Debates of 21 Mar 2013

MR SPEAKER
PRAYERS 11:10 a.m.

VOTES AND PROCEEDINGS AND THE OFFICIAL REPORT 11:10 a.m.

Mr Speaker 11:10 a.m.
There is no Official Report for today, so, we move to the Commencement of Public Business.
Dr Benjamin B. Kunbuor 11:10 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we can take item 4(a) on the Order Paper.
Mr Speaker 11:10 a.m.
Is that the only Paper we are laying?
Dr Kunbuor 11:10 a.m.
Mr Speaker, so far, that is -- and then item 4 (g). The other Committee Chairmen are still in their sessions. So, we can take item 4 (a) and (g).
Mr Speaker 11:10 a.m.
Very well.
PAPERS 11:10 a.m.

Dr Kunbuor 11:10 a.m.
Mr Speaker, if we can take item 4 (d) -- [Pause] -- 4 (d).
rose
Mr Speaker 11:10 a.m.
Item 4 (d), yes; because I saw the Chairman of the Finance Committee bowing -- Very well.
By the Chairman of the Committee --
Report of the Committee on Youth, Sports and Culture on the annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Youth and Sports for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Dr Kunbuor 11:10 a.m.
Mr Speaker, if we could take Motions numbered 12 and 13.
CONSIDERATION OF 11:10 a.m.

ANNUAL ESTIMATES 11:10 a.m.

Minister for Finance (Mr Seth E. Terkpeh) 11:10 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢292,206,478 for the services of the Ministry of Finance for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Mr Speaker, in so doing, I wish to draw attention to the dual functions of the Ministry of Finance both as a Ministry, Department and Agency (MDA) in the normal term, which also performs macro- fiscal functions in conjunction with the Bank of Ghana as far as management of the economy in its basic forms are concerned.
Mr Speaker, in this context, the Ministry of Finance has been pursuing a number of reforms, which would continue, to enrich, notably, the Ghana Revenue Authority and the Public Financial Management Systems. This year, it proposes to start the implementation of the budget system, which is a component of our Public Finance Management (PFM) reforms.
We would also be assisting the National Development Planning Commission (NDPC) and co-ordinate the financial activities of the various MDAs in the course of implementing the estimates that are being presented to the House.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Question proposed.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 11:20 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion moved by the Hon Minister for Finance, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢292,206,478 for the services of the Ministry of Finance for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Mr Speaker, in doing so, I present your Committee's Report.
1.0 Introduction
The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2013 financial year was presented to Parliament by the Hon Minister for Finance on Tuesday, 5th March, 2013, in accordance with article 179 of the 1992 Constitution of Ghana. The budget estimates of the Ministry of Finance (MoF) were accordingly referred to the Finance Committee for consideration and report pursuant to Orders 140(4) and 169 of the Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.
The Committee was assisted in its deliberations by the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth E. Terkpeh, and heads of related agencies and officials of the Ministry of Finance. The Committee is grateful to the Hon Minister and his technical team for their insightful presentation and clarifications during the deliberations.
Reference
The Committee referred to the following documents during its deliberations:
The 1992 Constitution of Ghana.
The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.
The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana, for the 2013 financial year.
The 2013 Annual Estimates for the Ministry of Finance.
Vision and Mission
The Ministry of Finance envisages to be recognised as a professional organisation, providing excellent public economic and finance management, improving accountability and good governance. The mission of the Ministry is
Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 11:20 a.m.
Completed work on the draft Petroleum Revenue Management Regulations and Legislative Instru- ments aimed at increasing revenue from the natural resource sector;
Conducted a research to determine the number of exemptions granted by the Minerals Commission, MoFA, EPA and diplomatic missions to reduce leakages through tax exemp- tions.
Assessed the procurement activities of 1,000 procurement entities for 2011 to determine the level of compliance with the provision of the Public Procurement Act, 2003 (Act 663).
Adopted the medium-term debt strategy to restrict non-concessional terms to project with high ex- pected risk-adjusted rate of return.
Maintained loan guarantee to State- owned-companies at marginal levels to limit contingent liabilities to con- trol the growth of public debt.
Budget performance in 2012
During the year under review, the Ministry of Finance and its agencies were allocated a total amount of GH¢65,918,822.00, which was made up of GH¢l03,816,470 of Government of Ghana (GoG) funds, GH¢42, 391,092.00 of internally generated funds (IGFs), ABFA of GH¢9,000,000.00 and GH¢50,711,260.00 of donor funds.
GoG budget performance
As at 31st December, 2012, the Ministry had spent GH¢146,458,523.58 (representing 141.07 per cent) instead of its 2012 budget approved allocation of GH¢103,816,470.00. The breakdown of this amount is as follows:
MoF Headquarters -- GH¢ 33,463,461.97
CAGD -- GH¢ 92,784,651.02
Statistical Service -- GH¢11,560,861.83
Securities and Exchange Commission -- GH¢2,051,449.91
Institute of Accountancy Training -- GH¢ 859,824.12
Public Procurement Authority -- GH¢3,840,312.73
Financial Intelligence Centre -- GH¢1,897,962.00
Total -- GH¢146,458,523.58

2012 I.G.F retention performance

The sum of GH¢3,013,001.31 being 126 per cent of the total IGF amount of GH¢2,391,092.00 allocated to the Controller and Accountant-General's Department, Securities and Exchange Commission and Institute of Accountancy Training in 2012 was utilised in undertaking the core activities of these institutions.

2012 Donor budget performance

An amount of GH¢50,711,260.00 being Donor Fund was allocated to the Ministry and its agencies for their activities in 2012. However, as of December, 2012, an amount of GH¢52,642,821.79 was spent, represen- ting 103.81 per cent, a variance of (GH¢1,931,560.79). The amount spent was in respect of the following projects and programmes:

Economic Management Capacity Building (EMCB)

GTZ good financial governance on
EITI 11:20 a.m.

NREG 11:20 a.m.

GIFMIS 11:20 a.m.

Dr A. A. Osei 11:20 a.m.
Mr Speaker, not at the Committee level. We met with the Hon Minister when you asked us to consult. But what I am saying is that, we are considering the budget of the Ministry of Finance, not a write-up in the Budget Statement. The two are different. This has nothing to do with the Ministry of Finance's Appropriation that we are about to do.
Mr Speaker 11:20 a.m.
If it has nothing to do, then the Motion before us is the Appropriation for the Ministry of Finance; therefore, the time you are raising it, is not the proper time.
Dr A. A. Osei 11:20 a.m.
Mr Speaker, it is in the Committee's Report; that is the point. It should not be.
Mr Speaker 11:20 a.m.
Well, that is your Report.
Hon Member for Old Tafo, you have drawn my attention to an issue. Yesterday, I made some consequential orders based on the discussion you held with me and the Hon Leader of the House, and I asked that you should go and have it sorted out. I was informed subsequently that it had been resolved. So, the Motion before us is the Appropriation for the Ministry of Finance. I would have thought that after you had resolved it, you would come back to my lobby to inform me.
But I learnt on the floor of the House that the matter had been resolved. That was when the matter that I had decided to defer with regard to the annual estimates of the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum was taken. That was when the matter that I, as the Speaker, had deferred on the Energy budget was taken. That was the
pronouncement that was made on the floor of the House.
I was informed that that Motion on the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum was taken. We now move to the Ministry of Finance, and now, you say it does not deal directly with the Appropriation and yet you do not want to take the Appropriation? This is because the Motion before us is the Appropriation.
That matter you are talking about, it could be handled but I do not think that this is the proper time to handle it.
Papa Owusu-Ankomah Mr Speaker, the Motion before us is to approve the budget or the estimates for the Ministry of Finance. We are not discussing the Budget Statement or a report on the expenditure of petroleum revenue. Mr Speaker, I can say on authority that the last paragraph of page 11 up to page 12, was not discussed at the Committee level; it was never discussed.
Indeed, what we discussed, in respect of which we had extensive commentary, was the first and second paragraphs. So, I do not know from where the Chairman imported this into the Report of the Committee. We never discussed it when we were discussing the estimates for the Ministry of Finance. This is because it was not part of the discussion; it could never have been part of that discussion.
So, I am just appealing to the Hon Chairman to delete those portions of the Report.
Mr Speaker 11:30 a.m.
Hon Member for Sekondi, your point is different from the -- [Interruption.]

Hon Members, when one of the Ministry's budgets was being laid, that was Chieftaincy, an objection was made by the Hon Member for Atwima-Mponua (Mr Isaac K. Asiamah), that the Committee, as a committee, had not looked at the final report, so I deferred it and said that they should consult and have it laid.

After the consultation, they cleared it, and it was laid. That is the point I am making. Principle is one and indivisible. That is the point I am making.

So, what is the noise about? Hon Chairman, let me hear you; they are saying that there are things in your Report which were not discussed at the Committee. What do you say?
Mr Avedzi 11:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, based on your directive yesterday, when the issue of the Report on the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum was about to be taken, there was an issue that was raised by the Ranking Member of the Finance Committee, that a paragraph in the Budget Statement conflicts with the paragraph in the Petroleum Management Report. Your goodself referred the matter to myself, the Ranking Member, the Chairman of the Energy Committee and the Ranking Member and the Ministers.
Mr Speaker, we withdrew from the Chamber and went to your lobby and had a discussion, where the Ranking Member of the Finance Committee was present, the Deputy Ranking Member of the Energy Committee was also present, the Energy Minister was there, the Finance Minister was there.
Mr Speaker, we agreed at that meeting that it is true -- and the Hon Minister for Finance said the statement in the Petroleum Management Report is the correct statement. In fact, the explanatory note under the table corresponds with the figures in the table.
But if you come to page 43 of the Budget Statement, the paragraph 108, the explanatory note there did not depict the figures in the table. So, the Hon Minister said that paragraph is wrong. Now, we agreed that we are yet to look at the Report of the Petroleum Revenue Management Act.
For that matter, for us to go ahead, we should come and take the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum estimates and we put in an observation in the Report of the Ministry of Finance, to which Dr A. A. Osei, who is the Ranking Member of the Finance Committee and the Deputy Ranking Member of the Energy Committee agreed yesterday. In fact, Mr Speaker, I even showed the draft to him and he accepted it. This was printed and distributed.
Mr Speaker, I am surprised that he has taken a different stand all together this morning.
Mr Speaker 11:30 a.m.
Hon Members, if this issue does not affect the Appropriation and we are waiting for the full report on the annual report of the Petroleum Fund, then we can go ahead and take it, except that contents of those observations are factually incorrect. If they are factually incorrect, then I would direct that they should be deleted. If they are factually correct, then they should keep them while we wait for the full report on the annual report.
Dr Kunbuor 11:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I guess that we seem to be getting into very, very uncomfortable areas in terms of the traditions that we have known in this House in relation to Committees' reports. When a Committee's report has been laid and the Motion is being taken, and there is no indication in the report that there were dissenting views, then we get the impression as if other members of the Committee did not even see the report before it was laid.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:30 a.m.
Mr Speaker, what we are dealing with here is not whether the content is factual or inaccurate; that is not what we are dealing with. What we are dealing with is the remit of the Finance Committee; it has nothing to do with whether the content is factual or not.
Mr Speaker, Standing Order 140(4) provides that and with your permission, I beg to quote:
“That part of the budget relating to the Ministr ies for which they have responsibility shall stand committed respectively to the Committees responsible for the subject-matter to which the heads of Estimates relate as referred to . . .”
So, in this case, we are dealing with that of the Ministry of Finance. Are you saying that, yes, the matter that the Chairman is referring to, we had some
discussions? But it does not mean we should have that situation captured in the Report on the Ministry of Finance. That is what we are saying.
Mr Speaker, when you asked what the noise was about, that is what the noise was about.
Mr Speaker 11:30 a.m.
Hon Members, I do not see any fundamental problem in taking this Motion. Yesterday, if you really went strictly by the position being canvassed on the floor by the Hon Minority Leader, it would have been problematic. Yesterday, when we were taking the estimates on Lands and Natural Resources, we went to “Mole Park”, we went to a “number of trees”, we went to “forest cover”, we went to “economic trees,” we went to a whole lot of things before the Question was put.
When we come to observations on the Report, we put all kinds of things there; we put all kinds of things in our observations. The most important point, in my view, is whether it would affect the Appropriation, which is the subject matter of the Motion before us; that is the fundamental issue. Would it affect the Appropriation? Hon Members, you may recall that yesterday when the issue of the Energy and Petroleum Ministry was raised, I had to defer the matter.
The reason I decided that this matter would have to be taken was that, out of courtesy, in my view, the Chair, presiding at the time -- even after the matter had been resolved, I was expecting those people to come back to me, to say that we have resolved the matter; this is the way to handle it. They did not come back to me and they took the Energy matter that I had deferred. So, if you have resolved it; you have resolved it, let us go ahead and take the Motion.

Hon Minister, who is on the floor? Yes, so make your contribution.

Hon Members, if this matter cannot be -- Yes. You would resolve it. Otherwise, if the matter was not resolved, how did you take the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum's Motion yesterday? You should have deferred that matter too, to come and brief me, since this was a matter that was discussed at the Speaker 's Lobby; and I would expect that you get back to me to have this matter resolved and see the way forward, to see how we can address it at our Leadership level before it is taken.

They never came back to me. You announced on the floor that you had resolved it. So, the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum Motion that I have deferred, should be taken. If you have resolved it, you have resolved it. Let us continue.

Yes, let me hear from the Hon Majority Leader.
Dr Kunbuor 11:40 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I guess that the rules of procedure have to be moved. We have young Hon Members in this House and it is important that we follow the rudiments of procedure.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:40 a.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, I think the issue that has arisen has nothing to do with the Motion; so, let the Hon Majority Leader understand this and not rather lead us astray.
Mr Speaker, this one does not call for any counter Motion. We are dealing with the ceiling. Now, it does not affect the
ceiling. The matter that he is raising does not affect the ceiling. It has to do with the remit of the Finance Committee, what they have done.
Mr Speaker 11:40 a.m.
Hon Minority Leader, the Question that I would be putting is on the estimates. All those observations that the committees put in their reports and all those things, I am not going to put Questions on them.
The Question that I am putting is on the amount of money being appropriated for the Ministry of Finance. In my view, that is the gravamen of the issue.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:40 a.m.
Mr Speaker, with respect, are we not going to call for the approval of the Report? Certainly, it would affect that. That is why the content should matter. If there is a mistake, yes, the Hon Minister has acknowledged it. Does it have to find expression in the Report the way it has been captured? I think that is the kernel of the matter. Mr Speaker, that is the gravamen of the matter and so, I am a bit surprised that some Hon Members are talking about --
Mr Speaker 11:40 a.m.
Hon Members, you see, the first point that the Hon Member for Old Tafo, who is the Hon Ranking Member on the Finance Committee made, was that the issue he is raising is not going to affect the appropriation to the Ministry of Finance. The Motion is for the approval of the appropriation of the Ministry. As for the contents and observations and all those things, they are neither here nor there.
When we come to look at the annual report of the Petroleum Funds, then all these issues of the -- That one, we are going to put the Question on the annual report of the Petroleum Fund; at that stage, all the issues would have to be thrown up.
Prof. George Y. Gyan-Baffour 11:40 a.m.
Mr Speaker, you are right. What he pointed out is not going to affect the appropriation for that Ministry. But what he is saying also is -- What he talked about does not belong to this Report. What it belongs to is that -- It is something affecting this document. So, the Hon Minister should come to the House with an Addendum to this document to correct what is here and not to put it in the Report and get away --
Mr Speaker 11:40 a.m.
Hon Members, that was why I made the point that when the Hon Member for Old Tafo first raised the matter on the floor, I did not know the ambit of the point he wanted to make.
I have decided that he should discuss the matter with me in the Speaker's Lobby. I got the Leadership to be with me for the discussion, so that we can fashion a way out. I keep on saying from the Chair that, this is the first time that this House is encountering this type of situation where an annual report would have to be laid, presented to the Budget Statement, so that we can canvass, find a way and adopt a formula which would be accepted to both sides of the House.
So, yesterday, when you raised the issue, I deferred the matter. I was expecting them to go and do the consultation, come back to me, and I would get the Leaders to help with this.
Hon Members, as far as I am concerned, the issue before me is the appropriation for the Ministry of Finance. Let us take it. When the Finance Committee brings their report on the annual report of the Petroleum Funds, all these issues would be -- If there is an error in the Budget Statement, then we should find another way of resolving it.
Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:40 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I entirely agree with you. But there is a serious matter here. What I am saying, which has also been confirmed by the Hon Chairman is that, the last paragraph of page 11 to the last line of page 12, was not discussed at the Committee level. The Report here says: “The Committee noted” and what I am saying is that, the Committee never noted because the matter was never discussed at the Committee level.

It was never discussed at the Committee and I was present and the Hon Chairman's statement has confirmed it that this was not discussed at the Committee. But here, we are saying “The Committee noted that paragraphs 108 and 108” -- giving the impression that the Finance Committee, in discussing the estimates of the Ministry of Finance, discussed this matter, but it was never discussed and I do not think deleting it would cause --
Mr Speaker 11:40 a.m.
Hon Chairman of the Committee, remove “The Committee” and put there “It is observed”.
Mr Avedzi 11:40 a.m.
Mr Speaker -- [Uproar.]
Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:40 a.m.
Mr Speaker --
Mr Speaker 11:40 a.m.
Your worry is “The Committee”?
Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:40 a.m.
Mr Speaker, in supporting, he can make his personal observation. I do not see anything wrong with the Hon Chairman of the Committee making a personal observation when he is moving the Report.
Mr Speaker 11:40 a.m.
Hon Member for Sekondi, when a committee meets, it is not every single word that the committee used that is determined by all the Members -- that the Hon Chairman used in the report that is determined by the Hon Members of the Committee. It is not every single word or thing that -- So, the -- Unless you want to say the Hon Chairman of a committee has no discretion at all.
Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:40 a.m.
Mr Speaker, this is a fundamental matter and it is so important that it ought to be discussed at the committee.
Mr Speaker 11:40 a.m.
Hon Members, let me --
Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:40 a.m.
Very well. Mr Speaker, I did not mean to challenge you. I am sorry.
Mr Speaker 11:40 a.m.
Hon Members, I think that you know very well that we put the Question on the Financial Policy last Friday? No Hon Member throughout the debate had drawn our attention to this matter. That was why when the Hon Member for Old Tafo drew my attention to this, I asked that there should be a further consultation.
I was expecting that after the consultation, they would come back to me and then we would fashion out a way of resolving this matter. They never got back to me; they came to announce on the floor that they had resolved the matter, and therefore, a matter that I had deferred should be taken on the floor of the House. So, that Motion was taken.
I know that there is a fundamental point that is being raised on the floor. We need to find a way of addressing it. The way to address it is not hiding behind the appropriation of the Ministry of Finance to address the problem. It is a matter that
I believe that the Leadership must meet to see how we can address this issue.
Dr Kunbuor 11:50 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I certainly do know that Mr Speaker would always want to indulge Hon Members and open up an issue as much as possible to get a lot of guidance on it. But I am worried about the procedure. If a Motion has been moved and accepted and there is going to be a contribution, I would have taken what the Ranking Member did as commencing his contribution.
So, he should have continued and finished; all other Hon Members would continue and finish, then we listen to what the Minister would say at the end, from all the concerns that have been raised and then the Question is put. And if the fundamental issues that the Hon Member for Sekondi is talking about are indeed, so fundamental, we would see it when the Question is put.
Dr A. A. Osei 11:50 a.m.
Mr Speaker, with respect, I am saddened by statements that have been made on this floor and I am trying to get your attention to correct it.
The Chairman categorically stated that we had agreed on something and I am changing my mind. This Paper was laid much earlier. When I read the draft of the Report, this part was not in. That is point number one.
Mr Speaker, you advised us, not as a committee, but as individuals, to meet. When we met your First Deputy, who I assume represents you, advised, we took it from there. We did not know that we had to personally come to the Speaker. We assumed that the First Deputy Speaker was acting on your behalf.
Mr Speaker, the issue is that, the Ministry of Energy estimates, if we did not make that correction, would have been affected, not the Finance Committee.
Mr Speaker 11:50 a.m.
Hon Member, are you challenging my ruling or you are contributing?
Dr A. A. Osei 11:50 a.m.
Mr Speaker, you made a statement and I think that since it is being captured in the Hansard, I have to respond, so that we know the truth.To give the impression that we disobeyed your direction, I do not believe it is fair to us. We were not meeting as a committee; we met as Ranking Member and Chairman.
Mr Speaker, the fact is that, I would want to repeat; this part of the Report, when the Report was laid, was not part. So, when the Chairman says that when the Paper was laid, it was there; it is false. And then he says we accepted it. Who is “we”? That is why immediately when I rose I objected to it.
Mr Speaker 11:50 a.m.
Hon Chairman, they are saying that the Report that you laid that they are complaining about, that that part was not part of it. Is that true?
Mr Avedzi 11:50 a.m.
Mr Speaker, first of all, I am beginning to think that the importance of consultation is being defeated in this particular matter. That is because as I have explained earlier, we did consult each other -- and if people should observe very well, yesterday, I did move from my chair and met the Ranking Member at the other end. It is part of the consultation and I have been showing everything to him. So, if after all these, he is portraying as if nothing happened, then the relevance of consultation is defeated.
Mr Speaker 11:50 a.m.
Hon Members, I have looked at all the issues and I am saying that the Motion is for appropriation to the Ministry of Finance and I think that we should continue the debate. Those mistakes or whatever you call them, if you need to correct them, you should find a way of doing them. The Question that we would put is not on what is in the Report, but on the appropriation as captured in the Motion, item number 12 on the Order Paper.
I, therefore, think that the Hon Ranking Member may make his contribution to the debate.
Hon Members, let me make this point very clear. When you want to raise objections, you should know when to raise them. In fact, if my attention was drawn to it, as was the case in the budget for the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum, which was done yesterday, when the Motion was going to be moved about the Report, I would have deferred this matter. But the Motion was moved and duly seconded, the Hon Ranking Member sat down, he never raised an issue, and then when I opened it for the debate on the floor of the House, he started raising issues.
Yesterday, when they raised the issue on the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum, I deferred it. When they were going to lay a Paper and Hon Asiamah raised the issue, I deferred it but not when the Motion has been moved and it is seconded and you want to arrest or stop the debate from proceeding, it is not consistent with the practice of this House.
Motion moved and seconded, it is for the consideration of the House and anybody can make any comment that he wants to make in his debate.
Mr Kyei-Mesnah-Bonsu 11:50 a.m.
Mr Speaker, first of all, the Hon Member was not in the Chamber when the Motion was first moved and then seconded. He was called on phone, so, he had to move out; he had to step out. In any event, procedurally, if
a Motion is moved and not seconded, it means there is nothing before the House; how can anybody challenge it? If a Motion is moved and it is not seconded, it means, in substance, there is nothing before the House. So, if you say that nobody challenged it --
Mr Speaker 11:50 a.m.
Hon Members have always drawn the attention of the Chair to any problem or difficulty and on several occasions, my predecessors had deferred matters for them to be resolved and at the appropriate time, we proceeded. I did it this week when we were going to lay a Paper and Hon Asiamah raised an issue, I deferred it. Yesterday, when the estimates for the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum was going to be taken and an issue was raised, I deferred it.
I do not see why we have not done that today but waited till the Motion was seconded.When the man was going to present his Report, I expected it to be raised, that the Report he was presenting, was not their Report; he seconded it, he sat down. I opened the floor before my attention was drawn to it. It is not consistent with our procedure.
Dr A. A. Osei 11:50 a.m.
Mr Speaker, with respect, I was not in the Chamber --
Mr Speaker 11:50 a.m.
Hon Member, please, I am not going to take any debate on this matter. I have ruled. If anybody disagrees with my ruling, there is a procedure in the House to challenge the ruling.
Dr A. A. Osei 11:50 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am not arguing with you. I would want to set the records straight as part of my debate.
I was called in after the Motion had been seconded. [Interruption.] The draft Report that was given to me as a Ranking
Member did not contain this part. I would want it on record. The draft that I read did not have this -- [Interruption] -- So, why would I have objected?
Mr Speaker 11:50 a.m.
Hon Member, I am not putting the Question on the Report of the Committee. If it were so, the points being raised would have been totally different. I am not putting the Question on the Report. I am putting the Question on the Motion moved by the Hon Minister for Finance and that is what has been captured -- [Hear! Hear!] -- That is what has been captured as item 12 on the Order Paper. I am not putting the Question on the Report, observations and all those things do not matter in my view at this stage.
Dr A. A. Osei noon
Mr Speaker, on page 11 of the Committee's Report and with our permission, I beg to quote:
“The explanatory statement in paragraph 108 did not reflect the expenditure in the table.”
Mr Speaker, it goes on further to say noon
“The table below and the accompanying explanatory note however, serves to correct paragraph 108 of the Budget Statement.”
Mr Speaker, I am a member of this Committee; I am saying that I did not agree to this, and that it is not a reflection of the Committee's work. In an case -- [Interruption.] If you would shut up, you would learn something. You are new; you do not want to learn. [Interruption.]
Mr Speaker, the Committee cannot be seen to be correcting it for the Hon Minister -- [Interruption.] He should control them.
Dr Kunbuor noon
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member, who had the floor, made a statement on the floor that people should shut up. And what I am saying is that there is a difference between having the floor and somebody making his own side comments. This is because he is addressing Mr Speaker. If he allows his attention to be diverted to another area, he only has himself to blame.
He can ask for Mr Speaker to protect him against people who are not allowing the matter to be heard, but that would not be sufficient, while he is on his feet, to use words like “shut up”. I think that is unparliamentary, Mr Speaker, the Hon Member should be made to withdraw that statement.
Mr Speaker noon
Hon Member, those who are also making the noise, do they also have my permission to it? There is only one person who has the floor. The only person who has the floor is the Hon Member for Old Tafo. Other people should listen to him in silence.
Dr A. A. Osei noon
Mr Speaker, if the Hon Majority Leader feels offended by the use of the words “shut up”, I withdraw them. But I think in fairness to me, he as a Leader
-- noon

Mr Speaker noon
Did you use the words “shut up”?
Dr A. A. Osei noon
Mr Speaker, I did, that is why I am withdrawing them.
Mr Speaker noon
Then withdraw them.
Dr A. A. Osei noon
Mr Speaker, I have withdrawn them.
Mr Alban S. K. Bagbin noon
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, I have a point of order as an issue of clarification.
Mr Speaker, when an Hon Member catches your eye and he is making submissions on the floor, he is actually addressing Mr Speaker. So, Mr Speaker, the statement that he made that “shut up” is a statement that is referred to the Speaker, but the Speaker was not speaking. [Interruption.] This is because, the Hon Member was addressing Mr Speaker.
Now, it is the practice of this House and of all Parliaments in the world that Hon Members do heckle one another. So, Mr Speaker, if the heckling is going beyond bounds, the Hon Member on the floor calls on the Speaker to come and protect him by drawing the attention of the others who are heckling him, that it is beyond the acceptable level of parliamentary practice. That is what he failed to do and then he addressed Mr Speaker that he should shut up. That is unparliamentary and he should withdraw it.
Mr Speaker noon
Hon Members, Hon Bagbin is right except that the “shut up” was not directed at me. [Laughter.]
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu noon
In any case, Mr Speaker, if an observation from the Hon Member was that the Speaker was actively descending into the arena of debate, he had the right to draw attention in respect of Order 90. [Interruption.] But I think, as Mr Speaker himself --
Mr Speaker noon
Hon Member for Old Tafo, was it directed at the Chair?
Dr A. A. Osei noon
Mr Speaker, I would never direct “shut up” at you. This is because I assume Mr Speaker does not take part in the debate. But if somebody decides to take part in the debate, then he has brought themselves to be part of the caucus. [Interruption.]
Mr Speaker, you know that I learned my parliamentary practice from you. Mr Speaker --
Mr Speaker noon
Hon Members, let us make progress.
Hon Member for Old Tafo, you have the floor.
Dr A. A. Osei noon
Mr Speaker, the point I would want to emphasise is that -- and I know earlier, you invited the Chairman to change some wording. Mr Speaker, all I am saying is that, this paragraph here --
Mr Speaker noon
Hon Member, the problem that you drew our attention to is a very fundamental one. I do not want to take part in the debate; I have my own view of addressing this issue. This is because it is a matter that ought to be addressed. Even if it is in this Report, it does not go to correct paragraphs 107 and
108.
Hon Member, are you listening to me? It does not. That is why Leadership should meet again to see how this matter can be resolved.
This is the signal I keep on sending to the House. Whether this thing is here or not, the fundamental problem that you came to discuss with me in my office is not-- It is because the problem is coming from all the Members of the House. This is because the two documents were laid the same day; it was when we were debating the principles of the budget, if Hon Members were diligent enough, was the time for it to be done.
But we have already put the Question on the financial policy. Now, we are only
taking estimates. We have detected some error; how do we address it? Let Leadership meet to see how we can address it, to make it acceptable to both sides of the House. Whether it is here or not, it does not cure the problem.
Dr A. A. Osei noon
Mr Speaker, I agree with you. All I sought to do was to invite the Hon Chairman, to avoid this confusion, to delete this part of it, so that --
Mr Speaker noon
Hon Members, there are so many things that I see in the Committee's Reports, that if I have my own way, those things should not be in it.
Hon Member, make your contribution, pass your comment on the Report and the Motion and let us make progress.
Dr A. A. Osei noon
Mr Speaker, I am on the Report precisely. I do not see where this belongs. Mr Speaker, this is a Motion to approve the financial estimates for the Ministry of Finance; it is not a Motion to correct a mistake made by the Ministry of Finance.
If we all agree, then we would invite the Hon Chairman to delete this part to amend the Report, so that on record, the Committee is not seen to be usurping the powers of the Hon Minister. That is why I thought it was in our interest to protect the Hon Minister for Finance, so that we are not seen as a Parliament usurping his power. And I think if --
Mr Speaker noon
What is before me is the Motion moved by the Hon Minister and that is what I am going to put the Question on.
Hon Member, have you finished with your contribution?
Dr A. A. Osei noon
No, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker noon
This is because each time you get up, you go back to what I have ruled on and the rules are very, very clear. This is because you are about to disobey the Chair. Yes! You are disobeying the
Dr A. A. Osei 12:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am not trying to disobey the Chair. [Interruption.] Mr Speaker, I invite you to protect me from these -- [Interrup- tion.] Mr Speaker, I would not go any further but read my lips. Mr Speaker, an Hon Member on the other side is trying to blow me a kiss -- look at her -- [Laughter.] That would not dissuade me from the point I want to make.
Mr Speaker, it is fundamental that as we address the estimates of the Ministry of Finance, we should hold them accountable as the first and foremost institution which must be diligent in the presentation of their estimates and budget. If the Ministry cannot do that, the signal to other Ministries is not very good. Why do I say that?
Mr Speaker, as the Hon Minister would confirm, in Committee, when they first showed up -- and this is not the Minister's fault, I believe. But the staff members came and presented something that was unknown to the Committee or to the Hon Minister.
We had to send them back to re-do the estimates. When they came back, it was correct. Mr Speaker, most of the information from the other sectors is channelled through the Ministry. So, if the Ministry itself is not being diligent, it would affect us. Mr Speaker, if you look at page 10, we have been talking about overspending -- Controller and Accountant General, Compensation of Employees --the overrun is almost GH¢44 million.
Mr Speaker, the Controller and Accountant-General's Office is perhaps, the largest agency under the Ministry, apart from the Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA), I believe. But the question I ask is, which was not clear to me and the Report -- It said -- actual recruitment of permanent staff -- how many people were hired and at what rate? Mr Speaker, if the overrun is specifically coming from arrears from the Single Spine Salary Structure, we should have the numbers but it cannot be from recruitment alone.
But GH¢44 million over and above what we have approved -- Mr Speaker, this is very serious and we should take note of that. Mr Speaker, the PRMA law is specific. It says that when they get money from the ABFA, at least, 70 per cent must go into capital investment. Mr Speaker, if you go to page 11, paragraph 7.3, an amount of GH¢9 million was allocated to the Ministry from the ABFA.
Mr Speaker, this is what the budget used for investment. GH¢5 million was allocated to the Venture Capital Fund. Is that capital development? Then GH¢2 million was allocated to the guarantee. That is not an asset acquisition. Another GH¢2 million was given to the Creative Arts Industry. I do not blame the Ministry.
In approving the budget last year, Parliament was not diligent enough. We should have questioned why we were giving the Ministry of Finance money to give to the Creative Industry. When I look at the budget, it was in there and this is the fault of Parliament. But at least, the Ministry should have brought such matters to our attention, that -- I do not blame the Ministry.
We put in GH¢2 million for the Ministry of Finance to disburse to the Creative Industry but that is not investment and 70 per cent of the GH¢9 million has not
rose
Mr Speaker 12:10 p.m.
Hon Chief Whip, do you have a point of order?
Alhaji Muntaka 12:10 p.m.
Rightly so, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker, with the greatest respect to your goodself and my Hon Colleague opposite, I have heard the issue of Members of Parliament not being diligent twice, and in my view, it is worrying. If we in Leadership say this to the hearing of the public, then Parliament may begin to insist that when they bring a budget, we would take one month to do it and that has its own repercussions.
Mr Speaker, I do not want us to create the impression that Members of Parliament are not diligent enough. There could be errors, there could be mistakes -- If we are all responsible -- We should not put this word across, that we are not diligent. I believe that we are --
Mr Speaker 12:10 p.m.
Hon Member, unfortunately, you made reference to my statement. I used the word advisedly. Indeed, when I used it, the Hon Member for Obuasi West -- when he drew attention to the TOR debt recovery levy being “zero, zero” I stopped it for clarification and for it to be corrected and explained during the Budget Statement. That is due diligence and it was explained that it was re-classification.
It was in that context that I used my word. So when you want to raise a point of order and you want me to make a ruling and you are objecting to the use of my word, how can I make a ruling? When the Hon Member for Obuasi West made that
point, I stopped the presentation for explanation and that is the context in which I used the word “diligence”.
Dr A. A. Osei 12:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, thank you for your ruling.
When he got up, I thought he was going to go there. When I say we are not being diligent, it is not negative. We need to criticise ourselves to go ahead. Mr Speaker, we have been very diligent in finding out that the write- up was wrong. That is diligence.
So, Mr Speaker, there is nothing wrong with that. Where we go wrong -- I am saying when we met here, we approved it -- Maybe, it is an oversight but we learn. That is why we are raising this issue, so that when we go forward, we know what to do. It is not a problem. There is nothing wrong with criticising yourself. Why? Are we perfect?
Mr Speaker 12:10 p.m.
We all make mistakes including the Chair, and that is why the rules allow the Chair 's ruling to be challenged by using the proper procedure. We all make mistakes.
Hon Member, continue.
Dr A. A. Osei 12:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, there is a matter that the Hon Minister is concerned about -- [Interruptions] -- I would want to invite Hon Members to see how best we can assist the Ministry. Mr Speaker, if we look through the expenditure returns of all MDAs -- not only one, all of them - - you will find a common thing -- inconsistency in data in every one of them. The Ministry currently is not in a position to solve it.
So, the Hon Minister is inviting us -- and I support it --to assist the Ministry in acquiring a software and the human capacity to make sure that the business is implemented very quickly. It is unfortunate. Government has spent over GH¢200 million thus far --PURFMAP, BICOMPs; now, it is GIFEX. The next time I do not know what they are going to call it and we still cannot handle the problem.
Mr Bagbin 12:10 p.m.
-- rose --
Mr Speaker 12:10 p.m.
Hon Member for Nadowli/Kaleo, do you have a point of order?
Mr Bagbin 12:10 p.m.
That is so, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker, my good Friend the Member of Parliament (MP) for Old Tafo seems to be misleading the House. Mr Speaker, I am not a member of the Finance Committee. It is the work of the Committee to interrogate all these issues at the Committee level, get the responses from the Ministry and report to the House, so that we can now pass the Appropriation Bill.
Now, the issues are being raised on the floor of the House, which means they did not interrogate them there. If they did, he would not be saying that and flogging them without telling us the responses of the Hon Minister. So, I am left in a complete darkness. I am tempted to say that they should go back to do a better job because he is raising issues, talking about amounts, talking about inconsistencies, which means they were not reconciled at the Committee level.
If they were reconciled, they would state them here for us. So, it is rather murky and I do not know what the Hon Member wants us to do now. They have
to lead us -- the Finance Committee is to lead the debate and tell us the corrections that they made at the Committee level, so that we can take a decision.
Dr A.A. Osei 12:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, that is precisely what I am doing -- [Interrup- tions] -- Mr Speaker, if you listened to me, I said at the Committee level, the Hon Minister invited us -- That is how I read it and I am bringing it to your attention. Mr Speaker, the “wise man” is very wise and I have been following him but on matters that are not on the legal area, he should please, allow us to talk a bit. This is an area which is not legal, so “wise men” must be careful when they are treading -- [Laughter.]
rose
Mr Speaker 12:10 p.m.
Hon Member for Wenchi, do you have a point of order?
Prof. Gyan-Baffour 12:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, it is not a point of order. I wanted you to give me some time to explain one thing.
This is not the first time we are experiencing that. In the supplementary budget, there were a lot of errors and he said they should bring him an errata to change them but this errata never came. Mr Speaker, he is actually bringing the errors out because he is a member of the Committee
Mr Speaker 12:10 p.m.
The point being made by the Member for Nadowli/Kaleo is that the Finance Committee -- Some of the issues, more especially with regard to the Ministry of Finance are issues -- We are giving them money to perform certain functions.
The Member for Nadowli/Kaleo is saying that these are issues they should have raised and got some assurance from the Ministry of Finance. The Finance Committee should have raised some of these issues at the Committee, so that
they would report to the House, that this inconsistency, they drew their attention to and this was the response of the Ministry and this is the recommendation they made. This is the point the Member for Nadowli/Kaleo is making. That is their responsibility. The estimates have been referred to them but it is still not too late.
Maybe, at the appropriation level, when the Finance Committee brings these documents, if they mean to draw our attention to certain things, they would have to draw our attention to them -- Hon Member for Old Tafo, you are the Ranking Member of the Committee.
Dr A. A. Osei 12:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, on pages three and four of the Report, you would notice that a few agencies have been listed as being under the Ministry of Finance.
Mr Speaker, technically speaking, the GSS, apparently, is not under the Ministry but for operational reasons, they are put there and it is a matter that we also need to look at. It is a constitutional matter; I believe they work under the Office of the Presidency. But as you know, they are located at the Ministry of Finance and they work closely together.
But I think we should find a way, if we are going to put them under the Ministry, to put them there and move them away under the Presidency, so that the Ministry can supervise them a bit better.
Mr Speaker, the Institute of Accoun- tancy Training is a training wing of the Ministry of Finance.
Mr Speaker, unless I am mistaken, what we were told was that the Controller and Accountant-General has about 4,000 employees at least. Out of that, only 184 are certified. It amazes me that we Ghanaians want --
Mr Speaker 12:20 p.m.
Certified as what?
Dr A. A. Osei 12:20 p.m.
Certified as Chartered Accountants.
Mr Speaker 12:20 p.m.
This is because there are different qualifications. So, if you just -
- 12:20 p.m.

Dr A. A. Osei 12:20 p.m.
Certified as Chartered Accountants; that is what we were told.
Mr Speaker 12:20 p.m.
Very well.
Dr A. A. Osei 12:20 p.m.
I am saying 184 out of 4,000 is less than five per cent. Mr Speaker, we ought to think about it.
Mr Speaker, the Accountant-General is our accountant over a budget of GH¢22 billion that is US$11 billion. This year, it is about GH¢30 billion; that is US$15 billion. And we are not putting in the necessary human capacity for them to manage it. I think it is a serious matter and Parliament ought to be thinking about it; we cannot continue like that.
We, in Parliament, must begin to think that, look, if they are going to monitor GH¢30 billion, then let us place the right people there and pay them well.
Mr Speaker, it is not only the Controller and Accountant-General's Department (CAGD), the Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA) too-- These two agencies are sort of twins. The Revenue agencies bring us the money and if we do not pay them well, it would not come. But the Accountants help us manage it.
Mr Speaker, all these pieces of information we are getting, if the Controller and Accountant-General does not do proper accounts, all our work would be useless.
I believe, as an oversight body, we have to find a way to advocate for a proper building of the capacity of the Controller and Accountant-General's Department. If we must pay them twice, let us do so.
Mr Murtala Muhammed Ibrahim 12:20 p.m.
-- rose --
Mr Speaker 12:20 p.m.
Hon Murtala, you have been on your feet for a long time; do you have a point of order?
Mr M. M. Ibrahim 12:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, several. Mr Speaker, my point of order is
-- 12:20 p.m.

Mr Speaker 12:20 p.m.
Hon Member, if you want to contribute to the debate, that is a different matter.
Hon Member, continue.
Dr A. A. Osei 12:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, sometimes I wonder whether or not Hon Members listen. I have not indicted the Finance Committee; I am raising issues arising out of our discussions to assist the House -- That is what we do here. This is not a political platform -- [Hear! Hear!]

Mr Speaker, if I am advising the House to assist the CAGD, is that an indictment on the Finance Committee?

Mr Speaker, I know my good Friend is still looking for a Deputy Ministerial position but this is not the forum.
Mr Speaker 12:20 p.m.
Hon Member, withdraw that. You cannot impute improper motive to the Member --
Dr A. A. Osei 12:20 p.m.
I withdraw that.
Mr Speaker 12:20 p.m.
And apologise to him.
Dr A. A. Osei 12:20 p.m.
I apologise [Laugh- ter.]
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 12:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I know Speaker is in charge of order in the House. So, if a statement is made by any Hon Member that appears to be untoward, the Speaker, in my view, can draw the attention of the Hon Member who made that statement to withdraw it.
Mr Speaker, my helplessness arises because in situations, you have told us that he does not want to suo motu involve himself in the debate. So, if the Chair is not prompted, then he will leave it to Hon Members to raise issues about points of order.
So, I would want to assure ourselves, that all of us are protected under the shield of the Speaker, so that when matters arise, Mr Speaker may not necessarily have to invite --
Mr Speaker 12:20 p.m.
Hon Minority Leader, look at Standing Order 99 (1) and I would want to quote:
“Any Member deviating from these Orders may be immediately called to order by Mr Speaker or by any other Member . . .”
So even the Standing Orders mention Speaker first before Hon Members and that was what I did.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 12:20 p.m.
Exactly what I said and I am gratified at what you have done except that on occasions, you have plentifully cried out that you do not want to suo moto do that. Today, you are doing that and I am very happy.
Mr Speaker 12:20 p.m.
I have always done it.
Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
Dr Kunbuor 12:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, it is, indeed, true that you would be protecting Hon Members but there are also situations on the floor of the House in which the conduct of Hon Members make them irredeemable to such a point that Mr Speaker cannot even protect them. This is because the only time Mr Speaker can protect them is when they address Mr Speaker.
So, yes, it is, indeed, significant that Mr Speaker must be seen to be giving an assurance that he would protect every Member of this House. That is indeed, the case. But Hon Members of the House should not put ourselves beyond the protection of Mr Speaker by our conduct.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 12:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, with respect, you have said to us that you have always done it. The Hon Majority Leader now is giving exceptions that sometimes you do not do it. [Laughter.]
Mr Speaker 12:20 p.m.
Hon Members, let us make progress. We have been on this Motion for a very long time and we have a lot of Motions to --
Hon Member, do you have a problem with the estimates, the figure there? I want you to conclude. I want to take the other two Members briefly and put the Question, so conclude.
Dr A. A. Osei 12:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, it is fair that this has taken a lot of time but I think the issues are germane and I am thankful for allowing us to --
Mr Speaker 12:20 p.m.
Yes, conclude.
Dr A. A. Osei 12:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, in conclusion-- [Laughter.] Mr Speaker, in concluding, I would want to say that as of date, the amount that is being requested for the Ministry of Finance is
GH¢292,206,478.
Mr Speaker, I do not believe it is adequate enough for the work that we are going to do.
That notwithstanding, I believe that the Ministry should come back around July to show us the progress they have made with this if they want a need -- and this time we would -- Mr Speaker, I think we should invite all the agencies to come back in July to justify the efficient use of the little that have been given them. At that time, we may be in a position to see if what they are doing is worthwhile.
With those long words, I thank you.
Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
Thank you very much, Hon Member for Old Tafo.
I will take one from each side.
Mr Gabriel K Essilfie (NDC -- Shama) 12:30 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to contribute to this Motion to approve the estimates for the Ministry of Finance.
Mr Speaker, before I do that, I would like to correct an error in the Report at paragraph 5.4. The information at paragraph 5.4 is the same information that is provided at paragraph 5.2. I think it is an error that the Committee made and needs to be deleted because it is the same information.
-- 12:30 p.m.

Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
Hon Member, I am not going to give more than five minutes.
Mr Essilfie 12:30 p.m.
I understand, Sir.
Mr Speaker, the notion that was created by the Hon Ranking Member as if only Chartered Accountants can perform well in the Ministry of Finance, particularly the Controller and Accountant-General's Department -- Mr Speaker --
Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
Hon Member, if you are qualified in your profession and certified, I think it is better. That is all the point he made. I do not think this is an issue we should waste time on.
Mr Essilfie 12:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I do understand that, but I just wanted to make the point that indeed, Chartered Accountants can be at the upper level of management at the Controller and Accountant-General's Department but there are middle level accountants who can be trained and can perform and we still can get the outcome that we need. That is all. I wanted to get that point clear.
Mr Speaker, the 2013 outlook has three pillars and basically, they are the Economic Strategy Programme (ESP), the Budget Management, and the Public Financial Management Programme (PFMP). Mr Speaker, the essence of these programmes, in my opinion, are to enhance the fiscal management and controls of the Ministry for us to be able to generate the necessary revenues that the country can use to somehow defray some of the deficit situation that we all
talk about. What this means is that indeed, the Ministry deserves to have all the necessary resources for them to perform their functions properly, to correct any problems that may be existing, just as have been enumerated in the Report, for them to perform well.
For that matter, Mr Speaker, I would one hundred per cent support that we all approve what has been allocated to the Ministry for them to be able to perform their functions properly.
On that note, I thank you, Mr Speaker.
Mr Kwaku Agyeman-Manu (NPP -- Domaa Central) 12:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I have taken a look at the Report and I would want to make a few comments, maybe, in less than the five minutes in which you want me to do so.
But I would want Hon Colleagues to appreciate the fact that I am not a member of the Finance Committee, so things that may have happened at the Committee room, I was not part of and they should not want to think that I have done it somewhere and I am coming to do it here again.
Mr Speaker, let me go to the concern that was raised by the Hon Ranking Member --
Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
Hon Member, we have dealt with that matter.
Mr Agyeman-Manu 12:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, not that one, it is strictly on the Report.
Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
We have rules against repetition.
Mr Agyeman-Manu 12:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, you do not even know what I am going to say and you say --
Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
You said you were going to deal with what the Hon Ranking Member had said.
Mr Agyeman-Manu 12:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am not going to say what he said. I am going to say what in my opinion, I want to say.
Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
Go ahead.
Mr Agyeman-Manu 12:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am talking about the overruns on their compensation. Mr Speaker, it is sad to note these huge overruns, especially with the Controller and Accountant-General's Department. Mr Speaker, budgets are done with very good judgments to give us what is supposed to be very real. This suggests that we just sat somewhere and cooked figures and when we started performing, we realised that they were just not adequate.
How can we draw a budget and have a variance of GH¢43 point something million just on payroll? This is serious -- [Interruption] -- No! No! Mr Speaker, what I would want to say is that I am making a suggestion. The Minister for Finance should have to supervise more diligently -- I am using the words “more digilently” -- so that these types of things do not occur any longer. These are things that would sort of destroy the targets we may have set and they would not allow us to achieve what we need to achieve.-- [Interruption]
rose rose
Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
Hon Minister for Finance before the Hon Majority Leader.
Mr Terkpeh 12:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to correct an impression that has gone through this debate.
In the first place, we did explain that the implementation of the Single Spine Salary Structure at the macro level --
Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
Hon Minister, I would allow you to wind up, so that if you want to correct anything or give some information, you can.
Dr Kunbuor 12:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rose on a point of order because the Hon Member is misleading the House by the statement he is making -- and the premises.
He did indicate that he is not a member of the Finance Committee and so, he did not have actual knowledge of what transpired and that he intended to concentrate on the Report.
This Report has not just talked about overruns in isolation. There is ample explanation of the overruns. So, his engagement here should be because he disagrees with the explanation that has been offered and not to present it as if it was just reported as overruns, simpliciter.
Mr Agyeman-Manu 12:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, let me do a bit of analytical work. If we were running any serious economic models to get our targets for deficits, we would put GH¢36 million in the model and we end up taking GH¢43 million; why not exceed the 6.7 per cent deficit? Some of the challenges we have are just mathematical and if we do not look at our figures correctly and we churn them out, they would result in serious overruns that would affect our budget deficit -- [Hear! Hear!] It is as simple as that and they do not want us to comment on this.
This is a very simple matter; more so, it is coming from the Controller and Accountant-General's Department where we have 124 Chartered Accountants, or let me use the American word, “Certified”. This is not acceptable and that is what I would want to comment on. It is as simple as this. For how long can we continue to do this?
Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
Hon Member, your time is up.
Mr Agyeman-Manu 12:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I thank you very much for this intervention.
Mr Speaker 12:30 p.m.
Hon Minister, would you wind up?
Mr Terkpeh 12:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I wish to express my gratitude to Hon Members for a lively debate on the estimates of the Ministry of Finance. It is not surprising because the Ministry performs an MDA role and it also performs macro-fiscal function, as I mentioned in my introduction.
Mr Speaker, I would like to just correct the impression that--to emphasize rather that we did provide answers to some of the issues that are coming up on the floor of the House and I would cite just a few in the interest of time.
Mr Speaker, we did explain that in the administration of the PRMA, this House

approved the use of the ABFA for capacity building. Mr Speaker, there can be no other better form of capacity building as far as I am concerned, than investing in the Venture Capital and the Exim Guarantee. This is because these are institutions that strengthen both the private sector 's ability to compete effectively. Therefore, if we have to build the capacity of the nation, I am of the view, as well as my officers that the allocation to these institutions are warranted.

Furthermore, when we invest in these institutions, it is a form of investment. And that explains why we classify them as assets. From the perspective of the Ministry, we are investing in these institutions. And the proper form of reflection as capital expenditures, is that they are assets.

Mr Speaker, we also explained the over- expenditure and we did state that the “adds” were pointed out in the budget itself. The Single Spine Salary Structure has resulted in several over-expenditure across the board. Mr Speaker, therefore, when one gets to the micro-level, you will see over-adds in all the MDAs. And therefore, it is the evolvement of the policy that makes it difficult to have a right estimate for what the ultimate amount should be spent on, which is why we had to come to this House with a supplementary budget which included, further estimates for the payment of the Single Spine.

Mr Speaker, we should also note that inasmuch as we will call for more experts to be employed in our revenue and expenditure institutions, it is these same institutions, when they are migrated to the Single Spine Salary Structure, that often lead to over-expenditure because when you put them on the right level, you are also allocating funds far in excess of what estimates you want --
Dr A. A. Osei 12:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, with respect, GRA has not been migrated onto the Single Spine Salary Structure, so, it cannot be that “these institutions” -- GRA is not on the Single Spine Salary Structure. They have their own terms and conditions of service. If you are talking about the CAGD, yes; but you cannot mention both of them in the same vein.
Mr Terkpeh 12:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I was making a general point and I referred to our revenue and expenditure institutions and the enhancement of their capacity. I was therefore, making a general point that the divergence would occur in a larger form whenever these institutions are migrated, to the extent that you are involving the policy and you would not be quite sure where they would be placed after the Fair Wages and Salaries Commission.
Having said that, however, Mr Speaker, we take note of the contributions that have been made on the floor and they would be used in the improvement of the budget for the Ministry as well as for the nation during the preparation of the 2014 Budget.
I thank you.
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
Hon Members, that brings us to the end of the debate.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved:
That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢292,206,478 for the services of the Ministry of Finance for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Hon Majority Leader, item number 13 -- that is what you told me.
Dr Kunbuor 12:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, that is so but with your indulgence, the Hon Chairperson for item (b), is caught up in a very urgent committee matter on quorum matters. So, I would like to crave your
indulgence for the Paper to be presented by the Hon Member and we get back to item 13.
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
What item are you referring to?
Dr Kunbuor 12:40 p.m.
Back to Presentation of Papers.
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
You are making an application --
Dr Kunbuor 12:40 p.m.
That is so, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
So, what item?
Dr Kunbuor 12:40 p.m.
Item 4 (b)
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
Very well. So, who is laying it on behalf of the Chairman?
rose
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
The Chairman is here.
Dr Kunbuor 12:40 p.m.
Yes, Mr Speaker, she has to go back to the Appointments Com- mittee, so that is why.
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
Very well.
PAPERS 12:40 p.m.

Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
Item number 13 on the Order Paper -- Motion.
Hon Minister for Finance --
Minister for Finance (Mr Seth E. Terkpeh) 12:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would like to crave your indulgence to correct the amount on the Order Paper, which was the result of a mathematical error in casting before I proceed to move the Motion.
Mr Speaker, the figure should be four hundred and thirty-three million, five hundred and six thousand and three hundred Ghana cedis (GH¢433,506,300). The difference occurred because the assets column was not extended and included in the capital in the Report.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢433,506,300 for the services of the Ghana Revenue Authority for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Dr A. A. Osei 12:40 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, did he mention 433?
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
Yes.
Dr A. A. Osei 12:40 p.m.
Which Motion is that?
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
The figure he is mentioning is what the Committee has reported on -- Ghana Revenue Authority.
Dr A. A. Osei 12:40 p.m.
Yes, let us --
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
The figure that he is giving, tallies with what is in the Committee's Report.
Prof. Gyan-Baffour 12:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, what it means is that the Order Paper needs to be amended?
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
Yes, that is what he has done.
Hon Ranking Member, are you all right with the figures? Hon Ranking Member, you raised the issue --
Dr A. A. Osei 12:40 p.m.
When he was speaking, I was not paying attention but then I heard “433” -- [Interruption]
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
Hon Members, let us have order. Yes --
Dr A. A. Osei 12:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, what we have in the Budget Statement is what is on the Order Paper. So, I do not know what is being amended.
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
He tried to explain with regard to assets.
Yes, Hon Chairman, were you not at the Committee?
Mr Avedzi 12:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I think that maybe, the Hon Ranking Member does not have a copy of the Report with him. What happened was that the Asset Column was not extended to the total column. So, the difference is that that amount of GH¢58 million was not there, that is why GH¢371 million was quoted on the Order Paper. So, he is amending the Order Paper to reflect the correct figure.
Mr Speaker 12:40 p.m.
Hon Minister for Finance, kindly move your Motion.
Mr Terkpeh 12:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I was in the process of drawing attention to the very important role which the Ghana Revenue Authority plays in the nation, which is the prime institution that brings in the most revenue to our budget. In fact, the Ghana Revenue Authority is currently undergoing significant reforms, which started in 2009 with this House passing the Ghana Revenue Authority Act, which is leading to its consolidation of the various services under the Authority.
Mr Speaker, these reforms are on- going; the main ones being the integration of the income tax and value added tax (VAT) sections and further modernisation of customs administration.
Mr Speaker, the GRA will also play a very leading and significant role when we return to the House at the appropriate time with the envisaged revision of our revenue laws.
Mr Speaker, with these few words, I thank you.
Question proposed.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 12:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion moved by the Hon Minister, that this House approves the sum of GH¢433,506,300.00 for the services of the Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA) for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Mr Speaker, in doing so, I present the Committee's Report.
Introduction
The Budget Statement and Economic Policy for the 2013 financial year was presented to the House on Thursday, 5th March, 2013. The estimates of the Ghana Revenue Authority were referred to the Finance Committee for consideration and report in accordance with article 179 of the Constitution and Standing Orders 140 (5) and 169.
The Committee met and discussed the estimates with the Hon Minister for Finance, Hon Seth Terkpeh, Commissioner- General of the Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA), Mr George Blankson and officials from the Ministry of Finance and the Ghana Revenue Authority and hereby presents this Report.
Reference Documents
In considering the estimates of the Ghana Revenue Authority, the Committee referred to the following.
1. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana.
2. Standing Orders of the House.
3. The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Govern- ment for the 2013 financial year.
4. Ghana Revenue Authority Act, 2009 (Act 791).
Background
The Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA) was established by the Ghana Revenue Authority Act, 2009 (Act 791) as a single semi-autonomous public organization to centralise, co-ordinate, integrate and replace the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Customs, Excise and Preventive Service (CEPS) and the Value Added Tax Service (VATS) for the assessment, collection, accounting and administration of tax and customs revenue.
The objects of the Authority include the following:
To provide a holistic approach to tax and customs administration.
Reduce administrative and tax compliance cost and provide better service to taxpayers.
Promote efficient collection of revenue and the equitable distribution of tax burden and ensure greater transparency and integrity.
Ensure greater accountability to Government for the professional management of tax administration.
Provide a one-stop service for taxpayers for the submission of returns and payment of taxes.
In order to achieve the above objects, the Authority is required to assess and collect taxes, interest and penalties on taxes due to the Republic with optimum efficiency, and to promote tax compliance and tax education. The Authority is further
Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 12:50 p.m.
required to combat tax fraud and evasion and to co-operate with competent law enforcement and revenue agencies in other countries.
The vision of the Authority is “to be a world class revenue administration recognized for professionalism, integrity and excellence”.
Performance in 2012
The major focus for the 2012 Budget was enhancement of revenue mobilisation and continuation of the integration and modernization of the Revenue Authority and thus influencing the activities undertaken. The under-listed are among the specific activities undertaken in 2012:
1. Conducted a research to determine the number of exemptions granted by the Minerals Commission, MoFA, EPA and Diplomatic Missions to reduce leakages through tax exemptions.
2. Continued efforts to modernize the tax collection system, and tax audit of companies to increase revenue.

3. Modernised domestic tax collection by segmenting taxpayers into large, medium and small for easy monitoring to enhance revenue mobilisation.

4. Continued to perform tax audits of companies which resulted in increased revenue.

5. Completed work on the Total Revenue Integrated Processing System (TRIPS).

2012 Budget allocation to GRA

The GRA was allocated an amount of GH¢287,618,860.00 from GoG for the implementation of their activities and programmes in 2012. As of 31st December, 2012 an amount of GH¢297,756,290.00 was spent. The breakdown of the expenditure is as follows:

Compensation for employees -- GH¢232,063,520.00

Goods and services -- GH¢ 48,702,160.00

Assets -- GH¢16,990,610.00

.

6.0 2012 Eexpenditure Returns

7.0 Outlook for 2013

In the 2013 financial year, the GRA intends to carry out the following activities among others:

a. Set up a special task force to monitor rent tax.

b. Continue to combat smuggling by injecting fresh officers into the Preventive Department of the Customs Division.

c. Extend the GCNET facility to other areas of collections hitherto not covered as a means to increase revenue collection and reduce collection cost.

d. Review of casino tax to streamline and regulate the activities of casinos to ensure efficient mobilization of casino revenue tax.

e. Put in place measures to ensure the passage of the Tax adminis- tration Bill, amendment to the Internal Revenue Act,

SPACE FOR TABLE - PAGE 5 -

amendment to the Customs, Ex- cise and Preventive Service (Management) Law and VAT (Amendment) Bill to strengthen, harmonize and organize the procedures and processes for GRA toeffectively mobilize revenue.

8.0 2013 budget allocation (GRA)

For the implementation of its planned programmes and activities, the revenue agencies have been allocated an amount of four hundred and thirty-three million, five hundred and six thousand, three hundred Ghana cedis (GH¢433,506,300.00) for the 2013 financial year to be disbursed as follows:

Compensation for employees -- GH¢ 289,750,000.00

Goods and services -- GH¢ 85,360,000.00

Assets -- GH¢58,396,300.00

Total -- GH¢433,506,300.00

9.0 2013 allocation by division

The allocation of the 2013 budget by division under the GRA is presen- ted in Table 1 below:

Table 1: 2013 budget allocations by Division

SPACE FOR TABLE - PAGE 7 -
Mr Speaker 12:50 p.m.
You are addressing the Chair.
Dr A. A. Osei 12:50 p.m.
Yes, I am addressing the Chair. I am asking the Chairman not to disturb the Minister because this is in his own interest. We must complete that building. I do not know in whose constituency it is; I think Hon Okudzeto or -- [Interruption.] Oh, Hon Fifi Kwetey; another Finance Minister-- Finance -- allied and related institutions.
Mr Speaker, with those few words, I think that we should approve the Motion to give GRA the amount that is being proposed.
Mr Benjamin Komla Kpodo (NDC -- Ho Central) 1 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion for approval of an amount of GH¢433,506,300.00 for GRA for 2013 operations.
Mr Speaker, from the budget, we know that they anticipated domestic revenue of GH¢21,274,762,131.00 as revenue. Out of this, the tax revenue is GH¢17,090,819,324.00. And this represents about 80 per cent of the total domestic revenue.
Now, the burden of collecting this 80 per cent lies on GRA and we are asking for GH¢433 million plus. This represents just about 2½ per cent of the total amount. When we collect our taxes efficiently and effectively, we can make more money to run our budget for the year.
GRA has decided to apply self- assessment for taxpayers. This is likely to bring in more revenue instead of just asking firms to pay certain amounts.
The important thing here is that, taxpayers should be made to declare their full incomes for the purpose of assessing their tax liabilities.
Mr Speaker, before I proceed, I would want to bring this to the attention of the House, that Hon Members of Parliament (MPs) need to be commended for honouring their tax obligations. The thing is that out of the much-touted high salary which MPs are said to be taking, they contribute 21 per cent of that towards the revenue of the whole nation and I can work out that; it is GH¢412,500.00 per month contributed by 275 MPs towards the domestic revenue. That works out to GH¢4,950,000.00 per year.
In fact, this amount can be applied to fund Cabinet Secretariat, Securities and Exchange Commission, Divestiture Implementation Committee (DIC), and Council of State. So, MPs, kudos.
But the important thing is that, all other taxpayers must also be made to pay the taxes due them. These, we can easily
Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
Hon Member, wind up.
Mr Kpodo 1 p.m.
Mr Speaker, other organisations which operate schools, even churches operate schools -- we must determine their incomes and make them pay appropriate taxes.
I would want to suggest to the Hon Minister that they should introduce a regulation which will enable GRA to determine the actual revenues of taxpaying institutions by producing audited accounts to GRA --
Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
Hon Member, you should wind up. Conclude.
Mr Kpodo 1 p.m.
Mr Speaker, on this note, I think that GRA requires to take this amount in order to cover its operations for the 2013 budget year.
Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
Hon Members, that brings us to the end of the debate. I will put the Question.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1 p.m.
Mr Speaker, this is a little thing that I would want the Hon Minister to respond to.
In the light of the amendment that was offered in respect of this very Motion, we have been told that assets for which an amount of GH¢58,396,300 was not added to the figure for the allocation to the Ghana Revenue Authority; Mr Speaker, if you look at the grand total, that is on page 284 of the Budget Statement, the totals have been made for a multi-sectoral allocations and the figure, it appears, without the GH¢58,396,300 comes to

GH¢16,098,636,896. I would want clarification from the Hon Minister. This is because it is going to affect that total; how is it to be treated? This is because clearly, that total there would definitely be affected if you have to increase that figure by adding to it the uncaptured allocation for assets, which amounts to GH¢58,396,300. Just for the records, so that we know our way clear.
Mr Terkpeh 1 p.m.
Mr Speaker, we would confirm whether the omission was a matter of just not extending the item and if it was in the programme, the total will reflect despite it not showing. On the other hand, if it is not -- If it is affecting the sub-total and the correction we just did, then as we normally do at the appropriation phase, we would reduce the contingency amount to take care of the increase in the capital allocation to GRA because the amount is significant and we cannot deprive GRA of that. So --
Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
That is what you Finance Ministers have been doing? After we have put our Question on an issue, then you go and do the necessary adjustments. When you were making the point, the Hon Ranking Member was nodding. Hon Ranking Member -- Which shows that, that is what you have been doing after we have taken a decision --
Dr A. A. Osei 1 p.m.
Mr Speaker, there is no evidence that I have done that. We are on the floor now and I thought the Leader was --
Mr Speaker 1 p.m.
But do you agree with his explanation?
Dr A. A. Osei 1 p.m.
Mr Speaker, if -- The way I see it, I believe that that adjustment would have to be done and if we have time to do it now, we should do that, so that the -- But it will come when we are doing the Other Government Obligations which we have not looked at yet. That is why there is no time --
Mr Speaker 1:10 a.m.
All right -- Other Government Obligations -- Very well.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved:
That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢433,506,300 for the services of the Ghana Revenue Authority for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Dr Kunbuor 1:10 a.m.
Mr Speaker, if we could take items 6, 11, 10 and 7.
Mr Speaker 1:10 a.m.
We are taking item 6?
Dr Kunbuor 1:10 a.m.
It is so, Mr Speaker. We have arranged it in a particular order after consultations with the Hon Ministers.
Mr Speaker 1:10 a.m.
Six --
Dr Kunbuor 1:10 a.m.
11, 10 and 7.
Mr Speaker 1:10 a.m.
Hon Minister for the Interior, item 6 on the Order Paper -- Motion.
ANNUAL ESTIMATES 1:10 a.m.

Minister for the Interior (Mr Kwesi Ahwoi) 1:10 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢825,817,169 for the services of the Ministry of the Interior for the year ending, 31st December, 2013.
Mr Speaker, with your indulgence, I wish to apologise to the Committee Members for the absence of both myself and Hon Mark Woyongo, the Minister for Defence, who stood in for me when I was out of office on an official mission outside the country and more importantly, during the consideration of the budget for the Ministry of the Interior. I do apologise
sincerely to the Committee members for my absence.
Mr Speaker, the Ministry of the Interior is charged with the overall responsibility for the maintenance of law and order, protection of life and property, narcotic drug control, immigration and border control, humane and reformative service as well as the management of disasters.
Mr Speaker, the budget of the Ministry of the Interior conforms to all relevant government policies for a “Better Ghana”, which includes, inter alia, the following:-
The 2013 budget guidelines.
The Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda (GSGDA).
The Millennium Development Goals.
Mr Speaker, let me assure this august House that the Ministry will continue to provide the requisite policy direction and support to enable the eleven agencies under the Ministry to perform their respective constitutional roles of providing safe and secure environment for socioeconomic activities to thrive.
In this respect, the focus of the Ministry in 2013, will cover the Ghana Police Service, which will be expected to reduce crime levels with particular emphasis on violent crimes by at least, 20 per cent through development and rigorous implementation of effective and well-co-ordinated policing strategies.
We also expect the Ghana Prisons Service to continue the construction of the second phase of the Ankaful Maximum Security Prisons, recruit 1,000 officers and provide Inmates Database Management System in all Central Prisons.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr George K. Arthur) 1:10 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion moved by the Minister for the Interior that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢825,817,169 for the services of the Ministry of the Interior for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Mr Speaker, I present the Report of the Committee.
Introduction
The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government for the 2013 financial year was presented to Parliament by the Hon Minister for Finance on Tuesday, 5th March, 2013 in accordance with article 179(1) of the 1992 Constitution of Ghana.
The draft budget estimates of the Ministry of the Interior were accordingly referred to the Committee on Defence and Interior for consideration and report pursuant to Orders 140 (4) and 158 of the Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.
The Committee met with officials of the Ministry of the Interior and the heads of agencies under the Ministry, as well as officials of the Ministry of Finance, and thoroughly deliberated on the estimates for 2013 pertaining to the Ministry of the Interior and its agencies.
The Ministry of the Interior is the institution charged with the responsibility of ensuring that the internal security of the country is maintained. The Committee is grateful to all the officials who acknowledged its invitation and attended upon it.
2.0 Reference documents
Your Committee referred to the following documents during its deliberations:
i. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana
ii. The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana
iii. The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of Government for the 2013 Financial year.
Background information
The Ministry of the Interior has the responsibility of ensuring that the internal security of the country is maintained. The Ministry therefore seeks to:
improve the capacity of the security agencies to provide intern security for human safety and protection;
increase national capacity to ensure safety of life and property; and
strengthen the intelligence agencies to fight social and economic crimes.
Its mandate is implemented through the following agencies:
(a) Ghana Police Service.
(b) Ghana Prisons Service.
(c) Ghana National Fire Service
(GNFS).
(d) Ghana Immigration Service
(GIS).
(e) National Disaster Management Organization (NADMO).
(f)Narcotics Control Board (NACOB).
Chairman of the Committee (Mr George K. Arthur) 1:10 a.m.
Recorded thirty-seven (37) narcotic drug arrests. This resulted in the arrest of forty-four (44) suspected persons involving thirty-eight (38) male and six (6) female. Of the 44 suspects, we have 25 Nigerians, 14 Ghanaians, 2 Togolese and 1 Thai, 1 Indian and 1 Moroccan. Also, thirteen (13) postal seizures were made without any arrests.
NACOB continued to work with the inter-agency committee for enforcement and control, which is comprises the Ghana Police Service, Ghana Immigration Service, Bureau of National Investigations, Ghana Airports Company Limited, Ghana Standards Board, Ghana Ports and Harbours Authority, Customs Division of GRA, Aviance, Defence Intelligence and National Security Council Secretariat; which met monthly to share intelligence and map out strategies to fight against the drug menace.
Three hundred and ninety-three (393) import permits and fifty-five (55) import authorizations for various precursors were issued. Institution and community-based preventive programmes continued through visits to schools, faith- based institutions and the media.
Outlook for 2013
The Ministry is mindful of the increasing crime rate especially robberies, bank attacks, murder, drug menace, cyber fraud, car snatching, natural and man- made disasters which call for equipping the Services under its umbrella, to effectively bring situations under control. For the year 2013, it seeks to undertake among others, the following:
The Ghana Police Service will deepen democratic policing culture and continue to minimize incidences of crime by increasing frontline policing (highway patrol and community policing) and intelligence gathering. The Service will improve road safety and traffic management and forge closer and mutual working relations with stakeholders.
The Ghana Prisons Service intends to focus on the welfare of prisoners, an issue that has assumed an added importance within the international community. It has become the main standard by which good governance and human rights adminis- tration of countries are measured. Ghana has acquitted itself in terms of a slight upward adjustment in the rate of prisoners rations, but issues of health, sanitation and beddings remain a blight on the record of the country.
The Ghana National Fire Service will ensure adequate protection of life and property, by training its personnel in modern fire fighting techniques and intensifying fire prevention and safety education nationwide. It will increase the issuance of fire certificates so as to generate more revenue.
The Ghana Immigration Service intends to expand enforcement activities, increase and expand intelligence-led operations at all district and sector commands, through improved border Management systems and the provi- sioning and installation of modern border management technology and infrastructure. The Service intends to improve revenue generation systems and incorporate anti human trafficking/ smuggling and anti money laundering in the mainstream operations.
NADMO intends to organize full-scale simulation exercises on oil ant chemical spillage, earthquakes and fires, to ensure that civilian capacity is built to withstand to a large extent, any unforeseen occurrence.
NACOB will continue to liaise with foreign international agencies on matters relating to narcotics. It will facilitate the review of the existing Law (PNDCL 236) so that it conforms to the international laws on narcotic drugs, psychotropic substances and precursor chemicals. It will intensify its drug supply suppression

operations and promote the concept of a National Dog Academy (Sniffer Dogs Project) which will service the Police, Customs and Immigration Services among others.

Estimates for fiscal year 2013

The Ministry of the Interior has been granted a total sum of eight hundred and twenty five million, eight hundred and seventeen thousand, one hundred and sixty nine Ghana cedis GH¢825,817, 169.00) for the 2013 financial year, made up of GH¢ 737,430,761 as GoG, GH¢ 23,000,000 as ABFA, GH¢ 6,420,758 as IGF and GH¢ 58,965,650 as Donor.

6.1.1 Allocation of funds for the Ministry (2013):

SPACE FOR TABLE - PAGE 13 - 1.10P.M.

6.1.2 Breakdown of budgetary allocation of GH¢ 825,817,169 to Ministry and its agencies

SPACE FOR TABLE - PAGE 14

- 1.10P.M.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr George K. Arthur) 1:20 p.m.
Observations and recommendations
The Committee observed that, the duty of ensuring peace, safety, security and stability for accelerated socioeconomic development is so vital that it cannot be taken for granted. Any disruption of peace and stability in the country will definitely throw the development agenda out of gear.
In considering the budget estimates, the Committee observed a general shortfall in allocations to all the sector agencies. The amounts granted are woefully inadequate to meet operational needs especially, in the face of the current crime rate, chieftaincy/ land disputes, and the drug menace confronting the country. The Committee wishes to make a special appeal to the Minister for Finance, to come to the aid of all the sector agencies with supplementary budget allowances.
The Committee lauds the Ministry for the initiative to take steps in conjunction with National Security and the Ministry of Food and Agriculture to address comprehensively and on a sustainable manner the menace posed by alien herdsmen, especially the Fulanis.
The Committee wishes to commend the Ghana Prisons Service for efforts it is making at managing costs and further wishes to recommend that it mechanizes its agriculture unit alongside the manual labour so as to increase food production and ultimately reduce dependence on government funding for feeding of inmates.
The Ghana National Fire Service complained of its inability to purchase adequate reserves of critical core fire- fighting and operational equipment such
as, foam compound, breathing apparatus, communication equipment, firefighting hoses, fire resistance suit, camouflage and ceremonial uniform, as a result of inadequate budgetary allocation. This would seriously affect its operational efficiency and effectiveness when confronted with demands.
The critical role of the Ghana Immigration Service demands resources for border control and security in the wake of increasing influx of foreigners and smuggling of goods in and out of the country. The Service is challenged with inadequate residential and office accommodation and lacks communication (radio/signal) equipment for its operations.
7.6 The Committee is of the view that agencies that generate revenue for the State should be allowed to retain significant per cent of their IGF for some of the operational costs. This would motivate them to give out the best of services.
Conclusion
The Committee, after a careful examination of the draft estimates, is of the view that the level of budgetary allocation for the Ministry of the Interior unfortunately still remains far from adequate. The Ministry and its agencies will require additional support to enable them carry out operational activities.
This notwithstanding, the Committee recommends to the House for approval, the total budgetary allocation of eight hundred and twenty five million, eight hundred and seventeen thousand, one hundred and sixty nine Ghana cedis (GH¢825,817,169.00) made to the Ministry of the Interior for the financial year ending, 31st December, 2013.
Respectfully submitted.

Maj. Derek Oduro (retd) (NPP -- Nkoranza North): Thank you, Mr Speaker, for this opportunity to contribute to the debate on the floor.

Mr Speaker, this is the budget for the Ministry of the Interior for the security agencies.

Mr Speaker, first and foremost, permit me to refer you to page 7 of the Committee's Report, bullet point 5.0. Mr Speaker, Ibeg to quote:

“The Ministry is mindful of the increasing crime rate especially robberies, bank attacks, murder, drug menace, cyber fraud, car snatching, natural and man-made disasters which call for equipping the services under its umbrella, to effectively bring situations under control.”

Mr Speaker, that is the responsibility of the security agencies under the Ministry of the Interior.

Mr Speaker, if you look at the allocation of funds to the various agencies, especially the Ghana Police Service, the Service requested for compensation for employees of approximately GH¢540 million, the approval was only GH¢420 million, leaving a shortfall of GH¢120 million.

Mr Speaker, the total requisition for the Ghana Police Service was GH¢678 million and they were given GH¢439 million.
Mr Joe K. Gidisu 1:20 p.m.
On a point of order.

Maj. Oduro (retd): Mr Speaker, I am very, very mindful of the contribution the Government has made to the Ghana Police Service. I am not doubting that. But Mr Speaker, if you buy a vehicle for the Service and you do not give them adequate money for them to even buy fuel to move, what are you talking about? Spare parts to even run the vehicles are not there.

So, he must listen to what I am saying and then maybe, even top up with whatever he has when it gets to his turn to contribute.

Mr Speaker, if we want to curb the menace of armed robbery in the system, if we want to control the road accidents -- There is no security on our roads; people are dying and it is the responsibility of the Ghana Police Service to ensure that the number of deaths on our roads are brought under control. And if they do not have adequate resources to move, to curb this menace, it is going to be a very, very big problem for Ghana.

Ghanaians should be able to have confidence to move out in the night, to go to work and come back without thinking that armed robbers would attack them, and it is the responsibility of the police to ensure that. These days, if you are in a vehicle, you are afraid. If you are even walking along the road, you are afraid. Therefore, you would look left, right to ensure that no car would crash you.
Mr Speaker 1:20 p.m.
Hon Member, conclude.
Maj. Oduro (retd): In conclusion, Mr Speaker, we expect the Government to adequately resource all the security agencies, so that they can perform to ensure maximum security for the citizenry of Ghana.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved:
That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢825,817,169 for the services of the Ministry of the Interior for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Mr Speaker 1:30 p.m.
Hon Members, item number 11 -- Minister for Roads and Highways.
ANNUAL ESTIMATES 1:30 p.m.

Minister for Roads and Highways (Alhaji Amin Amidu Sulemani) 1:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of
GH¢706,721,937.00 for the services of the Ministry of Roads and Highways for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
This amount is made up of the following:
Compensation of employees -- GH¢ 19,651,771.00
Goods and services -- GH¢805,566.00
Assets (GoG) -- GH¢ 65,617,269.00
Assets (ABFA) -- GH¢100,000,000.00
Assets (donor) -- GH¢313,484,595.00
Internally generated funds (IGFs) -- GH¢466,070.00
Road Fund -- GH¢206,696,665.00
Total -- GH¢706,721,936.00
Work programme for 2013
Mr Speaker, the objectives, outputs and activities of the Ministry are captured in the Medium Term Expenditure Framework for the 2013 -2015 fiscal years and the budget estimates for 2013 financial year.
The Ministry would continue to pursue its objectives to improve access through better distribution and integration of the road network system. Every region and district would benefit from the road intervention programmes.
Expectations for 2013
The Ministry's 2013 budget has been prepared to ensure that upon successful implementation, there would be steady and significant improvement in the Road Transport Infrastructure and Safety. This impact is expected to permeate all sectors of the economy.
Mr Speaker, the Ministry and its agencies would continue to pursue the following policy initiatives to improve on its operations and output:
1. The Ministry would continue to focus on routine and periodic maintenance activities. Routine maintenance activities would be undertaken on 11,199 kilometres of trunk roads, 26,223 kilometres of feeder roads and 7,411 kilometres of urban roads. The Ministry would also intensify the implementation of the law on axle load limit as provided in the new Road Traffic Regulations. This would enhance and protect the huge investment made by Government in the provision of the road infrastructure.
2. The Ministry would continue to partner with multilateral and bilateral organisations in the development of key road corridors to ensure effective mobility of persons, freight and services.
3. The private sector would also be invited to participate in the financing, design and construc- tion of key road transit corridors.
Mr Speaker, the total planned budget for the road sector for 2013 is one billion, seven hundred and thirty-six million, nine hundred and twenty-eight thousand, six hundred and forty Ghana cedis (GH¢1,736,928,640) compared with the total approved budget of seven hundred and six million, seven hundred and twenty- one thousand, nine hundred and thirty- six Ghana cedis (GH¢7O6,721,936). The approved budget represents about 41 per cent of the planned budget.
Mr Speaker, 1 wish to reiterate that, the reduction in the allocation to the sector would greatly affect the overall deliverables and the outcomes set out for the road transport sector.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move for this Honourable House to approve the total budget estimates of seven hundred and six million, seven hundred and twenty-one thousand, nine hundred and thirty-six Ghana cedis (GH¢706,721,936) for the Ministry of Roads and Highways and its agencies in order to undertake part of its programmes and activities for the year
2013.
I beg to move.
Question proposed.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Michael Coffie Boampong) 1:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I thank you for the opportunity to support the Motion, to approve the estimates for the Ministry of Roads and Highways for 2013 fiscal year.
In doing so, Mr Speaker, I wish to present your Committee's Report.
Introduction
In fulfilment of article 179 of the 1992 Constitution of Ghana, the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth E. Terkpeh presented the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2013 fiscal year to the august House on Tuesday, 5th March, 2013. Mr Speaker referred the budget estimates of the Ministry of Roads and Highways to the Committee on Roads and Transport for consideration and report pursuant to Orders 140 (4), 177 and 189 of the Standing Orders of the House.
During the consideration of the referral, the Committee met with the Hon Minister for Roads and Highways, Alhaji Amin Amidu Sulemani (MP), the Chief Director, the Directors of the Ministry, heads of agencies and key officials of the Ministry and the schedule officers from the
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Michael Coffie Boampong) 1:30 p.m.
Ministry of Finance. Indeed, it is instructive to state that the Ghana Highway Authority (GHA), the Department of Urban Roads (DUR), the Department of Feeder Roads (DFR), the Road Fund Secretariat and the Koforidua Training Centre are the agencies under the sector Ministry.
The Committee lauds the Hon Minister and all the officials who attended upon the Committee for their co-operation.
References
The Committee used the underlisted as reference materials during its deliberations:
(a) The 1992 Constitution of Ghana.
(b) The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana;
(c) The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government for the 2013 finan- cial year.
(d) The Medium Term Expenditure and Framework (MTEF) for 2013-2015 and the annual estimates for the budget estimates for the Ministry of Roads and Highways for 2013.
(e) The Report of the Committee on the 2012 budget estimates for the Ministry of Roads and Highways.
Vision of the Ministry of Roads and Highways
The vision of the Ministry of Roads and Highways is to provide “an
integrated, efficient, cost-effective and sustainable road transportation system responsive to the needs of society, supporting growth and poverty reduction and capable of establishing and maintaining Ghana as a transportation hub of West Africa”.
Mission Statement
In order to realise the above vision, the Ministry's Mission is to “provide leadership and an enabling environment for the development and maintenance of Ghana's road transportation system through effective policy formulation, market regulation, asset management and service provision.”
Policy objectives of the road sector
The policy objectives of the road sector as outlined in its Medium Term Development Plan (MTDP) and in line with the infrastructure and human settlement thematic area of the Ghana Shared Growth Development Agenda (GSGDA) 2010- 2013 are as follows:
Create and sustain an accessible, effective and efficient transport network that meets user needs.
Integrate land use, transport planning, development planning and service provision.
Create a vibrant investment and performance-based management environment that maximise benefits for public and private sector investors.
Develop and implement comprehen- sive and integrated policy,

governance and institutional frame- works.

Ensure sustainable development in the roads sub-sector.

Develop a multi-disciplinary human resource base to facilitate the implementation of our programmes.

Performance of the road sector in 2012 fiscal year

Ghana Highway Authority (GHA)

Trunk Road Development Projects

Under the Trunk Road Development Projects, the GHA effectively supervised to completion, a number of major road infrastructural works namely: the Achimota-Ofankor, Nsawam by-pass, Nkawkaw bypass 1, Akatsi-Akanu, Akatsi- Agbozume and Techiman-Apaaso were completed. Six contracts for the underlisted major trunk roads were also awarded and are in various stages of completion:

Asikuma Junction-Hohoe

Dodo-Pepesu Nkwanta

Nkwanta-Oti Damanko

Fufulso-Sawla

Ayamfuri-Asawinso

Agona Junction-Elubo

Trunk road maintenance/ improvement projects

The GHA undertook routine mainte- nance and periodic maintenance activities such as regravelling, resealing and spot

improvement on 10,674 kilometres and 186 kilometres respectively of the trunk road network. Both translate to 93 per cent performance of 11,199 kilometres planned for execution on routine maintenance and 3 per cent of 6,635 kilometres planned for periodic maintenance. A number of roads under upgrading to bituminous surfacing, partial reconstruction and rehabilitation are on-going in various parts of the country and are at various stages of completion.

The implementation of the law on axle load limit was vigorously pursued during the year under review which has resulted in the decline of overloading from 27.6 per cent in January, 2011 to 16 per cent at the end of December, 2012.

Department of Urban Roads (DUR)

The DUR facilitated the completion of major urban road projects in the cities of Accra and Kumasi to reduce the vehicular traffic congestion. These projects include:

(a) Expansion of the Odaw bridge and the construction of the flyover bridge;

(b) Extension of the La-Teshie road in Accra.

(c) Gulf House to GIMPA by-pass in Accra.

(d) Dansoman main roads in Accra,

(e) Reconstruction of the Oforikrom- Asokwa bypass including an (interchange at Timber Gardens) and the Lake Road in Kumasi.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Michael Coffie Boampong) 1:30 p.m.
Outlook for 2013
MRH Headquarters
The Ministry and its Agencies would ensure effective linkages with the thematic areas of the National Medium Term Development Plan (2010-2013) under the Ghana Shared Growth Development Agenda (GSGDA) for greater impact in the overall Government objective of reducing poverty and creating wealth.
In its bid at facilitating efficiency in the management of the road infrastructure, the Ministry proposed in the 2013 budget to recruit and maintain enough officers to manage the sector.
The Ministry would explore Public Private Partnership (PPP) Schemes in the financing, construction and management of road infrastructure with the PPP framework. Feasibility studies and new transaction process would therefore commence this year on the following:
Dualisation of the Accra-Cape Coast -Takoradi road.
The rehabilitation and expansion of the Accra-Tema Motorway and additional lanes.
Dualisation of Accra-Kumasi High- way.
The Ministry will continue to pursue its objective of improving access through better distribution and integration of the road network system.
The Ministry would also maintain its focus on routine and periodic maintenance activities to protect the huge investment made in providing road infrastructure, continue with upgrading and rehabilitation works that are ongoing in order to achieve a desirable road condition mix in line with the GSGDA.
In view of these, routine and periodic maintenance would be undertaken on

11,199 kilometres and 300 kilometres of trunk roads respectively. In addition 29,634 kilometres of feeder roads would have routine maintenance while 420 km of roads with soft spots would be improved. The Urban Department would undertake routine and periodic maintenance on 9,170 kilometres of roads.

5.2 Axle Load Control

The Ministry will continue to intensify the implementation of the law on axle load limit as provided for in the Road Traffic Act 2004 (Act 683) and the ECOWAS Supplementary Act to preserve the road asset.

Ghana Highway Authority (GHA)

Road Development Works

The following ongoing projects among others would achieve significant progress during the 2013 fiscal year: Nsawam- Suhum-Apedwa road, La-Teshie road, Sunyani road in Kumasi, eastern corridor roads. Asikuma Junction-Have, Nkwanta- Oti Damago, Enchi-Dadieso road, Asankragwa-Enchi road, Berekum-Sampa road, Walewale-Gambaga road and Navrongo-Tumu road. The others include Bomfa Junction Asiwa-Bekwai, Sefwi Bekwai-Eshiern-Asankragwa and Obogu- Ofoase-Gyaden-Agyenkwaso roads.

Department of Feeder Roads

The maintenance, rehabilitation and improvement of feeder roads including the construction of bridges would continue especially for ongoing projects.

Department of Urban Roads

The Department would continue with its road expansion projects to reduce vehicular traffic congestion in the cities and urban centres. Some of the road projects include Giffard and Burma Camp roads, Tetteh Quarshie-Madina-Pantang, Spintex road - Polo ground by-pass, American House-Madina and the emergency rehabilitation of Spintex and East Legon roads.

Table 2: MDA planned budget for 2013 against approved ceilings

SPACE FOR TABLE 2 - PAGE 16 - 1.30P.M.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Michael Coffie Boampong) 1:30 p.m.
Table 3: Comparison of approved budget for 2012 with 2013 ceilings

Observations and recommendations

For the second consecutive year, the Committee notes with great dis- satisfaction, the ceiling of GH¢65,617,270 provided for Assets against the Ministry's planned request of GH¢921,959,56.00. Inasmuch as the amount provided is woefully inadequate to impinge on the desired outcomes within the road infrastructural work, the Committee harbours the premonition that the untimely release of funds by the Ministry of Finance will further compound the already dire situation in the road infrastructure development.

A discourse with beneficiary communities during a field tour by the Committee last year and indeed observations made by the Committee brought to fore, the high rate of deterioration of most of the newly-

constructed urban and feeder roads nationwide. Although no scientific analysis of the situation has been carried out by the Committee, poor design of such roads, the use of inferior construction materials and inadequate supervision by the Engineers of the sector Ministry cannot be ruled out. The Committee will urge the sector Ministry to immediately conduct a study to unearth the causes of premature failure of roads. Meanwhile, action should be expedited to rigorously enforce standards and also resort to effective field supervision and monitoring of road projects.

Cognisant of the issue highlighted in the preceding paragraph, the Committee is agreeable with the proposition of the sector Ministry to implement a human resource development strategy aimed at strengthening co-ordination and oversight among others. This is a

laudable effort and we should not allow it to remain just in print.

An issue which the Committee deems as critical failing which the road infrastructure network would greatly be affected is the 124 officers of the Ghana Highway Authority who will reach the mandatory retirement age this year. Already, the staff strength of the Ministry and indeed the Department at issue falls below the required establishment.

In spite of the fact that the sector Ministry has made provision in this year's budget to recruit and retain personnel, the Committee respectfully appeals to the House to urge the Ministry of Finance to accord priority to the programme and facilitate the timely release of the required funds to the Ministry of Roads and Highways to recruit personnel to replace those earmarked for retirement, especially the technical staff.

The Committee could not properly assess details of work activities carried out by the agencies of the Ministry on routine maintenance on the road infrastructure network due to the procedure used by the Ministry in its reporting. In order to forestall such ambiguities, the Committee appeals to the Ministry to ensure that subsequent reports on routine maintenance of the road infrastructure network are based on actual activity that had been undertaken.

As a select Committee charged with superintending the Ministry of Roads and Highways, it is our expectation that the road network in our country is safe and comfortable to drive on. However, the Committee notes with concern, steep slopes of speed tables (ramps) on most of our highways which pose danger to motorists. Besides, there are multiple

SPACE FOR TABLE 3 - PAGE

17 - 1.30P.M.

unauthorised speed ramps erected by communities along the road network which are equally dangerous. The Committee has already raised the matter with the Ministry and hopes that immediate action will be taken to rectify the anomaly.

The Committee also noted that the COCOBOD as of the time of meeting the Ministry had not made provision for funds for road projects intended to provide access to cocoa, shea butter and coffee growing areas.

It was observed that the total arrears for payment to contractors for projects funded by the Road Fund was estimated at GH¢182,740,600.00. The Committee is not happy with this situation since delay in paying contractors affect the road construction industry and the performance of individual contractors.

The Committee also noted with concern the reduction to 10 per cent of the Ministry's request for Goods and Services, the fund from which Agencies purchase fuel for supervision and repairs of supervisory vehicles.

Inadequate supervision as a result of limited resources had contributed to poor quality of road works done and indeed, a great cost to the nation.

Conclusion

The pivotal role played by the road sector is known to all. Therefore, for the Ministry of Roads and Highways to realise its objectives and mission, the Committee urges the House to adopt this report and approve the sum of GH¢706,721,937.00 (seven hundred and six million, seven hundred and twenty-one thousand, nine hundred and thirty-seven Ghana cedis) for the activities of the Ministry of Roads and Highways for the 2013 financial year.

Respectfully submitted.

SPACE FOR APPENDIX I - PAGE 22 -
Mr J. K. Gidisu 1:40 p.m.
On a point of order.

Mr Speaker, for the Hon Member to be cataloguing those works that there had not been any significant show on the
Mrs Irene Naa-Torshi Addo 1:40 p.m.
-- rose
-- 1:40 p.m.

Mr J. K. Gidisu 1:40 p.m.
And you, Hon Member, Tema roads, what was done in your time? [Interruptions.] You had never seen asphalt road in Tema.
Mr Speaker 1:40 p.m.
Hon Members, I would want us to concentrate on the estimates. This comparison and blame game--the Motion before us is the estimates. As much as possible, the contributions should be limited to the Motion moved by the Hon Minister for Roads and Highways.
Mr Owusu-Aduomi 1:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I thought the former Minister was going to give us the percentage of our road network that presently is in a good condition but he could not.
Mr Speaker 1:40 p.m.
Hon Member, concen- trate on the estimates.
Mr Owusu-Aduomi 1:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, in the year 2000, only 28 per cent was in a good condition, 2004, it moved from 28 per cent to 35 per cent; seven percentage points, from 2004 to 2008, 35 to 42 per cent. Now, I am saying, for five years, it has only increased by one percentage point.
Mr Pele Abuga 1:40 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member has been quoting some figures in terms of percentage. He has not told us the source of those figures and for us, he is using
Mr Owusu-Aduomi 1:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the source is not difficult; if you read the analytical report, the statistical data prepared by the Ministry of Roads and Highways and Ghana Statistical Service, these are there. All the time, I give sources and when you read, from 2000 - 2010, Mr Speaker, you would get this. It is not a problem at all.
Mr Speaker, these thinly spread amounts on the projects -- they are so thin that they lead to undue delay of payments to contractors and most of the projects have been abandoned.
Mr Speaker, in doing so, you push routine and periodic maintenance to the background and this results in a poor road surface condition.
Mr Speaker, if you look at the Assets budget, out of the request of 922 million, only seven per cent was approved by the Ministry of Finance, when you go to table 2, page 13. It is obvious that this would not facilitate the acceleration of our road network that we would want to improve to support the growth of the economy and reduce poverty; this would never help.
Mr Speaker, arrears, only from the Consolidated Fund, about GH¢239 million, when you look at that table. This far exceeds the GH¢ 65.6 million budget ceiling that was given. So, you see that from day one, there was even no money at all for road projects.
Again, when you go to Road Fund funded projects, GH¢182.74 million is in arrears and this constitutes about 88 per cent of the GH¢206.7 million that has been allotted to the Road Fund.
So, Mr Speaker, the Ministry has not got enough money to work with. The total arrears that they have, which is about GH¢421.74 million is equivalent to about 60 per cent of the entire budget that has been allotted to the Ministry.
So, Mr Speaker, how can we get money for the Ministry to continue with its maintenance and infrastructure projects?
Mr Speaker, goods and services budget ceiling, that is the most critical, I have observed since I entered this House, from 2009, that, that is the least disbursed item but this is the item where the Engineers draw their monies for supervision of projects and repairs of their vehicles and so on. Mr Speaker, it is either untimely disbursed or disbursed in least amount.
Mr Speaker, we keep on awarding a lot of projects; how do we supervise these projects if we do not release timely and adequate amounts, funds from goods and services? That is the reason, Mr Speaker, most of our roads fail prematurely.
Mr Speaker, we need to intensify our supervision and therefore, I urge the Minister for Finance to take note of this, that it is important that the goods and services as budget, is released.
Mr Speaker, from the table, as at December, 2012, only 60 per cent has been released.
Mr Speaker, we tend to depend a lot on donor -- this year, the ceiling is GH¢313.48 million, which is about 44 per cent of the whole Ministry's allocation. 2012, it was 66 per cent.
Mr Speaker, when we have shortfalls in the disbursements of the Donor Fund, then it affects the programme of the
Ministry. So, we would want to appeal to the Government that we should not depend so much on the Donor Fund.
Mr Speaker, in a situation where we have limited funding, it is only important that you restrict yourself to routine and periodic maintenance to maintain the roads that had already been provided. We therefore, urge the new Minister for Roads and Highways to adhere strictly to routine and periodic maintenance in order to make the surface conditions of our road good -- in such limited funding situations.
Mr John Gyetuah (NDC -- Amenfi West) 1:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I wish to contribute to the Motion for the approval of GH¢706,721,937 for the Ministry of Roads and Highways for the fiscal year, 2013.
Indeed, the Ministry did very well in terms of road construction and bridges, especially considering the rural areas.
Out of 104 bridges which were awarded and sponsored by three donor countries, 82 were completed and the small span, about 12 out of 30 were also completed.
Indeed, Mr Speaker, the amount which has been allocated to the Ministry of Roads and Highways, I believe that in the supplementary budget, the Ministry would be considered additional funding to construct more roads to ameliorate the situation.
Indeed, considering the number of roads that were constructed -- indeed, the Report state that some roads were very
bad in terms of shoddy works executed by some of the contractors. In 2006, I can give a typical example of a road from Manso-Amenfi to Asankragua which was constructed during that time and handed over to the Ministry of Roads and Highways and within the deferred liability period, most of the road sections went bad and a whole lot of deterioration started. Irrespective of several letters that were written to the outfit, nothing was done.
Mr Speaker, it is not now that those shoddy works are being done but I would want to state categorically and appeal to the Minister that, he has to consider shoddy works that are being done. When you go out there, the sort of works that the contractors do are appalling and we have to have a critical look at those works that are being executed, so that we can save more money.
Indeed, with regard to the road toll booths which are erected on some of the roads, additional ones have been added but I would plead with the Minister to ensure that more toll booths are erected, so that we can get more funds to support the road construction. The automation is very necessary. This is because we can get the requisite funds that are projected. So, I would want to plead with the Minister to ensure that more of such works are done. Looking at those road tolls which are --
Mr Speaker 1:50 p.m.
Hon Member, conclude. I hope you do not have any problem with the estimates? Conclude.
Mr Gyetuah 1:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, there was much improvement in the Road Fund. In 2012, we had GH¢235 million as compared to 2011. In 2011, we had GH¢209 million and I believe that this year, it would be improved significantly to ensure that we get adequate funding for those roads.
Thank you very much for the opportu- nity.
Mr Kwabena Darko-Mensah (NPP -- Takoradi) 1:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to add my voice to the Motion.
Mr Speaker, if we take page 14, it talks about the 2013 ceiling and also talks about what was released in 2012. In comparing what was given in 2012 and what has been approved for 2013, you would clearly see that there has been a short-change of the Ministry. This is because looking at even inflation at 10 per cent rate, if anything at all, and we do not even want to add any figure or any value to what was given to them last year, the figure should have minimally been GH¢998,573,660.
So, clearly, right from the word go, it shows that the Ministry of Roads and Highways has been short-changed and I believe that next time, the Minister responsible for Finance should be looking at these figures subsequently by using inflation to ensure that they do not lose out on the figures.
Secondly, Mr Speaker, if you take the Committee's Report, bullet 6.2, you would come to realise that based on the observation made by the Committee in their last tour of Ghana --
Mr Speaker 1:50 p.m.
Hon Members, I refer you to Standing Order 40 (3) and direct that given the nature of business, we Sit outside the prescribed period.
Hon Member, continue.
Mr Darko-Mensah 1:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, if we take item number 6.2 and then item number 6.5, clearly, you would see that a lot of the roads that are being done in this country seem to deteriorate over a short period of time. But we also know that roads are made to last for about a minimum of ten years. Unfortunately, in this country, a lot of the roads that are made deteriorate over a short period of time.

Clearly, you would see the Ministry of Roads and Highways has become more like a bottomless pit for funds and therefore, we are not getting the right benefits from it. I believe that sometime ago, Mr Speaker, we discussed here that the actual programmes and outcomes of the Ministries need to be brought to this House, so that we can really look at them.

I strongly believe that if we had a data base in this country, of all the roads that are being made and the lifespan that we take them through, then we can start penalising contractors that do not do the right thing -- I believe that even if there is no supervision, the contractors are supposed to do the work according to a certain type of specification and they are supposed to ensure that these roads can last.

Mr Speaker, if you also take item number 6.8, it talks about delay in the payment of contractors in this country. Clearly, if we take all the budgets that we have been discussing over these two days, you would come to realise that every Ministry is looking for more money but unfortunately, we are not able to give them. Clearly, it shows that either we are not planning and actualising the revenue targets in this country or there is something amiss. Or we are asking too much from the Ministry that can never be delivered.

But I strongly believe that if Government is able to pay contractors on time, contractors would not lose the value of their money, especially those who borrow from the banks and in so doing, we are sure quality work would be done. This is because when the contractors are not getting their monies on time, they tend to short-change this country for --
Mr Speaker 1:50 p.m.
Hon Member, conclude.
Mr Darko-Mensah 1:50 p.m.
On this note, Mr Speaker, I thank you for the opportunity given me to add my voice to the Motion.
Mr Speaker 1:50 p.m.
Hon Minister, do you want to wind up; one minute?
Alhaji Sulemani 1:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I wish to thank the Committee and this Honourable House for understanding the issues that confront the road sector and I hope when we come up with issues collectively, we can all come together to see how we can address the sector.
My professional Colleague at the other end talked about percentages. You see, statistics is very mischievous. After 2008, road lengths have been increased in Ghana -- so more than 30 per cent of road length in 2008. So, that is what I would want to tell him, that statistics can be used for how you want to use it.
Mr Speaker 1:50 p.m.
Hon Members, that brings us to the end of the debate.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved:
That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢292,206,478 for the services of the Ministry of Finance for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
ANNUAL ESTIMATES 1:50 p.m.

Minister for Foreign Affairs and Regional Intergration (Ms Hannah S. Tetteh) (MP) 1:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable approves the sum of GH¢110,229,048 for the services of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Mr Speaker, this amount is to fund the activities of the headquarters of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration, the 55 Diplomatic and Consular Missions abroad and three subvented organisations, namely, the
Legon Centre for International Affairs and Diplomacy, the National African Peer Review Mechanism Governing Council and the All Africa Students Union.
Mr Speaker, specifically, GH¢73,625,903 has been allocated for employee compensation, GH¢21,402,242 for goods and services, and then GH¢15,200,904 for the acquisition of assets.
Mr Speaker, the primary function of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration is to project a positive image of our country at home and abroad, ensure the building of friendly bilateral and multilateral relations with nations with whom we have common interest, ensuring that our national trade policies and our economic developments are promoted through foreign affairs and all these operating through our Missions abroad.
Mr Speaker, I crave the indulgence of the Members of the House to approve the estimates of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration.
Thank you.
Question proposed.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Emmanuel K. Bandua) 2 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion. But before presenting the Committee's Report, I crave your indulgence to make a few corrections. Page 18 -- the “Conclusion”, the last paragraph, I intend to correct it. It should read:
“It is in this regard that the Committee recommends that the House approves the sum of one hundred and ten million, two hundred and twenty-nine thousand and forty-eight Ghana cedis
(GHS110,229,048.00). . .”
Instead of forty-nine Ghana cedis.
Mr Speaker 2 p.m.
Hon Member, before you go to page 1, look at page 13 of the Report, under “Total” --
Mr Bandua 2 p.m.
Yes, page 13, yes, I would make the amendments too under “Total”.
Mr Speaker 2 p.m.
Is that consequential, the total?
Mr Bandua 2 p.m.
Yes, I would make the amendment; it is consequential. This is because “Employee Compensation” would have to read “GH¢73,625,902” instead of “…903”. So if you add, it would give you “95,645,888.00.”
So we go to page 1, first paragraph, second line -- “The Minister for Finance”, I would want us to delete “and Economic Planning”.
Then item 1.1 -- “Reference” -- The first item is the “2012 Budget”; not 2013.
Then when we go to page 6, item “2.1.2” should read 2.1.3; and the heading should be “Employee Compensation” instead of “Poor Maintenance of the Ministry's Facilities”.
Mr Speaker 2 p.m.
It should read?
Mr Bandua 2 p.m.
“Employee Compensation
--”
Mr Speaker 2 p.m.
Poor what?
Mr Bandua 2 p.m.
“Poor Maintenance of the Ministry's Facilities” should go off and we should replace it with “Employee Compensation”. And then when you go to page 8 -- the second paragraph --
“The initiative involved facilitating visits of …” Remove “H. E.”; so it would read:
“The initiative involved facilitating visits of the President.”
Mr Speaker 2 p.m.
Which paragraph? Take your time.
Mr Bandua 2 p.m.
On page 8, the second paragraph, the first line: “The initiative involved facilitating visits of the”-- we take off “H. E.” So it would read --
“The initiative involved facilitating visits of the President”.
Then when we go to the last paragraph of the same page, second line --
“. . .Session of the Assembly of Heads of State of the African Mission. . .”. It should be African Union”; not “Mission”.
And then when we go to page 12, under “Promotion of ECOWAS Ideals”, second paragraph, the last line --
“Movement of goods and persons within the sub-region.” Not “with the sub-region.”
As for the Table, we have already taken care of that. So, we go to page 15, item 5.2 -- “Delayed Budgetary Releases”, the last line, we delete “penalties”. So it would be:
“. . .The imposition of fines and threats of ejection.”

Then page 17, this is the last correction. The last paragraph --

“The Committee observed that. . .”

I think that is the end of the corrections. Mr Speaker, having made these correc- tions --
Mr Speaker 2 p.m.
Hon Member, the last correction, if you put “that” there, it would read --
“The Committee observed that. . . ”
Mr Bandua 2 p.m.
“The Committee observed that though” -- that is it.
Mr Speaker 2 p.m.
You did not add “though” when you were correcting; you only said “that”.
Mr Bandua 2 p.m.
Very well. I thought I did.
Mr Speaker 2 p.m.
Very well. It is the second paragraph, under Employee Compensa- tion, “The Committee observed that” -- Very well.
Mr Bandua 2 p.m.
Mr Speaker, having made these corrections, I present the Committee's Report.
Introduction
In accordance with article 179 of the Constitution and Order 140(1) of the Standing Orders of the House, the
Minister for Finance Hon Seth Terkpeh presented to Parliament the 2013 Budget and Economic Policy Statement of the Government of Ghana.
Pursuant to Order 140(4) of the Standing Orders and article 103(3) of the Constitution, the estimates of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration were referred to the Committee for consideration and report.
The Committee met on Monday, 18th March, 2013 for the purpose of considering the estimates and reports as follows:
Reference
The Committee made reference to the following documents:
(i) The 2012 Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Govern- ment of Ghana.
(ii) The 2012 estimates of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration.
(iii) The 2013 Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Govern- ment.
(iv) The Constitution of the Republic.
(v) The Standing Orders of the House.
Mission of the Ministry
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration exists to advise the Government on the formulation of the Foreign Policy of Ghana and implements its objectives in the most efficient and cost-effective manner.
In pursuance of this Mission, the Ministry has set for itself a vision to establish “a well-resourced Foreign Ministry capable of establishing,
Ms Sara A. Safo (NPP -- Dome/ Kwabenya) 2:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to support and contribute to Motion number 10, for the approval of the sum of GH¢110,229,048 for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration for 2013.
Mr Speaker, it is obvious from the Report for this year's estimates and that of last year, that year after year, the budgetary requirement and that actually approved by the Ministry of Finance is always a shortfall some way, somehow.
Mr Speaker, the question then is, is it then important to look at our budgetary purse again when indeed, we are overspending in terms of public expenditure or that we need to cut down on our employee intake? Mr Speaker, that notwithstanding, it will be important to also note that if indeed, as a country, we are interested in our international image, which the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration really represents, then we really need to refocus and actually place more importance on the Ministry.
This is because it has so many correlations with other Ministries like the Ministry of Trade and Industry, if indeed, we want to promote direct and indirect foreign investments and tourism as well.
Mr Speaker, from the Report, it is noted that employee compensation has been cut down by 26 per cent. Mr Speaker, I wonder, because year in, year out, these costs are adjusted by a slim margin. It is not a cost that we need to pay attention to because it is fixed cost, no matter what, year after year, we ought to know that our people are out there working.
The difference between cutting down on employee compensation in other Ministries and that of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration, Mr Speaker, is that these are people who our beloved country has sent out to represent her and work for our Ministries. And if they get stranded because they are not paid on time, we ought to look at it again.
Mr Speaker, it was also noted in the Report that the releases of our budgetary approvals, though they are cut down do not come timeously and this has a very rippling effect on compensation that we pay to our employees out there in maintaining our Missions. And the question is, Mr Speaker, if indeed, we cut these estimates, then it must arrive on time to curtail other costs that would follow. Our Missions are out there and we rent houses from foreigners who are out there -- and have properties.
We sign specific Agreements, which the country needs to abide by and it is time restraining. And so, if we end up not paying on time, we have to pay penalties for breaching such Agreements. I think it

ends up compounding our costs rather than helping us as a country.

In winding up, Mr Speaker -- [Hear! Hear!] -- On the issue of --
Mr Speaker 2:10 p.m.
Hon Member, conclude.
Ms Safo 2:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am winding up.
Mr Speaker, I would want to touch on the issue of internally generated funds (IGFs). The Hon Minister indicated to us that out of their IGFs within the Ministry, they are allowed to retain 25 per cent. But the issue then arises that it has to be paid into the Consolidated Fund, then later on they are allowed to take their 25 per cent.
Mr Speaker, with the enumerated issues that I have already pointed out in terms of timeliness in this regard, I believe that if the Ministry is allowed to deduct the 25 per cent from source, it will go a long way in helping us and our Passport Department as well as our Missions out there. If we improve our services and indeed, there are proper accounting and auditing systems in our visa collection departments, I believe that we would generate a lot of IGFs to help the Ministry.
In concluding, Mr Speaker, we believe that it is not just the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, but the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration. If we believe that Ghana has a role to play in stability, in peace, in promoting free flow of persons and goods, then indeed, that di wo fie asem syndrome, that -- [Hear! Hear!] -- we were engulfed with, we should not be sitting on the fence.
Ghana should be seen to be participating in settling matters of peace and stability in the sub-region and internationally.
Mr Speaker 2:10 p.m.
I was going to put the Question but I got a signal from the Ranking Member that he wanted to say something. And so, automatically, I must balance it by picking somebody from the Majority side, unless I got the signal wrong.
Mr Isaac Osei 2:10 p.m.
No, on the contrary; we have a second person who would speak. But I know the Minister is not a member of the Committee.
Mr Speaker 2:10 p.m.
Hon Member for Subin, you are out of order.
Mr Isaac Osei 2:10 p.m.
I thank you. But he is still not a member of the Committee --
Mr Speaker 2:10 p.m.
Hon Member, the Motion is now before the House and anybody that catches the eye of the Speaker can contribute to it.
Hon Member for Subin, are you worried that the Hon Minister wants to contribute?
Mr H. Iddrisu 2:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, thank you very much for the opportunity.
Mr Speaker, I fail to see the unjustified objection for me to associate myself with the Motion for the approval of the budget estimates to support our very able and capable Foreign Minister, in taking economic diplomacy to higher heights and in ensuring that Ghana's foreign policy does not only promote good neighbourliness, but facilitate enduring peace and stability within the sub-region.
I believe that if the Ministry gets the support, that they are asking for a number of reform actions by her, together with the recommendation by my Hon Colleague who spoke earlier, that we make a strong recommendation to the Minister for
Mr Speaker 2:10 p.m.
Hon Minister, I thought there was a law on IGFs?
Mr H. Iddrisu 2:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, once the recommendation is made by this august House, the Minister for Finance would oblige this House an opportunity to amend that particular law, so that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration would be one of the listed institutions to retain their IGFs.
I wish to say that we have moved beyond the principles of the budget and I would urge my Hon Colleagues to stay focused and not drift backwards in provoking issues of di wo fie asem. We have long debated the principles of the budget; what we are debating now is approval of budget estimates for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration.
With these few words, Mr Speaker, I associate myself with the Motion.
Mr Patrick Yaw Boamah (NPP -- Okaikwei Central) 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, thank you for allowing me to add my voice to the Motion numbered 10 on the Order Paper.
Mr Speaker, the Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration Ministry is central to the development of this country. In so doing, the Ministry must attract Missions abroad.
The Missions are not adequately staffed to enable officers to properly negotiate trade Agreements with other international organisations. Why do I say so, Mr Speaker? Remittances that are due to officers of our Missions are unduly

Mr Speaker, talking about economic diplomacy which aims at attracting the necessary foreign investments into our country, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration has a lot of inter- linkages with other Ministries, especially the Trade and Industry Ministry. But if you look at the 2013 February release of the Monetary Policy Committee of the Central Bank, trade deficit in 2012 alone was US$4.2 billion as compared to US$3.1 billion in 2011.

This calls for proper collaboration between the Trade and Industry Ministry and the Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration Ministry to refocus to enable them attract the right or the needed investment into the country.

Mr Speaker, I saw in the Report that the Hon Minister wants to compile the data of Ghanaians abroad. It is a laudable idea. But if she wants to mobilise Ghanaians abroad, then it means that she must equip them or motivate them enough to be able to participate in local issues such as voting during our elections. I believe that is a very important incentive that will enable our nationals abroad contribute effectively to our national development.

Mr Speaker, on regional integration, the Ministry is Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration, which makes a lot of payments to international organi- sations. One of them is called COPAZ which is aimed at harmonising or bringing

into being a single currency in the West African sub-region. This institution has to be monitored very well because our meetings with officials of the Ministry, I got the impression that they were not in tune with that organisation and I believe the Central Bank, the Finance Ministry and the Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration Ministry must collaborate well in making sure that such an institution is well monitored for us to reach that common currency zone.

Mr Speaker, with these few words, I add my voice to the Motion on the floor.
Mr Speaker 2:20 p.m.
Thank you very much.
Hon Minister, do you want to wind up?
Ms Tetteh 2:20 p.m.
Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
Let me thank my Hon Colleague Members of the House for their contributions and comments on the Report that was presented by the Committee on Foreign Affairs on the budgetary estimates of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration and I would like to use this opportunity while I am winding up, to clarify a few issues.
Indeed, as the Hon Member for -- Hon Adwoa Safo -- [Interruption]-- Dome/ Kwabenya said -- regarding her comments about the request for the payment of emoluments for the staff of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration-- Indeed, what was requested was not given. But that does not mean that the budget for salaries and wages is not funded as per what was the budget for salaries and wages last year.
But in making the request for a specific allocation, the Ministry took into consideration the fact that there may be foreign exchange fluctuations in the
course of the year and therefore, in order to ensure that if such an event occurs, there would still be sufficient funds to ensure that all staff of the Ministry are paid; there was a request that was over and above what was required for the payment of salaries and wages to take into consideration an eventuality that may or may not occur.
So, that notwithstanding, we will be in a position currently, assuming of course, that there is no major exchange fluctuation, to pay the salaries and wages of staff of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration.
But I do very much also welcome Hon Members' contributions on the issue of the internally generated funds of the Ministry and how best we can have access to those funds for the activity of the Missions and headquarters.
Mr Speaker, the fact of the matter is, when you have Missions that are located in foreign countries, some of which are becoming more expensive in terms of location by the year as their economic circumstances change and improve, it is important to take into cognisance the fact that property prices, house rents and additional costs are likely to increase.
I would request my Hon Colleague, the Minister for Finance to bear that in mind when we are reviewing the budgetary allocation for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration, because it cannot be in our common interest that people who we have sent abroad on posting, find themselves in a position where what we have made available for them does not meet their basic costs.
rose
Mr Speaker 2:20 p.m.
Hon Asiamah, do you have a point of order?
Mr I. K. Asiamah 2:20 p.m.
Rightly so, Mr Speaker.
I quite remember the Hon Minister made reference to the Hon Minister for Finance but I cannot sight him around and I think it is most unfortunate. He should be around to listen to the concerns of Hon Members --
Mr Speaker 2:20 p.m.
Hon Asiamah, is that a point of order?
Mr I. K. Asiamah 2:20 p.m.
That is my point of order, Mr Speaker.
The Hon Member for Finance is supposed to be --
Mr Speaker 2:20 p.m.
Hon Member, is it a point of order? Hon Asiamah, is that a point of order?
Mr I. K. Asiamah 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, my concern is that the Hon Minister should be here and to listen to the debate and take part. It is important.
Mr Speaker 2:20 p.m.
Hon Members, you know the Finance Committee is not around now. They are at a committee meeting.
Ms Tetteh 2:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, as I was saying, on the point of the staff of other Ministries, departments and agencies who are part of our Missions abroad, the salary costs of those staff and indeed, associated costs are not part of the budget of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration. It is expected that their sector Ministries, departments and agencies will cater for them and ensure that the necessary funds are transmitted to them for their activities.
Unfortunately, what has been the practice or what has happened is that for some of those Ministries, departments and agencies, the releases are extremely late
and it is not possible for you to see your colleague who is also a public servant working in the Ministry not having the benefit of some kind of payment for salaries and wages because the remittances have not been sent. So, it puts an additional burden on our Missions abroad and I would like to request Ministries to take note that if indeed, they do have officers seconded to the Ministry, we would very much appreciate it if they take care of their own financial business, so that they do not become an issue for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration.
On that note, Mr Speaker, once again, I would like to thank Hon Members for their contributions.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved:
That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢110,229,048 for the services of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Mr Speaker 2:20 p.m.
Hon Members, I would want us to take item number 7 on the Order Paper, then we would decide what to do, whether to break or to continue and then - Yes. So, let us take --
The Hon Majority Leader gave four items. I want to exhaust them before I defer. I suspect he would have consulted before mentioning those items to me and when he did mention them, no Hon Member raised any issue.

Very well.
ANNUAL ESTIMATES 2:30 p.m.

Minister for Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs (Dr Henry S. Daannaa) 2:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢19,250,153 for the services of the Ministry of Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Mr Speaker, in doing this, with your permission, I beg to draw the attention of Hon Members of this House to some of the key functions the Ministry plays towards the promotion of and maintaining peaceable community life throughout the length and breadth of this country.
The Ministry of Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs, for this reason, needs this money to, among other things, pay for compensation, that is to say, salaries of staff and traditional authority allowances to chiefs and queen mothers. Also, the money covers the payment for office equipment, computers for the training of Traditional Council staff and chiefs and other furniture. It also covers services and goods.
Mr Speaker, one of the key objectives is to dispose of disputes pending before Regional Houses of Chiefs and also to codify the lines of succession to stools and skins with the view to eradicating disputes and promoting peaceful co- existence for the speedy development of the economy of Ghana.
Mr Speaker, it is for this reason I bring this Motion, that is, for the Honourable House to approve this said sum of money.

Question proposed.

Chairman of the Committee (Mr Kobena M. Woyome) Mr Speaker, I support the Motion, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢19,250,153 for the services of the Ministry of Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs for the year ending 31st December, 2013.

In doing so, I present the Committee's Report.

Introduction

1.1 In accordance with article 179 of the 1992 Constitution, the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Terkpeh presented the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2013 financial year to the House on Tuesday, 5th March, 2013. Pursuant to Order 140 (4) of the Standing Orders of the House, Mr Speaker referred the annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs to the Committee on Youth, Sports and Culture for consideration and report.

The Committee subsequently met with the Minister for Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs, Dr Henry Seidu Daannaa and his team on Friday, 15th March, 2013 and considered the referral.

The Committee expresses its apprecia- tion to the Hon Minister and his team for their co-operation.

Reference documents

The Committee made reference to the following documents during its delibera- tions:

i. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana.

ii. The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.
Minister for Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs (Dr Henry S. Daannaa) 2:30 p.m.
Ministry will now have to depend entirely on funding from Government to carry out this activity. It is therefore, imperative that allocations are released fully and on time to enable the Ministry perform efficiently.
For this year, the Ministry, among others, intends to codify 30 traditional areas and undertake the second and third phases of the “Ascertainment and Codification of Customary Law Project” relating to family and land in Ghana. The third phase which involves the validation, harmonisation and codification of customary laws pertaining to family and lands when completed will reduce land and chieftaincy disputes in the country.
The Committee however, observed that out of an amount of GH¢2,930.750 allocated in 2012 for goods and services, only GH¢976,912.00 representing 33.3 per cent was released. This greatly impacted negatively on the Ministry's activities in year 2012. To enable the Ministry meet its targets for 2013, the Committee recommends that an amount of GH¢800,000.00 be taken from the allocation of GH¢3,275,730.00 under assets to top up the allocation for goods and services.
In view of the importance of the above project in reducing chieftaincy and land disputes in the country, the Committee urges that the Ministry is allocated adequate resources to enable it realise its objectives.
For effective and efficient delivery of services, the Committee underscored the need for staff of the Ministry to be adequately trained. However, due to inadequate resources, staff of the Ministry do not often benefit from the requisite training. The Committee recommends that more resources are allocated to the

Ministry to enable it build the capacity of its human resource.

With an allocation of an amount of GH¢3,275,730.00 for assets, the Ministry plans, among others, to acquire a facility (traditional centre) and furnish it with the requisite regalia to serve as a waiting point for chiefs/queen mothers and their entourage who visit Accra for programmes and meetings.

The Committee noted that due to inadequate allocation, late releases and in some cases the non-release of funds, the Ministry was unable to undertake most of its planned activities for year 2012. The Committee strongly urges the Ministry of Finance to ensure that funds allocated are released to enable the Ministry implement its planned programmes and activities.

Conclusion

After a careful consideration of the budget estimates of the Ministry of Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs, the Committee is of the view that the budgetary allocation to the Ministry is inadequate. The Committee therefore, urges the Ministry of Finance to consider providing additional resources to the Ministry of Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs should there be a supplementary budget.

Nevertheless, the Committee recom- mends to the House for approval, the sum of nineteen million, two hundred and fifty thousand, one hundred and fifty-three cedis (GH¢19, 250, 153.00) for the implementation of the programmes and activities of the Ministry of Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs for the 2013 financial year.

Respectfully submitted.
Mr Boniface G. Adagbila (NPP -- Nabdam) 2:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion and in supporting it, I would want to draw attention to a couple of things for future improvement and effective support for our Minister for Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs.
First of all, I would need to confirm that this Ministry is a lucky one to have the Hon Minister as its Minister. I say so because, Mr Speaker, I used to repair his typewriters for him and I know what he can do with machines and he has a very good emotional intelligence to run this Ministry --
Mr Speaker 2:30 p.m.
What did you just say?
Mr Adagbila 2:30 p.m.
I said I used to repair his typewriters for him for his learning. He knows it very much.
Mr Speaker 2:30 p.m.
I thought if you had that relationship, you should be sitting on the same side.
Hon Member on the floor, continue.
Mr Adagbila 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, in supporting the Motion, however, I would want to say, looking at the mission of the Ministry, that it is an enviable one and a very useful one for this country. Mr Speaker, not only are they supposed to operate in the country but they are supposed to extend to build partnership internationally.
When you look at this, Mr Speaker, and you cast eyes on the budgetary allocation made to the Ministry, we need to crave the indulgence of the Ministry of Finance to re-look at the allocation. The bulk of the allocation to the Ministry is directed to compensation.

If you look at the allocation made in 2012, it did not help the Ministry so much in their performance for the year. They were able to present to Parliament for legislation only 11 lines of chieftaincy succession. They were only able to facilitate the amicable settlement of 150 cases or disputes out of 650.

They did monitor and evaluate programmes and projects of the agencies, the House of Chiefs and Traditional Councils in the Greater-Accra Region. If they had good allocation, they would have extended to the Upper East, Upper West, Northern, Central, Eastern and Volta Regions.

This means that if we have to allow them or push them to solve most of the disputes that this country has been engulfed, by both land and chieftaincy, then Mr Speaker, they need more money. They also need more money to pay allowances to our traditional leaders who invariably have been playing a major role for the governments of this country.
Mr Ahmed Ibrahim 2:40 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Colleague on the other side is saying that a Chief Executive collects GH¢150 million, which I think is grossly misleading to this House. If he cannot clarify, then he should withdraw that portion of his statement concerning the Chief Executive and chiefs allowances and those things.
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Hon Member, which Chief Executives are you referring collect
GH¢15,000?
Mr Adagbila 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am referring to publications that we have been reading in the newspapers --
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Hon Member, please. Hon Member, which Chief Executives were you referring to? You did not qualify it for us to know whether you are talking about District Chief Executives or Chief Executives of corporations and all those things. Which Chief Executives are you talking about?
Mr Adagbila 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am talking of experiences of Chief Executives from public corporations, boards and other institutions.
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Hon Member, which of them receives ¢150 million or GH¢15,000? Hon Member, if you do not have any record to substantiate, withdraw it and continue and conclude.
Mr Adagbila 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I do not have it right here.
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Then withdraw it.
Mr Adagbila 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, then I withdraw it.
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Very well.
Continue.
Mr Adagbila 2:40 p.m.
But we all have the experiences of salaries of Chief Executives in the system. Mr Speaker, what I am just trying to portray is that Chief Executives take big salaries anyway and our paramount chiefs --
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Hon Member, you can make your point by saying that their allowances are not adequate, then maybe, I can take your point.
Mr Adagbila 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, yes. The allowances or salaries to our Paramount Chiefs are woefully inadequate compared to the roles they perform.

Mr Speaker, the funds available to the Ministry would also not help them to look at big visions. It is important that the Ministry of Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs is required to go beyond our boundaries to seek partners at international level. We have the ECOWAS, we have similar traditional rulers in other ECOWAS countries, they need to reach out to them. And this is why I call that we need to give them special attention to be able to perform this gargantuan task.

Mr Speaker, if you look at the allocation for 2012, “Assets” they were finally allocated zero. However, by the close of the year 2012, the Houses of Chiefs were allocated vehicles and other logistics. We are not sure if it was done by the Ministry directly. We are neither sure if procurement was done through the Ministry and I would want the --
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Hon Member, are you a member of the Committee?
Mr Adagbila 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, yes.
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
But these are issues you should have raised in the Committee and be provided answers.
Mr Adagbila 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I studied the Report this morning and this is what just occurred to me and I would want to be able to factor it in my commentaries.
So, I am only trying to say now that we have a capable, competent Minister, he should be able to trace and take control of logistics for his Ministry. We should know whether the expenditure for the vehicles to the various Houses of Chiefs has been captured --
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Hon Member, conclude. You are repeating the same point.
Mr Adagbila 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, in conclu- sion, it gives a picture of extra expenditure which was not captured in the previous budget and we need to stand on our feet as a House to forestall those things in future.
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Hon Minister, do you want to wind up?
rose
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Hon Minister, you may sit down.
Hon Members, I got the sense of the House after the Motion was moved and seconded that there is nothing really controversial. It is based on the sense of the House that I am calling on the Hon Minister to wind up.
Dr Daannaa 2:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, all I have to do is just to thank the Committee for the work and to thank Hon Members of this august House.

Question put and Motion agreed to.

Resolved:

That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢19,250,153 for the services of the Ministry of Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs for the year ending 31st December,

2013.
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Any indication from the Leaders?
Hajia Mary S. Boforo: Mr Speaker, I think it is past 2 o'clock and we are relying on your discretion.
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Hon Member, I do not intend adjourning the House. What item are we going to take? Are we going to break and come or we are going to continue? That is what I would want to hear from the Leaders.
Hajia Boforo: Mr Speaker, we are going to break and come back.
Mr Speaker 2:40 p.m.
Or we continue?
Mrs Irene Naa-Torshie Addo 2:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, earlier, there was an agreement between the two sides that we should take the Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration, Chieftaincy and Traditional Affairs and Roads and Highways Ministries and then we should break and come back after an hour, like we did yesterday. That will give enough participation to more Hon Members. That was what I communicated to my Hon Members and that is what they know. I would crave your indulgence that we break now for an hour, please.
Thank you.
Mr Speaker 2:50 p.m.
I was getting co- operative signals from the Leaders and that was why I asked you to give me a clear signal. If the wish of the House is that we break for an hour and come back , I do not have any objection to that.
Hon Members, we suspend Sitting for an hour. It is almost 3.00 o'clock and we come back here at 4.00 o'clock prompt to continue with the deliberation on the estimates.
Hon Members, we thank you very much.
The House is accordingly suspended for an hour.
MR FIRST DEPUTY SPEAKER
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:50 p.m.
Yes, Hon Majority Leader.
Dr Kunbuor 2:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, we will take the item that we deferred on Defence, item number.
ANNUAL ESTIMATES 2:50 p.m.

Minister for Defence (Mr Mark O. Woyongo) 2:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢575,609,022 for the services of the Ministry of Defence for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Introduction
Mr Speaker, the sector's allocation as provided within the Medium-Term Expenditure Framework for the 2013 financial year is detailed as follows:
a. GoG -- GH¢492,303/112.00
b. IGF -- GH¢5,973,910.00
c. Donor contri- bution -- GH¢77,332,000.00
TOTAL = GH¢575,609,022.00
Vision of MoD
The vision of MoD in contributing to Government's achievement of its constitutional requirements is “To develop a highly professional, effective, efficient and politically neutral Armed Forces, which is subject to democratic or civilian control”
Mission Statement of MoD
The mission of MoD in contributing to the achievement of its vision is “To proactively promote national and regional defence interest and effectively contribute to the national development agenda”
Policy objectives of Ministry of Defence Budget
Taking into account the broad framework of the Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda (GSGDA), the budget proposals aim at achieving identified policy objectives and strategies within the constitutional mandate of the Ministry of Defence. The key focus area is public safety and security with policy objectives as follows:
a. To forestall external aggression.
b. Safeguard territorial Integrity.
c. Contribute to international peace and security.
d. Improve the capacity of the MoD and the GAF to provide internal security for human safety and protection.
Policy stance
Mr Speaker, article 210 of the 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana mandates the establishment of the Ghana Armed Forces consisting of the Army,
Navy and the Air Force, which shall be equipped and maintained to perform their role of the defence of Ghana as well as perform such other functions for the development of Ghana as the President may determine.
Our defence policy has been approved by Cabinet for implementation. The thrust of the document is to provide adequate guidelines for ensuring a credible and efficient, national defence for the present and future national security challenges.
6.0 Overview of the performance of the Ministry of Defence in 2012
Mr Speaker, the MoD made significant strides to enhance the overall security of the country despite budgetary constraints. There is no doubt that the acquisition of various platforms, combat vehicles and--
Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:50 p.m.
Hon Minister, can you conclude, so that the Chairman of the Committee will then --
Mr Speaker, in conclusion, within our limited national resources, Government has provided funding to support the operations of the Ghana Armed Forces. This level of support has enabled us provide cr ed ible deterrence in safeguarding the territorial integrity of the country.
However, our budgetary shortfall needs to be addressed by MoF as soon as possible to enable us meet operational and maintenance expenditures in 2013.
Thank you for your attention and co- operation.
Question proposed.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr George K. Arthur) 2:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion moved by the Minister for Defence, that this Honoura- ble House approves the sum of GH¢575,609.022 for the services of the Ministry of Defence for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Introduction
The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2013 financial year was presented to Parliament by the Hon Minister for Finance on Tuesday, 5th March, 2013 in accordance with article 179 (1) of the 1992 Constitution of Ghana.
The draft budget estimates of the Ministry of Defence were accordingly referred to the Committee on Defence and Interior for consideration and report, pursuant to Orders 140 (4) and 158 of the Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.
The Committee met with the Hon Minister for Defence and his staff, as well as officials of the Ministry of Finance, and thoroughly deliberated on the proposed allocations made to the Ministry.
The Committee expresses its gratitude to the Hon Minister and his officials for acknowledging its invitation and attending upon it.
2.0 Reference documents
Your Committee referred to the following documents during its deli- berations:
Chairman of the Committee (Mr George K. Arthur) 2:50 p.m.


essential stores, including ammunition are accessible to them.

A breakdown of the total allocation to the Ministry of Defence is as follows:

Breakdown of budgetary allocation of GH¢t575,609,022 to Ministry of Defence:

SPACE FOR TABLE - PAGE 5 - 4.10P.M.

Out of the IGF component of the budget totalling GH¢ 5,973,910, an amount of GH¢5,536,525 will be used by the Ghana Armed Forces for goods and services and GH¢ 437,385 for assets.

Though there are indications that the Ministry of Finance will meet all obligations relating to compensation of employees, the same cannot be said for goods and services and assets.

Observations and recommendations

The Committee observed that the Ministry's planned programmes and activities may be adversely affected and suffer long-term effects if budgetary allocation is not adequate. The Ministry may not be able to purchase enough ammunition and other logistics for the training of the Forces who are expected to be ready to respond effectively in any crisis situation.

The Committee also noted that the approved figures, as inadequate as they may be, are not released on time for implementation of programmes.

The budgetary allocation takes care of personal emoluments in full while goods and services and non-financial assets, which cover the core activities of the Forces, are only allocated 20 per cent of the proposed requirements. This will affect work output, healthcare delivery and maintenance of platforms.

The Committee recommends that the Ministry of Defence effectively and efficiently manages its resources and galvanises its internally generated funds, including revenue from external peace support operations.

The Committee would want to urge the Ministry of Finance to make additional

provision for the Ministry of Defence as supplementary budget, to enable it pay off some of its arrears (2012) for goods and services and non-financial assets.

The Committee observes that, the only way Ghana will benefit from the huge capital investments made recently to acquire assets for the Naval Command and the Armed Forces, is to ensure the effective maintenance and deployment of all the equipment to protect the territorial integrity of Ghana.

Conclusion

The Committee, after a careful examina- tion of the draft estimates, is of the view that the level of budgetary allocation for the Ministry of Defence falls far below its minimum requirements.

It is, therefore, imperative that the budgetary allocation is enhanced to improve the effectiveness and operational readiness of the Armed Forces for the security of the country in general.

This notwithstanding, the Committee recommends to the House for approval, the total budgetary allocation of five hundred and seventy-five million, six hundred and nine thousand, and twenty- two Ghana cedis (GH¢575,609,022.00) made to the Ministry of Defence for the financial year ending 31st December, 2013.

Respectfully submitted.
Mr Seth K. Acheampong (NPP -- Mpraeso) 4:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion ably moved by the Hon Minister.
In running through the Chairman's Report, paragraph 4.3 caught my eye and
Mr Speaker, I beg to quote 4:20 p.m.
“The budgetary allocation takes care of personal emoluments in full while goods and services and non- financial assets which cover the core activities of the Forces are only allocated 20 per cent of the proposed requirements.”
Mr Speaker, we are talking about the defence of our country. What is the mandate of the Ministry? The Minister ably quoted to us the mandate. Mr Speaker, the kits that the soldiers wear fall under goods and services and if we are offering them only 20 per cent of what they require, what is Government telling us in this country?
Mr Speaker, if you sat in our meetings, you would have found out that we are in arrears of nine months as we speak and how would they obtain it? It is through goods and services because the military must feed to rule, must feed to work. Mr Speaker, interestingly, when I read that paragraph, it dawned on me that where are we heading?
Mr G. K. Arthur 4:20 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, I appreciate the Hon Member's contribution but the issuse of the military is very key to us, so we have to be very careful on some of the comments we make about it.
The statement that the military does not even have attire, is my problem. So, if he pleases, he can at least, withdraw the statement and maybe, replace it with something else.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:20 p.m.
Hon Member, please, proceed.
Mr S. K. Acheampong 4:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I thank you very much for allowing me to proceed.
Mr Speaker, in furtherance to what I have said earlier, interestingly, I find in the Report at paragraph 4.5 that finally, preparatory works are underway for a 600- bed expansion for the 37 Military Hospital

and then another construction of a 500- bed hospital at Afari is landing. This is because believe and trust that after wondering for four years, and here, in particular, to the 500-bed for Afari land in Kumasi, it has been always said year in, year out in budget reviews but it has never landed. I pray that this time round, it would land and then we would all have a relief for our northern sector Command in terms of defence healthcare.

Mr Speaker, more importantly, is accommodation for our men and officers in the Ministry and under the sector.

Public safety is crucial to every person and to every Ghanaian. We may comfortably be living in our homes and for this reason, for two successive years running, the Military could not do any recruitment. Please, I urge Government to seriously consider these matters because this is very crucial for us. Accommodation for the security sector, we have to make sure we take it on, as a matter of urgency.

Mr Speaker, ex-servicemen who are going on retirement-- at the Committee meeting, it was very disheartening because they could not even offer us a schedule and a proper programme by which they are going to let them out.

Even their compensation which they have, does not cover the entirety of the men and officers who must go on retirement and this is hampering progress because they would not be able to recruit other young men and it is going to add to unemployment. Men and young women of this land who are prime and ripe for recruitment would be denied if we do not attend to some of these major issues that we are raising.

Mr Speaker, I am very much excited that at least, the Hon Minister admits that the points being raised by us, are true and not in bad taste but for our public safety and that sector in particular.

With this little contribution from my humble self, Mr Speaker, I am going to end but I would want to urge the Ministry that the suppliers that we are owing, in terms of food -- If we do not have food for our men and officers, they would not be able to do the business for us. That is why I am worried about the 20 per cent only, out of the 100 per cent -- 80 per cent has been slashed. Please --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:20 p.m.
Hon Member, you have already made that point. Can you conclude?
Mr S. K. Acheampong 4:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, it is about the suppliers -- [Interruption] -- It is about the suppliers, Mr Speaker.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:20 p.m.
Can you conclude, please?
Mr S. K. Acheampong 4:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, in conclusion, since I know some of the suppliers, I am just urging that they are paid on time -- [Interruption] -- so that they would not take Government to the courts.
Mr Speaker, with these few words, I thank you for the opportunity.
Wg Cdr Francis K Anaman (retd) (NDC -- Jomoro): Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion moved by the Minister for Defence -- [Interruption] -- Wing Commander Anaman (retd) -- [Interrup- tion] --”Retired” not “Retarded” -- [Laughter.]
In doing so, Mr Speaker, I wish to add my voice to the earlier contributors, that considering the nature of the job done by
the Ghana Armed Forces, every effort be made to top up the funds allocated to the Ministry to enable it do the good work that it is doing; and especially the Armed Forces for both internal and external peacekeeping.
With these few words, Mr Speaker, I wish to request this Honourable House to approve the budgetary allocation of GH¢575,609,022 to enable the Ministry perform its assigned roles.
Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity.
Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu -- rose
-- 4:20 p.m.

Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:20 p.m.
Hon Minority Leader, do you want to make a contribution?
Minority Leader (Mr Kyei-Mensah- Bonsu) 4:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, just a little contribution.
Mr Speaker, the security situation in our country has changed. Old threats, we must all agree, have faded away but new and daunting challenges have taken their place. There are many challenges, we must admit to that but we must equally admit that not all conflicts pose a threat to peace and security.
Mr Speaker, in any democracy, freedom of expression allows people to relay these views to their elected representatives. The discourse that we engage in really goes a long way to tamper the frustrations in the system. That is why Mr Speaker, it is a dicey issue considering whether or not to openly debate matters relating to our national security.
Mr Speaker, this link provides a cooling effect to those of them who think that they are at the mercy of the powers that be. So, it is important for us to strike a careful balance on what to do with our security budget.
Mr G. K. Arthur 4:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, on a point of order.
I think I heard the Hon Minority Leader mentioned national security. But we must be very clear here that we have the National Security whose budget goes under Defence and then we have the Defence Ministry whose budget comes
to the Defence and Interior. So, if he can clarify that, whether he is talking about National Security or he is talking about Defence. That is the point I would want him to clear.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 4:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I was talking about security and in the context of usage. National security is being used generically and I thought he would understand that. [Interruption.]
Mr Speaker, for those of them who are shouting, “No” it is not meant for them; those who understand, understand. [Laughter.] And I believe the Chairman now understands and appreciate what I have said. Mr Speaker, I was saying that -- and this morning, I was having a discussion with the Hon Majority Leader -- As I am saying, I do not understand why it does not find expression here. And I think that -- [Interruption.] Mr Speaker, do I give way to the Propaganda Secretary of the National Democratic Congress?
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:30 p.m.
Yes, Hon Quashigah.
Mr Richard Quashigah 4:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Chairman of the Committee actually sought some clarification from the Minority Leader and he said that he thought he should know. And when there were shouts from behind, he said it was not meant for them.
I am a new Member; I think that if there are issues that I need to understand, it is for him to make it very clear, so that one would really understand exactly where he is coming from. [Interruption.] But if he decides to code information, it does not help those of us who are new in the House.
So, I would crave your indulgence, Mr Speaker, to compel the Hon Minority Leader to clarify that aspect for those of us who are new Members to really understand.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 4:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I said, for those of them who were shouting, it was not meant for them. I did not see and hear my Hon Friend shout. But if he shouted, then it was not meant for him; but I think I did not see him or even hear him shout.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:30 p.m.
Hon Minority Leader, even if he did not shout, he is entitled to know.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 4:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I thought I had offered some explanation, that in the context of the usage, that expression was generically used, relating to our security in totality and that includes the Armed Forces.
Mr Speaker, the purchase of the Embraer planes -- [Interruption] -- carries with it -- [Interruption.]
rose
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:30 p.m.
Hon Member for Pusiga, is it on a point of order?
Ms Ayamba 4:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, sorry I have never been a District Chief Executive (DCE) and I am not a DCE. I am Hon Laadi Ayi Ayamba, Member of Parliament (MP) for Pusiga. [Hear! Hear!]
Mr Speaker, the Hon Minority Leader just made a statement supposed to be a sweeping one across, all those who shouted from this angle. [Interruption.] It was a reaction; it was not a shout as such, in the way that it has been described.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:40 p.m.
Hon Member, he explained it. So, I do not think that we have any problem with it. Let us proceed.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 4:40 p.m.
Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
Except that when a person is on his feet talking and you are shouting at the same time, you will not appreciate the import of what the person says. That is, I said what I said.
Mr Speaker, the acquisition of the Embraer planes as I was saying is --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:40 p.m.
Hon Minority Leader, proceed. Please, proceed.
rose
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 4:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I will. I will endeavour to proceed but I thought you had been very magnanimous to other Hon Members who had intervened? But if I should proceed --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:40 p.m.
I do not know if he is raising an objection or raising a point of order against you. You are presenting your side of the case, so, I do not see why he should get up.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 4:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, sometimes, it is good to allow for some internal bleeding. So, I will yield to him.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:40 p.m.
All right; Hon Asiamah.
Mr I. K. Asiamah 4:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, we have respect for our Leaders here. The statement that came from our Hon Colleague is so much regrettable, unparliamentary and it should be withdrawn and she should render the right
apology. [Interruption.] He is a good Leader for us. If she does not see it that way, he is a good Leader for us and indeed, for this House. So, please, that word should be withdrawn and an apology accordingly rendered to our Leader here. We take an offence, Mr Speaker.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:40 p.m.
Hon Member, I thought we had cleared the air as far as that was concerned? The Hon Minority Leader has given an explanation and so we just move on, please.
Mr I. K. Asiamah 4:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, she says the Hon Minority Leader is not a “good” Leader; that is the word she used and I do not think it is appropriate for this House. Please, Mr Speaker, let us protect the integrity of this House, the integrity of our Leadership. I do not think we can use such a word on the Hon Majority Leader; we will not do that.
We will never do that on the Hon Majority Leader. So, we take strong offence and strong exception to the word she used on our Hon Leader. So, we humbly request her to withdraw that word and apologise --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:40 p.m.
What words did she use? What exact words did she use, if you can help us? What were the words?
Mr I. K. Asiamah 4:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, “good Leaders are supposed to understand” -- [Interruption] -- And I do not think it is the right --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:40 p.m.
Hon Member for Pusiga, could you just withdraw that portion and apologise to the Hon Minority Leader?
Ms Ayamba 4:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I said nothing of that sort. I said “Leaders”. I never said -- [Interruption.] I never directed -- It was a generic statement and I stand on that.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:40 p.m.
Hon Member for Pusiga, the import of what you said could mean that you were saying that he was not a good Leader. That is -- [Some Hon Members: No! So, I just want you to withdraw that portion of your statement and apologise. That is all.
Ms Ayamba 4:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, with respect to your Honourable Chair, I withdraw that portion.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:40 p.m.
You will withdraw that and apologise, please. Please, withdraw that and apologise.
Ms Ayamba 4:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I did not mean what he has taken it to be. But if that be it, I withdraw that and apologise.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:40 p.m.
Thank you. Hon Minority Leader.
Can we go on?
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 4:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, as I was saying, the acquisition of the Embraer planes produced a lot of ghosts and there are several outstanding questions which must be answered and I believe that at the appropriate time, the Questions would be filed and the Hon Minister would be required to come and answer them, which will be --
Mr Speaker, the last thing that I would want to relate to, is the proposed 500-bed hospital at Afari near Kumasi for the military. These facilities are built for the security forces but ultimately, they come to benefit the general public. That is why I am not too sure of the location of the proposed 500- bed hospital at Afari.
In terms of the location, in my humble view, it is not central enough, as far as Kumasi is concerned. And we expect that because it is going to serve the Northern Command, it would be accessible to people from the Northern Region. The main routes that they use are the Tamale-
Techiman road. Afari is on the Sunyani road. Again, the Mampong road is not easily accessible. That is why I am saying that we should look at the centrality, the location of that facility once again, if it is meant to provide services for the Armed Forces belonging to the Northern Command and also serve the civil population as well.
Mr Speaker, with these few words, I beg to support the Motion.
Majority Leader (Dr Benjamin B. Kunbuor) 4:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, under normal circumstances, we would allow the debate to proceed but my good Colleague, the Hon Minority Leader, perhaps, has indirectly invited me to make one or two comments.
Secondly, I think I have been asso- ciated with the work of the Ministry of Defence at various levels and have served this Committee as Hon Ranking Member for a number of years. It is in that context that I beg to support the Motion and to register one or two significant issues with the defence sector.
Mr Speaker, in other jurisdictions, issues of defence before a parliamentary committee have been shrouded in secrecy and the discussions are not normally taken openly on the floor of the House. I have enough experience on that matter in this House where we had addressed a number of security issues in a Closed Sitting.
Mr Speaker, I would want to register that when we are dealing with agencies like the defence sector, it has a lot of strategic implications. While we, as innocent Hon Members of Parliament within the security sector, might consider the details of discussion of a military aircraft as not a big deal, it does feed into your strategic balance and the disposition of your security architecture and it is normally for these reasons that we have
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:50 p.m.
Hon Members, please, let us have some quiet. Order in this House, please. Let us concentrate on the presentations.
Dr Kunbuor 4:50 p.m.
Thank you Mr Speaker.
My fair ladies have actually interrupted my talk processes, so, I would like to actually conclude by indicating that, just beyond the budgetary approval, our Committee on Defence in Parliament, would be very, very interested in their engagement with the Ministry of Defence to see the extent to which this budgetary appropriations are beginning to address a number of the concerns with a view of assisting it to make sure that preparedness
and combat readiness are sufficient to perform their traditional role of maintain the territorial integrity of Ghana.
With these few words, I support the Motion.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:50 p.m.
Hon Minister, do you want to wind up?
Mr Woyongo 4:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to express the gratitude of the Ministry to the House, for supporting the budget estimates of the Ministry.
As indicated in the Report, what has been allocated to the Ministry is inadequate and it is my hope and prayer that when we are considering estimates for a supplementary budget, the Ministry will be considered.
I want to thank the House again for debating the budget.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved:
That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢575,609,022 for the services of the Ministry of Defence for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Dr Kunbuor 4:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want us to take a look at the Addendum to the Order Paper to enable us correct some situations before we get back to Motions.
I would want us to take item number 1 on Presentation of Papers on the Order Paper.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:50 p.m.
Are you talking about the one that has to do with the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts?
Alhaji Amadu B. Sorogho 4:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to withdraw the Report which was laid by my goodself yesterday, on the estimates in respect of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts and instead, lay the Report of the joint Committee on Trade, Industry and Tourism and Youth, Sports and Culture on the 2013 annual budget estimates of the Ministries of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts and Youth and Sports.
Mr Speaker, the reason is that the “culture aspect” by our Standing Orders is committed to the Committee on Youth, Sports and Culture and so, I would want that to be captured.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:50 p.m.
Hon Members, that earlier Report laid is accordingly withdrawn.
Now, let us go through the process of laying this current one.
PAPERS 4:50 p.m.

Dr Kunbuor 4:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, if we can take item 8 on the main Order Paper.
ANNUAL ESTIMATES 4:50 p.m.

Minister for Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation (Dr Joe Oteng - Adjei) 4:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢139,995,861 for the services of the Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Simon E. Asimah) 5 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to support the Motion moved by the Hon Minister for this House to approve the sum of GH¢139,995,861 for the services of the Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation.
Mr Speaker, I present the Report of the Committee.
Introduction
In accordance with article 179 (1) of the Constitution, the Hon. Minister for Finance, Mr Seth E. Terkpeh presented to Parliament the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of Government for the 2013 financial year on Tuesday, 5th March, 2013. Pursuant to Orders 140 (4) and 185 of the Standing Orders of Parliament, the Speaker referred the annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation (MESTI) to the Committee on Environment, Science and Technology for consideration and report.
Deliberations
The Committee met on Tuesday, 19th March, 2013 and considered the Estimates. In attendance were the Hon Minister for Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation, Dr Joe Oteng-Adjei and his technical team as well as officials from the Ministry of Finance to assist the Committee in the deliberation of the estimates.
The Committee is grateful to them for their assistance.
Reference documents
The Committee referred to the under- listed documents during its deliberations on the estimates:
i. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana.
ii. The Standing Orders of Parlia- ment.
iii. The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Govern- ment of Ghana for the 2013 financial year.
iv. The Environmental Protection Agency Act, 1994 (Act 490).
v. The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research Act, 1996 (Act 521).
vi. The Atomic Energy Commission Act, 2000 (Act 588);
vii. The Report of the Committee on Environment, Science and Tech- nology on the 2012 annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation.
Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation (MESTI)
Mission Statement
MESTI exists to promote sustainable development through the application of scientific knowledge to resource potentials.
The vision of the Ministry is to ensure sustainable development-based on a strong and vibrant promotion of science, technology and innovation, proper planning and management of human settlements, sound environmental governance and sustainable management of its natural resources.
GSGDA Policy objectives under the Ministry
a. Accelerated agricultural moderni- sation and sustainable natural resource management
i. Adapt to the impacts and reduce vulnerability to climate varia- bility and change.
ii. The use of Low Carbon Growth (LCG) as a specific approach to integrate the link between climate and Development.
iii. Curb the loss of bio-diversity by the intensification of safe and sound environmental practices.
b. Oil and gas development
i. Ensure that the practices of the oil and gas industry are consistent with international standards of environmental protection.
c. Infrastructure, energy and human settlement development
i. Promote the application of science, technology and innovation in all sectors of the economy.
ii. Strengthen the appropriate industrial framework to pro- mote the development of science and technology research.
iii. Explore the options for nuclear and geothermal energy.
d. Human resource development
i. Promote a sustainable, spatially integrated and orderly develop- ment of human settlements for socioeconomic development.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Simon E. Asimah) 5 p.m.
ii. Facilitate ongoing institutional,
technological and legal reforms under the LAP/TCPD-LUPMP in support of land use.
e. Transparent and accountable governance
i. Strengthen monitoring and enforcement mechanism of environmental legislation.
ii. Enhance policy and regulatory framework and effective co- ordination among key govern- ment agencies to improve the performance of the environment sector.

Departments and agencies under the Ministry:

i. Environmental Protection Agency

(EPA).

ii. Ghana Atomic Energy Commis- sion (GAEC).

iii. Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR).

iv. Town and Country Planning Department (TCPD).

Performance review of the 2012 budgetary allocation

Summary of 2012 budget of MESTI

SPACE FOR TABLE - PAGE 5 - 500PM

The table above indicates the total releases made to MEST in 2012. Even though the Ministry and its departments and agencies (MDAs) did not receive the expected amount, they were able to undertake the following major programs and activities during the year:

MESTI (Headquarters)

a. Promotion of the application of science and technology

i. The Ministry was able to procure 108,000 pieces of Laptop

computers to be distributed to students at the various educa- tional institutions through-out the country. This exercise is still ongoing. Again, the Ministry successfully organised the first ever science congress and implemented the Ghana Skill and Technology Development Project (GSTDP).

ii. In order to address the falling standards of mathematics, science and technical educa- tion, MESTI in collaboration with GETFund and other key stakeholders, set aside two per cent of the GETFund in 2012 and initiated an annual Mathematics, Science and Technology Scholarship Scheme (MAS- TESS) to provide scholarships to needy but brilliant students.

In 2012, 2,560 students benefited from the scheme, which brings the total to 7,000 students who have benefited from the scheme since its inception.

b. Mitigating the impact of climate change and vulnerability

i. As part of efforts to reduce climate vulnerability, the Ministry in 2009, sponsored tree planting and nurturing project along the coastal zone and the savannah regions of the country. So far, 50,000 trees have been planted which aided in the creation of jobs for 18,000 youth in various communities across the country.

ii. The Ministry also reviewed the National Bio-diversity Strategy Action Plan and also developed a Clearing House Mechanism website.

c. Environmental protection

i. In order to ensure good environ- mental governance, the Ministry spearheaded the review of the draft Mineral and Mining Law, the e-Waste and noise pollution policy. The implemen- tation strategy has been completed. Three chemical conventions have also been ratified.

ii. As part of Government's effort to maintain sanitation and re- establish bio-diversity of the country's coastal communities, the Ministry continued the implementation of the Coastal Development Project targeted at promoting coastal ecotourism and job creation. The project is being implemented in the Volta, Greater Accra, Central and Western Regions of the country.

Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

i. CSIR has developed and released four early maturing and drought tolerant maize varieties in commercial quantities. The Council has also replaced the first and second generation breeding flock with stock hatched, selected and placed in growing facilities at Pokoase and Katamanso Poultry Farms. CSIR has established yam, cocoyam and potato cultures using nodal cuttings as explants for field establishment of clean planting materials with a hundred per cent success rate.

ii. The Council has successfully completed a project to restore degraded areas within Afram Headwaters Forest Reserve with indigenous tree species for bio- diversity conservation. They have also developed rainwater harvesting systems for some institutions and communities.

Ghana Atomic Energy Commission

(GAEC)

i. GAEC with the support from GET- Fund has commenced the construction of a nuclear accelerator building. The Commission has also rehabili-
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Simon E. Asimah) 5 p.m.
tated a two story building into offices for the National Regu- latory Authority.
ii. The Commission conducted a hazard assessment of electro- magnetic radiation from mobile phones and radio stations and also researched into the radiation preservation of fresh agricultural produce.
Environmental Protection Agency
In 2012, EPA inaugurateed the Ghana National Cleaner Production Centre (GNCPC). The Centre is expected to build the capacity of manufacturing industries in energy efficiency and water conservation during production and

efficient management of both solid and liquid waste after production. The center would also ensure that manufacturing industr ies operate under sound environmental conditions.

Town and Country Planning Department

(TCPD)

The Department collected some base line data on the Bui resettlement area to support spatial planning. The Department also prepared the manuals for spatial planning and reviewed the national standards.

The 2013 Budget Estimates

The Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation has been provided with budget resources of GHC139,995,861.00 for its activities in

2013.

Summary of the 2013 budgetary allocations for the MESTI

Table 1: Breakdown of GoG budget ceiling by MoF

SPACE FOR TABLE 1 - PAGE 8 - 5.00P.M

Table 2: MESTI MP A 2013 Budget

SPACE FOR TABLE 2 - PAGE 9 - 5.00P.M.

This total figure indicates an increase of sixteen million, seven hundred and forty seven thousand, nine hundred and eighty-five Ghana cedis (GH¢16,747, 985.00) over the 2012 budgetary allocation for the Ministry.

Outlook for the year 2013

The Ministry in 2013, has outlined a number of programmes and activities to be implemented. Among these are the following:

i. Establishment of Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Fund

The Ministry would establish Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Fund to promote science, technology and innovation through the implementation of Phase III of the action plan for the utilisation of local building materials in the construction industry.

ii. The “Better Ghana” ICT Project

The Ministry would continue to promote teaching, learning and the use of ICT. To this end, the Ministry would procure and distribute 100,000 laptops for distribution by the end of 2013, that is the Phase IV of the “Better Ghana” ICT Project.

iii. Implementation of the Ma- thematics, Science and Tech- nology Scholarship Scheme

(MASTESS)

The scholarship scheme would continue to disburse funds for an additional 5,000 beneficiaries to augment and maintain the interest of needy but brilliant students in the science and technology field of study.

iv. Environmental development

The Ministry would also continue the coastal zone development programme of tree
Ms Patricia Appiagyei(NPP -- Asokwa) 5 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to support the Motion tabled by the Hon Minister for Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation for the sum of GH¢139,995,861 for the services of the Ministry for the year ending 31st December, 2013.

Mr Speaker, in supporting this Motion, I have a few concerns and observations, which I would like the House to address. The first one is about the “Better Ghana Agenda” laptops. Mr Speaker, may I refer the House to page 116, paragraph 430 of the 2013 Budget Statement? I beg to quote:

“Mr Speaker, under the “Better Ghana” ICT Project which aims at promoting skills and knowledge in information communication techno- logy among pupils and students country wide, 108,000 laptops were procured and distributed.”

Mr Speaker, I know -- I would want to mention here and now that this amount does not reflect in the budget of the Ministry, So, we do not know where this figure is captured -- [Hear! Hear!].
Mr Asimah 5:10 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, I think what I read was that one hundred thousand pieces were funded by the Ministry of Finance at the cost of fifty million from the non- road account. I would want to draw your attention to that.
Ms Appiagyei 5:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I mentioned earlier that the fifty million being the cost of the one hundred thousand computers was not captured in the budget. We realised that the one hundred and eight
thousand computers, only twenty-six thousand had been distr ibuted -- [Interruptions.] We do not know where the remaining computers are. We would want the Ministry to indicate what policies were applied in the distribution of those computers. Mr Speaker, we would want to also indicate -- [Interruption]
Mr David T. Assumeng 5:10 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, I heard Hon Appiagyei asking” “Where are the computers?” I would want to remind her that she got one of those computers --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:10 p.m.
Hon Member, please, proceed.
Ms Appiagyei 5:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, for this revelation, contrary to the Budget Statement, we realised that -- [Interruption]
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member for Shai Osudoku -- He is not there, he has gone to hide. Let him come forward if he believes in what he has said.
Mr Speaker, he attributes a statement -- He said he heard somebody ask 5:10 p.m.
“Where are the computers?” Mr Speaker, nobody heard that. The person who is alleged to have said that never spoke into the microphone.
Mr Speaker, he or she did not catch your eye; you never called anybody and nobody made any such declaration. So, for the Hon Member to have got up and made such an attr ibution, is most unwarranted and I think it is an abuse of the procedures of this House. Mr Speaker, may I urge that we call on him to withdraw that?
Dr Kunbuor 5:10 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker, while I share the concern of the Hon Minority Leader, these are particularly very personal matters. Once an attribution was made and the Hon
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Majority Leader has got it all wrong. The issue is not about a beneficiary or a non beneficiary. The issue is about whether or not any such statement has been made in the House.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:10 p.m.
Hon Minority Leader, that is the very reason I asked the Hon Member to continue with her presentation because the issue was not raised on the floor of this House officially. So, we might as well just ignore it.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the difficulty is that his own intervention is captured in the Hansard; that is the difficulty.
Dr Kunbuor 5:10 p.m.
In fact, Mr Speaker, that is precisely the issue. If the person who made that statement did not catch your eye and is deemed not to have had the floor in this House, I will not see why the Hon Minority Leader should be worried about a non issue.
It is precisely because of the concern he has raised that he ought not to have commented on something that is not before this House. That is the more reason we should not even aggravate this issue to the record of this House.
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, in this case, the Hon Majority Leader will agree with me that the Hon Member for
Shai Osudoku was bearing false witness in his attribution because no such a thing had ever happened in this House.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:10 p.m.
Hon Members, I do not want us to drag this matter on and on. The point is that the person who made the comment did not catch my eye and therefore, it does not form part of the record. So, Hon Member, please, proceed.
Ms Appiagyei 5:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the other point is, contrary to the statement that distribution is still ongoing, we still do not know the criteria that are being applied for the distribution of these computers - [Interruptions.] Mr Speaker, I would like to mention that this leaves room for discretion and possible abuse of the distribution and therefore, the impact of the so-called “Better Ghana ICT Agenda” is being defeated -- [Hear! Hear!]
Mr Mahama Ayariga 5:10 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member used the expression “so- called Better Ghana Agenda”. Mr Speaker, I think that she can have an opinion about the agenda but it is not so-called, it is real -- [Interruptions.] Mr Speaker, the agenda is being advanced -- [Hear! Hear!] Mr Speaker, in advancing the agenda, ICT facilities have been acquired -- [Hear! Hear!]
Mr Speaker, if she took some time off and went round secondary schools, she would see school children playing with the ICT facilities [Hear! Hear!].
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:10 p.m.
Hon Member, please, proceed but try to wind up.
Ms Appiagyei 5:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, for 2013, the Ministry again intends to procure additional one hundred thousand pieces of this facility. Mr Speaker, looking at the
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:10 p.m.
Hon Member, please, conclude.
Ms Appiagyei 5:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am also mentioning inconsistencies in the figures
-- 5:10 p.m.

Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:10 p.m.
Please, conclude.
Mrs Appiagyei 5:20 p.m.
I would want to thank you, Mr Speaker. But I know that in the Budget Statement, the Ministry mentioned that they are going to offer additional 3,000 laptop computers but I realised from the --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:20 p.m.
Hon Member, your time is up. Please, resume your seat. [Interruptions.]
Order! One more contribution from the right side of the House.
Mr Ebenezer O. Terlabi (NDC -- Lower Manya Krobo) 5:20 p.m.
Rt Hon Speaker, I thank you for the opportunity to also contribute to the Motion, to approve -- [Interruptions.]
Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, just a little matter since he has already apologised on something else.
Mr Speaker, he addresses you as the Rt Hon Speaker, the substantive Speaker, is the Rt Hon Speaker. The First and Second Deputy Speakers are Hon Speakers.
Mr Ebenezer Terlabi 5:20 p.m.
Thank you very much. That is the sign of a very good leader.
Mr Speaker, before I come to the substantive issue, that is the budget, I would like to make a comment. I believe that the essence of the committees that we belong, is to sit down, meet, assess, ask questions where questions are due and seek answers.
I believe that during our interactions with the Ministry, some of the concerns that were raised by some of my Hon Colleagues were duly addressed by the Hon Minister.
For example, in the case of the computers, the Hon Minster said they had paid for them -- [Interruptions.] They had been paid for but what the Hon Minister sought to do was to make sure that because he is new in the Ministry, he asked that they give him a list of all schools.
So, the process is ongoing and so far they have distributed 26,000.
Mr Speaker, it is a fact that science and technology are the anchor of our development and therefore, there is the need to seriously look at the budget, whatever we give to science and technology.
Mr Speaker, the problem we have is that more often then not, most of the allocations to these institutions go into research and we all know that research normally has a very long incubation period. It is because of that, that we really do not see the effect as early as we would want to see it. That is the reason it is sometimes difficult when it comes to allocation of funds to scientific institutions.
I saw the Hon Minister for Education here but she is not around any more.
That is the reason, Mr Speaker, you realise that when it comes to the establishment of tertiary institutions, people easily invest into non science related institutions; they invest more into the arts because it is easy to establish -- That is the reason I would entreat the Hon Minister for Finance to look again at the budget.
We would want to really use science and technology as the anchor of our development and if we want that to happen, then we must do proper investment in that area and that is the reason I call upon the Hon Minister to really take a second look at the amounts that have been allocated to these institutions. Most of them research, as the Hon Minister alluded to, into health, agriculture et cetera. They require a substantial amount of money --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:20 p.m.
Hon Member, that point has been made. Can you make some progress?
Mr Terlabi 5:20 p.m.
On this note, Mr Speaker, I thank you and support the Motion.
Mr David H. Yeboah (NPP -- Efigya- Sekyere East) 5:20 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker, for allowing me to contribute to the Motion on the floor.
Mr Speaker, I am happy the Govern- ment has captured the hazard assessment on the electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones and radio stations. Hopefully, they would include the telephone masts.
Mr Speaker, we are talking about radiation here. I am not a scientist, but we are talking about better radiation, Gama and ironising radiation.
Mr Speaker, when you call your friend in the United States of America by using a mobile phone -- [Hear! Hear!] When you speak with your friend or family for about five minutes, you will feel the heat from the telephone. The heat that comes to your ear and the -- [Interruptions.]
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:20 p.m.
Order! Order!
Mr Yeboah 5:20 p.m.
It is the same like the one that comes from the microwave. That means, we need to resource the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission to do this research.
Mr Speaker, the Government is financing students with computers. The Ghana Atomic Energy Commission needs only about US$160,000 to buy machines called spectrum radio frequency spectrum with antenna to do this research.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:20 p.m.
Hon Member, please, resume your seat.
Hon Members, we have to have some order in this House. We are listening to an Hon Member making his presentation. Can we have some quiet, so that we can listen and if necessary, make meaning of it? Please, let us have some order.
Hon Member, please, proceed.
Mr Yeboah 5:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the machine that we have to buy for the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission is called radio frequencies spectrum with antenna and one costs GH¢40,000 and we need about four of them plus two pickups for the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission to go round the country to assess this radiation especially the telephone masts. It is very important because it borders on a national issue.
Mr Yeboah 5:20 p.m.


Mr Speaker, while we have the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission and if we resource them -- Mr Speaker, we have brilliant professors there; and what do they do? They do no research, they only teach. The Ghana Atomic Energy Commission has --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:30 p.m.
Hon Member, begin to wind up.
Mr Yeboah 5:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Commis- sion has the radiation chamber, that if resourced, it can make millions of dollars from this. The professors need to do research.
Mr Speaker, in conclusion, I hope the Ministry would find money, at least, US$160,000 plus two pick-ups for the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission to do this research for us.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:30 p.m.
Order! Order!
Hon Minister, do you want to sum up?
Mr Joe Oteng-Adjei 5:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would like to express my profound appreciation especially to the Committee for the friendly and family atmosphere with which we discussed these things.
Mr Speaker, I thank you so much.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:30 p.m.
Hon Members, that brings us to the end of the debate.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Dr Kunbuor 5:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, if we could take Motion 2 on the Addendum to the Order Paper.
ANNUAL ESTIMATES 5:30 p.m.

Minister for Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts (Mrs Elizabeth Ofosu- Agyare) 5:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move the Motion for the approval of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts' 2013 budget of eighteen million, five hundred and eighty-five thousand, three hundred and seventy-five Ghana cedis (GH¢18,585,375) for the implementation of its programmes and activities.
The creation of the new Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts is a demonstration of Government's commit- ment to a proactive approach to the development of tourism, culture and creative arts.
The new Ministry has an oversight responsibility for 14 agencies and subvented organisations, namely:
Ghana Tourism Authority.
Hotel Catering and Tourism Training Centre (HOTCATT).
Ghana Tourism Development Com- pany.
National Commission on Culture.
Bureau of Ghana Languages.
Ghana Museums and Monuments Board.
National Theatre of Ghana.
Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park.
W. E. B. Dubois Memorial Centre.
National Symphony Orchestra.
Ghana Dance Ensemble.
Abibigromma Theatre Company.
National Folklore Board.
Pan -African Writers Association.
Programmed activities for 2013
The Ministry will continue to carry out its mandate of making Ghana the preferred tourist destination in Africa and to make tourism, culture and the creative arts sectors become an important sector for foreign exchange generation and employment creation in line with the tourism sector medium-term development plan under the Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda (GSGDA) 2010-
2013.
To this end, the Ministry will focus on aggressive promotion of Ghana and repackaging of the diverse tourism and cultural products for higher international and domestic patronage.
Marketing
Mr Speaker, the Ministry will augment its Marketing Ghana Programme through intensive use of the international media as part of efforts to showcase Ghana's tourism and investment potentials to an extensively influential business leisure travellers and investors from all over the world. It will continue to participate in international tourism exhibitions and the United Nations World Tourism Organisa- tion's conferences and workshops to
showcase Ghana's tourism, culture and creative arts products and place Ghana on the international tourism map.
Additionally, the ongoing Ghana Tourism Branding Programme initiated will be implemented to maintain visibility of Ghana's tourism and cultural products in the international market.
Furthermore, the Ministry will organise major events including the National Chocolate Day, the 2nd African Choral Music Festival dubbed Africa “Sing Aloud”, 8th Hang and Paragliding at Atibie-Kwahu, the PANAFEST/ Emancipation Day, World Tourism Day and the 2013 Ghana Carnival for Peace geared towards boosting domestic and international tourism for foreign exchange, revenue generation, and employment creation for Ghanaians in local communities.
Product Development/ Projects
Mr Speaker, the Accra Visitor Information Centre (AVIC) will be completed, furnished and made operational to serve as a one-stop shop information, ICT, entertainment and sports tourism centre for all domestic and international tourists and provide over jobs for Ghanaians in the formal and informal sectors.
The tourist receptive/facilities under construction at Salaga, Gwollu, Saltpond, Agogo, Wli, Axim and Kpetoe will be completed and made operational to enhance visitation and revenue generation in the communities.
Furthermore, the Ministry will foster international friendship and sign bilateral agreements in the field of tourism, culture and creative arts. Other focal areas will include supervision, monitoring, training and retraining of hospitality, culture and creative arts service providers to ensure compliance of quality service delivery.
Chairman of the Committee (Alhaji Amadu B Sorogho) 5:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion ably moved by the Minister responsible for Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts and to present the joint Report of the Committee on Trade, Industry and Tourism and then Youth, Sports and Culture on the 2013 annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts.
Introduction
The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2013 financial year was presented to the House on Tuesday, 5th March, 2013 in accordance with article 179 of the Constitution of Ghana by the Hon. Minister for Finance Mr Seth Emmanuel Terkpeh.
Pursuant to the Standing Orders 140(4), 159 and 188 of the House, Mr Speaker referred the 2013 annual estimates of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts to the Committees on Trade, Industry and Tourism and Youth, Sports, and Culture for consideration and report.
In considering the annual estimates, the Committee met with the Hon Minister for Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts, Hon Elizabeth Ofosu-Agyare and her technical team. The Committee wishes to express its gratitude to them for their immense assistance.
Reference documents
The following documents served as reference guide during the Committee's deliberations:
1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana.
Standing Orders of the House.
MDAs 2012 actuals.
2013 Budget Statement and Econo- mic Policy.
Mandate and mission of the Ministry
The mandate of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts is to initiate and formulate policies, plans and programmes as wells as co-ordinate, monitor and evaluate effectiveness and efficiency of the performance of the tourism and cultural sector.
It exists to create environment for sustainable growth and development of the tourism, culture and creative arts sub- sectors to contribute enormously to Gross Domestic Product (GDP), good governance and international partnership for the overall development of Ghana.
Implementing agencies
1. Ghana Tourism Authority.
2. Hotel Catering and Tourism Training Centre (HOTCATT).
3. Ghana Tourism Development Company.
4. National Commission on Culture.
5. Bureau of Ghana Languages.
6. Ghana Museums and Monu- ments Board.
7. National Theatre of Ghana.
8. Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park.
9. W.E.B. Dubois Memorial Centre.
10. National Symphony Orchestra.
11. Ghana Dance Ensemble.
Chairman of the Committee (Alhaji Amadu B Sorogho) 5:30 p.m.
12. AbibigrommaTheatre Company.
13. National Folklore Board.
14.Pan-African Writers Association.
Performance for the year, 2012
The Ministry was allocated a total budget of nine million, six hundred and fifty eight-thousand, six hundred and twenty- two Ghana cedis (GH¢9,658,622.00) for the 2012 fiscal year for itself and its two agencies - Ghana Tourism Authority (GTA) and Hotel, Catering and Tourism Training Institute (HOTCATT) to cater for compensation, goods and services, assets, internally generated funds (IGFs) and donor component.

Out of the nine million, six hundred and fifty-eight thousand and six hundred and twenty-one Ghana cedis (GH¢9,658,621.00), the Ministry received eight million, two hundred and eighty-six thousand, six hundred and eighty-four Ghana cedis and ninety-eight pesewas (GH¢8,286,684.98). Out of this, four million, five hundred and eighty-one thousand, seven hundred and twenty-two Ghana cedis (GH¢4,581,722.00) was for the payment of compensation of employees, leaving a balance of three million, seven hundred and four thousand, nine hundred and sixty-two Ghana cedis, ninety-eight pesewas (GH¢3,704,962.98) for goods and services and assets, which was woefully in adequate.

The details are outlined in Table 1:

Table 1: Budget eeiling for 2012 summary by cost centre

SPACE FOR TABLE 1 - PAGE 9 - 5.30P.M.

It was noted that there was a shortfall of about 35 per cent for the goods and services and assets allocations. The shortfalls of about 35 per cent as well as logistics were the major issues to be addressed. The non release of the Ministry's budget for 2012 fiscal year by Ministry of Finance created a huge challenge in the implementation of the Ministry's programmes and activities. It

also left significant commitment and arrears which are yet to be settled.

Programmes and activities of the Ministry in 2012

Over ten (10) international tour operators expressed interest to promote tour to Ghana.

Initiation of CNN Eye on Ghana Project as part of improving global information access to Ghana's tourism. This project is estimated at one million, five hundred US dollars (US$1.5 million) which is currently on hold.

Produced and distributed three thousand, two hundred and se- venty-five (GH¢3,275.00) promotional materials to Ghana Missions, abroad.

Participated in the 38th African Travel Organisation Annual Congress and Trade Show at Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe, to showcase Ghana's tourism to American tour olperators and international media.

Organised the 7th Okwahu Hang Paragliding Festival at Atibie during the Easter Festival.

Five (5) major events on the National Tourism Calendar were organised to promote domestic and international tourism in the country as notably among them are:

i. National Chocolate Day Celebration - 14th February;

ii. 1st African Choral Music Festival “Sing Aloud” ;

iii. World Tourism Day at Akosombo.

Other initiatives of the Ministry

The Ministry organised tours for six hundred (600) students, one hundred and fifty (150) each from the Greater Accra, Volta, Northern and Upper West Regions to tourist sites outside their respective regions. This resulted in youth appreciation of the country's local cultures and environment. It aleo fostered social cohesion through their interactions with different ethnic groupings.

Accra Visitor Information Centre

The Accra Visitor Information Centre (AVIC) which is to serve as one-stop-shop

information, ICT, entertainment and sports tourism centre for all domestic and international tourists, is at its final stage of completion.

UNWTO/UNIDO/Government of Ghana Collective Action for Sustainable Tourism (COAST) Project at Ada

The Coast Project under the theme: “Integrated Eco-tourism Destination Planning and Management for the Ada Estuary” which seeks to strengthen existing environmental policy, legislation and institutional arrangements for encouraging and achieving better environmental management in smaller hotels sector in Ada and promoting eco- tourism in Ada and its environs, is on course.

UNWTO-ST-EP Government of Ghana “Thank You, Small Libra Projects”

The Ministry in collaboration with the UNWTO ST-EP Foundation established Five (5) new Libraries in 2012 at Mamp- robi, Prampram, Akwatia, Anfoega, Wuve and Tema New-Town. A total of twenty- nine (29), “Thank You” Small Libraries have so far been established across the country.

Preparation of new 15 year National Tourism Development Master Plan

(2013- 2027)

The Ministry reviewed its fifteen (15) years National Tourism Development Master Plan (1996- 2010) and prepared a new 15-year National Tourism Development Plan (2013- 2027) to enhance the contribution of tourism sector to national and local economic development.

Restructuring of HOTCATT

Cabinet has approved the restructuring of HOTCATT into a National Tourism and Hospitality Training Institution with accreditation, from the National Accreditation Board. It will be a certificate and diploma awarding institute. Proposals on both institutions are being worked on by the Ministry under a public-private partnership arrangement.
Chairman of the Committee (Alhaji Amadu B Sorogho) 5:30 p.m.
SPACE FOR TABE 3 - PAGE 14 - 5./30P.M

Ghana Tourism Authority

The Authority will develop standards for new tourism enterprises (conference centres, SPAs, parks, health farms, off- shore catering establishments, tour guides and tourist attractions. Standards and conduct inspections and licensed tourism plants will be developed in all the regions before September, 2013. Moreover, the Authority will not only establish and operate enforcement task force for these service standards but also undertake and monitor extension service schemes and returns that will improve quality standards in hotels and other tourism establishments.

Hotel Catering and Tourism Training Centre (HCTCATT)

The Centre will train hospitality service providers in the ten (10) regions.

National Commission on Culture

The Commission will organise Arts Skuul (School) and half-yearly choral music competition for the workplace at the headquarters (HQTRS). Workshop for visual and performing artistes and production techniques will be organised in the Western Region. Handicraft and export production workshop for craftsmen and seminars to effectively, promote cultural programmes in both the Ashanti and Upper East Regions will be organised respectively.

There will also be the completion of the developmentof fully-functional Centres for National Culture in all regional and district capitals.

Ghana Museums and Monuments Board

Awareness creation seminars/work- shops on relics collection, protection and preservation of national heritage monuments and sites will be organised by the Board.
Dr A. A. Osei 5:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, my good Friend, Hon Sorogho is a senior Member like myself. He just made a statement that it came to the information of the Committee that tourism contributed a certain amount. He has not provided any evidence of such -- If it is true, it is good for us. But to convince us, he must tell us the source of that information. I have read this budget and there is no page here that tells us that. So, if he has other information, he should table it.
Alhaji Sorogho 5:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, 7.0 -- I mentioned that I only wanted to mention the highlights while I leave the others for the Hansard Department to capture.
But Mr Speaker, when we met the Ministry responsible for that sector, the information which was given to us, which is not doubted, is that -- [Interruption.] Source? Ministry of Finance and the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts. [Interruption.] Mr Speaker, it is not in doubt that the Ministry is the fourth largest earner of foreign exchange to this country. Mr Speaker --
Nii K. Titus-Glover (NPP -- Tema East): Mr Speaker, I rise to second the Motion
-- 5:40 p.m.

Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:40 p.m.
You just go ahead, but do not use the words --
Nii KwarteiTitus-Glover: Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion for the budget allocation of GH¢18,585,375.00 for the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts.
Mr Speaker, with your indulgence, I would want us to go to page 11 of the Report where it is captured and I beg to quote with your permission:
“The Committee observed that the performance of the tourism sector continued to be impressive as the sector recorded growth of over 10 per cent in international tourist arrivals and receipts.”
Dr A. A. Osei 5:40 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, the Members of the Committee keep referring to some information and we keep asking them for the source. Whether it is the Chairman or the Hon Member on this side, we would want the source of that information. It is not in the Budget Statement. So, whether it is coming from this side or that side, we would want the source.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:40 p.m.
Hon Chairman of the Committee, do you have a response to that?
Alhaji Sorogho 5:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I know for sure that the Hon senior Member wants -- [Interruption.] The MDA 2012 is there, but he says the source. I have told him that the source is from the Finance

Ministry and then -- [Interruption.] Mr Speaker, even if you open the budget estimates for 2012, the performance, page 103-- [Interruption.] Sit down, sit down.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:40 p.m.
Allow him to explain and then we take it up later.
Alhaji Sorogho 5:40 p.m.
Mr Speaker, if you take the reference documents, go to the Report and watch the reference documents. [Interruption] You take your time; why? And then 2013 budget estimates and economic policy and the MDAs 2012 actuals. Go there, you will see the contribution of tourism.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:40 p.m.
All right, your point is well made.
Now, Hon Member, please, continue.
Nii Kwartei Titus-Glover: Mr Speaker, I am supporting this Motion because out of the total of GH¢18 million, GH¢7.8 million is going into goods and services. Mr Speaker, on page 5 of your Report, captured in 5.3, Accra Visitor Information Centre -- Mr Speaker, I see this position as very innovative, where the Ministry is trying to bring along Information and Communication Technology (ICT), entertainment and other things into one stop-shop.
When you travel to London, Mr Speaker, we have something called “London Guide”, where there is a guide that any tourist that travels to London for the first time, would be given this opportunity to know the number of tourist attractions in the United Kingdom (UK) and in particular London. So, I see that this innovation needs the support of this House and for that matter, the moneys should be given accordingly.
Mr Speaker, supporting further, there is another area that I find quite striking, on page 6, paragraph 5.7 -- restructuring HOTCATT and in this very clause, Mr
Speaker, it talks about how they want to upgrade the HOTCATT to have a certificate and diploma status. This is a way of trying to support young men and women who would want to work in the tourism industry, and I see this as a very laudable idea that we would throw our weight behind our Minister.

Baba Jamal M. Ahmed (NDC-- Akwatia): Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion, to approve the sum of GH¢18,585,375.00 for the services of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts for the year ending 31st December,

2013.

Mr Speaker, even though I support this Motion, I still think that we could have given more to this Ministry. This is because tourism over the world is growing and Ghana is no exception. Looking at our central position as a country, we are located at the centre of the world. When you look at the Greenwich Meridian, it passes through Ghana.

When you look at where the Equator is, our position is unique and it is important we make sure that tourism thrives in this country. That is why I thought this Ministry should have been given more attention. But be it as it is, I think that the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts-- I would want to give specific credence to the President for making sure that he re-aligns the Ministry to include Culture.

The cultural aspect of tourism cannot be detached from tourism itself. So, bringing culture and attaching it to tourism, makes it work better than what we had.

Mr Speaker, I think that Ghana has comparative advantage over its West African neighbours in terms of tourism.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:50 p.m.
Hon Member, address the estimates.
Baba Jamal M. Ahmed: Mr Speaker, I am saying that the estimates are appropriate. But in my opinion, we should have even given the Ministry more money. [Interruption] I am addressing the estimates. I am saying that tourism being a very important sector in Ghana, it is not getting the attention that it needs and as a country, we need to take advantage of our unique position on the continent to ensure that we give the Ministry more money.
On that note, Mr Speaker, I support the Motion.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:50 p.m.
Thank you very much.
One more contribution from the other side.
Mr Kwadwo B. Agyemang (NPP -- Asante Akim North) 5:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion ably moved by our Hon Minister.
Mr Speaker, Ghana posits with a life of culture from the bustle of Accra to the atmospheric villages in the North. When you move from the Ashanti Region right down to the medieval mosque in Bole, the country has immense cultural displays that cannot be over-looked. Not even a day passes in Ghana that there is no cultural display or cultural activity in one place or the other.
Mr Speaker, the amount allocated to the Ministry needs to be taken care of very well. When you go to Egypt, they spend about US$600 million in promoting culture and tourism. [Some Hon Members:
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:50 p.m.
Hon Member, start to conclude.
Mr Agyemang 5:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, as I am concluding, I would advise the Ministry to invest in promoting the cultural and tourism aspects of Ghana, so that Ghana can be seen by other parts of the world as a place where career and job opportunities would be given to the youth who are in our cultural display aspects in life.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:50 p.m.
Thank you very much.
Hon Members, that brings us to the end of the debate.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved:
That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢ 18,585,375.00 for the services of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Dr Kunbuor 5:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, item number 3 on the Addendum to the Order Paper.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:50 p.m.
Yes, Hon Minister?
ANNUAL ESTIMATES 5:50 p.m.

Minister for Gender, Children and Social Protection (Nana (Mrs) O. Lithur) 5:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢38,596,470 for the services of the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Mr Speaker, the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection was established by the Civil Service Instrument of 2013 on 18th January, 2013. The Ministry used to be known as the Ministry of Women and Children's Affairs.
The newly-designated Ministry is an amalgam of the former Ministry of Women
and Children's Affairs and the Department of Social Welfare of the Ministry of Employment and Social Welfare.
The Social Protection Division of the Ministry of Employment and Social Welfare also comes under the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection.
The Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection is by its mandate responsible for the co-ordination of all social protection interventions currently being implemented by a number of Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) with the technical and financial support of some development partners and United Nations systems.
The Departments that operate under this Ministry are the Department of Gender, Department of Children, Department of Social Welfare, National Social Protection Strategy, the National Council of Persons with Disability, the Domestic Violence Secretariat, and the Human Trafficking Secretariat.
Mr Speaker, the total approved budget for this Ministry is GH¢38,596,470 and this amount falls short of our planned budget and would greatly affect the overall deliverables in line with the outcomes set for the Ministry.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move for this Honourable House to approve the total budget estimate for our Ministry in order to undertake our programmes and activities.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:50 p.m.
Thank you very much. Hon Chairman of the Committee.
Mrs Juliana Azumah Mensah) 5:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:50 p.m.
Hon Dr Akoto Osei.
Dr A. A. Osei 6 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I crave the indulgence of the Hon Minister not to say that “the approved budget”. She is requesting us to approve it. She cannot say that it is approved. So, I crave her indulgence that if she recognises that, it would help us. We would want to support her Ministry but she cannot say we have approved it. She should convince us.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 6 p.m.
The point is well taken. The Motion is being moved, so that we would give approval.
Question Proposed.
Chairperson of the Committee (Mrs Juliana Azumah Mensah) 6 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion moved by the Minister for Gender, Children and Social Protection.
I would also like my Colleague Chairman of the Commission on Employment and Social Welfare and State Enterprises to take the social protection aspect of the Report.
Mr Speaker, I, therefore, present your Committee's Report --
Mr First Deputy Speaker 6 p.m.
Hon Members, the Second Deputy Speaker will take the Chair.
MR SECOND DEPUTY SPEAKER
Mrs Juliana Azuma Mensah 6:02 p.m.
Introduction
In accordance with article 179 of the Constitution, the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Emmanuel Terkpeh, on
Mrs Juliana Azuma Mensah 6:02 p.m.
The expenditure performance from January to December, 2012 is captured in Table (2) below:
Table 2
Financial performance for 2012
SPACE FOR TABLE 2 - PAGE 6 - 6.00P.M

Out of funds released, the following were achieved:

Performance in 2012

The underlisted were given as some of the key achievements of the Ministry for the year 2012.

Human trafficking

The Ministry in the year under review, developed a draft Legislative Instrument (L.I.) and referral system for the implementation of the Human Trafficking Act 2005 (Act 694). In addition, the Ministry intensified its sensitisation programmes on Human Trafficking (HT) in endemic areas. Twenty-two (22) stakeholders' workshops were held with anti-trafficking partners to facilitate the sharing of information and experiences on human trafficking.

The National Plan of Action (NPA) on Human Trafficking was reviewed for another 5-year period. Technical proposal, communication strategies and resource mobilisation plan were also developed for the operationalisation of the plan of action.

Also, research on internal and cross- border trafficking was commenced in the year under review to deepen the understanding of the causes and effect of Human Trafficking and develop strategies to address it.

Women in Decision-making and Governance

The Ministry organised ten (10) regional consultative fora to solicit views for the drafting of the Affirmative Action Bill. Consultations were also held with the leadership of political parties and

Members of Parliament to discuss strategies to facilitate drafting of an Affirmative Action Bill.

Domestic violence

The Ministry scaled up its sensitisa- tion and awareness creation programmes in the District Assembles and established rural response co-ordinating systems at the regions. Information, Education and Communication (IE&C) materials including a documentary translated into Ga, Twi, Dagbani, Ewe, Hausa and Nzema were developed to facilitate sensitisation on domestic violence issues.

The Ministry also collaborated with Civil Society Organisations to raise awareness about gender-based violence and human rights and rehabilitated a facility as shelter for survivors of domestic violence and victims of human trafficking in Greater Accra.

The Domestic Violence draft L.I. was finalised and submitted to the Attorney General's Department for final drafting.

Gender mainstreaming and budgeting

MOGCSP trained key staff of 59 MMDAs in gender mainstreaming and gender responsive budgeting to build their capacities and enhance their ability to oversee gender mainstreaming in sector policies and budgets.

The Ministry also organised training for Gender Officers and Planning Officers of 59 MMDAs in the use of gender planning template for planning at the various MMDAs.

Gender equality and women empower- ment

MOGCSP in collaboration with ECOWAS Gender Development Centre

(EGDC) provided micro-finance assistance to 3 rural agro-based women's groups located in Upper West, Eastern and Volta Regions. In addition, training programmes in food processing and handicraft production were organised for women drawn from Ghana and Nigeria. Twenty women benefited from cassava and palmnut food processing from Kyekyewere in the Central Region in response to the 56th Commission on the Status of Women session.

The Ministry initiated the process of selecting 466 girls from poor households to benefit from African Development Bank's grant for local scholarships to pursue Technical and Vocational Educational Training (TVET).

Child protection and survival

A National Child Protection Policy (NCPP) has been developed by the Ministry to provide an integrated approach in the delivery of child-related services and outlined comprehensive interventions and standard operating procedures for child care professionals.

4.7 Women, peace and security

The Ghana National Action Plan 1325 for the implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security was officially launched.

International obligations

On international commitments to gender equity, equality, women's empowerment and child rights and protection issues the following were undertaken:56 th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) Conference held in New York; celebrated the International Women's Day organised by the Commonwealth Africa
Mrs Juliana Azuma Mensah 6:02 p.m.
Regional Colloquium; observed the African Union Day of the Child under the theme “The Rights of Children with Disabilities: The Duty to Protect, Respect, Promote and Fulfil” and submitted the 6th and 7th combined reports on the elimination of discrimination against women to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) on behalf of Govern- ment.
Old women's homes/ witches camps
The Ministry has put in place social protection interventions to ensure the fundamental human rights and security of women in the “old women's homes” in Gambaga, Gushiegu, Bimbilla, Central Gonja, Yendi and Saboba. In addition, these old women's homes are provided with potable water.

7Outlook For 2013

Funds allocated for the 2013 fiscal year

For the implementation of activities for 2013 fiscal year, an amount of thirty eight million, five hundred and ninety-six thousand four hundred and seventy Ghana cedis (GH¢38,596,470) has been allocated.

Out of this, seven million, six hundred and four thousand, eight hundred and twenty Ghana cedis (GH¢7,604,820) is GoG. SIP is thirty million Ghana cedis (GH¢30,000,000), twenty-five thousand Ghana cedis (GH¢25,000) is IGF and nine hundred and sixty-six thousand six Hundred and fifty Ghana cedis (GH¢966,650) is Donor.

The breakdown of the allocation is as follows:

Table 3: Allocation for 2013

Table 4

Summary of 2013 budget distribution by item for MoGCSP and its departments

SPACE FOR TABLE 3 - PAGE

10 - 6.00 P.M.

SPACE FOR TABLE 4 - PAGE

11 - 6.00 P.M.

Activities for 2013

The Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection will use the allocated sum of thirty-eight million five hundred and ninety-six thousand four hundred and seventy Ghana cedis (GH¢38,596,470) to perform the following activities in the 2013 fiscal year:

Recruitment of technical staff

The Ministry will engage the services of Technical Assistants (TAs) as part of its institutional capacity development initiative under the Capacity Development Mechanism Initiative Project. Information Technology equipment will be procured under the project for the Ministry and its regional offices.

National Gender Policy

The Ministry will consult with stakeholders to validate the draft National Gender Policy (NGP) for submission to Cabinet. The Ministry will continue to implement the Gender Responsive Skills and Community Development Project (GRSCDP) to assess the performance of Ghanaian women micro entrepreneurs and the youth to increase their access to both financial and non-financial services.

Scholarship programme

The Ministry awarded scholarships to 300 girls from poor households to pursue technical and vocational education in 2012. 466 more girls have been selected to benefit from scholarships this year.
Mrs Juliana Azuma Mensah 6:02 p.m.
Awareness creation on human trafficking
The Human Trafficking (HT) and Domestic Violence (DV) Secretariats will continue to co-ordinate the imple- mentation of the Human Trafficking Act and the drafting of the Domestic Violence Legislative Instrument as well as intensify advocacy, sensitisation and awareness creation campaigns on HT and DV issues.
Child Protection Policy
The Ministry will continue the development of the Child Protection Policy. It will also be revamping the child helpline and streamline its operations to better help children in times of distress. The Ministry will continue to implement the Ghana National Action Plan 1325 on Women, Peace and Security.
Consolidation of social protection policies
In the year 2013, the Ministry will consolidate all social protection policies and programmes. It will also build a database of the elderly, pensioners, school children and persons with disability. Implement aging policy and initiate drafting of the Domestic Workers Support and Protection Act.
Capacity building programme
Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection will develop a comprehensive capacity programme to support MDAs, MMDAs, CSOs and the Legislature to formulate and analyse Gender Responsive Budget (GRB).
Observations and recommendations
Compensation of employees
The Committee observed that compensation for employees of the Department of Social Welfare and the

Commission of Persons with Disability has not been catered for in the budget estimates of the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection. It was however explained that the remuneration of the affected persons were yet to be migrated onto the payroll of the Ministry.

It was also generally observed that provision made for compensation of employees of the Ministry falls short of what is required.

The Committee, therefore, recommends that the Ministry of Finance should ensure that the compensations for employees are migrated onto the payroll of the Ministry to ensure complete integration. Provision should also be made to ensure that the shortfalls in the remuneration as observed are addressed.

Inadequate technical staff

The Committee noted that inadequate technical staff at the Headquarters is one major challenge affecting productivity at the Ministry.

There is therefore, the urgent need to recruit more technical staff to ensure efficiency in the new role of the Ministry and the realisation of its new mandate. The Committee recommends that the Ministry of Finance should grant approval for the Ministry to recruit the required technical staff to enable the Ministry perform efficiently.

Re-alignment of departments currently under the Ministry

The Committee noted that the broadened mandate of the Ministry requires that all funds that support social protection activities as well as projects under the Department of Social Welfare and the National Council for the Disabled should be brought under the purview of

the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection. There are also challenges regarding the alignment of departments and units ceded to the Ministry. To ensure a smooth transition of projects and activities, the Committee recommends that the President should issue an administrative directive on how the transition should be managed.

8.4 Award of scholarships

It was realised that scholarships were awarded to 300 girls from poor households to pursue technical and vocational education training under the Gender Responsive Skill and Community Development Project (GRSCDP) in 2012. Provision has also been made for the training of 466 more girls in 2013 fiscal year.

The Committee lauded the Ministry for the initiative and urged them to seek funds to provide employable skills to the needy. Members were also encouraged to take interest in the selection process at the level of the District Assemblies to ensure that girls selected are indeed, from deprived homes.

Provision of micro credit

The Committee was informed of challenges associated with the management of micro credit to market women. The Committee was informed that the Ministry would consider the base line, measure the impact and strengthen the monitoring system to enhance the efficiency of the programme. The Committee urged the Ministry to address the issue of high interest rates regarding the repayment of the loans.

Construction of office complex

The Committee was informed that the 5- storey complex of the Ministry is about 40 per cent complete. Members were further informed that there may be a need

for a review of the total cost of construction due to time overrun and additional works. The Committee urges the Ministry of Finance to facilitate the completion of the new office complex to enable the Ministry accommodate its new staff.

Disability Fund

The Committee realised that although there are about 5 million disabled persons in Ghana, only eight million Ghana cedis (GH¢8,000,000) has been provided as support for their livelihoods. This translates into one cedi sixty pesewas (GH¢l.60) per person. To make a meaningful impact, there is the need to seek further funds to support their programme or increase their share of the District Assemblies Common Fund.

The Committee recommends an increase in their share of the District Assemblies Common Fund to ensure that their needs are better catered for. The Committee again calls for synchronisation of funds allocated to the disabled under the various social protection programmes for easy administration and to eliminate duplication of programmes.

Increase in fees

The Committee noted with concern that only ten Ghana cedis (GH¢ 10) is charged by the Department of Social Welfare for registration of non-governmental Organisations (NGO) in the country. The Department of Children also charges only five hundred Ghana cedis (GH¢500) for the use of the Efua Sutherland's Children's Park. The Committee considers these charges too low and urged that they should be reviewed upward to reflect current trends.
rose
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:02 p.m.
Hon Member, do you have a point of order?
Mr Joe K. Gidisu 6:02 p.m.
Mr Speaker, verily so.
The Hon Colleague, I hope would be very accurate in giving time line as to the President's appointments and the creation of Ministries. She said about three months now, but the Ministry was created barely two months ago and the set up is in progress. The advice to the President is not by Executive Instrument. So, the advice is misplaced.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:02 p.m.
Hon Member, would you continue.
Mrs Kusi 6:02 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I do not want to go there. But once he had decided to do something, I am not the one to tell him what to do. He has decided as a President to align any Ministry and I am not going to tell him -- Mr Speaker, even before he names it, he should know what to do.
Mr Baba J. M. Ahmed 6:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I am rightly on a point of order -- [Interruption] Order 91 (a).
The language used by the Hon Member, clearly, is unparliamentary. To tell a Colleague that he should not bring himself, what does she mean?
I think that this statement is insulting and it is not right for this House.
Mr Speaker, I need your direction on this.
Dr Kunbuor 6:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, it order for the debate to actually flow smoothly, let me understand that the Hon Member was only advising his Hon Colleague that he is not welcome to get closer. So, let us leave it at that.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:10 p.m.
Hon Member, would you proceed, please?
Mrs Kusi 6:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, to put it on record, I did not say he should not bring himself. I said he should not go there. That is what I said. [Interruption.] I did not say he should not bring himself. [Interruption]
Mr James K. Avedzi 6:10 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member did say here that he should not bring himself, but now that he is bringing himself here, she will advise. [Interruption.] So, if she said she did not say it, Mr Speaker, that is not the fact.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:10 p.m.
Hon Members, I think we have listened to the wise counsel of the Hon Majority Leader and I ask the Hon Member for Tarkwa- Nsuaem to proceed.
Mrs Kusi 6:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, this issue of trying to bring out the equality balance -- Mr Speaker, from a report from the Ministry that is in my hand now, we read that in 2012, we had male Ministers, 83 per cent, female, 17 per cent. On appointment of District Chief Executives (DCEs), we had 95 per cent males and 5 per cent females. [Interruption.]
Mr Alfred Agbesi 6:10 p.m.
On a point of order.
I heard my Hon Colleague say she is advising the President. Is she advising the President? [Interruption.] Mr Speaker, the President is on course; to all intents and purposes, he does not need her advice. This is because they have refused to co-operate with him.
How do they advise him? So, Mr Speaker, her advice is not needed, it is not wanted. She should keep her advice. We do not need it.
Mrs Kusi 6:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member did not listen to me. I said 2012 -- this is what I read from the Ministry in 2012. I am not saying 2013. I am saying 2012. The Hon Member should please, listen before he makes any comment. [Hear! Hear!]
Ms Ursula G. Owusu 6:10 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:10 p.m.
Hon Members, let us have some order.
The Hon Member has a point of order; please, let her proceed. Let us have your order.
Ms Owusu 6:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Deputy Majority Leader said that the President does not need our advice. This is because we cannot advise him.
I believe we are all here approving the estimates on the budget of the President. So, if he does not need our advice, he does not need the work that the Honourable House is doing; so does he want us to leave?
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:10 p.m.
Hon Majority Leader, I believe with the greatest of respect, let us just make some progress. I have asked the Hon Member for Tarkwa- Nsuaem to conclude.
Mrs Kusi 6:10 p.m.
In conclusion, Mr Speaker, I would also want to draw attention to paragraph 8.7 about the two per cent District Assemblies Common Fund for disabled persons in Ghana. From the Report, you would realise that if they share it among the 5 million disabled persons, each person will get GH¢1.60. As a House which has been considering the formula, we should advise ourselves, at least, the Hon Minister can make recommendation for us to increase -- [Interruption.]
Mr Mahama Ayariga 6:10 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, I rose earlier but I did not catch your eye.

Mr Speaker, if the Hon Member and her Colleagues on the other side had participated in the work of the Appointments Committee --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:10 p.m.
Hon Ayariga, with respect --
Hon Members, let us have some order. Let the Hon Member for Tarkwa-Nsuaem conclude without going there or coming here then after. We would take one from this side and one from the other side, then the Hon Minister would wind-up and then we would quietly proceed and come to an end on this thing.
Hon Member for Tarkwa-Nsuaem, your last sentence.
Mrs Kusi 6:10 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I was saying that since we approved the formula, I would want the Minister for Local Government and Rural Development to consider this two per cent, which gives each disabled person GH¢1.60p, is woefully inadequate. So, we should consider it; he should make presentations for us to do something for the disabled persons in this country.
With this, Mr Speaker, I thank you for the opportunity.
Mr Joseph Z. Amenowode (NDC -- Afadzato South) 6:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I wish to support the Motion, that, this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢38,596,470 for the services of the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection.
Mr Speaker, I represent the Social Protection Department of the Ministry and your Committee met and deliberated on the budget allocation for the Ministry -- [Interruption.] Mr Speaker, I would want to comment on the re-alignment aspect of the Ministry. Mr Speaker --[Interruption.]
rose
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:20 p.m.
Hon Sackey, do you have a point of order?
Mrs Sackey 6:20 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 6:20 p.m.
Hon Member, proceed.
Mr Amenowode 6:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member has already given the answer. I am on the floor as the Chairman of the Social Protection Department and I am saying that I am representing that Department and she knows that.
Mr Speaker, we did ask that His Excellency the President gives administrative instructions to the re- aligned department, so that they would know exactly what to do and that does not in any way mean that His Excellency did not consider who should do what at the time he was re-aligning the departments.
Mr Speaker, as Members of this Honourable House, we are aware that political directives need administrative
rose
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:20 p.m.
Hon Member, do you have a point of order?
Mr O. B. Amoah 6:20 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member, with all due respect, appears to be a bit confused -- [Interruptions] -- the Hon Member who spoke (Hon Titus- Glover) does not represent Tema West. If you are talking about Tema West, it is Hon Naa Torshie and Naa Torshie has not spoken on this matter.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:20 p.m.
Hon Member for Afadjato South, proceed.
Mr Amenowode 6:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I think the Hon Member is rather confused. I did say my Hon Colleague, that is Tema West, in her contribution on the Budget Statement -- I am not talking of this. She did say that GH¢38 million was meagre and she is right. The reason is that money for social protection has been staggered in various departments and agencies.
So, all we are asking is that there should be a proper re-alignment where all these funds should be under one administration, so that we actually know how much is going for the social protection department of the Ministry.
Mr Speaker, the other point is about the Disability Fund. The amount of one cedi, sixty pesewas, actually, is not enough. But the point is that, Mr Speaker, there is the need for us to clearly identify
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:20 p.m.
Hon Members, the background noise --
Mr Amenowode 6:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would quickly --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:20 p.m.
Hon Member for Afadjato South, I have not asked you to wind up, so, you speak.
Mr Amenowode 6:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would also want to talk about one very important aspect of the new Ministry. That is the orphanages and child care facilities under them. There is the need for the Ministry to take proper look at these so-called orphanages, most of which are just there to -- [Interruption]
Mr Kofi Frimpong 6:20 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, I would want the Hon Member to speak to the estimates. He is talking about policy and referring to so- called orphanages -- what does he mean by that? Mr Speaker, he must go straight to the point, speak to the estimates, let us see whether the estimates are enough to curb certain social menaces, to see if we can fight some social cankers and so on and not to talk about --
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:20 p.m.
Hon Kofi Frimpong, this is definitely not a point of order.
Hon Member for Afadjato you proceed.
Mr Amenowode 6:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, Mr Frimpong is my good Friend; he is not being naughty, Hon Speaker. He is just doing his normal self --[Laughter]
rose
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:20 p.m.
Hon Member, do you have a point of order?
Mr Asafu-Adjei 6:20 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member keeps saying “people with disability”. It is “physically challenged”. That are the correct words.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:20 p.m.
Hon Member for Afadjato South , now, I think I am compelled to ask you to conclude.
Mr Amenowode 6:20 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
I am just saying that the Ministry needs enough resources to be able to do the work that His Excellency the President has assigned to them.
Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:20 p.m.
Thank you very much. We would take one more from each side.
Mrs Mavis Hawa Koomson (NPP -- Awutu -Senya East) 6:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, thank you for the opportunity to support this Motion.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:20 p.m.
Hon Members, let us have some quiet.
Mrs Koomson 6:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, last year, GH¢15 million was allocated to the Ministry and the Ministry was only Women and Children's Affairs. This year, it is Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection and it is being allocated
GH¢38 million. Mr Speaker, considering the number of activities the Minister wants to take this year, the money would not be sufficient.
The Minister is well known to be an advocate of human rights and I know she would like to do her best more than she has been doing when she was not a Minister -- [Interruption] -- Mr Speaker, when we look at the percentage of women we have in this country, we constitute more than 50 per cent and it is the women who are more vulnerable in this country. Mr Speaker, some of the activities the Minister wants to embark on are to increase the micro credit -- [Interruption]
Dr A. A. Osei 6:20 p.m.
On a point of order.
Mr Speaker, the Ministry is no longer Women and Children's Affairs, it is Gender -- including men, so when you start talking about -- “we are more than”, it is gender. Even if you are more, it is to cater for all of us, including the men. The Minister should take note; the men are part of the Ministry and all the women should take note, it has been re-aligned to take care of all of us.
Dr Kunbuor 6:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I would want to draw the Hon Member's attention to the fact that the women have taken care of him for far too long. So, it is about time that he took care of them.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:20 p.m.
I think it is on a lighter side.
Hon Koomson, can you proceed?
Mrs Koomson 6:20 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I mentioned women not because the women are more than -- [Interruption] -- Mr Speaker, what I was saying is, looking at the activities of women in the country, they need loans, so that they can -- [Interruptions] -- activities like trading, yes.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Minister mentioned that she would like to implement more micro finance projects, so that both men and women can have access and go on with their businesses. What I have realised is that, with the micro finance credit, the interest rate is too high for the women to pay and also the mode of payment, most of the micro finance institutions give the money out to the traders or women to do the repayment in a short time, maybe, one or two weeks.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:30 p.m.
Now, would the Minister want to wind up?
Nana (Mrs) Oye Lithur 6:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I express my gratitude for the consideration of our budget estimates.
I have taken note of the concerns, recommendations and observations made by Hon Members of this House.
These would be considered when we implement our programmes for this year.
We are most grateful.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved:
That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢38,596, 470.00 for the services of the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Dr Kunbuor 6:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, if we can consider item number 16, that is the Ministry of Information and Media Relations. But I am also aware the Judicial Secretary had been here since morning. So, if we could take that item number in addition. Item number 15 is the Judicial Service. But we would take item number 16 first.
Minister for Information and Media Relations (Mr Mahama Ayariga) 6:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢41,670,827 for the services of the Ministry of Information and Media Relations for the year ending 31st December, 2013
Mr Speaker, the Ministry of Information and Media Relations was recently re- designated and oversees a number of agencies including the main Ministry itself, the Information Services Department, the Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, Ghana News Agency, the National Film and Television Institute, the Ghana Publishing Corporation, the New Times Corporation and the Graphic Communications Group Limited.
Mr Speaker, the Ministry has as its main mandate to make sure that information flows easily and accessibly to the general population and that Government also gathers feedback from the general population regarding its policies.
Mr Speaker, the Ministry organises a number of events and implements a number of projects in order to achieve this objective.
Mr Speaker, we are requesting for this sum to be able to implement these policies, programmes and activities during the year.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move.
Question proposed.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Herod Cobbina) 6:30 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I wish to support this Motion moved by the Minister for Information and Media Rela- tions for an amount of GH¢41,670,827.
Mr Speaker, in so doing, I present your Committee's Report.
Introduction
The annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Information and Media Relations (Mol MR) were referred to the
Select Committee on Communications for consideration and report in accordance with Orders 140 (4) and 182 of the Standing Orders of the House. This followed the presentation of the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government for 2013 to the House by the Minister of Finance (MoF), Mr Seth Terkpeh, in accordance with article 179 of the Constitution and Order 140 (1) of the Standing Orders of the House.
The Committee met to consider the referral and was assisted by the Hon Minister for Information and Media Relations, Mr Mahama Ayariga, accompanied by officials of the Ministry and its agencies.
Reference documents
i. Constitution of the Republic of Ghana, 1992.
ii. The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.
iii. The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Go- vernment of Ghana for the 2013 financial year.
iv. The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of th Go- vernment of Ghana for the 2012 financial year.
v. Report of the Ministry of Information on its approved releases and expenditure for
2012.
Mission statement and medium-term objectives
The vision of the Ministry of Information and Media Relations is to achieve “a free, united, informed and prosperous society with good governance through Development Communication (DevCom).”
The mission of the Ministry is therefore, to facilitate the creation of an effective two-way free flow of timely and reliable information and feedback between the Government and its publics, to develop a national communication policy,
co-ordinate, monitor and evaluate the implementation of programmes and activities of its agencies.
It also exists to create the r ight environment to generate necessary understanding and support of the public for the policies and programmes of Government and to facilitate their realisation through adequately trained, motivated and committed staff.
In pursuit of this mission, the Ministry has five broad sectoral objectives:
i. To improve transparency and public access to information.
ii. To mainstream development communication across the public sector and policy cycle.
iii. To promote social accountability in the public policy cycle.
iv. To enhance the capacity of the media for enhanced develop- ment communications, account- ability and press freedom.
v. To project the image of the country both internally and externally in collaboration with other agencies to attract fo- reign investment.
Agencies and institutions under the Ministry
The Ministry has responsibility for the following agencies and institutions:
i. Information Services Department
(ISD).
ii. Ghana News Agency (GNA);
iii. Ghana Broadcasting Corporation
(GBC).
iv. National Film and Television Institute (NAFTI).
The Ministry also has oversight responsibilities over the following Public Institutions:
i. Ghana Publishing Corporation
(GPC).
ii. New Times Corporation (NTC).
iii. The Graphic Communications Group Ltd (GCG).
iv. GAMA Films.
2012 in retrospect
The Ministry of Information and Media Relations was provided a total amount of twenty-nine million, two hundred and one thousand, three hundred and eighty-one Ghana cedis (GH¢29,201,381.00) with the breakdown as follows:
SPACE FOR TABLE 1 - PAGE
5 - 6.30P.M.

TABLE 1 -- 2012 Actual expenditure for the Ministry of Information and Media Relations
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Herod Cobbina) 6:30 p.m.
5.1 Key achievements
The Committee was informed that the figures for employee compensation rose so high in 2012 because the staff of the Ministry had migrated to the Single Spine Salary Structure (SSSS). Staff therefore, had been paid their new salaries as well as the backpay accumulated since 2009, when the new structure was introduced. Although the Ministry was not able to carry out all its planned programmes and projects for 2012 due to inadequate funds, coupled with delayed releases by MoF, the following significant successes were chalked during the period:
i. One National Policy Fair was organised in Accra while three Regional Policy Fairs were held in Western, Brong-Ahafo and Eastern Regions.
ii. The Ministry organised regional tours in the Ashanti, Brong-Ahafo, Northern, Upper East, Upper West, Western and Volta Regions. During this period, Government's policies and programmes were thoroughly explained to the people at the grassroots level and feedback was also gathered for Government at town halls meetings.
iii. The Ministry organised Meet-the- Press Sessions for almost all Ministries which helped to better explain the various MDA projects and programmes to the general public. It also facilitated closer interaction between Government and the media and brought about better appreciation of Government policies and activities through the mass media.
iv. Feature articles in the major national dailies to educate the public on Government projects and pro- grammes were published.

v. Produced reports on public reaction to Government policies and activities such as the 2012 Budget and Ministerial reshuffle.

vi. The Ministry undertook nationwide public education campaign on the 2012 Budget, the Right to Information Bill, the 2012 General Elections, and the Biometric Voter Registration. This was followed up with monitoring and evaluation of these campaigns in all regions.

vii. The draft Broadcasting Bill, aimed at strengthening and sanitising the broadcasting industry, was completed by the consultant and it is being finalised in collaboration with the Attorney-General's Department. It will soon be submitted to Cabinet for approval and subsequently to Parliament to be passed into law.

viii.The Ministry collated, processed and posted Government-oriented stories on the GoG website.

ix. 15,300 stories were gathered and processed from all the 170 districts into Home News Bulletins for forty (40) local and foreign subscribers.

6.0 Expectations for 2013

In 2013, the Ministry will continue to ensure the free flow of relevant information in pursuance of the transparent and accountable governance policy. It will also continue to effectively and efficiently monitor and evaluate public responses to Government policies, programmes and activities in addition to providing timely feedback to Government.

The strategic orientation of the Ministry of Information and Media Relations will be pursued through the following activities in 2013.

i. Organisation of National Policy Fair in Accra and five Regional Policy Fairs in Central, Upper East, Upper West, Ashanti and Volta Regions.

ii. Organisation of regional/district tours.

iii. Organisation of 90 District /Town Hall Meetings.

iv. Organisation of 45 Meet-the-Press series/press briefings.

v. Embark on public education campaigns on the national budget, major national events, draft policies, epidemic and disasters.

vi. Link the Regional and District Information Offices electronically to the head office to support the effective management of informa- tion on the Government of Ghana website via Virtual Private Network.

vii. Publicise the celebration of the Independence Day, Republic Day, Farmers Day, State of the Nation Address, official opening of Parliament, reading of the national budget, et cetera.

viii. Provide T V and radio coverage (live) for public programmes: Public Accounts Committee Sittings, regional tours, policy fairs, Meet- the-Press series, Farmers Day, May Day Celebration, Founders Day, Independence Day, A.U Day, Eid- ul-Adha, Eid-ul-Fitr, Republic Day Celebration, and Presidential tours as well as inauguration and inspection of projects.

ix. Provision of production facilities in Accra and the other regions in support of the ongoing digital migration project.

x. Collection and dissemination of news internally and externally.

xi. Increase partnership with the media in line with the principles of fairness, objectivity and truthfulness to promote national cohesion and sustainable development.

xii. Organise regular press/media briefings.

xiii. Increase media encounters by the Hon Ministers with the public through Town Hall Meetings and other public fora.

xiv. Facilitate the enactment of the Broadcasting Law.

xv. Facilitate the enactment of the Right to Information Law.

xv. Educate and sensitise the public on the Right to Information Law.

xvi. Promote cross-sectoral co-ordi- nation and decentralisation of communications within the public sector.

xvii. Strengthen the capacity of the State/public media, and the ISD to play their public education roles effectively.

xviii. Establish communication chan- nels between Government and

civil society to address informa- tion asymmetry.

xx. Improve co-ordination of infor- mation among information agen-

cies.

6.2 Budget estimates for 2013

To achieve its targets for 2013, the Ministry and its departments/agencies have been allocated a total amount of GH¢41,670,827.00 for its activities. These figures do not include input from GBC, which is now fully subvented and operates solely on IGFs.

TABLE 3 --2013 budgetary allocations for the Ministry

SPACE FOR TABLE 3 - PAGE 8 - 6.30P.M.
Chairman of the Committee (Mr Herod Cobbina) 6:40 p.m.


7.0 Observations and recommendations

7.1 Budgetary Allocation

The Committee observed that looking at the MoF allocation to the Ministry of Information and Media Relations, its departments/agencies, it will be extremely difficult for the Ministry to perform most of the activities earmarked for the year

2013.

The Ministry informed the Committee, the following activities in particular, will be affected:

i. Organisation of national and regional policy fairs. The Ministry intends to organise one national and five (5) regional policy fairs across the country.

ii. Organisation of regional/district tours to explain Government policies and programmes and also to gather feedback for Government.

iii.Provision and rehabilitation of office accommodation to ensure a conducive working environment for the staff of the Ministry and its departments/agencies.

iv. Effective coverage of all national events especially live coverage of Parliamentary Sittings by G. B C.

vi.Development of documentaries on various government policies, programmes, projects and activities.

vii.Effective organisation of activities to promote Ghana's image abroad to attract investment.

viii.Establishment of Information Services Department's offices in all the newly-created districts.

ix. Training/capacity building for the staff of the Ministry and its departments/agencies.

ix. Enhancement of ICT infrastructure and management of Government of Ghana portal.

x. Payment of utility bills by the Ministry and its department and agencies.

xi. Purchase of equipment (digital cameras, editing suites, high-end computers) for training progra- mmes.

xii. Payment of accumulated fees for part-time lecturers of NAFTI.

viii. Payment of NAFTI accreditation and affiliation fees.

xiv. Settlement of debts owed to individuals and companies who have supplied various goods and services to departments and agencies on credit.

xv. Effective functioning of the foreign Mission offices of the Information Services Department.

xvi. Acquisition of new cinema vans for all the newly created districts. The lack of sufficient funds, the Committee observed, is therefore risky as it will reduce the flow of information which has the potential to create suspicion between Government and the citizenry.

The Committee is of the opinion that cutting down the goods and services allocation to the Ministry will indeed, cripple these vital activities, which will go a long way to ensure that State information is disseminated along the length and breadth of the nation.

7.2 Internally generated funds (IGFs)

The Committee observed, as with previous years, that though the various agencies have a capacity to internally generate funds, they are still faced with

challenges ranging from inability to compete with well-resourced private competitors, through the lack of capacity to actually operate at optimum levels to the lack of political will to levy economic rates for the very specialised services provided by the agencies. Some others are also unable to generate adequate IGFs to cater for their needs because of the low budgetary support over the years, which has left them with huge deficits.

These deficits prevent them from rising to the level of development where they can compete favourably within the industry.

7.2.1 NAFTI

NAFTI ranks among the highly affected agencies with regard to low IGFs generation. Despite having existed for more than forty years, the institute is yet to own its premises and the academic block it started constructing thirty years ago, is yet to be completed. This has kept students enrolment very low and made it impossible for the school to charge real economic rates, thereby compounding the inability to generate enough IGFs.

Besides, NAFTI lacks well-equipped modern state-of-the-art studios for its activities and also for serving the needs of stakeholders as a source of direct IGFs generation. Indeed, the equipment in the exiting old studios are obsolete and therefore, unattractive to potential partners.

7.2.2 Information Service Department

(ISD)

The ISD is yet another highly affected agency in respect of low IGFs generation. In spite of the advantage of having a presence in all districts and major towns in the country, and being in possession of cinema vans, cameras, public address

systems as well as having the technical know-how to manage public broadcasting and advertising, the ISD is still unable to generate enough funds due to obsolete equipment. This, coupled with the low GoG funding, perpetrates the cycle of the inability to get the relevant equipment, inability to fully disseminate information, lack of competitiveness and the inability to generate a respectable amount of IGFs.

The Committee was therefore, dissatisfied that the ISD is still not allowed to retain any portion of its IGFs which could be used to even enhance the IGFs generation itself.

7.3 Information Officers in Foreign Missions

The Committee was informed that while the staff of the Ministry serving Ghanaian Missions abroad are provided with their salaries and related allowances, they are not provided with funds to cater for their recurrent expenditure incurred during the performance of their duties. No provision is also made in the Ministry's budget to cater for such costs.

However, the host Missions, over the years, have been supportive of the officers' activities but have subsequently passed the cost accruing thereto to the Ministry for refund. Indeed, the Committee noted that our Missions in London and New York are in dire straits as they cannot even pay rent, much more for utilities. The Committee recommends that the MoF takes immediate steps to rectify this situation in order not to create more embarrassment for the nation.

8.0 Conclusion

The usefulness of information to the development of a nation cannot be over- emphasised as it promotes peace, tranquility and development.

Indeed, the 1992 Constitution enjoins the Government of Ghana to let our citizens know about the opportunities available in areas of national development. These include agriculture, education, energy, health and transport which are means of improving one's life and sustaining better standards of living. Therefore, the role of the Ministry of Information and Media Relations must not only be recognised, but also be adequately resourced to ensure the effective and efficient delivery of information, not just to the Ghanaian public but to the world at large.

It is with regard to the forgoing that the Committee recommends to the House to approve the sum of forty-one million, six hundred and seventy thousand, eight hundred and twenty-seven Ghana cedis (GH¢41,670,827.00) comprising twenty million, thirty thousand, nine hundred and fifty-seven Ghana cedis (GH¢20,030,957.00) from GoG, nineteen million, six hundred and thirty-nine thousand, eight hundred and seventy Ghana cedis (GH¢ 19,639,870.00) from IGFs and two million (GH¢ 2,000,000.00) from S.I.P to enable the Ministry of Information carry out its planned strategies for the 2013 financial year.

Respectfully submitted

Ranking Member of the Committee (Mr Ken O. Agyapong): Mr Speaker, I wish to contribute to support the Motion on the floor. In doing so, Mr Speaker, I would like to make a few comments on what we experienced during our deliberation on this budget.

Mr Speaker, we realised that even the estimates from the Ministry of Finance were totally different from what was presented in the budget and because of that, we sat on this for two consecutive times and we could not take a decision. So, we asked the Minister to go and see the Finance Minister and the Director of Budget at the Ministry of Finance.

By so doing, he came back to assure us that whatever estimates that were given to the Ministry and its agencies, Ghana Broadcasting Company (GBC) should not be included. This is because the amount that was allocated to the Ministry was reduced drastically by about 50 per cent and therefore, the Ministry had to share the amount to all the agencies including the Ministry itself.

So, we are urging the Minister -- I hope he is here, but the Minister for Finance is not here and I know for sure they would come back with an excuse.

Again, when we take the Information Services Department, Mr Speaker, goods and services, they budgeted for GH¢9,184,578.59 of which GH¢1,391,810.61 was approved. Members would be

surprised to know that the Information Services Department's offices abroad are being closed down. This is because they do not have money to pay their rents. So, if GH¢9,185 million is budgeted for and it is cut down drastically to GH¢1.39 million, we all wonder how efficient this Information Services Department would operate.

Therefore, we are pleading with the Minister for Finance to assist this Ministry, if not, it would be seen as a propaganda Ministry. This is because whatever they are supposed to do, is in the interest of the nation.
rose
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:40 p.m.
Hon Yieleh Chireh, do you have a point of order?
Mr Chireh 6:40 p.m.
Yes, Mr Speaker.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:40 p.m.
Hon Yieleh Chireh, that is under Order what? [Laughter] -- But Hon Yieleh Chireh, you are also laughing!
Hon Member, proceed.
Mr Agyapong 6:40 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Surprisingly, my Colleagues are heckling me not to speak in favour of you.
Mr Speaker, I would like to end here since time is not on our side.
Mr Richard M. Quashigah (NDC -- Keta) 6:40 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to contribute to the Motion on floor.
Dr Kunbuor 6:40 p.m.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker, we had agreed at the level of Leadership that given the stress that Members have gone through, after the Chairperson, we would have one person from the other side and we would bring this to a close.
It is unfortunate that the Hon Member was acknowledged. This is because we still have one more significant Motion to take and I would plead that we give the Hon Member just three sentences, so that we could wind up -- [Interruption] -- He is actually on his feet, and that would mean he has to give the other side three sentences as well. But if the Hon Member would oblige me, I think we could conveniently bring this matter to a close at this moment.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:40 p.m.
I would invite the Minister to wind up. This is because I think that the Hon Member has declined the invitation for three sentences.
So, Hon Minister, would you want to wind up or you are not with us?
Mr Ayariga 6:40 p.m.
Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker, let me thank this Honourable House and Hon Members, and thank the Hon Ranking Member of the Committee for outlining some of the challenges of this Ministry and appealing for increased assistance to the Ministry of Information and Media Relations.
Mr Speaker, I would want to assure this House that the Ministry is working very hard to change what might seem as a perception that it is a propaganda outlet to -- [Interruption] -- a Ministry that works towards ensuring that useful and important information such as the appropriate name of the Flag Staff House is made -- [Laughter.]
On that note, Mr Speaker, I thank Hon Members and move that they approve the budget for the Ministry for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Question put and Motion agreed to.
Resolved:
That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢41,670,827 for the services of the Ministry of Information and Media Relations for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Dr Kunbuor 6:50 p.m.
Motion 15, Mr Speaker, and with your indulgence, I would move the Motion on behalf of the Minister for Finance.
ANNUAL ESTIMATES 6:50 p.m.

Minister for Finance) 6:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I beg to move that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢156,341,878.93 for the services of the Judicial Service for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
Mr Speaker, the role of the Judicial Service in this country cannot be over- emphasised. It is, indeed, a separate arm of Government and it is actually the only constitutionally neutral arbiter of all disputes of a commercial nature, constitutional and disputes among individual citizens.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:50 p.m.
The Majority Leader is moving a Motion, could we please, have some order? And he is talking about the Judiciary, a very important institution.
Dr Kunbuor 6:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, thank you very much.
Dr A. A. Osei 6:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, on a point of order.
Mr Speaker, I am looking at the budget at page 284 and what was submitted to us, I do not see GH¢156,341,878.93; I do not see that. So, if something is hap- pening, I think it would be useful to explain to us, so that we know that there is a mistake either in the Budget Statement or -- But none of them has a .93 or decimal after it; that is to begin with. But the amount here is 66-something. There is something that he may have to educate us on.
Dr Kunbuor 6:50 p.m.
Mr Speaker, my attention has actually be drawn by the Chairman of the Finance Committee who worked closely with the Finance Minister, that the figure that is being mentioned by the Hon Member on the other side is the right one. I guess that this figure might have found its way there as a result of our internal slips, as it were.
So, Mr Speaker, if I could crave your indulgence, I would like to make the correction and to move that the House approves the total sum -- [Pause.] Mr Speaker, the sum of GH¢64,234,144.00.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:50 p.m.
Majority Leader, you know, I receive all kinds of piece of advice. Is there another Motion you would want to take after this? Or this is the last Motion.
Dr Kunbuor 6:50 p.m.
This is the last Motion, Mr Speaker.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7 p.m.
Majority Leader, in my view, and this is not a ruling. My view is that, since you are dealing with the Judiciary, you know the constitu- tional provisions on the Judiciary, where you are not sure of the figures -- I saw that you were looking for them and so on. From today to tomorrow morning -- If it finds your favour, I would gladly welcome the fact that perhaps, you advise me to stand this down, so that you consider the figures, so that tomorrow when -- This is because the difference between 156 and 64 is rather huge, and if it were just one decimal or something--
Prof. Gyan-Baffour 7 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I think we will have to abide by your wise counsel. This is because the allocation to the Judicial Service normally goes through the Office of the President and in the President's letter may have been what is in the Report. So maybe, we should stand it down today and then refer to what the President actually approved. I think that is where the contention is.
rose
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7 p.m.
Hon Dr Akoto Osei, the Majority Leader -- I spoke to him in parables and I am sure that he understood the parables. Let us hear from him, because if he is going to withdraw it, then we must as well curtail the discussion. Afterwards, you can advise or discuss with him.
Dr A. A. Osei 7 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I said that if it came from the President, then when the Hon Minister was speaking on it, it should have been amended. So, we cannot assume that -- The facts are that, so far, it has not been amended. So, we have to go by what is here.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7 p.m.
If the Hon Majority Leader decides not to proceed, then what is here, I believe,
Dr Kunbuor 7 p.m.
Mr Speaker, I certainly take a cue from the Chair and for various obvious reasons, the Hon Professor certainly saw the correspondence from the Office of the President that has some challenges in terms of the figures. So, I would want that we actually are cautious and I would like you to stand it down till tomorrow, Mr Speaker.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7 p.m.
Hon Majority Leader, thank you very much. Motion on the Judicial Service is accordingly stood down.
Would I have any indication from you?
Dr Kunbuor 7 p.m.
Mr Speaker, lastly, we would want that we lay the Paper by the Chairman of the Food and Agriculture Committee for consideration tomorrow, that is item number 4(c) of the original Order Paper.
PAPERS 7 p.m.

Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7 p.m.
Majority Leader?
Dr Kunbuor 7 p.m.
Mr Speaker, the House is in your hands now that we have an extended Sitting. So, I would be guided by Mr Speaker on an issue like this.
Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7 p.m.
If it is in my hands, then, maybe, I will decide that we stay here until tomorrow morning.
Dr Kunbuor 7 p.m.
Very well, Mr Speaker.
Mr First Deputy Speaker 7 p.m.
I think that the House is accordingly adjourned till tomorrow at 10 o'clock in the forenoon. So, soon after that, we can meet.
Thank you very much.
ADJOURNMENT 7 p.m.

  • The House was adjourned at 6.53 p.m. till Friday, 22nd March, 2013 at 10.00 a.m.