (US$2,000,000.00) shall be paid by the contractor as technology support to GNPC within 30 days after the effective date of the Agreement.

    The contractor shall pay to GNPC a training allowance of one million two hundred and fifty thousand united States Dollars (US$1,250,000.00) per contract year.

    Legislative and regulatory provisions

    It was noted that new legislation or regulatory changes that will have an impact on the Petroleum Agreement after it has been approved are anticipated. For example, the proposed Petroleum (Exploration and Production) Bill may modify certain aspects of the Petroleum (Exploration and Production) Law 1984 (PNDCL 84) under which this Petroleum Agreement has been negotiated. Such changes will apply to this Petroleum Agreement.

    Recent legislations that have been enacted and have an impact on the Petroleum Agreement include the Local Content and Local Participation Regulations, 2013 (L.I. 2204), which seeks to maximise the value-addition and job creation, and to develop local capacity as well as the Petroleum Commission Act, 2011 (Act 821) to regulate and manage the utilization of petroleum resources and to co-ordinate the policies in relation to them.

    The setting up of the Ghana Gas Company Limited, wholly State entity with the responsibility to build, own and operate infrastructure required for the gathering, processing, transporting and marketing of natural gas resources in the country also changes the existing landscape in the hauling of gas under the Petroleum Agreements.

    Observations

    The Committee made the following observations during consideration of the
    Draft Agreement 1:44 p.m.
    Improved benefits to the State
    The Committee noted that, in the event of a commercial discovery of oil and gas, significant revenue will accrue to the State from the different fiscal terms negotiated. It observed that, even though the royalty rate of 12.5 per cent remains the same
    when compared to recent Agreements within the same basin, there were marked improvement in the additional oil entitlement when the company achieves the agreed Rate of Return of 12.5 per cent.
    This provision enables the State to participate in profits in excess of the company's expected risk adjusted rate of return of 12.5 per cent. The Committee viewed this to be consistent with Ghana's strength as an oil producer, the determination to get more out of the oil and gas resource.
    Improvement in the joint management committee structure
    The Committee noted that, the Petroleum Agreement makes provision for the effective participation of the GNPC in the management of petroleum operations with respect to the Bloc. Under article 6.2 of the Agreement, the Joint Management Committee (JMC) will oversee, supervise and approve all petroleum operations which will be composed of two (2) representatives of GNPC and two (2) representatives of the contractor with the Chairperson designated by GNPC.
    According to the Committee, this provision empowers GNPC to control spending and ensure that all approved work programme and development plans are complied with. The Committee urged GNPC to utilise the opportunity to enhance its capacity and also ensures that, the State's interest remains paramount at all times.
    Improvement in training and technology support
    The Committee further noted marked improvements in the technology and training allowances of two million United States Dollars (US$2,000,000.00) and one million, hundred and fifty thousand United States dollars (US$1,2150,000.00) negotiated in previous Petroleum Agreements. This, the Committee stated
    that if put to judicious use and for the intended purpose, would assist in enhancing the capacity of GNPC to compete favourably with industry players.
    In addition, the Committee observed and tasked the Minister to ensure that, such allowances are utilised to train Ghanaians as provided for by PNDCL 64. The Committee noted the need to train Ghanaians in critical technical areas of the geosciences, instrumentation and petroleum engineering. The need for transparent stewardship of such training funds was emphasised.
    Inclusion of provisions on intellectual property
    Under the Agreement, the Committee noted that, new intellectual property provisions have been introduced to give GNPC joint ownership rights in all inventions, discoveries or improvements made or conceived in connection with petroleum operations either through the Contractor Party's employees or sub- contractors.
    The Committee found the provisions to have reinforced GNPC's mandate under the Ghana National Petroleum Corpora- tion Law of 1983 (PNDC L 64) to “obtain the effective transfer to Ghana of appropriate technology relating to petroleum operations”.
    The Committee opined that, access to such rights would improve GNPC's technical capabilities in line with its vision of attaining operatorship ability within the shortest possible time.
    Conclusion
    The C0mmittee is satisfied the Agreement will be in the interest of the State and also meets the requirements of laws relating to petroleum exploration and production in the country.
    The Committee therefore recommends to the House to adopt this Report and ratify this Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, the Ghana National Corporation,
    Dr Kunbuor 1:44 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if we could take item 12. [Interruption.] Mr Speaker, I did not know there was a consequential Resolution. Normally, we do not announce that one. Resolution 35 --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:44 p.m.
    Item numbered 35, Minister for Energy and Petroleum --
    RESOLUTIONS 1:44 p.m.

    Minister for Energy and Petroleum (Mr E. A. K. Buah) 1:44 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that:
    WHEREAS by the provisions of article 268 (1) of the Constitution, any transaction, contract or undertaking involving the grant of a right or concession by or on behalf of any person or body of persons howsoever described, for the exploitation of any mineral, water or other natural resource of Ghana made or entered into after the coming into force of the Constitution is made subject to ratification by Parliament.
    IN PURSUANCE of the said article 268 (1) of the Constitution, the Government of Ghana has caused to be laid before Parliament through the Minister responsible for Energy and Petroleum the Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, GNPC Exploration and Production Company Limited, A-Z Petroleum Products Ghana Limited and Eco Atlantic Oil and Gas Ghana
    SPACE FOR ANNEX 1 - PAGE
    17 - 1.40 P.M
    Limited for the Exploration for, and Development and Production of Petroleum in respect of the South- West Cape Three Points Bloc, Offshore of the Republic of Ghana.
    NOW THEREFORE, this House in accordance with the said article 268 (1) of the Constitution hereby resolve to ratify the said Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, GNPC Exploration and Production Company Limited, A-Z Petroleum Products Ghana Limited and Eco Atlantic Oil and Gas Ghana Limited for the Exploration for, and Development and Production of Petroleum in respect of the South- West Cape Three Points Bloc, Offshore of the Republic of Ghana.
    Dr Donkor 1:44 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    MOTIONS 1:50 p.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80(1) which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the
    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 1:50 p.m.


    Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, GNPC Exploration and Production Company Limited, UB Resources Limited, Royalgate Ghana Limited and Houston Drilling Manage- ment (Ghana) Limited for the Exploration for, and Development and Production of Petroleum in respect of the Offshore Cape Three Points South Block may be moved today.
    Mr K. T. Hammond 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Petroleum
    Agreement by and among GoG/GNPC/ GNPC Exploration and Production
    Company Ltd. et cetera
    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, GNPC Exploration and Production Company Limited, UB Resources Limited, Royalgate Ghana Limited and Houston Drilling Manage- ment (Ghana) Limited for the Exploration for, and development and Production of Petroleum in respect of the Offshore Cape Three Points South Bloc.
    Mr Speaker, in doing so I present your Committee's Report.
    Introduction
    The Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, UB Resources Limited,
    Royalgate Ghana Limited and Houston Drilling Management Ghana Limited was laid in Parliament on Thursday, 17th July, 2014 by the Hon. Minister of Energy and Petroleum, Mr. Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah in accordance with article 268 of the 1992 Constitution.
    Following this, Mr Speaker referred the Petroleum Agreement to the Select Committee on Mines and Energy for consideration and report pursuant to Orders 156 and 188 of the Standing Orders of Parliament.
    Deliberations
    The Committee met with the Hon. Minister for Energy and Petroleum, Mr. Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah and his deputy, Hon Benjamin Kwaku Dagadu to consider the Agreement. Officials of the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum and the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC) were in attendance to assist in the Committees deliberations.
    The Committee is grateful to the officials for their attendance and for offering clarifications on issues raised at the meeting.
    Reference documents
    The Committee referred to the under- listed documents during its deliberations:
    i. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana;
    ii. The Standing Orders of Parliament;
    iii. The Ghana National Petroleum Corporation Law, 1983 (PNDCL
    64);
    iv. The Petroleum (Exploration and Production) Law, 1984 (PNDCL
    84);
    v. The Petroleum Income Tax Law,
    1987 (PNDCL 188);
    vi. The Petroleum Commission Act, 2011 (Act, 821);
    vii.The Environmental Protection Agency Act, 1994 (Act 490);
    viii. The Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, 1999 (L.I. 1652); and
    ix. The Petroleum (Local Content and Local Participation) Regulations,
    2013 (L.I. 2204).
    Background information
    The Offshore Cape Three Points South Bloc was relinquished by the operator Eni Ghana Exploration and Production Limited and Vitol Upstream Ghana Limited after the Asase Ye Duru well failed to prove any hydrocarbon at the end of the Initial Exploration Period on June 27, 2010.
    The operator had by then acquired and processed about 865 sq. km of 3D seismic over portions of the block and the adjacent Offshore Cape Three Points (OCTP) Block. The areas were subsequently declared open by the Minister for Energy and Petroleum and interested companies were invited to review geological and geophysical data over the area.
    Several companies including UB Group, FZE visited the GNPC Dataroom to review the existing 3D Seismic and Well data over the area. UB Group FZE applied to the Minister for Energy and Petroleum for rights to conduct petroleum operations over the Offshore Cape Three Points South Block (OCTPS) in November, 2013.
    Under a new evaluation process adopted by the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum, the Minister forwarded the application to the Bloc Application Evaluation Committee (“BAEC”), made up of representatives from the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum, Petroleum Commission and GNPC for evaluation and due diligence. Upon the receipt of recommendations from BAEC and the Government negotiation team, the Minister then gave his approval.
    Background information of the applicants
    The contractor group
    The applicants for the block are UB Resources Limited with eighty-one (81%) per cent participation interest, Houston Drilling Management Ghana Limited (HDM), the operator of the block, with fourteen (14%) per cent interest and RoyalGate Limited, an indigenous Ghanaian company with five (5%) per cent interest.
    UB Resources FZE was established in 2009 as an affiliate of Iraq Oil Company and is based in the United Arab Emirates. It is an oil trading company that is wholly owned by UB Holding. UB Holding is a family owned group of companies that historically started business in agriculture and subsequently diversified into the food sector in 1992. The company's main activity is trading of petroleum products such as oil diesel, gas, oil naphtha and
    LPG.
    HDM is a wholly owned subsidiary of Houston Drilling Management L.I.C, a service engineering company that provides technical expertise for clients engaged in the drilling, completion, and production of oil and gas worldwide. Houston Drilling Management LLC provides the technical and managerial staff
    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 1:50 p.m.


    To further strengthen the Contractor, it has been agreed in the Petroleum Agreement that the Contractor will assign thirty (30%) per cent of its participating interest to a technical partner with stronger technical and financial capability acceptable to the Minister and GNPC within twelve (12) months of the Effective Date of the Petroleum Agreement.

    The Ghana National Petroleum Corpora- tion (GNPC)

    The GNPC is a Public Corporation established by the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation Act, 1983 (PNDCL 64). By virtue of the PNDCL 84, the Corporation is authorised to undertake exploration, development and production of petroleum either alone or in association with other Exploration and Production Companies.

    The contract area

    The proposed contract area is approximately 755 sq. Km and lies in water depth between 1000m and 2000m.

    The Block is located in the Tano-Cape Three Points Basin (T-CTP), and shares an eastern boundary with Lukoil Deep Water Tano Cape Three Block, a northern boundary with the Eni Cape Three Points Bloc, and a western boundary with the Hess Deep Water Cape Three Points Bloc as per the attached. Portions of the Block were previously licensed to Eni Ghana Exploration and Production Limited.

    Interest structure in the bloc

    The interest of each participating company in the bloc applied for is as stated in Table 1 below:

    SPACE FOR Table 1: PAGE 5 - 1.50P.M.

    Duration of agreement

    The Petroleum Agreement is for a total of 25 years if a commercial discovery is made under Article 23 of the Agreement. However, the Agreement expires after seven (7) years if no commercial discovery is made within that period.

    Work programme and minimum expenditure

    Obligations

    Article 4 of the Petroleum Agreement provides for the Exploration Period of seven (7) years. The subdivision of the exploration period and the accompanying Work Programme and Minimum Expenditure Obligations as provided as follows:

    Initial exploration period (3 years)

    During this period, the Contractor is obliged to license existing 3D Seismic Data over Applied Area (about 700 sq. km) and re-process data, and drill one (1) Exploration Well. The Contractor 's Minimum Expenditure Obligation for the work in the Initial Exploration Period is Seventy Million United States Dollars

    (US$70,000,000).

    First extension period (2 years)

    During this period, the Contractor will drill One (1) Exploration Well. The Contractor 's minimum expenditure Obligation for the work in the First Extension Period is Sixty Million United States Dollars (US$60,000,000).

    Second extension period (2 years)

    During this period, the Contractor will drill One (1) Exploration Well. The Contractor 's Minimum Expenditure Obligation for the work in the Second Extension Period Sixty Million United Dollars (US$60,000,000).

    Fiscal terms negotiated

    In the event of commercial discovery of oil in the Contract Area, the following fiscal benefits will accrue to the State under Article 10 of the Agreement.

    Royalties and other entitlements

    On royalties and other entitlements, the State would benefit from oil and gas production at the rates provided in the Table 2 below.

    In the event of commercial discovery in the proposed contract area, the following fiscal benefits will accrue to the State from the Agreement:

    SPACE FOR Table 2: PAGE 6 - 1.150P.M.
    Mr K. T. Hammond 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion and I do not intend to add much to what the Hon Chairman has indicated.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    RESOLUTIONS 1:50 p.m.

    Minister for Energy and Petroleum (Mr Emmanuel Armah-Kosi Buah) 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
    WHEREAS by the provisions of article 268 (1) of the Constitution, any transaction, contract or undertaking involving the grant of a right or concession by or on behalf of any person or body of persons howsoever described, for the exploitation of any mineral, water or other natural resource of Ghana made or entered into after the coming into force of the Constitution is made subject to ratification by Parliament.
    IN PURSUANCE of the said article 268 (1) of the Constitution, the Government of Ghana has caused to be laid before Parliament through the Minister responsible for Energy and Petroleum the Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, GNPC Exploration and Production Company Limited, UB Resources Limited, RoyalGate Ghana Limited and Houston Drilling Management (Ghana) Limited for the Exploration for, and Development and Production of Petroleum in
    respect of the Offshore Cape Three Points South Bloc.
    NOW THEREFORE, this House in accordance with the said article 268 (1) of the Constitution hereby resolve to ratify the said Petroleum Agreement by and among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, GNPC Exploration and Production Company Limited, UB Resources Limited, Royalgate Ghana Limited and Houston Drilling Management (Ghana) Limited for the Exploration for, and Development and Production of Petroleum in respect of the Offshore Cape Three Points South Bloc.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Any seconder?
    Dr Kwabena Donkor 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    BILLS -- CONSIDERATION 1:50 p.m.

    STAGE 1:50 p.m.

  • [Continuation of debates from 17-7- 2014]
  • Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K, Avedzi) 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move clause 10, subclause (2), paragraph (b), line 3, delete “reasonably”.
    Mr Speaker, the new rendition would read 1:50 p.m.
    “To exercise the degree of care and diligence in the performance of the member's functions that a reasonable person in that position would be expected to exercise”.

    SPACE FOR ANNEX 1 - PAGE

    11 - 1.50P.M.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Members, I think this is straight forward. I would put the Question.
    rose
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, except to say that the apostrophes in the “Members” and that begins with subclause 2(a), 2(b) and there is one noticeably in subclause (c) as well. Indeed, the Hon Member would know. The Chair would know, that is not the style of drafting. But let us leave that to the draftspersons.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Very well, Table Office to take note, the draftspersons would clean up.
    Question put and amendment agreed to.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:50 p.m.
    Hon Chairman, clause 10 again?
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K, Avedzi) 1:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, clause 10, subclause (2), paragraph (c), line 1, delete “avoid” and insert “desist from”
    The new rendition would be:
    “To desist from making improper use of information acquired by virtue of the member's position”.
    Mr Speaker, the Committee thinks that the use of the word “avoid” would not suit the situation. But to desist from making improper use of the information would convey the intention of that clause.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I believe that, much as I appreciate the principle contained in that provision, I think we should be careful in attaching ourselves to this construction that, a member has a duty to avoid making improper use of information. What is improper use of information?
    Unless you have a definition of that, it becomes difficult to accept this construction.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Chairman?
    Hon Members, can we have some order, can we have some order in the House?
    Yes, Hon Chairman.
    Mr Avedzi 2 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think being a member of the Board puts you in a position to have access to some information which you could use for the object of the Fund.
    If you do not use it for that purpose, it becomes improper. If you have information that you use probably to leak out the information for your own benefit or the benefit of another; that is improper use of the information.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, as I said, if you talk about ‘improper use' and you go down there to define what the member is not supposed to do with the information so acquired -- So, we just say that the member of the Board has a duty not to use information acquired by virtue of the position of that member so that, it is a better that way than to say that you may not make an improper use of information. If you do that you are required to define what ‘improper use' is.
    If you put it in the positive then you would not be required to define ‘improper use'. I think it would be better just to say:
    “a member of the Board has a duty not to use information acquired by virtue of the position of that member as a member of the Board so as to gain directly or indirectly, the benefit of so and so”.
    I think it is a better construction.
    Mr Speaker, the Chairman is not listening -- he is quarrelling as an aside.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.
    Chairman of the Committee, how do you respond?
    Mr Avedzi 2 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Ranking Member is disturbing me.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.
    Hon Minority Leader, can you go over your proposal?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the issue that I raised is this. Subclause (2) states -- I hope the Chairman is listening this time around -- “without limiting subsection (1), a Member of the board has a duty …” and I am suggesting to him that for (2) (c), the rendition should read as follows:
    “has a duty not to use information acquired by virtue of the position of that member, as a member of the board so as to gain directly or indirectly a benefit for the member to the detriment of the Fund”.
    Rather than say that ‘he must avoid making “improper use …” This is because if you resort to that construction in the original, you may be required to define what you mean by ‘improper use'.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.
    Hon Chairman, are you clear on the point?
    Mr Avedzi 2 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker. I think that he is conveying the same meaning for what we are capturing here. So, we can propose a new amendment that would delete “to avoid making improper” and substitute with “not to”.
    So, we delete “to avoid making improper” and substitute with “not to”, so it would read “has a duty not to use information” -- We would also delete “of” after the word “use”, “not to use information acquired by virtue of the member's position as a member of the Board so as to gain directly or indirectly a benefit for the member to the detriment of the Fund”.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.
    Very well. So, I would put the Question with regard to the amendment and the further amendment.
    Question put and amendment agreed to.
    rose
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Member for Sekondi?
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 2 p.m.
    It may not be in my place, but Mr Speaker, I thought that the Leadership could agree so that this Kumasi Central Market matter is taken out of turn. This morning, I heard statements being made by a Member of the Assembly that, they would not allow the people to reconstruct the market because there is something before this House.
    Dr Kunbuor 2 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we certainly do appreciate the urgency of the Kumasi Market. What we are basically doing is that, we want to be able to push a bit of the heavy schedule because, from all readings of the Report, I do not think we would even take-up to three minutes on this Kumasi Market issue.
    We want to push this thing, imme- diately after that -- So if we all agree on the urgency and we do not think that some of these amendments are sufficiently controversial, let us get through with them and immediately take the Kumasi Market one, then other Business can be re- adjusted.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Manority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, really I did not want to be cited for conflict of interest, that is why I did not get-up to push this agenda. But I thought it would be very reasonable to deal with that, now that the Hon Majority Leader agrees that it is not going to take time.
    The point is, the Chief Executive has been in Accra all this while chasing after this Agreement. And I am told that last night, fire gutted the place and it had razed down a huge section of the market. The Chief Executive has not been able to even visit.
    I would plead that, if we all agree that it is not going to take time, then we can take it out of turn and deal with it.
    The Minister for Finance is here and he knows we have been very much co- operative in resolving this matter about the Infrastructure Investment Fund. So, if the Hon Majority Leader would agree, then I guess we can take it out of turn and deal with it.
    Dr Kunbuor 2 p.m.
    I certainly do not disagree on the priority of Kumasi market but once we are at a particular stage of the proceedings and the House is in the Consideration Stage, let us push ahead and get this done and take that on board.
    All what we are doing now is further delaying the Metropolitan Chief Executive, and I think if this matter is sufficiently important, the Metropolitan Chief Executive would indulge us for a few minutes. I do not believe that these amendments, with all intents and purposes, should take the length of delay that they are taking on the floor.
    There is also a good reason why I want us to order the Business in this particular way.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have not had the opportunity to go through this Bill. But a cursory look at it, as we go along, I am making some suggestions which have been going a long way to sanitize the Bill. You never know how long that one is going to take, so I thought if the Hon Majority Leader --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2 p.m.
    Hon Members, whiles we are at it, I would like to direct that, looking at the state of proceedings or Business, Sitting be extended beyond the normal Sitting hours as by Order 40 (3) of our Standing Orders.
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I do not think the amendments are that controversial. The problem however is that, you cannot anticipate those who are seeing this for the first time and may have their own suggestions. It is a question of principle.
    I think when we left the Committee meeting, we had a gentleman's understanding that, we would come and plead that we take the issue on the Kumasi Market, then we go the Consideration Stage.
    I got here and it has changed. I think perhaps, because I am from the Kumasi Metropolis, I am being kept here so that I could work on the Ghana Infrastructure Investment Fund (GIIF) before I get to Kumasi.
    The Chairman of the Committee said that he would come and plead with you so that we could take the issue on the Kumasi Central Market. So, I am surprised that it has changed. That is all.
    Dr Kunbuor 2:10 p.m.
    I was not privy to that decision.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Hon Members, I think to make assurance double sure, we could take the proposed amendments in respect of clause 10, complete that one, and then suspend the Consideration Stage, and deal with the Kumasi issue. We would then come back to the Bill, provided Members would give me the assurance that after that, they would not desert us.
    If we are sure that Members would not desert us. Very well, once I have the assurance, then would go ahead and do it that way.
    Let us finish with the various amendments of clause 10 and then we
    suspend the Consideration Stage, deal with the Kumasi issue, and then we come back to the Consideration Stage.
    Chairman of the Committee.
    rose
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Agbesi 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we are of the view that, once we have started with the Consideration Stage, let us complete it before we go to the Kumasi issue.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Hon Members, I have been able to exact from Members, the assurance that they would be here to deal with the Consideration Stage when we come back to it.
    Let us just conclude clause 10, break off for three or five minutes on the Kumasi issue as you have assured us, then we come back and continue. I do not think we would lose anything thereby.
    Mr Avedzi 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we have a number of items on the Order Paper for today, which we have planned to complete today. If you see the order of which the items have been arranged, the Consideration Stage comes before any other Motion.
    So, Mr Speaker, I do not know why we should have --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Hon Chairman, you see, as we go along, we are taking up more time. Let us just do as I have directed; let us complete the amendments to clause 10, go to the issue on Kumasi, come back and I believe that we would be through with it.
    So, Hon Chairman, where are we with regard to clause 10?
    Mr Avedzi 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, clause 10, subclause ()3), line 3, delete “three' and insert “fifty” and delete “six” and insert “one hundred”.
    The new rendition would read:
    A member of the Board who contravenes subsection 2 (a) or 2 (b), commits an offence, and is liable on summary conviction to a fine of not less than fifty thousand penalty units and not more than one hundred thousand units”.
    Mr Speaker, the Committee thinks that the punishment should be such punitive to prevent the member of the Board contravening subsection 2 (a) or 2 (b).
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Hon Members, I think it is straight forward, and I would put the Question.
    Question put and amendment agreed to.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Chairman, clause 10 again.
    Mr Avedzi 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, clause 10, subclause (4), lines 2, 4, and 5, delete all the words after “than” and insert the following:
    “fifty thousand penalty units and not more than one hundred thousand penalty units and to a term of imprisonment of not less than five years and not more than ten years or to both”.
    Mr Speaker, the reason is same as in subclause (3).
    Mr Osie Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu -- rose
    -- 2:10 p.m.

    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, just to inquire, in respect of subclause (3), the penalty regime; the exacting of 50,000 penalty units and 100,000 penalty units now, what happens in the event of non- fulfillment?
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Chairman, are we there yet? Is that what we are now dealing with?
    Mr Avedzi 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is in clause 10. I think he is referring to subclause (3), where there is only a fine minimum and maximum without an option of a term of imprisonment.
    So, he is asking what happens in the absence of a person not paying the fine.
    The Committee thinks that in respect of subsection 2 (a) and (b), the only option should be a fine but not a term of imprisonment. [Interruptions]-- The person must be made to pay.

    That is the thinking of the Committee, Mr Speaker.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    But, how about looking at it this way. You see, normally, the practice has been that you were given the fine, and in default, there is either a custodian sentence or if you would want to avoid a custodian sentence, the type of sentence that you would want to further provide; like communal labour, or some such thing.
    Certainly, there must be some specific introduction that would put the matter to rest beyond doubt.
    Mr Avedzi 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, as I said, the Committee thinks that the subsections 2 (a) and (b) should be limited to only a fine but not a term, but if the House thinks that we should also add a term of imprisonment in default, then we could propose a new rendition. But for now, that is what the Committee thinks.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Members, what is the thinking of the House? This is because it is possible for a person to be fined and that person not paying the fine. When that happens, what do we do?
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think the Board would find a way of dealing with it. They are a Board and they would consult with their legal person and take it from there.
    rose
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:10 p.m.
    Yes, Hon W. O. Boafo?
    Mr Boafo 2:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, you did not call the Ranking Member but he got up to speak; I was on my feet too.
    Mr Speaker, you know that if a person is unable to pay a fine, then it becomes a -- Then they could take a civil process against the person by going into execution against the person to recover the amount.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Whose go into execution?
    Mr Boafo 2:20 p.m.
    The State --
    rose
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Member?
    Ms Safo 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am thinking that if we should leave it open in an event of a default, it would not be the best but to put it in the Act also would look a bit clumsy. Therefore, I am thinking that, the Regulation to the Act can specify all these details which are internal.
    Before the legal action with the civil action would come to play, we need to exhaust the local remedies and that can be catered for in the Regulation. That is my humble opinion.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Members, the way we see things happening; normally Regulations take till Kingdom come to be brought into effect. So, in the meantime, what do we do?
    Yes, Hon Ranking Member?
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:20 p.m.
    We have been assured by the Minister that, in this case, they are almost finished with the Regulations. In fact, they were thinking that it would have come along with the Bill; that is what we were told.
    Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu -- rose --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Well, if we have that assurance, can we take that and then move on? But then, we get the Table Office to take note of it so that the Regulation can fill in the gap if any.
    Yes, Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the difficulty is because, we may have to adjourn this evening which then may mean that, we would be carrying the Third reading before we adjourn. If it does not find expression anywhere, it is going to be difficult.
    Mr Boafo 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I was saying that, we should allow the criminal law and practice to take its normal course. -- [Interruption] -- We should allow it to take its normal course as we know. It becomes a civil recovery and these are members of the Board; members of substance. They are not members of straw; they are members of substance.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Very well. Is it possible for us to flag this while we continue? We can take a second look at it subsequently. -- [Interruption] -- Yes, today; we would take a look at it today by which time we would have had enough time to toss it over in our minds.
    Yes, Chairman to the Committee?
    rose
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Yes Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Avedzi 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Sorry, Hon Majority Leader?
    Dr Kunbuor 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in terms of procedure, if you are flagging items on clause 10, then we must as well just stop and take the Kumasi one because if you cannot put the Question on clause 10 but you indicated that you wanted clause 10 taken before we get back to it, as a matter of procedure, we have a problem. [Interruption] -- But I am saying that it
    is on record from Mr Speaker's directive that, he proposed that after clause 10 has been taken -- which means we cannot take any clause. You have to make the records reflect so that he can vary his directive and then we proceed. If he does not vary it, the Official Report would not be intelligible.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Very well. In that case, for the meantime we would bring the consideration Stage to a close for now and come back to it after the Kumasi issue. -- [Pause.]
    Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
    Dr Kunbuor 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, item 15 --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Very well, item 15, Chairman of the Committee?
    MOTIONS 2:20 p.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80 (1) which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Finance Committee on the Term Facility Agreement among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Deutsche Bank S.A. - Banco Alemão (as Arranger) and Deutsche Bank AG, New York Branch (as Agent) for an amount of thirty-seven million United States dollars (US$37,000,000.00) being Part I support of tranche 1 of a total amount of two hundred and fifty-nine million, four hundred and twenty-five thousand United States dollars (US$259,425,000.00) to finance the Kumasi Central Market Redevelopment Project (Phase I) may be moved today.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Any seconder?
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to second the Motion.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Hon Members, it has been moved and seconded. I would put the Question.
    Question put and Motion agreed to
    Resolved accordingly.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
    Dr Kunbuor 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, item 16.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:20 p.m.
    Item 16 -- Chairman of the Committee?
    Report of the Finance Committee on Term Facility Agreement
    (among GOG/Deutsche Bank S.A./ et cetera to Finance the Kumasi Central
    Market)
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 2:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Finance Committee on the Term Facility Agreement among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Deutsche Bank S.A.-Banco Alemão (as Arranger) and Deutsche Bank AG, New York Branch (as Agent) for an amount of thirty-seven million United States dollars (US$37,000,000.00) being part support of tranche 1 of a total amount of two hundred and fifty-nine million, four hundred and twenty-five thousand United States dollars (US$259, 425,000.00) to finance the Kumasi Central Market Redevelopment Project (Phase I).
    Mr Speaker, in doing so, I present your Committee's Report.
    Introduction
    The request for approval of the SAIN Covered Export Credit Facility Agreement among the Government of the Republic of Ghana, Deutsche Bank S.A.-Banco Alemao (as Arranger), Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas (as agent and security agent) and its affiliates supported by Segurado Brasileira de Credito a Exportacao (SBCE) and the Brazilian Official Equalization Program (PROEX) for an amount of one hundred and thirty-five million, five hundred and twelve thousand, five hundred United States dollars (US$135,512,500.00) being part support of tranche 1 of a total amount of two hundred and fifty-nine million, four hundred and twenty-five thousand United States dollars (US$259,425,000.00) to finance the Kumasi Central Market Redevelopment Project (Phase 1) was presented to the House by the Hon. Minister for Finance Mr Seth Terkpeh on Wednesday, 16th July 2014 in accordance with Article 181 of the 1992 Constitution.
    Mr Speaker referred the request to the Finance Committee for consideration and report in accordance with Order 169 of the Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.
    The Committee was assisted in its deliberations by the Hon. Ministers for Finance and Local Government and Rural Development Messrs Seth Terkpeh and Julius Debra, Hon. Deputy Ministers for Finance and Local Government and Rural Development, Messrs. Forson, Cassiel Atto Baah and Nii Lamptey Vandapuye and Officials from both Ministries and considered the referral.
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 2:20 p.m.


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