Debates of 20 Mar 2013

MR SPEAKER
PRAYERS 11:05 a.m.

VOTES AND PROCEEDINGS AND THE OFFICIAL REPORT 11:05 a.m.

Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Hon Members, Correc- tion of Votes and Proceedings and the Official Report.
We start with the correction of the Votes and Proceedings of Tuesday, 19th March, 2013.
Page 1…7 --
Mr Foster J. Andoh 11:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, page 2, number 64 -- yesterday, I was absent with permission but I have been marked present.
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Very well; we will cross- check.
Page 8…10 --
Mr James K. Avedzi 11:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, yesterday, the House approved the estimates of the National Development Planning Commission (N D P C) but it has not been captured. So, I would want the Table Office to capture it.
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Hon Member for Ketu North, look at item number 25 at page 14.
Mr Avedzi 11:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, that is what I am talking about but I thought it could be captured first because it was the first --
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
This is because it was one of the early items that we took yesterday.
Mr Avedzi 11:05 a.m.
Yes, Mr Speaker.
Mr Frederick Opare-Ansah 11:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I believe that should have come a bit earlier, especially --
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Yes, I agree with you. This is because I presided over the estimates for the National Development Planning Commission yesterday. So, where it is captured, creates the impression that somebody else presided over it. So, the Table Office should take note and correct it.
Page 11 --
Mr Dahamani Alhassan 11:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, page 8, item number 6, the last paragraph,
“The Rt Hon Speaker on behalf of the House wished the delegation
…”
Mr Speaker, it should have read “I wished” but “I” is omitted. Instead of “I wished” it is only “wished”. I do not know.
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
They are reporting; I think it is correct. What is there is correct. In the Hansard the “I” that I used, would be captured but not in the Votes and Procee- dings.
Mr Dahamani Alhassan 11:05 a.m.
Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
Page 12…27 --
Mr Simon E. Asimah 11:05 a.m.
Mr Speaker, page 26(ix), “Mr Longman Attakumah”. That is the name and not “Attakamah.”
Then on page 27(xxvi), it should be “Mr Frank Kofi Dei -- Director of Budget, Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing” and not “Mr Frank Kofi Dei-- Rent Control Department.”
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Why, your roman numbers are not good?
Mr Asimah 11:05 a.m.
Yes, I am not good at the roman numerals.
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Then that is 26
Mr Asimah 11:05 a.m.
All right.
Thank you, Mr Speaker.
Still I am having a problem with the roman numerals, so item (xxii)-- “Mr William Nunoo” and not “Mr William Numed.”
Mr Speaker 11:05 a.m.
Very well.
Page 28…33 --
Mr Justice J. Appiah 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am taking you back to page 25.
Mr Speaker, Hon Thomas Kwesi Nasah was not at the meeting of the Committee of Works and Housing and yet he has been marked present.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Which item are you referring to?
Mr Appiah 11:15 a.m.
Item number 2(iii) -- “Mr Thomas Kwesi Nasah”; he was not part of the meeting.
Mr Speaker, thank you.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Very well.
Yes, Hon Member for Shai-Osudoku?
Mr David T. Assumeng 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, in the morning, he was present. He came but asked for permission to join the Vice President to attend a meeting in his constituency. So, he was present.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Members, at the beginning of the meeting, was he there?
Mr Assumeng 11:15 a.m.
Yes, Mr Speaker. He was there.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Very well.
Mr Opare-Ansah 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am wondering if I came this morning and I came to your office to seek permission to travel, would I be marked as present?
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
I learnt he was at the meeting at the initial stage.
Mr Opare-Ansah 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, his initial submission was that --
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
When I posed the question to him whether he was at the meeting from the beginning, the answer the Chairman of the Committee gave was “Yes”. If he was not at the meeting at all, then his name cannot be here.
Hon Member, was he at the meeting?
Mr Assumeng 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, he was in the meeting before he was granted permission to join the Vice President.
Mr Opare-Ansah 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, his purpose at the meeting was not to attend but to ask for permission to leave. So, he was not at the meeting.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Member --
Mr Thomas Kwesi Nasah 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I came and asked for permission from my Hon Chairman and left for my constituency. [Interruption.] Yes, I was in the meeting and I requested for permission from my Hon Chairman --
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
How many minutes did you spend at the meeting? [Laughter.]
Mr Nasah 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I did 30 minutes
-- 11:15 a.m.

Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Yes, Hon Member for Nkoranza North --

Maj. Derek Oduro (retd): Mr Speaker, the Hon Colleague is here, we have to find out from him what they discussed at the meeting, so that we would be able to know -- [Interruption] -- yes. He should tell us.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Members, the Chairman of the Committee has spoken that he was there briefly, took permission from him the Chairman and then left to join the Vice President's team.
rose
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Members, we should not waste too much time on this issue.
Hon Member for Ablekuma North, you raised the issue, let me hear from you.
Mr J. J. Appiah 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I called my Hon Friend -- Hon Kwesi Nasah is my best Friend -- and he told me he was in the North, just before the meeting started. So, I do not see where he came and asked for permission from the Chairman. I talked to him early in the morning and he said he was in the North. I do not want to expose my Hon Chairman but I think the right thing must be done at the right time.
Thank you very much.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Nasah, did the Hon Member for Ablekuma North call you yesterday?
Mr Nasah 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, he called me but after that I left to the constituency --
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Let me take the last contribution from the Hon Chairman of the Committee.
Mr Assumeng 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, in the same vein, Hon Joe Appiah also asked for permission and left the meeting and so, I do not know why he is -- [Interruption]
-- he also asked for permission and left the meeting.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Members, we would find out and then we would know how to capture it.
Page 27, 28,--
Mr Kwame G. Agbodza 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, page 26, I was at the Works and Housing Committee meeting but my name was not captured. My name is Kwame Agbodza, Adaklu Constituency.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Very well.
Page 29 … 35 --
Dr Matthew O. Prempeh 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am pretty sure that I was at the Health Committee meeting and I even made changes to our Report but my name has been omitted -- [Interruption] -- We do not go to committees to sign; we go to committees to contribute.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Member, you address the Chair.
Dr Prempeh 11:15 a.m.
Sorry, Mr Speaker.
Mr Speaker, the Hon Member for Odododiodioo caught me unawares and I apologise for that. But I have to tell you, Mr Speaker, that we go to committees to contribute, not to sign and run away. He signs and runs away because he cannot contribute.
Mr Charles Obeng-Inkoom 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, we had a meeting of the Defence and Interior Committee yesterday but it is not captured.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Yes, when it is brought to the Table Office, it would be captured subsequently. I am sure your Clerk did not submit it to the Table Office, that is why it is not captured.
Mr Joseph Osei-Owusu 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, the report omits the meeting of the Committee on Transport yesterday.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Yes, normally, the Clerk submits it to the Table Office and it is added as a supplement. So, if the Clerk to the Committee did not submit it or did not submit it in good time, then it would not be captured. But I am sure subsequently, it would be captured.
Page 35, 36 --[Pause]--
Hon Members, the Votes and Proceedings of Wednesday, 19th March, 2013 as corrected, are hereby adopted as the true record of proceedings.
Hon Members, we have two Official Reports for correction. We would start with that of Thursday, 14th March, 2013 -
- 11:15 a.m.

Dr Ahmed Y. Alhassan 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, column 1607, the very first paragraph, there are some problems with the acronyms. “FASDEP” is Food and Agricultural Sector Development Policy and “METASIP” is not “MATE” --
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
What is the full rendition?
Dr Alhassan 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, it is “METASIP” -- Medium-term Agricultural Sector Investment Plan; that is the full one. And “CAADP” -- Comprehensive Africa Agricultural Development Policy --
The third paragraph, the seventh line, the spelling of “surpluses” has got to be checked -- “surpluses”.
I thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
Mr Isaac Adjei Mensah 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, column 1661, paragraph 2, line 7 -- “Task force”; it is spelt “tax” but it should be “Task”. Mr Speaker, the same thing
applies to paragraph 3, the last sentence -- “Task” is indicated “Tax”; it should be “TASK”.
Ms Patricia Appiagyei 11:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, column 1617, last paragraph; Mr Agyekum's name has been misspelt. I think it is a typographical mistake; if we could correct it.
Mr Agbodza 11:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, column 1569, paragraph 2, the statement attributed to Hon Wumbei Suhuyini is actually a statement I made. [Pause.]
It is on just the second page of the document.
Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
I have seen it, but were you the one who did the correction?
Mr Agbodza 11:25 a.m.
Yes, I did the correction.
Mr Francis Addai-Nimoh 11:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, column 1625, paragraph 4, the word “behalf” is missing between the two words: “whose” and “the”. That is “public authority on whose behalf…”
Mr Alexander Afenyo-Markin 11:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, column 1577, a statement attributed to you: “Hon Member, your time is up.” It is spelt “term”.
Mr Kwame Asafu-Adjei 11:25 a.m.
Mr Speaker, column 1656, paragraph 4, line 3: It should be corrected to read: “I would do just that,” instead of “I would do just right.” [Pause]
Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
Hon Members, in the absence of any further correction, the Official Report of Thursday, 14th March, 2013 as corrected, is hereby adopted as the true record of proceedings.
  • [No correction was made to the Official Report of Monday, 18th March, 2013.]
  • Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Hon Members, at the Commencement of Public Business -- Presentation of Papers.
    Hon Deputy Majority Leader, which Papers are ready to be laid?
    Mr Alfred K. Agbesi 11:25 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, item 4 (a), (b), (d) (i) and (ii), then (e) (ii) and (iii). Then we go to (i) on page 3 and then (l) and (m) (i) and (ii) and then (n) (i) and (ii). Those are ready for laying.
    PAPERS 11:25 a.m.

    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Item 4 (n) (i).
    Dr Alhassan 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, (n)(i) is not ready; it is (n)(ii) that is ready for laying.
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Are you the Chairman?
    Dr Alhassan 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, yes, I am the Chairman.
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    For Defence and Interior?
    Dr Alhassan 11:35 a.m.
    No, not for Defence and Interior but for Agriculture.
    Mr Agbesi 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, we can take Motion numbered 8 on the Trade and Industry Ministry.
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Does it mean that items 5, 6 and 7 are not ready to be taken?
    Mr Agbesi 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Minister for Trade and Industry is to attend an emergency meeting.
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    If you are deferring an item, you should have explained to the House that we want to take item 8 out of turn.
    Mr Agbesi 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Minister for Trade and Industry is to attend an urgent meeting, for that matter, we are asking for permission that we take his Motion out of turn. So, Motion number 8.
    Mr Dominic B. A. Nitiwul 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think that is in order. For items 5, 6 and 7, we can excuse them and take 8 and maybe, later on, look at 6 and 7 and see and leave out item 5. This is because of the interraction you had with him.
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Very well.
    CONSIDERATION OF ANNUAL 11:35 a.m.

    Minister for Trade and Industry (Mr Haruna Iddrisu) (MP) 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢124,868,439 under the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) estimates for the Ministry of Trade and Industry for its programmes and activities for the 2013 fiscal year.
    Mr Speaker, I am grateful for the opportunity to indicate some of the successes that were achieved in the year 2012 and to outline our proposed programmes and projects earmarked for the 2013 fiscal year.
    Mr Speaker, the Ministry will pursue its activities through its agencies, namely, the Ghana Standards Authority, the Ghana Export Promotion Authority, the Export Development Investment and Agricultural Fund and then Central Regional Development Corporation (CEDECOM).
    Mr Speaker, in 2012, the Private Sector Advisory Council with a Board was commissioned and some flagship initiatives with technical assistance from our development partners were undertaken.
    Mr Speaker, in the 2010 fiscal year, the Ministry of Trade and Industry would continue to work to diversify and increase exports, increase the competitiveness of

    our country, particularly for domestic and international trade and continue to create an enabling environment for the country.

    In doing so for this year, the Ministry will review the implementation of the Export Development and Agricultural Investment Fund (EDAIF) Act to make it more private sector responsive by providing a resource envelope for the activities of private sector enterprises and industry.
    Mr Opare-Ansah 11:35 a.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Minister is on his feet moving a Motion that is entirely different from what is contained in the Order Paper. The Order Paper states in the Motion the amount of GH¢124,868,440, but I heard the Hon Minister moving for GH¢124,868,439, a difference of a whopp- ing GH¢1.00.
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Hon Minister for Trade and Industry, the Committee's Report is giving us what you have moved, so you should have amended the Order Paper before moving the Motion. So, kindly amend the Order Paper and give us the correct figure.
    Mr H. Iddrisu 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to seek an amendment to item 8 by just the substitution of 440 for 439 at the end. Mr Speaker, I beg to move-- [An Hon Member: No!] All right, I will yield to the Chairman of the Finance Committee.
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Hon Members, what we have in the Committee's Report is GH¢124,868,439. What we have on the Order Paper is GH¢124,868,440. So, it is not only amending the 440 to 439, it is more than that.
    Prof. George Y. Gyan-Baffour 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Order Paper is correct. It is rather the Report that has dropped it by just 1.00. So, the Report should rather be “440” instead of “439”. So, the Order Paper is all right; it is the Report that should be “440” instead of “439”.
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Hon Members, our Committee is bringing us a report and at the end of the day, the micro ceiling for the Ministry should all tally, both the Motion the Hon Minister is moving and what is in the Committee's Report. So, you are the Ranking Member.
    Prof Gyan-Baffour 11:35 a.m.
    What I am saying is that the Order Paper gives the correct figure that is in the budget. In the calculation, I think they rounded it off and it came to “439” instead of “440”. So, the Report should read “440”. It should be amended to be “440”.
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    So, the Hon Minister is right?
    Prof Gyan-Baffour 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Minister is right. Yes.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, in moving the estimates, committees should look at the allocation made in the main budget and correct their reports accordingly even at the committee level. Other than that, if we are not careful, we may approve estimates in this House which are not in consonance with what is in the budget and then when it comes to Appropriations --
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Hon Member for Sekondi, what about the situation where what is in the budget itself is wrong? We have experienced that before in this House.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, but that ought to be corrected at the committee level and we must be careful because it is not easy to see what is wrong here. That is the caution that I am sounding.
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Hon Chairman, let me hear from you and I would hear from the Finance Committee.
    Alhaji Amadu B. Sorogho 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is just a calculation which was wrongly put here. The actual figure is 440. So, when you do the tabulation very well, it is 440. So, the one cedi -- So, the budget estimate is correct. If I had had the opportunity, I was going to correct the figure and so, I was just waiting for the opportunity to correct it. It is one cedi difference that we are talking of. But of course, it is not the amount.
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Hon Members, we are dealing with figures and they must all tally.
    Let me hear from the Hon Chairman, then I will get back to you.
    Mr Avedzi 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think I agree with the Hon Ranking Member and the Hon Member for Sekondi.
    There are items that are put together and the rounding up of the figures, sometimes does not agree with the global total. At the Committee level, when you detect that you have to adjust any of the items -- compensation, goods and services or assets -- to agree with the total in the budget document itself. So, the Report should be amended to read “440” instead of the “439”.
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Hon Member, what is the essence of having a Committee or referring the matter to a committee? These are matters that are supposed to be reconciled, harmonised at the committee level.
    rose
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Yes, who raised the issue? Let me hear from you again, Hon Member for Suhum.
    Mr Opare-Ansah 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, these little things arise out of the spreadsheet that they use. Sometimes they suppress the decimal places at the end of the figures. So, you see in reality, it adds up to the “440” you see but because they are taking the figures from what they see and those decimal points have been suppressed, it adds up actually to 339. So, when you take the breakdown and you add it up, you will get 339 but in reality, in a spreadsheet format, it adds up to 440.
    We had the same problem with the Communications Committee, so, we came to seek advice from the Hon Member for Old Tafo. What we decided to do was to add one Ghana cedi to the IGF of the headquarters and then it translated through. We had 313 in the estimates but 314 in the budget, so by the time we came to the floor --
    So, this is free advice to the Committee Chairman.
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Hon Member for Old Tafo, let me hear from you. You have been on your feet; then I would take one each from the Hon Ranking Member and the Hon Chairman.
    Dr Anthony A. Osei 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Chairman of the Finance Committee has said appropriately what ought to be done. It is not a matter of just copying the numbers and bringing them here. So, the Committee should not have in their Report in Table 2 and the recommenda- tions “439.” So, maybe, they forgot.
    But you just do not pick the numbers; you have to make sure they match. So, I think as the Hon Chairman said, they noticed it but in the Report on page 8, it is still “439” in the Conclusion. So, the Hon Chairman would amend the Report --
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    When it gets to his turn.
    Hon Member for Wenchi, you are the Hon Ranking Member.
    Prof. Gyan-Baffour 11:45 a.m.
    Precisely so, Mr Speaker.
    After it had been printed out, we saw that error, so, he was going to amend it before presenting the Report and we did not get there and probably, the Hon Minister for Trade and Industry read it from his. So, he will amend it when it gets to the point of presenting the Report.
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Very well.
    Hon Minister for Trade and Industry, you are right. The Motion on the Order Paper is the correct one, so you are right.
    Mr H. Iddrisu 11:45 a.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, and thanks for those inputs.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this august House approves the sum of GH¢124,868,440 under the Medium-Term Expenditure Framework for the Ministry of Trade and Industry for its programmes and activities for the year 2013.
    Mr Speaker, the priority programmes of the Ministry would be a vigorous pursuit of Private Sector Development Strategy II, the Industr ial Sector Support Programme II, and shift the focus of Government from export oriented industry to import substitution industry.
    In that respect, Mr Speaker, Government will comprehensively review, as I said earlier, the EDIF legislation in order to provide a resource envelope that will support the needs of industry.
    Mr Speaker, in the course of this year, to give meaning to the President's request for a strong partnership between the public and private sectors, we expect that Ghana Industrial Holding Company (GIHOC) Distilleries will be publicly listed, so that Ghanaians can participate in the ownership and management to recapitalise GIHOC and other entities.
    Mr Speaker, it is also envisaged that, for the period 2013, work would commence by the end of July on a 35 million dollar Komenda Sugarcane Factory, while feasibility studies will be conducted in the northern part of Ghana for another sugarcane factory to be established in the northern sector of our country.
    Mr Speaker, as you are already aware, the Ghana Investment Promotion Centre (GIPC) Act has been brought to this House for its consideration in order that it would also respond to making Ghana a destination for investment countrywide.
    We will also strengthen the work of the National Export Development through a review of a policy document on export strategy for our country and get an intellectual property policy considered and approved for guidance.
    Mr Speaker, in the course of this year we will also get a national corporate social responsibility policy to guide how corporate entities respond to this important need.
    Mr Speaker, the Ghana Standards Authority, in 2012, issued some 590 health certificates to cover fish and fishery products for export and some 493 export certificates.
    The National Board for Small Scale Industries and the GRATTIS Foundation would also be assisted while Government will consider a review of the operations of CEDECOM to establish the Western Corridor Development Authority, which would be positioned like Savannah Accelerated Development Authority (SADA) in order to take care of the development needs of the western corridor which will include both the Central and Western Regions.
    I thank you for the opportunity.
    Question proposed.
    Chairman of the Committee (Alhaji Amadu B. Sorogho) 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, before presenting the Report, I would wish that a few corrections are made.
    Number one has to do with the figure given which is, on page 8. Instead of the GH¢124,868,439, it should read,
    GH¢124,868.440.
    On page 7, Mr Speaker, “sector wide allocation by source”, instead of “2013” it should be “2012”.
    Mr Speaker, in presenting the Report --
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    What about the last page?
    Alhaji Sorogho 11:45 a.m.
    “Last year” is what I said. The last year, that is captured on page 7 of the Report, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    You should also correct the last page too, even though it is consequential -- the Conclusion.
    Alhaji Sorogho 11:45 a.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker. The Conclusion” -- This is because it is consequential. I just thought that it would reflect when we get there.
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Very well.
    Dr A. A. Osei 11:45 a.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, he cannot just say you have corrected the “439” to “440.” Something else in the Table must change because eight plus one is still nine. I am sure he has the number, but you change something in the Table to achieve the effect that they want. But as it is, he said we should change it to “440” but eight plus one would not add up to zero.
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Hon Member for Old Tafo, can you help the House, so that we make progress?
    Dr A. A. Osei 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have not read the entire Report. They did it. He said they were doing it. Thus the Hon Chairman said they were going to do it.
    Alhaji Sorogho 11:55 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, IGF, where we have GH¢7,079,771 should be GH¢7,079,772 and that will add up to
    GH¢124,868,440.
    Dr A. A. Osei 11:55 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, then the last column must also change.
    Alhaji Sorogho 11:55 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, it will affect the overall.
    Dr A. A. Osei 11:55 a.m.
    But if you change that, the totals of GH¢77,876,760 cannot remain the same. Mr Speaker, they have told us that they have done all the corrections and now, give it to us, he is not giving it to us.
    Mr James K. Avedzi 11:55 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think if it is IGF, we are changing the Ministry of Trade and Industry's figure of IGF of GH¢19,340,709 to GH¢19,340,710. When we come to the total column, it will be GH¢77,876 -- [Interruption.] I am a member of the Committee.
    Mr Speaker 11:55 a.m.
    Hon Member, but he has changed something first. He mentioned a figure earlier. Is that one withdrawn?
    Mr Avedzi 11:55 a.m.
    No! He said IGF but the figure he changed is for donor. We cannot change the “donor” column: so, we have changed the IGF column. [Interruption.]
    Dr A. A. Osei 11:55 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Committee did the changes and we are going to amend it.
    Mr Speaker 11:55 a.m.
    The Chairman is changing “assets”, you are changing “goods and services”, so which one are you changing? Hon Member for Ketu North, you said you are a member of the Committee?
    Mr Speaker 11:55 a.m.
    My understanding is that the correction made by the Chairman of the Finance Committee, who is also a member of the Committee is withdrawn?
    Alhaji Sorogho 11:55 a.m.
    Yes. That one is withdrawn.
    Mr Speaker 11:55 a.m.
    He should withdraw it.
    Mr Avedzi 11:55 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I withdraw the changes.
    Mr Speaker 11:55 a.m.
    Very well.
    Alhaji Sorogho 11:55 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I present the Report of the Committee.
    1.0 Introduction
    The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2013 financial year was presented to the House on Tuesday, 5th March, 2013 in accordance with article 179 of the Constitution of Ghana by the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Emmanuel Terkpeh.
    Pursuant to the Standing Orders 140 (4) and 159 of the House, Mr Speaker referred the annual estimates for the 2013 of the Ministry of Trade and Industry to the Committee on Trade, Industry and Tourism for consideration and report.
    In considering the annual estimates, the Committee met with the Hon. Minister for Trade and industry, Hon Haruna Iddrisu, the technical team from the Ministry and agencies under the Ministry. The Committee appreciates their invaluable contributions.
    2.0 Reference documents
    The following documents served as a reference guide during the Committee's deliberations:
    1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana.
    Standing Orders of the House.
    MDAs' 2012 Actuals.
    2013 Budget Statement and Economic Policy.
    3.0 The Ministry of Trade and Industry
    3.1 Mandate
    The Ministry of Trade and Industry is the primary Government agency with the overall mandate for formulating, developing, implementing, monitoring and evaluating policies, programmes and projects to promote inclusive growth and development of trade, industry and the private sector in Ghana.
    These are being discharged within the context of the overall economic development plan of the Government of Ghana as set out in the Medium-Term National Development Policy Framework and the Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda (GSGDA).

    In line with Ghana's Shared Growth and Development Agenda (GSGDA) and the Ministry's sector medium-term plan, programmes and activities under the second phase of the Private Sector Development Strategy (PSDS II) and Industrial Sector Support Programme (ISSP) are being pursued to create jobs, increase levels of income, enhance technological advancement and improve livelihoods for all.

    In order to achieve its mandate, the Ministry has the underlisted as its priority programmes:

    Private Sector Development Stra- tegy (PSDS II).

    Industrial Sector Support Prog- ramme (ISSP).

    National Export Strategy.

    MOTI Communication Strategy.

    Trade Related and Quality Enabling (TRAQUE) Programme.

    State-owned Enterprise (SOEs):

    1. Ghana Trade Fair Company Limited (GTFCL).

    2. Ghana Heavy Equipment Company Limited.

    3. GNPA Limited.

    3.2 Vision

    To establish Ghana as a major manufacturing, value-added, financial and commercial hub in West Africa by the year

    2015.

    3.3 Mission

    To develop a vibrant, technology- driven, liberalized and competitive trade and industrial sector that significantly

    contributes to inclusive and sustainable economic growth and employment creation, particularly involving mass mobilization of rural communities and other vulnerable groups including women.

    3.4 Oversight responsibility of Ministry of Trade and Industry (MoTI)

    The Ministry of Trade and Industry (MoTI) has an oversight responsibility of the following agencies and State-owned Enterprises (SOEs):

    To ensure effective implementation of its policies:

    1. Ghana Export Promotion Authority.

    2. Ghana Standards Authority.

    3. National Board for Small Scale Enterprises.

    4. Gratis Foundation.

    5. Export Development and Agricultural Investment Fund

    (EDAIF).

    6. Ghana Freezones Board (GFZB).

    7. Central Region Development Commission.

    8. State-owned Enterprise (SOEs).

    9. Ghana Trade Fair Company Limited (GTFCL).

    10. Ghana Heavy Equipment Company Limited.

    11. Ghana National Procurement Authority (GNPA) Limited.

    12. Ghana Industrial Holding Company (GIHOC) Distilleries.
    Alhaji Sorogho 11:55 a.m.
    The Ministry also has an oversight responsibility for the operations of some special projects, namely:
    1. Ayensu Starch Company Limited
    2. Volta Star Textiles
    3. Northern Star Tomato Company Limited.
    4.0 Performance for the year, 2012
    a. Private Sector Development Strategy
    (PSDS II)
    In 2012, the Ministry pursued the implementation of PSDS II to widen economic opportunities for the transformation of the Ghanaian economic and to develop a thriving private sector that creates jobs and enhances livelihoods for all.
    b. Industrial Sector Support Programme
    (ISSP)
    During the year, the Ministry initiated the implementation of the Industrial Sector Support Programme (ISSP) to catapult growth, productivity and the employment potentials for the manufacturing sector while pursuing measures to achieve economic-wide factor productivity growth over the long-term.
    The Ministry has been reorganised and an Industry Directorate created to lead the implementation of the Industrial Policy and the Industrial Sector Support Programme with the objective of improving manufacturing. Focal persons have been identified in relevant MDAs to lead the implementation of the ISSP across the sectors.
    c. GCNet strengthened
    To provide cost effective and secure cargo transit facilities to serve landlocked

    neighbours, GCNet deployed for Customs, IP camera facilities, seals and satellite transit tracking devices as an integral part of Ghana Customs Management System (GCMS). The transit tracking system makes Ghana Customs the first customs administration to use such system in Africa. Kumasi transit tracking route has been provided with a modem to enhance the process of checking transit goods.

    d. Web-based product gallery for made- in-Ghana goods

    This programme seeks to showcase made-in-Ghana goods on the internet on a specially created website. The website is populated with about three hundred (300) products. The focus is on Small, Medium Enterprise (SMEs); however, other big companies are being targeted and have also been accommodated.

    e. Sanitization of trading activities in market places

    As part of efforts to sanitize the domestic markets from the activities of illegal non-Ghanaian traders, an inter- institutional task force made up of various institutions was reconstituted at the beginning of the 2012 to monitor and ensure the compliance of GIPC Act, 1994 (Act 478).

    The Inter-Agency Task Force market operation has covered about 2 per cent to 3 per cent of the proposed markets. The task force closed 134 shops and temporarily re-opened 108.

    The operations of the Inter-Agency Task Force compelled 70 foreign companies to pay corporate tax, submitted. VAT returns, filed annual returns, paid employee income tax and SSNIT contributions.

    f. Rural Enterprise Programme (REP III)

    In 2012, the Rural Enterprise Programme (REP II) established the Programme Co-ordination and Management Unit (PCMU) to ensure smooth implementation of the programme.

    Some of the key results achieved during the period under review were:

    Completion of two (2) major studies that will feed into the African Development Bank's appraisal of the Programme.

    Completion of an impact assess- ment study of REP II.

    Sensitization of the key stake- holders of the Programme.

    Commissioned baseline study for the Programme.

    Inaugurated Offinso Rural Tech- nology Facility (ORTF).

    g. Micro-Small and Medium Enterprises (MSME) Project

    This programme which is aimed at increasing the competiveness and employment levels of SMEs would end in June, 2013.

    It approved eight hundred and twenty- three (823) loan applications worth fifty- five million and four hundred thousand US dollars (US$55.4) for MSMEs and funded the following:

    The development of an ICT park which is 45 per cent complete.

    The construction of storm drains to prevent perennial flooding of the multi-purpose industrial park at the freezone enclave-Tema.

    Ghana Export Promotion Authority to acquire Global Positioning System (GPS) to aid in traceability of export customers.

    The provision of transformers to garment export cluster at Adjabeng, Accra;

    Trained 50 food exporters to develop the quality systems neces- sary for them to meet the Hanzard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) accreditation for export to the European Union (EU).

    h. Trade Related and Quality Enabling

    (TRAQUE)

    The programme is a joint Government of Ghana and European Union Programme to improve standards of goods and services and build capacity of staff of the Ministry on trade and trade-related issues.

    i. Ghana Commodity Exchange (GCX)

    The GCX seeks to help producers and buyers gain access to a more transparent and fair pricing system through an orderly and efficient marketing of commodities:

    The Ministry established a National Working Group on Commodity Exchange with an institutional membership comprising Ministry of Finance (MoEP), Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA), Ghana Standards Authority (GSA), Ministry of Trade and Industry (MoTI), AGD, Securities Exchange Commission and National Buffer Stock.

    The UNDP assisted the GCX National Technical Committee to undertake a study tour and training

    on commodity exchanges at the Ethiopia Commodity Exchange (ECX) Institute in Addis Ababa to facilitate its work.

    5.0 Agencies

    i. Ghana Export Promotion Authority

    (GEPA)

    Ghana Export Promotion Authority (GEPA) embarked on the following human resource development activities to improve the service and activities of exporters and trade-related organizations as well as enhance quality of products suitable for the export market:

    200 oil palm farmers were trained in Quality Export Marketing at Bechem, in the Brong-Ahafo Region.

    Capacity building training was provided for 50 Agricultural Extension Officers in Ejura Sekyeredumase.

    40 officers of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration were trained to be equipped to manage the Economic Affairs desk in Ghana's Mission abroad.

    Ghana Export School (GES) trained 20 horticultural farmers in Quality Export Marketing at Kpando (Gbefi).

    75 mango farmers were trained in Quality Export Marketing at Ho in the Volta Region.

    ii. Ghana Standards Authority (GSA)

    Ghana Standards Authority (GSA) issued 590 health certificates to cover fish and fishery products for export and 493 export certificates. It also inspected 150 fish establishments or frozen vessels, 187 consignments of yam, scrap metals and other non-traditional exports. The GSA

    further verified 23,117 weighing and measuring devices used for trading purposes and inspected 42,027 imported high risk goods.

    iii. National Board for Small Scale Industry (NBSSI)

    National Board for Small Scale Industry (NBSSI) achieved the following during the year:

    200 tailor-made programmes have been organized for 5,000 entrepre- neurs made up of 2,150 males and 2,850 females.

    50 Medium Scale Enterprise (MSEs) were assisted to participate in the 10th Ghana Internal Trade Fair.

    1,000 informal enterprises were transformed and integrated into the formal sector.

    iv. GRATIS Foundation

    GRATIS Foundation in collaboration with PLAN Ghana, with funding from HYUNDAI MOTORS through the Korean Overseas Development Agency (KOICA) established a training centre at Koforidua to train the youth in automobile engineering. It will be a three-year programme, after which trainees will be expected to graduate with the COTVET/ GES Technical Examinations Unit Certificate III.

    v. Central Regional Development Corporation (CEDECOM)

    Central Regional Development Corporation (CEDECOM) exists to promote the sustainable development of the Central Region through partnership with the private sector and development partners for agriculture, natural resource and rural development, investment

    promotion and enterprise development, integrated tourism development, and ICT development working with the MMDAs.
    Alhaji Sorogho 11:55 a.m.


    The Ministry undertook the activities enumerated above with funds as detailed in table 1 below:

    TABLE 1: SECTOR WIDE ALLOCATION BY SOURCE - 2013

    SPACE FOR TABLE 1 - PAGE 7 - 11.55AM

    NB: The increase in the compensation of employees component of the budget was due to payment of arrears and adjustment of salaries of the Trade and Investment Missions.

    Even though the approved budgetary allocations for the Ministry in 2012 was one hundred and fifty-seven million, five hundred and twenty thousand, four hundred and fifty-nine Ghana cedis (GH¢ 157,520,459.00), the total lodgement (as not all the releases were banked) for the year under review amounted to ninety-four million, six hundred and thirty-seven thousand, four hundred and fifteen Ghana cedis, nine pesewas (GH¢94,637,415.9). The variance of sixty-two million, eight hundred and eighty-three thousand forty-three Ghana cedis, ninety-one pesewas (GH¢62,883,043.91) amounted to 39.92 per cent of the total budgetary allocations.

    6.0 Outlook for the Ministry for 2013

    For 2013, the Ministry has been allocated one hundred and twenty-four million, eight hundred and sixty-eight thousand, four hundred and thirty-nine Ghana cedis (GH¢ 124,868,439.00) for its operations. The following are the details in table 2:

    TABLE 2: SECTOR WIDE ALLOCATION BY SOURCE - 2013

    SPACE FOR TABLE 2 - PAGE 8 - 11.55A.M

    NB: The IGF component of the budget includes fifty-four million four hundred and fifty-six thousand two hundred and eighty Ghana cedis (GH¢54,456,280.00) for the Ghana Free Zones Board as per Table 2 above.
    Alhaji Sorogho 11:55 a.m.
    The Committee was informed that in the year 2012, nothing was released in respect of goods and services for the Ghana Export and Promotion Authority. The Ghana Export Promotion Authority (GEPA) participated in a lot of international fairs and exhibitions in 2012. Notable among these are the Abuja and Lagos International Fairs, SIAO Fair, Izmir International Fair in Turkey, Ambiente Fair in Frankfurt-Germany, Kenya Solo Exhibition and the la Cote d' lviore Solo Exhibition.
    The Committee observed that the 2012 Export Performance Statistics Report showed a decline of 2.45 per cent of the total Non-Traditional Export (NTE) earnings in 2012. In 2011, the figure was two billion and forty-two million US dollars (US$2.42 billion) but was reduced to two billion and thirty-six million US dollars (US$ 2.36 billion) in 2012.
    The Authority was constrained with weak supply base of Non-Traditional Export (NTE) product and limited medium export financing for the exporter community.
    The Ghana Export Promotion Authority (GEPA) will implement specific, strategic projects and programmes in line with the Government's Trade Policy to support the growth of non-traditional export earnings to achieve the five billion US dollars (US$5.0 billion) target by 2015.
    The National Board for Small Scale Industries will improve small and medium enterprises access to formal credit through increased supply of funds and simplified loan application and processing procedures.
    The Board will also provide tailor-made entrepreneurial, managerial and technical skills training programmes to enhance the

    capacity of the medium and small enterprises.

    The Board will also promote the integration of women into formal business activities. The Committee was informed that the Board will make business support services easily accessible to rural entrepreneurs and also improve the quality of products to meet international standards.

    The Ghana Regional Appropriate Technology Industrial Service (GRATIS) Foundation in collaboration with PLAN Ghana is establishing a training centre at Koforidua to train the youth in automobile engineering. It has funding from the HYUNDAI MOTORS Agency (KONICA).

    Indebtedness to Messrs Cromwell International of England.

    In April, 2006, GRATIS Foundation, through national competitive bidding, contracted Messrs Cromwell International of 65th Chartwell Drive, Wigston, Leicester, England to supply workshop equipment such as Computer Numerically Control (CNC) machines, welding and fabrication equipment, foundry equipment, materials, testing equipment and measuring instruments.

    The equipment were supplied and GRATIS Foundation paid part of the cost, leaving a balance of one hundred and forty-two thousand US dollars (US$ 142,000). Efforts have been made to pay fifty thousand dollars (US$50,000), leaving a balance of ninety-two thousand dollars (US$92,000) unpaid.

    Liabilities of the GISDC as of December, 2010 when the services of K9 Security Services were terminated totalled one hundred and twenty-one thousand, five hundred and seventy-nine Ghana cedis,

    twenty-eight pesewas (GH¢ 121,579.28) GRATIS has paid seventeen thousand, five hundred Ghana cedis (GH¢17,500.00) to K9 Security Services out of the twenty- three thousand, five hundred and forty- two Ghana cedis (GH¢23,542.00) owed. The total indebtedness of the Ghana Industrial Skills Development Center now stands at one hundred and twenty thousand, two hundred and fifty-two Ghana cedis, forty-six pesewas

    (GH¢120,252.46)

    The Committee was informed that in 2012, the Foundation provided technical and income generating training programmes to the youth and vulnerable groups in various skills such as metal machinery, welders and fabrication occupational safety and health environ- mental management, engineering, architecture, et cetera.

    The Foundation also produced assorted equipments and spare parts in agric/agro and other sectors for both local and West African markets.

    The Foundation needs sufficient funds to procure cross-country vehicles for effective monitoring of the regional branches.

    It came to light that in 2012, nothing was released to the Foundation in respect of assets acquisition. Even though the Foundation was given the warrant to purchase two vehicles, payment is yet to be effected by the Ministry of Finance to GHAMOT Company which has been on the neck of the Foundation day in and day out.

    In 2013, the Foundation requested for a budgetary allocation of four million, three hundred and eighty-two thousand, nine hundred and ninety-two Ghana cedis, thirty-four pesewas (GH¢4,382,992.34) but

    was allocated two million, one hundred and thirty-one thousand, six hundred and ninety-nine Ghana cedis (GH¢2,131, 699.00) which is about 50 per cent of its request which is woefully inadequate for its activities.

    It was revealed that, the Ghana National Procurement Agency (GNPA) will need the Ministry's support to pay its thirty-six (36) employees.

    Moreover, the Agency lacked seed capital for bulk purchase of food items.

    The Central Regional Development Corporation was paid five million, four hundred thousand Ghana cedis (GH¢5,400,000.00) to clear arrears of 2011 in 2012 in respect of social intervention projects. However, there is an outstanding amount of five million, eight hundred thousand Ghana cedis (GH¢5,800,000.00). The Committee was informed that the Ministry of Finance has given the green light and it was up to the corporation to present certificate for onward payments.

    The Authority continued its market, product and other promotional and developmental activities.

    8.0 Recommendations

    Based on the above observations, the Committee would wish to make the following recommendations for the consideration of the House. It is the hope of the Committee that these recommenda- tions, when adopted, would go a long way to help the Ministry, its departments and agencies to achieve set goals and targets.

    Ministry of Trade and Industry

    The Ministry should liaise with the Ministry of Finance to ensure the timely release of funds to the Ministry, Departments and Agencies.
    Mr Daniel Nii Kwartei Titus-Glover (NPP -- Tema East) 12:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion on the annual budget estimates for the Ministry of Trade and Industry.
    In the presentation made by the Chairman of the Committee, if I heard him clearly; he said not enough provision was made for the Private Sector Development Strategy II (PSDSII). Mr Speaker, that is not true. Nothing was provided in this budget for the Private Sector Development Strategy II.
    Mr Speaker, if I proceed further, there is a need for us to critically examine the year under review. We are dealing with a country that is into oil production. The Ministry Mr Speaker, has under performed and for that matter, there is the need for us to get the statistics very clear. The Ministry is before this House, seeking your approval for moneys to be provided for them to superintendent the activities of industries in this country.
    Mr Speaker, in the year 2009, the contribution of industry into GDP was negative 1.3 per cent. This is a serious matter, Mr Speaker. It rose in 2010 to 7.6 and fell drastically to 1.7 per cent under the era of “Better Ghana Agenda”. This is an issue that we need to confront as a

    country. We need to be very serious. Mr Speaker -- [Interruptions] -- There have been some factors that have contributed to the abysmal performance of industries as long as the “Better Ghana Agenda” is concerned. And Mr Speaker, I am talking about high interest rates. Mr Speaker, in this budget, Ghana is telling us --
    Mr Speaker 12:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, we have finished with the principles of the budget -- [Interruptions] -- Hon Member, kindly take your seat. We have finished with the principles of the budget -- [Interruptions] -- Hon Member, as much as possible, limit yourself to the annual estimates because the general policy and principles of the financial policy have been debated. That was what you did last week.
    I am not saying that you cannot draw our attention to interest rates, you can, but that should not be your main focus - - You can mention them in passing but your main focus must be the estimates which are before the House.
    Mr Titus-Glover 12:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, thank you very much.
    Mr Speaker, in the year 2012, an allocation of GH¢157,520,459.00 was approved by this House to the Ministry and the releases that we had was GH¢96,592,836.22. A shortfall of GH¢63 million.
    Mr Speaker, we need to be very careful for all the approval that we are seeking for this Ministry. This year, the possibility of all these moneys not being given to the Ministry is something that we need to be very careful about and we need to draw attention. This is because the Ministry has a lot of task to make sure that all the State agencies under the Ministry are performing to support the industrial sector that we are talking about.
    Mr Speaker 12:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, do you have a problem with the estimates? Look at the terms of the Motion -- [Interruption] -- Hon Member, do you have problems with the estimates before us? That is the substance of the Motion.
    Mr Titus-Glover 12:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the dum so dum so is a problem --
    Mr Speaker 12:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, take your seat.
    Hon Member, you know that you can raise energy issues and all those things. We are talking about the estimates now -- That was why I made the point early on that we had debated the whole of last week to look at the general policy of the budget. We are talking about allocation made to the Ministry of Trade and Industry and therefore, relevance becomes very, very

    important. Relevance in terms of your submission. Do you have any problem with the estimates? If you do not have any problem, say so, so that I can move to the next person. Otherwise, if you open the floodgates, if you take one sector, we cannot leave here today.

    Do you have any problem with the estimates, that is the substance of the Motion? Are you against the approval of the Motion or you are for the approval of the Motion for the amount stated.
    Mr Titus-Glover 12:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, thank you very much for your direction.
    rose
    Mr Speaker 12:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, do you have a point of order?
    Mr Akandoh 12:05 p.m.
    Exactly so.
    Mr Speaker 12:05 p.m.
    What is your point of order?
    Mr Akandoh 12:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, you asked the Hon Member a question, whether he has a problem with the estimates and he seems to be debating. The relevance is not showing on the floor of the House.
    Mr Titus-Glover 12:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am not certain about the actual -- GH¢81,000.00 out of GH¢330,000 for the Ghana Export Promotion Authority; we want an export driven economy where we do not have a lot of American dollars to
    support this economy. And Mr Speaker, with this GH¢31,000.00, I am afraid some of the good works that the Export Promotion Authority would be doing will fall short and they will come back to this House for another money. I think that there is a lot that we can do to support the Ghana Export Promotion Authority --
    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    Hon Member, conclude. I was giving you the chance because you are speaking for the Ranking Member. So, conclude.
    Mr Titus- Glover 12:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have spoken for only five minutes.
    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    Hon Member, we have a lot of Motions to lay, so kindly conclude.
    Your last sentence.
    Mr Titus -Glover 12:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, under the observation --
    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    Hon Member, when the Chair calls you and you do not listen -- I do not intend to cut you. Please, conclude. The Leaders have advised the Chair the number of Members who would speak on each Motion.
    Mr Titus-Glover 12:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in conclusion, one of the observations that were made in my report --
    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    Is that Hon Titus- Glover?
    Mr Titus Glover 12:15 p.m.
    Yes, I am, Mr Speaker. [Interruptions.]
    The non-payment of compensation to the landowners, where the trade fair site is located, Mr Speaker, we need to consider it very carefully. I can see my Hon Colleague Nii Amasah Namoale is out of his seat. I would want to join him to
    say that Government makes provision to compensate the people of La. After all, we are in an era where the priority of this Government is to make provision for judgment debts -- questionable ones.
    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    Hon Member, your time is up.
    Titus-Glover: Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    One more from my right hand side of the House.
    Hon Member for Ketu North.
    Mr James K. Avedzi (NDC -- Ketu North) 12:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion on the floor of the House and urge my Hon Colleagues to approve the sum of GH¢124,868,440.00 for the Ministry of Trade and Industry for the running of the Ministry for 2013 fiscal year.
    Mr Speaker, in doing so, I would just want to read a recommendation that was made by the Committee on page 17 under the “Ministry of Finance”:
    “The Committee urges the Ministry of Finance to allocate funds to support the activities of the Private Sector Development Strategy II (PSDSII) in 2013.”

    Mr Ignatius Baffour Awuah -- rose
    -- 12:15 p.m.

    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    Hon Member for Sunyani West.
    Mr Baffour Awuah 12:15 p.m.
    On a point of order!
    Thank you, Mr Speaker. This time, you have got it right.
    Mr Speaker, since the Hon Member is a member of the Committee, I would want
    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    Corrected to 2012.
    Mr Baffour Awuah 12:15 p.m.
    I have not finished. What has been corrected to 2012? Mr Speaker, on the IGF side, we have an approved figure of GH¢23,729,311.00 and a release of GH¢6,139,333.12.
    Mr Speaker, the information I would want from the Committee member --
    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    It should be all the Committee members. This is their Report.
    Mr Awuah 12:15 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker. The internally generated funds (IGFs) are generated locally and within the institution and -- if a release of six million Ghana cedis out of 23 million Ghana cedis was made, the release was made by whom? From whom to whom? I would want know from the Committee. This is because I would want to believe that this is an amount which was generated internally, so, if he is saying that a release of so, much was made, then the question is, by whom?
    Mr Avedzi 12:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, even though the point of order has no relevance to my debate on the issue, but IGF --
    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    That was why I corrected him to the members of the Committee. He is referring to a Committee's Report and he is entitled to get that clarification. If you can provide an answer, you can, otherwise, I would call on the Chairman or the Ranking Member.
    Mr Avedzi 12:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think that the IGF is collected by the agencies and paid into their own account. By our own law here, they are allowed to utilise that fund. So, it is in a way, a release to them by the Act.
    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    Hon Member, you know sometime ago, we passed a law on IGF in this House, that before you keep your IGF, there should be a law. So, first of all, you must look at the law to see whether it states that they are supposed to retain 100 per cent of their collection or they are to keep part of it. So, it is not a straight- forward issue that you generate and then --
    Mr Haruna Iddrisu 12:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if I do have an opportunity to sum up, I may be able to respond to some of these issues.
    The IGF of the Ministry is largely a percentage of the Destination Inspection Fee which is paid to a number of agencies including the Ministry of Trade and Industry and volumes of imports affect what comes in. So, they have got less than the projected. That would be the explanation, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    Hon Minister, you better take a look at the point that he is raising. The point is that, release is GH¢ 6.1million, approved GH¢ 23.7 million, and there is a lodgement of GH¢5.4 million. So, where is the difference? If you look at the issue the Hon Member is raising, that is the --
    Dr A. A. Osei 12:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the entire IGF, if they are right, comes from the Ministry of Trade and Industry (MoTI) and Ghana Free Zones Board (GFZB). Now, the issue that my Hon Colleague is raising is that, are they saying that both MoTI and GFZB, the only amount they
    raised was GH¢5.4 million? That is the question. If they did raise more than that, the target was GH¢23.00; then there was a problem. There should have been documentation to confirm that there was a shortfall from MoTI as well as GFZB. I do not believe the reason is that, you are already projecting GH¢54.00 million. So, it is very likely that you reached your targets in 2012, that is why you are over estimating.
    So there is an issue of where the MoTI and GFZB keep the GH¢23 million. It is not evident here; that is the issue the Hon Member is raising.
    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    Hon Members, even it is more than that; he asked the question of who released it. This is because if GH¢6.1 is released, where is the lodgement of 5.4?
    Dr A. A. Osei 12:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that is the problem. GFZB gets 100 per cent retention, so they cannot be lodging at the Ministry. GFZB is 100 per cent retention. So, they should not be talking about lodging in the Consolidated Fund. The law says ‘keep it'? The question is, did they raise the GH¢23 million or not, and where did they keep it? That is not so clear here; that is the issue he is raising.
    Alhaji Sorogho 12:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think as far as the Free Zones Board's figures are concerned, they are not part of the 2012 at all. What happens is that -- [Interruption] -- No, the 2012 -- no but 2013 -- That is why if you watch the 2013 projections, under the internally generated funds (IGFs), you would see there is a line and it has been shown under as Ministry of Trade and Industry (MoTI) -- 19, Free Zones -- 54. So, this year, we insisted and it was included. But

    what I am saying is that, the GH¢23 million, which is there was paid. The GH¢5 million that was released is a percentage of the 23. This is because MoTI is not supposed to retain 100 per cent. MoTI does not retain 100 per cent; so, that figure there is the percentage that came to MoTI. MOTI thought they could get as much as GH¢23 million based on the collections but at the end of the day, what really they got is what is reflecting here. The releases were six but the actual lodgement came up to five.
    Dr A. A. Osei 12:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if MoTI does not get 100 per cent retention, five out of six is what percentage? What does the law say MoTI should retain? It raises issues; is it 25 per cent? That is the issue; because if they retain 50 per cent, then five is only GH¢10 million; it cannot be six. That is the issue.
    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    Hon Members, let me hear from the Ranking Member.
    Prof. Gyan-Baffour 12:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if you look at that Table, none of the approved allocations actually tally with the releases and that is natural. You would see that the donor -- GH¢110,068,244.00 and we had only GH¢66,508,100.58. Even the ABFA which is GH¢13,040,610.000, it was only GH¢8,850,808.11 that was realised. So, similarly, the IGF was GH¢23,729,311.00 that was the projection in the budget but it does not necessarily mean that they would have got all of it.
    What we do not have here probably, is what they really collected and the percentage that was given to MoTI. Yes, that one is missing but it does not mean that GH¢23,729,311.00 is what they should have, it is what was projected. But that which came to them is the GH¢6,139,333.12 and that is very natural. It may have been that they overestimated in the 2012 Budget and they did not get all of them.
    -- 12:25 p.m.

    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    So, what is the difference between the releases and the lodgements?
    Prof. Gyan-Baffour 12:25 p.m.
    Exactly, Mr Speaker, they may have in the books of whatever is being collected as so much, but what has been lodged in an account is dull and that is what they are saying, and that difference should be actually lodged somewhere maybe, even now. So, at the time of the presentation, this is what had been lodged into the account but they know that this is what -- and that difference is about one million Ghana cedis or something like that would need to be added --
    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    It is less than one million Ghana cedis.
    Prof. Gyan-Baffour 12:25 p.m.
    Yes, less than one million Ghana cedis. So, the words “lodgement” the “release” are not very specific to only the IGF but to everything in that column and they were used in a generic manner. It means that they have not received it but they are expecting to get it.
    Dr Prempeh 12:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that is a very good attempt to explain and we still need that information. This is because the difference is not one million Ghana cedis or less than one million, it is more than one million.
    But Mr Speaker, if the Ministry's projection of GH¢23,729,311.00 is hit --
    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    Hon Member, the difference is less than one million Ghana cedis -- Please, the projection in the estimates is GH¢23,729,311.00; we are not talking about that. We are talking about the release and the lodgement.
    Dr Prempeh 12:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am talking about total release and total lodgement. One is GH¢96,542,836.32 and the other is GH¢94,637,415.09 -- [Interruption] -- I said the total of releases is GH¢96,542,836.32; total lodgement -- GH¢94,637,415.09. Even if we add one million, it would be GH¢95,637,415.09. So, it is more than -- that is what I am saying the total.
    But Mr Speaker, the fundamental issue is that if we projected GH¢23,729,311.00, assuming we got five, now, they are projecting GH¢54 million, what is the basis? --
    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    So, they are now projecting 19.
    Dr Prempeh 12:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what is even the basis?
    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    Based on his explanation, they are now projecting 19.3.
    Dr Prempeh 12:25 p.m.
    That is why, Mr Speaker, it is very important that committees are given --
    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    Hon Members, let us make progress. I direct that the Committee on Trade and Industry should pursue this matter while we concentrate on the annual estimates for 2013. I so direct; so let us proceed.
    Mr Avedzi 12:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I was just saying that if the recommendation of the Committee is that, the Ministry of Finance supports the Private Sector Development Strategy 11, this could go in a long way to the development of the private sector. As we have all been saying that the private
    sector is the engine of growth, that can relate in the creation of more jobs for our people, expansion of the economy, therefore, the industry sector can contribute more to the GDP growth for the good of this country.
    Mr Speaker, this is the only point I would want to make and I want to urge Colleagues that we approve this budget for the Ministry, so that they can run the Ministry for the year 2013.
    Mr Joseph B. A. Danquah (NPP -- Abuakwa North) 12:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the annual estimates for the Ministry of Trade and Industry to the tune of GH¢124,868,440 and I would want to share a few words in support of this budget allocation. My area of concern is about the private sector and also the industry policy support that the Ministry is going to carry out this year.
    Mr Speaker, you may well recall that, as a country, our competitiveness is key in the generation of employment and income, therefore, in this year's outlook, where the Minister and the Ministry are going to undertake a lot of private sector related programmes and industry sector support programmes, it is important that the right policies and support are given to this area.
    Mr Speaker, you may also recall that it has been indicated in the Report that there is no budgetary allocation for this programme and I would indulge the Minister to ensure that a lot of support is given towards this programme, so that we would become competitive as a country and we would be able to generate the income, so desired and then create employment and jobs for our teeming youth and for entrepreneurs in this country.
    Mr Speaker, the Minister mentioned the Komenda Sugar Factory. Mr Speaker, I would want to advise that we do not only depend on the Government. Where the funds are coming from is important but I would be happy if we would encourage the Ghanaian private sector to undertake this commendable project, the Komenda Sugar Factory in the Central Region and not to depend on the State.
    Yes, the State may provide the infrastructure or may provide the funds but the implementation thereof, let the Ghanaian businessman or the Ghanaian entrepreneur undertake this project with the funds coming from India or from the Government and not the Government itself undertaking this manufacturing of sugar. Otherwise, it would become a GIHOC model.
    As we may rightly know, today, GIHOC is going onto the stock market and we would want to revamp it and therefore, bring it into the private-public ownership with the management being undertaken by private-Ghanaian individuals. That is the model that I would want us to look at when we talk about the Komenda Sugar Factory.
    Mr Speaker, with these few words, I would also want to add on the Ghana Free Zones Board. Mr Speaker, it is important that --
    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    I thought you were concluding when you said --
    Mr Danquah 12:25 p.m.
    I am concluding on the Ghana Free Zones Board, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker, the Ghana Free Zones concept is a very laudable concept and I think I would be very happy if it is open to the larger Ghanaian economy or the Ghanaian entrepreneur, especially so when the enclave is under-populated. We would be happy to have a lot more factories situated in the free zones enclave, so that they can enjoy the benefits of this policy.
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    Hon Members, that brings us to the end of the debate.
    Hon Minister, do you intend winding up?
    Mr H. Iddrisu 12:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if you would indulge me, it would be appreciated.
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    I give you one minute.
    Prof. Dominic Fobih 12:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think there is an error on page 15, the third paragraph. So, maybe, we can change it at this point. There is a figure there -- 121,579.28; is that the right figure? If it is not, maybe, we have to find a way to amend it.
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    You are a member of the Committee, what is the correct figure?
    Prof. Fobih 12:35 p.m.
    The Hon Minister would actually respond to that.
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    Hon Minister --
    Mr H. Iddrisu 12:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would indulge the Hon Chairman to engage the Hon Ranking Member to resolve it while I just take one minute to sum up.
    Mr Speaker, thank you for the opportunity.
    On the Komenda Sugar Factory, Mr Speaker, it is a loan facility from the Government of India for US$ 35 million, which was approved by this august
    House. We are currently concluding the procurement process in accordance with Ghanaian law for award of the contract.
    But I would want to assure my Hon Colleagues that a number of Ghanaian entities would be open up for public- private partnership including the Ayensu Starch Factory, Neoplan Ghana, sited both in Kumasi and Accra.
    I have been consulting with my Hon Colleague, the Minister for Finance who presides over Government shares, that with the trust of the President's message being a strong partnership of the private sector, we would publicly delist the Ghana Stock Exchange Market. The Keta Salt Project would also commence and transaction advisers would be appointed accordingly to do an assessment of the values of those and open them up for public-private partnership.
    Mr Speaker, let me conclude by saying that the Government of Ghana is currently engaging stakeholders in order to conclude on an interim economic partnership agreement to avoid dire consequence for Ghanaian exports. We will at some level, commit to a West African protocol and sign with the EU in order that we can protect the 40 per cent exports that go into the market.
    Mr Speaker, my final comment is that Government will review the operations and performance of the DICs and the GCNET in terms of valuing and classification of imports in order that we can strengthen the partnership between GICs and Customs and eventually build the capacities of Customs to take over valuation.
    In that respect, a number of committees would be put in place and the Tariff Advisory Board would be converted to an International Trade Commission, which would deal with petitions of
    dumping, unfair trade practices and other issues. Government remains determined to ease the cost of doing business by short and medium-terms in making available to industry.
    I thank you, Mr Speaker -- and I understand that page 15 has been rectified accordingly.
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    Hon Members, that brings us to the end of the debate.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved:
    That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢124,868,440 is hereby approved for the services of the Ministry of Trade and Industry for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
    Mr Agbesi 12:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if we can take Motion numbered 5 for the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum.
    Dr A. A. Osei 12:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I crave your indulgence.
    Following the discussions that we had earlier, I think that it may be prudent not to look at the Ministry of Energy's budget since the petroleum issues flow in there - - GNPC's allocation. Until we do that correction, it would not be the best. So, I crave your indulgence.
    The Finance Committee is expected to meet with the Hon Minister today. Once that is solved, then we get the correct numbers to make sure that the number is all right. This is because if it comes out and they use the wrong numbers, we would be making a mistake.
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    Hon Deputy Majority Leader, let me hear from you first before I give any guideline that I might want to give.
    Mr Agbesi 12:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to understand his concern.
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    Hon Members, it may be recalled that yesterday, the Hon Member wanted to raise an issue and I advised that he should see me in my lobby, the Speaker's Lobby this morning together with the Hon Minority Leader and the Hon Majority Leader.
    He came to meet us in the Speaker's Lobby and raised some issues and I would direct that the Hon Chairman and the Hon Ranking Member on Mines and Energy and the Hon Chairman of the Finance Committee and the Hon Ranking Member on the Finance Committee should meet the Hon Minister for Energy and Petroleum and the Hon Minister for Finance to reconcile some figures in the Budget Statement and the annual report of the Petroleum Fund, so that when the debate comes on the floor of the House, it does not create unnecessary delay.
    Figures can cause a lot of delay on the floor of the House as we witnessed this morning. Therefore, my position is that as much as possible, let us iron out those figures, so that when we come to the floor of the House, the debate can be smooth as much as possible. I so direct.
    So, Hon Deputy Majority Leader --
    Mr Agbesi 12:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in that case, we would take Motion numbered 10 for the Ministry of Health.
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    Very well.
    Hon Members, item number 10 on the Order Paper.
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 12:35 p.m.

    Minister for Health (Ms Hanny- Sherry Ayittey) 12:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢3,529,444,056 for the services of the Ministry of Health for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
    Minister for Health (Ms Hanny- Sherry Ayittey) 12:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move that the sum of GH¢3,529,444,056 (three billion, five hundred and twenty-nine million, four hundred and forty-four thousand and fifty-six Ghana cedis) be provided to finance the recurrent and capital expenditures of the Ministry of Health and its agencies for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
    Out of this, GoG is providing GH¢508,879,926. Social Intervention Programme (SIP) -- GH¢46,840,000; Annual Budget Funding Amount (ABFA) -- GH¢29,900,000; Internally Generated Fund (IGF) Donor -- GH¢1,831,402,804; GH¢194,462,917; and National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) GH¢917,858,409.
    Mr Speaker, these resources would be used to support the mandate of the Ministry of Health for promoting good health, preventing diseases and injuries and restoring the health of the sick and the incapacitated. The resources would also support the objectives of the Ministry of Health, which under the Ghana Shared Growth Development Agenda (GSGDA), focus on the following:
    a) Bridging equity gaps in access to quality healthcare and nutrition services.
    b) Strengthening governance and improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the health system.
    c) Improving access to quality maternal, neonatal, child and adolescent health.
    d) Intensifying the prevention and control of communicable and non-communicable diseases.
    e) Strengthening institutional care and mental health service delivery.

    Mr Speaker, to conclude, the Ministry of Health is requesting for GH¢3,529, 444,056.00 (three billion, five hundred and twenty-nine million, four hundred and forty-four thousand and fifty-six Ghana cedis) to meet its planned expenditure in 2013. The vote, when approved, will enable the Ministry and its agencies to continue working towards meeting the target of the Health Millennium Development Goals as well as implement programmes directed at strengthening our healthcare system.

    Mr Speaker, I now humbly request the House to consider and approve the Ministry of Health's annual estimates of GH¢3,529,444,056 (three billion five hundred and twenty-nine million, four hundred and forty-four thousand and fifty-six Ghana cedis) for the 2013 financial year.

    Mr Speaker, I beg to move.

    Question proposed.
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr Joseph Y. Chireh) 12:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion and to present the Report of the Committee.
    Mr Speaker, indeed, one of the observations that I would want to make a comment on is maternal mortality rate, where the statistics seem to be stagnating and we have urged that this be looked at seriously. This is because since 2008, we seem to have the same figure all the time. That does not reflect interventions that have been made so far and we think that
    the statistics should be better handled; data collection should be improved upon.
    Mr Speaker, we would want to bring to the notice of all Hon Members the need for us to follow up on the Acts that have been passed here to see to their implementation. The Committee is requesting the Ministry of Health to speed up in setting up the relevant bodies, the boards to be able to implement these new legislations that we passed in 2011/
    12.
    1.0 Introduction
    In accordance with article 179 of the 1992 Constitution of Ghana, the Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Terkpeh, on 5th March, 2013 presented to the House, the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2013 financial year.
    Pursuant to Standing Orders 140 (4) and 159 of the House, Mr Speaker referred the annual estimates of the Ministry of Health for the year 2013 to the Committee on Health for consideration and report.
    In considering the annual estimates, the Committee met with the Hon Minister for Health, Hon Hanny-Sherry Ayittey and the technical team from the Ministry and its agencies. The Committee reports as follows:
    2.0 Reference documents
    The Committee, in its deliberations, referred to the following:
    1. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana.
    2. The Standing Orders of the House.
    3. The 2013 Budget Statement and Economic Policy.
    4. 2013 annual estimates of the Ministry of Health.
    3. Mission Statement of the Ministry
    The Mission Statement of the Ministry is to continue to improve the health status of all people living in Ghana through the development and promotion of proactive policies for good health and longevity as well as the provision of universal access to basic health services.
    It would also be in line with the achievements of the health- related MDGs by 2015, concentrate on improving health outcomes by targeting resources towards the health of women and children, prevention and control of communicable and non-communicable diseases.
    3.1 Objectives
    The Ministry operates by the five objectives cited below in pursuance of its mission statement and policy within the Medium Term Expenditure Framework
    (MTEF).
    The health policy objectives for the medium term (2010 - 2013) are to:
    1. bridge equity gabs in access to healthcare and nutrition services and ensure sustainable financing arrangements that protect the poor;
    2. improve governance and ensure efficiency and effectiveness in health service delivery;
    3. improve access to quality maternal, neonatal, child and adolescent health services;
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr Joseph Y. Chireh) 12:45 p.m.
    4. intensify prevention and con- trol to communicable and non- communicable diseases and promote a healthy lifestyle; and
    5. strengthen institutional care, including mental health service delivery.
    4. Implementing agencies
    The main implementing agencies of the Ministry are:
    1. Health headquarters
    2. Ghana Health Service

    Accra Psychiatric Hospital

    Pantang Hospital

    Ankaful Hospital

    4. Christian Health Association of Ghana (CHAG)

    5. Regulatory Authorities

    Food and Drugs Authority

    Medical and Dental Council

    Nurses and Midwives Council

    Pharmacy Council

    Traditional Medicine Practice Council

    Health Facilities Regulatory Agency (Private Hospitals and Maternity Homes Board)

    Allied Health Professions Council

    6. Teaching hospitals

    Korle -Bu Teaching Hospital

    Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital

    Tamale Teaching Hospital

    7. Training institutions

    8. Subvented organisations

    Centre for Scientific Research into Plant Medicine

    National Ambulance Service

    World Health Organisation

    West Africa Health Commu- nity

    Ghana Red Cross Society

    St. John Ambulance Brigade

    Ghana Institute of Clinical Genetics

    Ghana College of Physicians and Surgeons

    College of Pharmacy

    5. Performance for 2012

    For the financial year 2012, the Ministry was allocated GH¢1,286.19 million. The budget was later revised to GH¢3,339.65 million. Budget outturn for the Ministry to undertake its programme of activities amounted to GH¢2,899.62. The breakdown is as follows:

    SPACE FOR TABLE - PAGE 8 - 12.45P.M.

    For 2012, the Ministry recorded the following performance under the five health objectives as follows

    Performance under Objective one is as follows:
    SPACE FOR OBJECTIVE ONE 12:45 p.m.

    SPACE FOR OBJECTIVE 12:45 p.m.

    NHIL 12:45 p.m.

    -- 12:45 p.m.

    Mr Speaker 12:45 p.m.
    I hope you would take a cue from the Chairman of the Committee?
    Dr Anane 12:45 p.m.
    Exactly. That notwith- standing, there are a few points that have to be made.
    Mr Speaker, looking at the budget, one would notice that there is a marked increase in the sector's budget as revised in 2012. Mr Speaker, the 2012 revised budget was GH¢1.7649 billion. The budget for this year is GH¢3.5 billion. The ratio is 1:2. Virtually, the budget for the Ministry has been doubled.
    But Mr Speaker, we may wish to note that there is a huge IGF component of about GH¢1.8 billion and this IGF component is of a non-NHIL accrual to the health institutions as captured in the Ministry's budget. Mr Speaker, this accrual and this generation is as a result of the concerns raised by the Committee on Health of the previous Parliament with respect to the declaration of IGF by the agencies and this has been captured under paragraph 8.1 of page 10 of the Report.
    Mr Speaker, we may wish to also note that this amount is more than the total budget of the Ministry of Health for 2012. The estimated National Health Insurance Fund contribution is about GH¢917.858 million in the sectoral budget of which an estimated amount of about GH¢500 million should be additional IGF to the public and some publicly supported health sector institutions.
    Mr Speaker, in effect, we expect the agencies under the Ministry to generate IGF to the tune of about GH¢2.3 billion and not just the GH¢1.831, 402,805.00 as captured under paragraph 6 of the Report.
    This amount, Mr Speaker, would be expected to cater for mainly goods and services, and to some extent, for capital expenditure for a few temporary hands that the institution hires.
    Mr Speaker, I am drawing attention to this, so that we know the amount that is now going to be in the hands of the agencies as they run their institutions. Mr Speaker, the National Ambulance Service also is constrained and the constraint comes especially from the delayed execution of the Bill, which Bill was prepared way back in 2003.
    Mr Speaker, some days ago, there was some exchange here with respect to the passage of the Bill. I checked up, Mr Speaker, and I may have to be corrected; even though we prepared that Bill way back in 2002/3, it is still yet to be seized of the House and therefore, it has not been passed. Mr Speaker, if this is not passed, it does not permit the National Ambulance Service to manage itself as it should and it is all because this has been added to the general Health Service Bill.
    The National Ambulance Service part, is part 3 of this Bill. Mr Speaker, we hope that this can easily come to the House for it to see to it, so that the Service would be enabled to perform its national role.
    Mr Speaker, the last Parliament passed about six major Acts. They include laws from many regulatory agencies and training institutions. The issue is about their operationalisation. There is no evidence of adequate funding for operationalising these institutions and regulatory bodies. Therefore, Mr Speaker, this may become another constraint even though these laws have been passed by the House.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Chairman had mentioned the issue of maternal mortality and the statistics thereof.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Chairman had mentioned the issue of maternal mortality and the statistics thereof. Yes, the statistics of maternal mortality in Ghana has remained static since 2008. The question is, is it the same or is it just that we have not been updating our data? And why do we continuously keep on repeating this 350 per 100,000? Are we waiting for the World Health Organisation (WHO) to come in to tell us what data we have?
    Mr Speaker, we think that the Ministry is up to the task and it should be able to gather enough data to update us on some of these things. This is because we must be able to advise the international organisations. As a signatory to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), we should be able to tell from our own observations whether we are going forward or we are not going forward.
    Mr Speaker, we appear to be still grappling with our mortality rate especially the maternal one in spite of the very far reaching interventions over the past decade and a half. We are therefore, proffering for consideration what we would term “facilitated deployment of health professionals” such as midwives and private practitioners as was done by the Ministry of Food and Agriculture sometime back where they facilitated the deployment of veterinary surgeons, so that the veterinary surgeons could set up their clinics where they would want them.
    In this particular case, the Ministry could determine which areas are in need and then give some incentives to those who would want to settle in these areas. In this way, we would be able to spread geographically the kind of health professionals that we want in the country.
    rose
    Mr Speaker 12:55 p.m.
    Hon Members, I have listened to the Report, I have listened to the Hon Ranking Memberr, there are no contentious issues. There are issues that the Report has captured.
    I intend to put the Question. It is not always that we need to -- With regard to the estimates, there is no --
    Hon Members, I intend putting the Question. The emphasis here is about the figures.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved:
    That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢3,529, 444,056 for the services of the Ministry of Health for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
    Mr Speaker 12:55 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader, what is the next item?
    Dr Kunbuor 12:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if we could take the Motion on Works and Housing, Motion number 7 on the Order Paper.
    Mr Speaker 12:55 p.m.
    Hon Members, item number 7 -- Motion.
    Hon Minister for Water Resources, Works and Housing.
    Hon Members, the First Deputy Speaker to take the Chair but I will come back. I have got visitors from my former constituency so the First Deputy Speaker to take the Chair.
    Yes, move the Motion.
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 12:55 p.m.

    Minister for Water Resources, Works and Housing (Alhaji Collins Dauda) 12:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢598,902,647 for the services of the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
    12. 58 p.m. --
    MR FIRST DEPUTY SPEAKER
    Alhaji Dauda 12:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the appro- val of this sum by this august House will enable the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing to continue to perform its function of ensuring the
    efficient management of the country's water resources and promote sustainable delivery of urban and rural physical facilities in the water and housing sub- sectors.
    Mr Speaker, it would also ensure the protection of our coastline against sea erosion and to provide effective concrete drain systems to ensure free-flow of run- offs to reduce flooding in the country.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move.
    Question proposed.
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr David T. Assumeng) 12:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion.
    1.0 Introduction
    1.1 The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government for the fiscal year ending 31st December, 2013 was presented to Parliament by the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Terkpeh on Tuesday, 5th March, 2013 in fulfillment of article 179 of the 1992 Constitution.
    In accordance with Order 140(4) of the Standing Orders of Parliament, Mr Speaker referred the annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing to the Committee on Works and Housing for consideration and report.
    1.2 The Committee subsequently met on Monday, 18th March, 2013 and consi-
    dered the referral. The Hon Minister for Water Resources, Works and Housing Alhaji Collins Dauda, officials of the Minis- try of Water Resources, Works and Housing, Ministry of Finance (MoF) and the underlisted departments and agencies under the purview of the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing attended the Committee's sitting to provide clarifications on the estimates:
    a. Rent Control Department
    b. Department of Rural Housing
    c. Public Works Department
    d. Water Resources Commission
    e. Hydrological Services Department
    f. Community Water and Sanitation Agency
    g. Ghana Water Company Limited
    h. Architects Registration Council
    i. Public Servants Housing Loans Scheme Board.
    The Committee is grateful to the Hon Minister and his team for their assistance during its deliberations.
    2.0 Reference documents
    The Committee availed itself of the following documents during its deliberations on the budget estimates:
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr David T. Assumeng) 12:55 p.m.
    a. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana.
    b. The Standing Orders of the House.
    c. The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government for the 2012 financial year..
    d. The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government for the 2013 financial year.
    3.0 Mission Statement of the Ministry
    The Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing exists to formulate and implement policies and programmes for the provision of adequate, secure and affordable housing, other landed properties, potable water, and the development of infrastructural facilities with regard to water and flood control systems, water-related sanitation, drainage, coastal protection works and operational hydrology for the benefit and improvement of the welfare of all people living in Ghana.
    4.0 Objectives of the Ministry
    The following objectives have been outlined by the Ministry for the attainment of its mission. These include the:
    a) provision and facilitation of access to adequate, affordable potable water; adequate, secure and affordable housing, control systems, water-related sanitation and drainage systems;
    b) promotion of rural and urban infrastructural development and the provision of basic services;
    c) provision, maintenance and protection of public property and infrastructure;

    d) promotion and facilitation of private sector participation in housing, potable water and safe sanitation delivery; and

    e) support of creative and innovative ways in the production and use of local building material among others.

    5.0 Departments and agencies under the Ministry

    The Ministry seeks to achieve its objectives through the combined efforts of the underlisted departments and agencies in the three sub-sectors:

    a. Housing

    .

    ii. Department of Rural Housing

    (DRH).

    iii. Public Servants Housing Loan Scheme Board (PSHLSB).

    iv. Architects Registration Council

    (ARC).

    b. Works

    i. Public Works Department (PWD);

    ii. Hydrological Services Department

    (HSD).

    c. Water

    i. Water Resources Commission

    (WRC).

    ii. Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA).

    iii. Ghana Water Company Limited

    (GWCL).

    6.0 Performance in year 2012

    6.1 For the year 2012, an amount of two hundred and eighty-three million, one hundred and seventy-six thousand and fourteen cedis (GH¢283/176/014.00) wasallocated to the Ministry. The breakdown is as follows:

    GH¢

    Government of Ghana -- 51,318,428.00

    Internally generated funds (IGFs) -- 1,611,880.00

    Annual Budget Funding Amount (ABFA) -- 21,000,000.00

    Donor -- 209,245,706.00

    TOTAL -- 283,176,014.00

    6.2 The breakdown of the GoG allocation and actual releases for the year 2012 is shown in table 1.

    Table 1

    GoG budgetary allocation and releases for 2012

    The Committee noted that although an amount of GH¢51,318,428.00 was allocated to the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing from GoG funds for 2012, actual releases made to the Ministry was GH¢122,932,189.93.

    For compensation, an amount of GH¢10,812,904.00 was allocated to the Ministry. However, actual releases made to the Ministry was GH¢25,745,702.09. For goods and services, only GH¢556,772.73 representing 30.3 per cent of an allocation

    of GH¢l,837,524.00 was released. It is worth noting that the amount of GH¢96/629,715.11 released to the Ministry for assets included the ABFA budgetary component.

    Notwithstanding the above, the Ministry continued with its mandate of ensuring efficiency in the management of the country's water resources and the promotion and sustainable delivery of urban and rural physical facilities in housing, water and sanitation.

    SPACE FOR TABLE 1 - PAGE

    11 - 12.55P.M.
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr David T. Assumeng) 12:55 p.m.
    and the outmoded Architects Decree 1969, NLCD 357 to meet current trends in the industry.
    The works sub-sector
    a. Under the Storm Water Drainage and Sanitation Programme, the Government will continue to resource the Hydrological Services Department to con- struct various storm water concrete drainage system at Sakaman, Nima, Goaso, Salaga, Sakumono-Lashibi and Bolga- tanga to reduce perennial flooding and safeguard life and property. The drainage systems at Ashaiman, Swedru, Winneba, Ejura, Tepa, Asankragua Kumawu, Tamale and others will be commenced by the Minis- try.
    b. Desilting, widening and deepening of most drains at flood prone areas within the Accra- Tema Metropolis and other regional capitals and selected district capitals will be sustained under the National Flood Control Programme in 2013.1n addition, the routine mainte- nance (i.e. dredging) of the lower and upper sections of the Korle Lagoon and Odaw Stream will continue.
    c. Sea defence works at Ngyiresia will commence to salvage the adjoining road from being totally washed by the sea waves. While work along 1.5 kilometres of A t or k or - D z i t a - A n ya n u i , Sakumono and Ada shore- lines will be continued.
    d. As part of its Peri-Urban, Rural and Small Towns Water and Sanitation Project in the Brong- Ahafo Region, the Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA) will test run the 15 small towns'piped systems and fit 550 boreholes with hand pumps.

    The Water Sub-sector

    i. In executing the Government of Ghana 5-year 20,000 Borehole Delivery Programme, the technical department of the CWSA will oversee the completion of the 1,090 boreholes fitted with hand pumps and also initiate the construction of another batch of 4,000 boreholes for this year. There will also be a follow-up on the correction of construction and installation defects as well as water quality issues.

    ii. Construction work on the Kpong Water Supply Expansion and Rehabilitation Project will be progressed. This will include the replacement of the existing intake pumps and the installation of a 15,000 m3/day unit water treatment plant. Furthermore, the Madina reservoir, Boi booster station and the Asofaa booster renovation will commence in the course of the year.

    i. During the year, expansion works on the Nsawam water system, the Mampong water supply system and the Kumawu, Kwahu Ridge, Konongo water systems will be continued.

    ii. In 2013, the dams rehabilitation component of the Urban Water Project which involves cons- truction and consultancy services on the dams at Abessim, Axim, Barekese, Inchaban, Koforidua, Mampong, Owabi, Tanoso, Vea and Weija will also continue.

    8.0 Budgetary allocation for 2013

    8.1 A total allocation of five hundred and ninety-eight million, nine hundred

    and two thousand, six hundred and forty seven cedis (GH¢598,902,647.00) has been given to the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing for the implementation

    of its programmes and activities for the 2013 financial year.

    8.2 The summary of the total budgetary allocation is shown in table 1.

    Table 1

    Summary of 2013 Budgetary Allocation

    SPACE FOR TABLE 1 - PAGE 18 - 12.55P.M.

    8.3 The summary of the allocation by item of expenditure is also shown in table 2.

    Table 2

    Summary of 2013 allocation

    9.0 Observations and recommendations

    The Committee made the following observations and recommendations during its deliberations:

    a. 2012 Budgetary allocation

    The Committee noted that almost all the expenditure items for the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing for 2012 run

    SPACE FOR TABLE 2 - PAGE

    19 - 12.55P.M
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr David T. Assumeng) 12:55 p.m.
    Assets votes for all the directorates under the Ministry were significantly varied. This was however, after the initial allocation of assets due the Rent Control Department has been committed to a planned project for the construction and renovation of offices in Wa and Jirapa.
    As a result of the revision, the Department could not pay the contractors of the project and it is indebted to the tune of GH¢500,000.00. The Committee was informed that the offices of the Department are constantly besieged by creditors and this is affecting work at the Department. Aside, the whole Department has no official means of transportation. In the opinion of the Committee, the 2013 asset allocation of GH¢119,620.00 is not adequate enough to offset the liabilities of the Rent Control Department.
    The Committee therefore, entreats MoF to consider taking over the indebtedness of the Rent Control Department to enable the officers have the right frame of mind to deliver on their mandate.
    g. The Public Servants Housing Loan Scheme Board
    The Public Servants Housing Loan Scheme Board was established with the sole aim of the disbursement and the management of soft housing loans to Public Servants of the country.
    The Committee noted that inadequate funding over the years has affected the ability of the Board to meet sizeable numbers of applicants. This is because although the amortization period of the loan is between ten and fifteen years, there are many instances where it takes up to fifty years to recover loans, thus rendering the revolving Fund ineffective.

    For 2013, the funds for the scheme has been upped by GH¢5 million to augment the current Scheme Fund of GH¢2 million. This is to enable the Scheme to cover more beneficiaries.

    The Committee therefore, recommends that the Board members of the Scheme should put in place proper mechanisms for loan recoveries.

    10.0 Conclusion

    The critical role that the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing plays in infrastructural development and social service delivery in propelling economic growth, sustaining poverty reduction and development, cannot be over-emphasised. If Ghana is to achieve these desirable goals as envisaged in the Ghana Shared Growth Development Agenda (GSGDA), then it is imperative that the Ministry is adequately resourced to carry out its mandate.

    Finally, the Committee recommends to the House to approve the sum of five hundred and ninety eight million, nine hundred and two thousand, six hundred and forty-seven Ghana cedis (GH¢598,902,647.00) for the implementation of the programmes and activities of the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing for the 2013 fiscal year.

    Respectfully submitted.
    Mr Justice J. Appiah (NPP -- Ablekuma North) 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am on the floor of this august House to second the Motion for the approval of an amount of GH¢598,902,647 for the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing for the financial year ending 31st December, 2013.
    Mr Joe K. Gidisu 1:05 p.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, my very good Brother and Friend, in the first place, is not seconding the Motion but supporting it as the Chairman has already seconded it and he is copiously reading his submission also. But I know that is not his usual trend of speaking.
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am the Deputy Ranking Member for the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing, so, I have every right to second the Motion.
    Mr Speaker, I am also referring to my notes and the figures are so huge, so gargantuan, so, I have to take my time and --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, you can support the Motion. It has already been seconded, so just support it and let us go.
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I support the Motion.
    Mr Speaker, as I indicated, page 7 of 27 indicates that and amount of GH¢1,127,626 was overspent.
    Mr Speaker, on the non-financial assets expressed for 2012, an amount of GH¢60,824,048.44 was also overspent. This calls for unwanted dissipation of public funds. An amount of GH¢5,345 was also given to the Public Servants Housing Scheme. In 2012, an amount of GH¢2 million was given to the same
    agency. But when were the houses started and when were they built and where are the allocations of the houses?
    Dr Alhassan 1:05 p.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Member must be restrained from further misleading himself and the general public. The amount he is quoting under goods and services, 2012 was the allocation and they were given GH¢556,772.73. They certainly could not have overspent because they were not allocated the money. So, the balance he is reading is money they did not receive. So they cannot be overspending.
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have the Parliamentary Select Committee budget hearing meeting minutes and he can refer to page 9 of 27, that GH¢ 60.8 billion --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, we are looking at the budget estimates.
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is still there in the budget estimates.
    Mr Speaker, let me turn to page 13; as at November, 2012 expenditure captured under compensation was in excess of about GH¢15,833 and then 60.8 -- This is in the Report. It is in the Report, if he can open and read it, it is there on page
    13.
    Mr Speaker, on page 14 of 427 --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, just lead us through, page 13, which paragraph, so that we are all clear in our minds?
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am talking about the Report.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:05 p.m.
    Yes, we are looking at the Report. You referred us to page 13 but we want to know which paragraph.
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, page 13 9 (a), that is 2012 budgetary allocation. If he has it, he can read and see. Mr Speaker, can I crave your indulgence to read?
    “The Committee noted that almost all the expenditure items for the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing 2012 run into significant excess. As of November 2012 expenditure captured under compensation was in excess of about GH¢15.833.873.42 while that of assets was in excess of
    GH¢60,824,048.00”.
    This is clear in the Report.
    Mr Speaker, when we go to pages 14 and 27, the capacity of the Minister for Finance --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, to be fair to everybody here, just continue because there is some explanation for some expenditure in excess of what was originally --
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, now, let me turn to the water sector --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, let us be fair to ourselves. Complete the whole paragraph, just a few lines left.
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, let me turn to the water sector --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, I direct that you complete reading the paragraph you started reading.
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, so, in the nutshell, as of November, 2012, “expenditure captured under compensation was in excess of about GH¢15,833,873.42 while that of assets was in excess of GH¢60,824,048. The variance for compensation was attributed to the Single Spine Pay Policy whereas reasons given for the excesses registered in the assets allocation where all budget expenditure and Job 600 Renovation Project million.”
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:05 p.m.
    I believe that explains it, so you can now go to the other side you want to go to.
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, on the water sector, 20,000 boreholes and 1,090 boreholes were said to be fitted with hand pumps. The promises are too many and with the abundance of so many water boreholes that we have in this country, Ghanaians are still thirsty. If these policies are implemented, it will help alleviate the plight of men and women who have to travel several kilometres to look for water -- [Interruption.]
    Dr Alhassan 1:05 p.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Member should be restrained from misleading himself and the general public. There is nowhere in this Report that twenty thousand wells had been given pumps. It is nowhere in the Report, unless he is reading a different report from what we have; he should correct himself and let us be doing the right thing.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:05 p.m.
    Hon Joe Appiah, how do you respond to that?
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is in the budget, 20,000 boreholes and 1,090 boreholes are to be fitted this year. That is what is in the budget. And what I am saying is that if these promises are fulfilled, it will help all of us in order to alleviate the plight of men and women who have been travelling several kilometres to look for water without success. It is so simple. [Interruption.]
    Mr Kwame G. Agbodza 1:05 p.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Member is misleading us. What he just read, what the Report actually captured is this.
    “In executing the Government of Ghana five-year programme twenty thousand boreholes will be drilled.”
    So, I do not know what he is talking about that we are saying we are going to drill twenty thousand boreholes this year. So, can he correct himself.
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what I am saying is that the promises are so huge. Last year, 2012, there were promises on boreholes and this year, if it is 5,000 -- What I am saying is that if these promises are met, it will alleviate the plight of men and women who have to travel for several kilometres to look for water without success --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, what he is saying is that it spans over a certain time- frame and not just one year. If we all understand it that way then we move on.
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is lamentable to know that the campaign promises made in the manifesto and highlighted in pulpits, synagogues, roof- tops, university campuses, colleges and many more --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, begin to wind up.
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:05 p.m.
    This Administration has never been able to continue the good work of the affordable houses project that was started by His Excellency, former President J. A. Kufuor -- 5,200 were started and they were nearing completion when we were exiting.
    Mr Speaker, this voluminous book shows that there was no identification of any affordable housing, yet in their campaign promises, they said they were going to put up affordable houses. In 2010, Mr Speaker --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Hon Member, let us address the Report which is before us, please.
    Please, conclude; Your time is up; conclude.
    Mr J. J. Appiah 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what I am saying is that there was no allocation for affordable houses. Mr Speaker, I am urging this Administration to be very sincere to Ghanaians and also fulfil their promises. Not a single block has been laid at the affordable housing sites --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Hon Member, your time is up. Please, resume your seat.
    Mr Emmanuel K. Bedzrah (NDC -- Ho West) 1:15 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for giving me the opportunity to contribute to the Motion, urging Hon Members to approve the sum of GH¢598,902,647 for the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing.
    Mr Speaker, the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing is one of the major Ministries that work with infrastructure that would propel the development of this nation. Mr Speaker, there are agencies that work under the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing and one of that agencies is the Public Servants Housing Loan Scheme.
    The Public Servants Housing Loan Scheme is an agency that we all know, supports the delivery of housing for public servants. Mr Speaker, last year, this House approved an amount of GH¢2
    Mr Emmanuel K. Bedzrah (NDC -- Ho West) 1:15 p.m.
    million for the Public Housing Loan Scheme and that GH¢2 million has judiciously been used. And as we have been told at the Committee level, we are aware that over 100 houses had been completed for public housing or public servants in this country. This is an achievement for this country, the Government and for that matter, for public servants in this country.
    Mr Speaker, one of the agencies also is the Rent Control Department. Mr Speaker, the Rent Control Department, we all know, deals in adjudication of rental issues. Where there is arbitration, they come in to arbitrate between owners of houses and those who rent. We were told that the amount allocated to them last year was not released; and this year, what has been allocated is woefully inadequate.
    We urge the Ministry, or the Minister for that matter, to support the Rent Control Department because it is an agency that would curtail or prevent a lot of these arbitrations that we see from going to court. We urge the Hon Minister to support them and make sure that he looks at their figure once again and then if there is any virement that they have to do, they should vire it.
    The last of the agencies is the Ghana Water Company. Mr Speaker, we allocated or this House approved some funds for the Ghana Water Company. And we have been told that the contractor, especially the one working on the Kpong Project, has gone very, very fast. It is so advanced that they would even complete the project before the scheduled date.
    It is also heartwarming to note that they have plans to make sure the water problem in this country, especially in the Greater- Accra Region, would be a thing

    of the past come 2015. They are doing everything in their power. Therefore, Mr Speaker, it is my pleasure to support this Motion that this House and Hon Colleagues approve the amount for the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing.
    Mr Henry Quartey (NPP -- Ayawaso Central) 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, thank you very much for the opportunity to support the Motion.
    Mr Speaker, I woke up this morning, bearing in mind that today marks the United Nations International Day of Happiness and I thought I was going to be happy, but only to realise that water was not flowing in my tap. [Laughter.] And as a matter of fact, I had to go and buy three bags of sachet water to take my bath before coming to Parliament. [Interruption.]
    Mr Speaker, then my attention was drawn to the mission of the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing Committee, of which I am a member. Mr Speaker, with your permission, I beg to read
    Mr Joe K. Gidisu 1:15 p.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Hon Member, proceed with your presentation.
    Hon Member, ignore the comment and proceed with your presentation, please.
    Mr Quartey 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I request your guidance for the Hon Member to withdraw the statement.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    It is not necessary; just proceed.
    Mr Quartey 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I was wondering whether the size between myself and him is not perhaps equal? [Interruption.]
    Mr Speaker, once again, I represent the good people of Ayawaso Central, and the calls that I get every day say “we cannot find water”. They cannot get water to bath their children to go to school. They cannot get water to cook for their husbands to eat before going to work.
    Mr Speaker, that brings to mind the mission statement of the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing and I would want to state it categorically. It states that:
    “. . . to provide affordable, portable, clean water.”
    Mr Speaker, I wonder whether we are enjoying affordable, clean, potable water or perhaps, we are enjoining affordable sachet water in this country.
    Mr Speaker, in going forward, I would also want to plead with the Hon Minister to perhaps, begin to look at ways of ensuring value for money. I say value for money because it emerged during our Committee meetings, that the human resource department at the headquarters was going to procure -- and as a matter of fact, it is here; it is part of the estimates -- One motorbike at ¢200 million.
    Mr Bedzrah 1:15 p.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, my other Colleague just mentioned that one motorbike for GH¢200 million. I do not know what he is talking about.
    Mr Quartey 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am talking about GH¢20,000 and the Hon Member knows it. It is here. It is in the Hon Minister's presentation.
    Mr Bedzrah 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we are talking about our Report, not the Minister's minutes. We are talking about our Report here and he is supposed to talk about it. There was a typographical error which we corrected.
    Mr Quartey 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have it here captured. It is not a typographical error
    -- 1:15 p.m.

    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    He is saying that the error has been corrected.
    Mr Quartey 1:15 p.m.
    It has not been corrected, Mr Speaker. Mr Speaker, we are considering figures and these add up to the total amount that we are to consider for approval.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Hon Member, I believe you were here when the corrections were effected by the Chairman of the Committee. These things have been corrected; let us accept the correction and move on, please.
    Mr Quartey 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is not on the motorbike.
    Mr Speaker, again, I move forward to find out how an internal audit unit of the human resource department --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Hon Member, begin to wind up.
    Mr Quartey 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, well, again, I do not know. But what I want to humbly plead to the House is that, it takes technocrats close about eight months or so to prepare the budget and perhaps, Hon Members should be given adequate time in order to consider the Budget.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    We have already debated the budget. These are specific Ministries allocation of the budget.
    Mr Quartey 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in moving forward, I would like to also state that the Ghana Water Company is being allocated with GH¢366, 901, 943.00 and that is from the donors. Mr Speaker, Ghana Water Company's assets do not generate income or revenue. Mr Speaker, if the donors are giving Ghana GH¢366,901,943.00 with the Ghana Water and Sewerage not generating income but rather --
    Mr Assumeng 1:15 p.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, in the first place, the name is no longer “Ghana Water and Sewerage”. It is Ghana Water Company. So, let us take note.
    We did the correction at the Committee level, so I do not know why the Hon Member is insisting still that we did not do it. Please, let us do the right thing.
    Mr Quartey 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I said “Ghana Water Company” --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Your time is already up. Hon Member, proceed to conclude.
    Mr Quartey 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in conclusion, I would want to state that this year, after going through all the pain to approve the budget, we believe that we will not have excess spending of over GH¢60 million that my Colleague talked about early on, only for us to be given an excuse that, that GH¢60 million was payment made to Job 600. Mr Speaker, that should come to the House for supplementary because the impression we were given was that --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Hon Member, were you a Member of Parliament at the time?
    Mr Quartey 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am now.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    No! At the time, were you a Member of Parliament?
    Mr Quartey 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am now a Member of Parliament and I think based on history, we can all move forward.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Yes Hon Member, can you please, finish off?
    Mr Quartey 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, my humble plea is that in future the sector Ministries should make clear to Parliament their expenditures, so that when they are approved, they will not spend --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Hon Member, your point is well taken.
    Hon Members, I will put the Question. Sorry, Hon Minority Leader.
    Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would want some clarification before the Question is put and I believe the Minister would be competent enough to provide the answers.
    In respect of what I am now saying, the excess spending relating to the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing, I am told that some off budget expenditure is attributable to the Job 600 renovation project. How did it find expression there, if the Minister can really provide us with the explanation? This is because we have insisted that this project is for Parliament; so, how does it happen that the Ministry is spending the money? That is number one.
    Mr Speaker, again, this is a general question because I notice that for this year, there is an allocation of GH¢59,517,043.00 -- page 13 of the Report -- relating to the Annual Budget Funding Amount (ABFA).
    Mr Speaker, the Petroleum Revenue Management Act provides that, wherever allocations are made to Ministries, Departments and Agencies in respect of ABFA, at least, 70 per cent should be for
    investment. Can the Minister tell us what investment -- Can he tell us what investment the amount they are injecting into this, because it is nowhere?
    Alhaji Dauda 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with respect to the last question that has to do with the ABFA, clearly, I would need some notice to be able to provide the information whether 70 per cent was invested or not. Indeed, as I stand now, I am unable to provide that information. Mr Speaker, I require notice.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with respect to the Minister, this is budget time -- [Interruptions]
    Alhaji Dauda I am saying I require notice. I am saying that you are asking if 70 per cent was invested and in order that I do not provide this House with wrong information, I am saying that I need notice.
    Dr Kunbuor 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think it is the procedure that is the problem. Normally, as we debate these estimates the concerns could be raised for the Minister in his winding up to draw attention.
    But the Hon Minority Leader has asked him a direct question and we think that by our Standing Orders, there are proper times to normally ask Ministers questions. And what I am indicating is that, you have forced him to say he needs notice, which is certainly not the case you should be doing at budget time. But as he is winding up on all the issues that have been raised, he will indicate that, look -- [Interruptions] -- No, no.
    You have asked him a direct question and forced him to say he needs notice and I think we should regularize the procedure that definitely, he has to take account of
    the concerns that have been raised in the debate so far. But to require that he gives a particular answer, I do not think it is the proper way to proceed, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I do not know which procedures that the Hon Majority Leader is referring to. But Mr Speaker, at the end of this debate, you will put the Question, that we approve of a sum in respect of the services and activities of a particular Ministry and I thought that this information should be handy. Unfortunately, even though I belong to the Committee, I could not find space and time to be with them.
    Maybe, I could have raised it there and that is why I am asking this very innocuous question. But he says to me that he needs notice. Who am I to press on -- even though he knows that it should be handy. This is very, very relevant but I will not pursue the matter. The Minister should come with this information. It should be in his pocket and he should be able to pull it out immediately.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    I believe the Hon Minister has taken note and as indicated by the Majority Leader, he will take steps to address the issue.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved:
    That this House approves the sum of GH¢598,902,647.00 for the services of the Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing for the year ending 31st December,
    2013.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader, do you have any more?
    Dr Kunbuor 1:15 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker. I am informed that the Hon Speaker had directed and deferred item 5 -- the Motion on the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum for some reconciliation of the estimates. I have been informed that, that discussion
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Is that the case because I remember Hon Dr Akoto Osei, you were part of the team to carry out this discussion? Is that correct?
    Dr A. A. Osei 1:15 p.m.
    That is right, Mr Speaker.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    We can move on with item 5?
    Dr A. A. Osei 1:15 p.m.
    I believe so, Mr Speaker.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    All right. In that case the Hon Minister for Energy and Petroleum -- Item 5.
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 1:15 p.m.

    Minister for Energy and Petroleum (Mr Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah) 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢1,061,947,265.00 for the services of the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum for the 2013 fiscal year.
    Mr Speaker, the breakdown of the allocation for the Ministry is as follows -- The core centres for the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum is GH¢9, 473,124.00. GH¢30,000,000 being the matching Fund for SHEP and GH¢100,000,000 CDB matching for the Ghana Gas Infrastructure Project that is critically needed to sustain our fuel requirements. Mr Speaker, GH¢552,995,998.00 being loan and donor projects and GH¢369, 478,143.00 being the transfer to the GNPC from the Petroleum Revenue Account.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Before I call on the Chairman of the Committee to present the Report, I direct that having regard to the state of business, this House Sits beyond the stipulated time for proceedings as provided for under Order 40 (3) of the Standing Orders--
    Mr Kobina T. Hammond 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, just a point of clarification; would the Minister repeat the figure; how much has been allocated to his Ministry?
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Hon Minister, can you give us the figure?
    Mr Buah 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think the Motion that I moved had the amount of GH¢1,061,947,265 specifically for the
    Ministry of Energy -- [Interruption.] I said one billion--But for the Ministry of Energy itself, is nine million. That is what you want to know.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    Are you all right with the explanation?
    Mr K. T. Hammond 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it was not contentious, whether he was saying one million or one billion.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:15 p.m.
    All right, the Hon Chairman of the Committee.
    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion, that the House approves the budget of GH¢1,061,947,265 for the activities of the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum for the 2013 fiscal year.
    1.0 Introduction
    The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government for the 2013 Fiscal year was presented to Parliament by the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Terkpeh on Tuesday, 5th March, 2013, in accordance with article 179 of the Constitution. Subsequent to this, the draft annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum were referred to the Committee on Mines and Energy for consideration and report pursuant to Order 188 of the Standing Orders of the House.
    2.0 Deliberations
    The Committee met with the Hon Minister for Energy and Petroleum, Mr Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah, officials of the Ministry and heads of agencies under the Ministry, to discuss the estimates. In attendance were officials from the Ministry of Finance to assist in the deliberations.
    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 1:15 p.m.
    The Committee is grateful to the officials for their attendance and for providing clarifications on issues raised at the meeting.
    3.0 Reference documents
    The Committee referred to the under- listed documents during its deliberations:
    i. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana.
    ii.The Standing Orders of Parliament.
    iii. The Production and Exploration Act, 1984 (PNDCL 84).
    iv. The Petroleum Revenue Manage- ment Act, 2011 (Act 815).
    v. The Petroleum Commission Act, 2011 (Act 821).
    vi. The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2013 fiscal year.
    4.0 Vision of the Ministry
    The vision of the Ministry is to develop an energy economy that would ensure secure and reliable supply of high quality energy services for the Ghanaian economy and to become a major exporter of oil and power by 2012 and 2015 respectively.
    5.0 Mission of the Ministry
    The mission of the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum is to formulate, monitor and evaluate policies for the provision of secure, safe and reliable supply of energy to meet Ghana's developmental needs in an efficient, competitive and environmen- tally sustainable manner.
    6.0 Medium-term policy objectives of the Ministry
    To achieve its mandate, the Ministry has set out the following policy objectives for the medium term:
    i. Provide adequate and reliable power to meet the needs of Ghanaians and for export.
    ii. Increase the proportion of renewable energy, particularly solar, wind and mini -hydro in the national energy supply mix.
    iii. Build transparent regulatory environment and strengthen regulatory institutions in the energy sector.
    iv. Sustain and optimize the exploration, exploitation and utilization of oil and gas endowment.
    v. Ensure the development of oil and gas industry.
    vi. Build relevant capacity for players in the oil and gas industry.
    vii. Promote and facilitate private sector investments in the energy sector.
    viii. Promote energy efficiency and conservation programmes.
    7.0 Agencies under the Ministry
    The Ministry has oversight responsibilities over the underlisted agencies:
    i. The Energy Commission.
    ii. The Volta River Authority (VRA).
    iii. The Bui Power Authority (BPA).
    iv. The Ghana Grid Company Limited (GRIDCo).
    v. The Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC).
    vi. The Electricity Company of Ghana (ECG).
    vii. The Northern Electr icity Distribution Company (NEDCo).
    viii. The Volta Aluminum Company
    (VALCO).
    ix. The Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC).
    x. The National Petroleum Authority
    (NPA).
    xi. The Petroleum Commission.
    xii. The Tema Oil Refinery (TOR).
    xiii. The Ghana National Gas Company (GNGC).
    xiv. The Bulk Oil Storage and Transportation Company Limited (BOST).
    xv.The Ghana Cylinder Manufac- turing Company (GCMC).
    xvi.The Ghana Oil Company Limited
    (GOIL).
    xvii. The Volta Aluminium Company Limited (VALCO).
    8.0 Overview of Approved Budgetary Allocation For the Ministry for the Year 2012
    In the year under review, a sum of thirty-seven million, five hundred and fifty thousand, two hundred and three Ghana cedis (GH¢37,550,203.00) was approved for the activities of the Ministry for the year 2012. However, a total of thirty-eight million, nine hundred and thirty-six thousand, three hundred and twenty-four Ghana cedis (GH¢38,936,324.00) was released to the Ministry for its activities during the year under review. This is in excess of one million, three hundred and eighty-six thousand, one hundred and twenty-one Ghana cedis (GH¢1,386,121.00) which was as a result of the implementation of the Single Spine Salary Structure.

    The breakdown of the allocation and expenditure is shown in the Table 1 below.

    Table 1: Breakdown of Approved Budget and Expenditure of the Ministry for the Year 2012

    SPACE FOR TABLE 1 - PAGE

    7 - 1.35P.M.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am wondering how this House can direct any Ministry to give funds to a Government agency. This is the Government's budget, presented by the Minister for Finance, who is in charge of administering the purse. So, if there is any direction, it should be to the President. Which appropriate agency? No one can do it except the President. We cannot even increase the budget in any way.
    So, it is really misplaced but he can amend it and say he directs Government, or appeals or recommends. It is Govern- ment that provides services for the country.
    Dr Donkor 1:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the word “recommended” ought to have been and we recommend strongly to the Hon Minister for Finance.
    11.6 Utilisation of GNPC share of the Jubilee Crude Oil Revenue
    Mr Speaker, the Committee was informed that the GNPC received a total of two hundred and thirty million, nine
    Mr William O. Aidoo (NPP -- Afigya Kwabre South) 1:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have been given the honour this morning by my Ranking Member to rise and say a few words in support of the Motion on the floor.
    To start with, Mr Speaker, I would like to congratulate GNPC and its Jubilee Partners for the good job they did in successfully stopping the premature decline of the Jubilee Oilfield. Mr Speaker, the production started from about 80,000 barrels in October 2011 to 63,000 barrels somewhere around July, 2012. And I am happy to say that production has since climbed up to 100,000 barrels as I stand here and hopefully, it should rise to the targeted 120,000 barrels.
    Mr Speaker, when the Hon Minister was speaking, I heard him mention the establishment of the SME centres in Takoradi. The SME centres are very important. Why am I saying this? We see in our country now our brothers from neighbouring countries flocking into this

    country to take advantage of the Service sector in the oil industry which can easily be done by our local indigenes. I am glad to see the former Hon Minister for Trade and Industry here. This is because I do believe that an MOU was signed by the former Minister for Trade and Industry, the Ministry of Energy and the Jubilee Partners to establish these SME centres.

    To date, I am glad to hear the Minister saying that he has captured it in the budget and that they would be established. I hope they would be established expeditiously to afford the good people of Ghana to also benefit directly from the oil and gas industry.

    Mr Speaker, I would like to talk a little about the gas infrastructure. My Chairman mentioned something on that front and alluded to the fact that there is a shortfall of about GH¢50 million which government has to catch up with. My Chairman did not tell the House about an additional GH¢30 million which should have gone into the capitalisation of the Ghana National Gas Company.

    Fortunately, I had the opportunity to talk to the Minister for Finance this morning and he assured me that the GH¢80 million would be forthcoming shortly. That is extremely important because Ghana, as we know, with the dum so, dum so phenomenon that is going on right now, the addition of the gas infrastructure or the gas coming on stream would do a great deal to diminish the problem of energy shortage that we are encountering right now.

    Mr Speaker, I would also like to touch on the Bui Dam. I do believe that Government has some obligation to the project and I would ask the Hon Minister for Finance to use his good offices to make sure that the obligation is met in order for the timelines of the project to be met and to help alleviate the problems that we are encountering right now in the country.
    rose
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:45 p.m.
    Hon K. T. Hammond, is it on a point of order? I thought you had gone through the process of reconciliation and also, we do not need to overburden ourselves with so many contributions.
    Mr Hammond 1:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that may well be the case but I did not know that you have restricted it to only one person; I would have spoken rather than yielding to one of my Colleagues. So, if that was it, I still crave your indulgence -- I am not going to -- I promise you I would not be controversial -- [Laughter.]
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:45 p.m.
    Very well. But be brief. This is because the Hon Member has taken over your position.
    Mr Hammond 1:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, actually, he has not said a single one of the things on my mind but I have told you that I would be extremely uncontroversial. Mr Speaker, if you would allow me, I would make some progress.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:45 p.m.
    All right.
    Ranking Member of the Committee (Mr Kobina T. Hammond): Mr Speaker, I also rise to contribute to the Motion and in making my contribution, I indicated I would not be controversial today.
    But a few items -- Number one, this phenomenon of allowing only foreign donors to contribute to the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum's budget is

    scandalous and it is time it stopped. Mr Speaker, for all these years, some little allocation is given to the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum and we are to rely on donors.

    On this occasion, the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum is to rely on donors to the tune of over GH¢550 something million. But what the Government is allocating to them from its own resources is really meagre. Now, what happens in the end is that, they expend whatever is given them and the donor thing never materialises and it does not help anybody. So, Government, in these budget allocations, should be very careful how much money is allocated to the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum.
    rose
    Mr Hammond 1:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if he interrupts me, then I am going to fire; so, the Minister may better sit down for me to make my very harmless contributions and sit down.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:45 p.m.
    Hon K. T. Hammond, I hope you are not blackmailing him?
    Mr Hammond 1:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, this is a blackmail; it is a complete blackmail.
    Mr Buah 1:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to draw the Hon Member's attention to the fact that, in the budget, we addressed the payment of outstanding utilities, which is very critical to addressing the generation and distribution challenges.
    We also talked about the projects that we are focusing on and matched them with funding including the critical gas project that we need. So, to say that we did not address this challenge, is completely erroneous.
    Mr Hammond 1:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I maintain that he has got it all wrong. The point is, are we going to wait for the gas to come before we restore power to its normality?
    Mr Daniel Botwe 1:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I need some explanation. The Hon K. T. Hammond talked about dum so dum so phenomenon and then the Minister for Energy and Petroleum in response used certain words. I would want to find out whether that is the technical definition of the dum so dum so.
    He said “generation and distribution challenges.” Is that what we should take as the explanation for dum so, dum so? This is because that is what he said in response; so that from now, Ghanaians would know that they should stop using dum so, dum so and say “generation and distribution challenges.”
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:45 p.m.
    Hon Member, I do not think this is appropriate. I do not think so.
    Please, Hon K. T. Hammond, proceed.
    Mr Hammond 1:55 p.m.
    My Hon younger Brother should listen to big Brother's advice and let us just get through what it is that we would want to get through.
    Mr Speaker, there are two other matters that I would want to get through and these are -- there seems to be some unfortunate conflict and confusion in the functions of Ghana National Petroleum Company (GNPC) and the Ghana Gas Company. I
    am sounding some caution in the House and implore those who are responsible for this matter to handle it rather carefully. They are supposed to be two State institutions; I do not sit comfortably in my chair when I look at the files -- I look at the situation on the ground; it is not palatable. This thing has to be sorted out.
    GNPC, Mr Speaker, we know how hard people have worked to make sure GNPC is now functioning --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    Hon K. T. Hammond, you promised me that you were not going to be controversial.
    Mr Hammond 1:55 p.m.
    I am not going to say anything controversial; I am almost done.
    GNPC -- we implore them, the monies that are going to them are quite significant. They should put the money to good use -- [Interruption] -- w'annye din wo ho a! (If you do not keep quiet over there.)
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    Please, address the Chair.
    Mr Hammond 1:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to live up to the promise I gave you and since you would keep on reminding me, I thank you for allowing me to contribute.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    Thank you very much.
    Yes, Hon Chairman of the Committee
    Dr Kwabena Donkor 1:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Member is the Hon Ranking Member and I believe the Committee is taking steps to ensure that whatever resource is allocated to any organisation including GNPC, is managed for the benefit of this country and I believe we have agreed at the Committee that we would do this. So, the Hon Member knows that we would be doing this.
    Mr Awuah 1:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, before the Hon Minister sums up, I would want him to look at the Committee's Report, page 10, Table 2 -- “Breakdown of total budgetary provisions for the year 2013.”
    Mr Speaker, we have Cost Centre Allocation provision -- GH¢9,473,124; ABFA SHEP -- GH¢30 million; ABFA CDB Baction Fund -- GH¢100 million; matching funds for projects funded with loans -- GH¢552.9 million. I would want to seek an explanation to the last figure.
    The matching fund, is he saying that within the year, we are not expecting any donor funding for his Ministry and that the Ministry is rather preparing a sum of money to match whichever money would be coming, which we do not know and which is not indicated here? So, I would, want him to explain that particular matching fund to us. This is because I have looked at the budget.
    If you look at page 282 of the budget, the table there, it rather indicates that the figure which is described as matching funds for projects funded with loans is rather the donor funds for the Ministry. So, the explanations are different and I would want him to clarify that.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    Hon Minister, can you do us that favour?
    Mr Buah 1:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the donor loans, if you look at the budget, is the GH¢559 million. The matching fund for the Self- Help Electrification Project, as has been indicated in this budget, is GH¢30 million. That is for projects that we already know, Mr Speaker, and let me tell the Hon
    Member some of those projects. If he would remember, we have talked about - - [Interruption] -- Which page are you looking at?
    Mr Awuah 1:55 p.m.
    Page 10 -- the matching funds for projects funded with loans is GH¢552.9 million. And I am saying that if you go to the budget, that figure is rather described as donor funds for the Ministry
    -- 1:55 p.m.

    Mr Buah 1:55 p.m.
    Actually, it is donor funds for the Ministry; that is correct. And that has to be corrected by the Committee. I think that the description is “Donor Funds”; not “Matching Funds”.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    All right, Hon Chairman of the Committee, can you effect that correction?
    Dr Donkor 1:55 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker, we would effect the wording. The “Matching Funds” is what is there but indeed, it should be “Donor Funds” that we have to match the actual loans.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    Are we all right, Hon Member?
    Mr Awuah 1:55 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    Thank you very much.
    Hon Minister, please, sum up.
    Mr Buah 1:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, let me thank the Hon Members for their contributions. I have taken note of all the concerns that have been raised including the shortfall for the Ghana Gas Company and the allocation for the Petroleum Commission. Mr Speaker, these are issues that are very, very important and I am going to follow up with the Hon Minister for Finance on these.
    Mr Speaker, on this note, I would want to thank the Hon Members and urge them to approve the budget allocation for the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum.
    Thank you.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved:
    That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢1,061, 947,265 for the services of the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    Hon Members, information reaching me has it that a few more Papers are ready for laying. Accordingly, we would like to find out from the Hon Majority Leader which of them are ready.
    Mr Sampson Ahi 1:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker -- [Interruption] -- Mr Speaker, I am doing this on behalf of --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    Majority Deputy Chief Whip --
    Mr Ahi 1:55 p.m.
    I am doing this on behalf of the Hon Majority Leader.
    Mr Speaker, we would want to go back to Presentation of Papers and lay items numbered (h) and (k).
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    All right. In that case, can we take item number (h), the one on Lands and Forestry, Mines and Energy --
    PAPERS 1:55 p.m.

    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    Hon Members, there would be a short break for one hour. It is 2 o'clock now and we would resume at 3.00 p.m. But before then, members of the Committee of Privileges -- the meeting which was scheduled for the period after adjournment could be rather dangerous. So, I am informed that this meeting would take place 30 minutes from now in Committee Room 6.
    This is because adjournment would most likely take place very close to midnight, if I may not scare you.
    So Hon Members, the House is suspended for one hour.
    2.06 p.m. --Sitting suspended.
    4.10 p.m.-- Sitting resumed.
    MR FIRST DEPUTY SPEAKER
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    Majority Leader?
    Dr Kunbuor 1:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if we can take item number 6.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    The Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations?
    Dr Kunbuor 1:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am craving your indulgence to move the Motion on behalf of the Hon Minister who had to travel out of the country for a statutory meeting. If Mr Speaker grants the leave, I would move the Motion on behalf of the Minister. [Pause.]
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 1:55 p.m.
    I do not see anybody --
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 1:55 p.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Mr Joseph Z. Amenowode) 1:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion that seeks to approve the 2013 annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations.

    Mr Speaker, in so doing, I present the Report of your Committee.

    Introduction

    In accordance with article 179 of the Constitution, the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Emmanuel Terkpeh, on Tuesday, 5th March, 2013 presented the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2013 fiscal year to the House.

    Pursuant to Standing Orders 140 (4) and 184 of the House, Mr Speaker referred the draft annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations to the Committee on Employment, Social Welfare and State Enterprises for consideration and report to the House.

    Acknowledgement

    The Committee met with the following to deliberate on the 2013 draft annual estimates of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations:

    1. The Minister for Employment and Labour Relations, Hon Nii Armah Ashietey, the acting Chief Director, Mr Roland A. Modey as well as Registrars, Directors and officials of the following departments and agencies:

    a. Ministry Headquarters

    b. Labour Department

    c. Department of Factories Inspec- torate

    d. Department of Co-operatives

    e. GYEEDA

    f. Management Development and Productivity Institute

    g. National Vocational Training Institute

    h. Organisation of African Trade Union Unity

    i. Opportunity Industrialisation Centre

    j. Ghana Co-operative Council

    k. Integrated Community Centre for Employable Skills

    1. Fair Wages and Salaries Com- mission

    m. Ministry of Finance

    The Committee is grateful to all who participated in the deliberation of the draft annual estimates of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations for the 2013 fiscal year and also for the information and support they provided during deliberations on the estimates.

    Reference documents

    In considering the draft annual estimates for the Ministry, the underlisted documents were used as reference materials:

    1. The 1992 Constitution of Ghana.

    2. The Standing Orders of Parliament of Ghana.

    3. The 2012 Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana.

    4. The 2013 Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana.

    6. The 2013 draft annual estimates of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations.

    Mission Statement

    The Mission of the Ministry is to:

    a. promote gainful employment creation in all sectors of the economy through demand-driven employable skills training;

    b. formulate policies and strategies to accelerate job creation in both formal and informal sectors of the economy;

    c. co-ordinate all public and private sector employment interventions in segments of the economy;

    d. collate employment data in collaboration with the Ghana Statistical Service for plan- ning and decision-making on accelerated job creation;

    e. establish a labour market information system to link the unemployed and employers;

    f. enhance harmonious industrial relations;

    g. promote social justice and protect the rights of workers through enforcement of labour laws and regulations and tripartism;

    h. ensure equity in public sector pay management; and

    i. co-ordinate the timely production of labour statistics for decision- making on accelerated economic growth and national development.

    Strategic Policy Objectives

    The strategic policy objectives of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations are to promote:

    a) productivity and employment;

    b) human capital formation for national development;

    c) transparent and accountable governance; and

    d) evidence-based decision-making on labour and employment.
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr Joseph Z. Amenowode) 1:55 p.m.
    Outlook for 2013
    Funds allocated for the 2013 fiscal year
    For the implementation of activities for 2013 fiscal year, an amount of sixty-one million two hundred and twenty-nine

    thousand eight hundred and eighty (GH¢61,229,880) has been allocated.

    Out of this, fifty-four million nine hundred and sixty-eight thousand nine hundred and seventy Ghana cedis (GH¢54,968,970) is GoG, SIP is one million Ghana cedis (GH¢1,000,000) and five million two hundred and sixty thousand nine hundred and ten (GH¢5,26O,910) is

    IGF.

    The breakdown of the allocation is as follows:

    2013 Allocations to departments and agencies under the Ministry
    Mr Kofi Okyere-Agyekum (NPP-- Fanteakwa South) 4:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion. In doing so, I would like to make some few comments.
    Mr Speaker, most of the issues that have been raised by my Chairman are genuine. Employment is very critical for the growth of the economy. Unfor- tunately, the institutions that have been set up to give the youth the necessary skills are ill-equipped, they are underfunded and they are not able to provide the critical data that would aid decision-making because of lack of funding.
    Mr Joseph N. Bukari (NDC -- Saboba) 4:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion, that this House approves the sum of GH¢61,229,880 for the activities and programmes of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations.
    Mr Speaker, the Ministry, over the years, has positioned itself to embark on a lot of skills development training to equip the Ghanaian youth and position them adequately to fit into a good number of the jobs that would be created within the economy.
    The Ministry has put itself in a position to add value to the Ghanaian youth or job seekers such that, when they get the job or when they have the opportunity to be employed in any job, they would be able to perform and discharge their duties that could bring about productivity. This is clearly a departure from the past where youth were lined up in promise of jobs without any skills being given to them for them to work.
    Mr Speaker, the Ministry, in collabora- tion with the Ministry of Finance and COTVET, are training a lot of the Ghanaian youth in the areas of oil and gas, to position them to be able to perform or work in the companies that are operating in the oil fields. They are not only training them, they are also ensuring that about 76 per cent to 85 per cent of them are employed in these companies working in the oil fields.
    The good of it is that, a lot of the training institutions working with the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations are to be re-tooled. You cannot say you are going to train people without considering actually re-tooling the training institutions with modern equipment that would be able to put them
    to a modern standard of job training. Mr Speaker, a total of 84 training institutions would be retooled. The only thing this Ministry can perform is to have these resources to be able to see these programmes go through.
    You would find out that over the years, the LEAP programme that the Ministry is currently handling also saw some significant improvement in the grants that are being given to beneficiaries. For example, in 2011, they received GH¢12.00 per beneficiary. This has been increased to about GH¢36.00. This represents a percentage increase of 300 per cent. Not only giving support to the poor but also giving a kind of training to some of them.
    Mr Speaker, I would therefore, urge this House, that we approve of these budget estimates, so that with these good policies or these activities that have been lined up by the Ministry, they would be able to have the necessary funds to be able to execute the programmes.
    Dr A.A. Osei 4:20 p.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, a few days ago, the Hon Colleague said that the budget was very good; he had no problems with it. If it is very good, why is he complaining about inadequate funds? A very good budget cannot be deficient in terms of funds. So, I am surprised that two days ago, he said that this was a very good budget; now, he is saying that they should find adequate funds.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:20 p.m.
    Hon Member, can you respond?
    Mr Bukari 4:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am sure my Hon Good Friend did not listen well. I said that this sum of money that has been allocated to the Ministry should be released to them on time, such that they can execute these good policies that they have. But not that the money is not enough. [Hear! Hear!]
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:20 p.m.
    Hon Member, I think we have had enough.
    Any more contributions?
    Ms Abena Osei-Asare (NPP -- Atiwa East) 4:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I wish to support the Motion on the Report of the Committee.

    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Joseph Y. Chireh (NDC -- Wa West) 4:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to contribute to this debate.
    What is important is that, if we look at the role of Ministries and the various sectors vis-a-vis the workers and arranging relations between workers' conditions of service and the fact that we have the Fair Wages Commission means that workers should take note and know that most of the things they discuss should not be with management or with the Ministries but with the Fair Wages Commission, which is negotiating to ensure that there are no disparities in fixing these wages and conditions of service.
    Definitely, the capacity of the Fair Wages Commission and indeed, building their capacity and ensuring that they have good facilities to be proactive in dealing with these matters, is very important. Workers must also realise that there is the need for this economy to continue to run. If you demand excessively and you are paid excessively, the economy would not do well and the first target would be workers themselves having to suffer by retrenchment.
    Mr A. K. Afenyo-Markin 4:30 p.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to put on record that we have “Fair Wages and Salaries Commission” but Hon Yieleh Chireh is referring to “Fair Wages Commission.” Is it “Fair Wages and Salaries” or “Fair Wages”?
    Mr Chireh 4:30 p.m.
    Thank you very much for the unnecessary correction. [Laughter.] But I would want to emphasise that when I say “Fair Wages Commission”, everybody knows that the full name is “Fair Wages and Salaries Commission”. The full name is assured.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:30 p.m.
    Hon Members, let us clear the air first. Is it a Commission or a Committee?
    Mr Chireh 4:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is a Commission and not a Committee. Fair Wages and Salaries Commission and when I started my contribution, I called out the full name. It is the subsequent one that I am abbreviating. So, this is why his point cannot be taken.
    I think that we should all vote for this Motion and let us look critically at how to support to build the capacity of the Fair Wages and Salaries Commission so that in future, they can handle labour disputes better.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:30 p.m.
    Hon Members, we have had enough debate on the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved:
    That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢61,229,880 for the services of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations for the year ending 31st December
    2013.
    Mr Agbesi 4:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if we can take the Motion on the Addendum Order Paper 2, concerning the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:30 p.m.
    Is the Minister available to move the Motion?
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 4:30 p.m.

    Minister for Fisheries and Aqua- culture (Mr Nayon Bilijo) 4:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢48,336,230 for
    the services of the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:30 p.m.
    Hon Members, let us have some quiet.
    Mr Bilijo 4:30 p.m.
    There has also been an increase in illegal fishing activities in our fishing waters. Now, illegal fishing activities take two major forms in our fishing waters. The first is illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing (IUU). The second is in the area of trans- shipment of catch on the high waters.
    As I speak now, there are cases emanating from the EU Office in Brazil concerning Ghanaian fishing vessels that have been detected to have engaged in illegal fishing and have attempted to export the products into the European Union (EU) and have been blocked. Unless something is done seriously against illegal fishing, very soon, it may be difficult for us to export our fish products into the EU.
    Therefore, a substantial part of this money would be used to put in place an effective management compliance system, so that Ghana would take complete control of our fishing waters to be able to detect and apprehend those who engage in illegal fishing, so that we would be able to meet our international commitments.
    Mr Speaker, the other area that we would be concentrating on during the year is to do with an accelerated aquaculture development. Ghanaians consume a lot

    of fish; that is a well known fact. The per capita consumption of fish in Ghana is much higher than the global average and the fact that fish catch is reducing, means that there is a huge deficit of fish requirement in the country. The only way we can make up for this deficit is to go into aquaculture development.

    Mr Speaker, aquaculture development is capital intensive and very expensive to do when it comes to feed stuff, manufacturing and setting up facilities for hatcheries. Therefore, the Ministry would be spending some money to develop these areas to enable as many Ghanaians in the areas of small and medium-scale entrepreneurs to get involved in fish farming.

    Mr Speaker, the Ministry would also be dealing with the issue of improving capacity of the Fisheries Commission to perform its duty when it comes to going out to assist the fish farmers to handle and manage their fish farms properly.

    Mr Speaker, during the year, the Ministry would also commence the construction of the Fisheries College at Anomabo. This Fisheries College is going to be a department of the University of Cape Coast and would help to train people in the fisheries industry so that there would be improved handling of fish catch and so on.

    Mr Speaker, this is a new Ministry that has recently been established. As a result, we would also be spending some money to set up the Secretariat of the Ministry. We would also be spending money to develop regional and zonal offices of the Fisheries Commission.

    In the light of the foregoing, I would like to request that the sum that has been requested for, be approved.

    Question proposed.
    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Ahmed Y. Alhassan) 4:30 p.m.
    Thank you very much, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to support the Motion ably moved by the Hon Minister for Fisheries and Aquaculture Development.
    Mr Speaker, before I proceed, I would want to make a minor correction on page 2, paragraph 2.0, line one. There is a word there “chuck”. The word there should be “chalk”.
    So the sentence should read: “during the year under review the sector was able to chalk the following successes.”
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:30 p.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, I am sorry. The Chairman is talking about the sector. Mr Speaker, in 2012, that Ministry was not a sector; it was a sub-sector and they put here the “sector”. It has just been set up, so how could this sector -- it should read properly as “the sub-sector of the Ministry of Food and Agriculture”. It is not a sector. So, I would want to remind the Chairman that he should make that amendment for us.
    Dr Alhassan 4:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I thank my Hon Friend for the advice. But this Report is on the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development and it is relying on its history to bring out information. So, if the discussion was on the Ministry of Food and Agriculture, yes, it would be a sub-sector. But this is a Ministry set up to manage the fisheries sector and the information is being reported as such.
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, last year, it was not a sector, so how can he say that -- [Interruption.]
    Dr Alhassan 4:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have no quarrel with that and if the Hon Member would be a bit patient --[Interruption.]
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the correct rendition should be “this Ministry which was a sub-sector of the …” That is more accurate. In 2012, it was not; it was not known to this House as a sector. It was not. When we approved the budget in 2012, there was nothing available for this sector; so, he should not be saying a “sector.”
    Dr Alhassan 4:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that was why I told my Hon Colleague that I will take his advice.
    But this is a Report on the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development. If he is seeking my permission to amend the statement, he could do so and it is up to me or us to decide or not and Mr Speaker, to allow it or not. But I think that reporting on the fisheries sector is right.
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in this House, we do not seek the permission of the Chairman; it is a committee report and the committee brings it to the House. We do not need his permission. So, if he is asking me to seek his permission, why should I seek his permission? It is not the Chairman's report.
    Dr Alhassan 4:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I just told the Hon Member that we needed the guidance of the Speaker to ask you to either amend the statement or not. That was what I said. So, the issue of permission was a slip and I do not see why he should be, if you like, making mountains out of a molehill.
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, once he said it is a slip, he is my good Friend, he can continue.
    Dr Alhassan 4:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he knows it was a slip.
    Mr Speaker, I present the Committee's Report.
    Introduction
    The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2013 financial year was presented to Parliament, by the Minister for Finance, Hon Seth Terkpeh, on Tuesday 5th March 2013 pursuant to article 179 of the 1992 Constitution.
    Mr Speaker subsequently referred the Estimates of the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development to the Committee on Food, Agriculture and Cocoa Affairs for consideration and report in accordance with Orders 140 (4) and 176 of the Standing Orders of Parliament.
    Deliberations
    The Committee met on the 18th March 2013 and discussed the draft estimates of the Ministry. Present at the meeting were the Hon Minister for Fisheries and Aquaculture Development, Hon Nayon Bilijo, the Chief Director, Mrs Rebecca Amu-Aboagye and other officials from the Ministry. The Committee extends its gratitude to the Hon Minister and his staff for their inputs.
    Reference materials
    1. The 1992 Constitution of Ghana.
    2. The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.
    3. The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for 2013 financial year.
    4.The 2012 annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Food and Agriculture.
    Dr Alhassan 4:30 p.m.
    in the country. The Committee noted that there was currently only one company located in Prampram, which is engaged in the production of fish feed, but this was insufficient to meet local demand. The Committee, therefore, recommends that the Ministry institutes policy measures that would provide incentives to local producers of fish feed.
    It was also noted that aquaculture is an expensive business venture requiring huge capital outlay, which most ordinary farmers are unable to provide. The Committee, therefore, recommends that the Ministry should support farmers source for credit from agencies set up by Government to provide financial support to small to medium scale aquaculture enterprises
    .
    Internally generated funds (IGF)
    The Committee noted from the Budget Statement that the Ministry's projected IGF for 2013 was GH¢89,666,230.The Committee was informed by the officials of the Ministry that the said figure was a typographical error. The Ministry noted that the IGFs target of GH¢8,966,620 was unrealistic. The officials argued that out of a projected IGFs of GH¢5,700,000 for the year 2012, only GH¢2,900,000 was realised. According to the Ministry, its main source of IGF, is fish vessel licensing fees.
    The Ministry noted that the number of vessels licensed to fish in Ghanaian waters was almost at the optimum level and that licensing additional vessels might lead to over exploitation of the country's marine resources.
    The Committee recommends that the Ministry of Finance takes a second look at the Ministry's lGFs estimate for 2013, not to unduly distort implementation of

    planned programmes of the Ministry given that over 50 per cent of the allocation for goods and services is expected to be funded from the IGFs.

    Proportion of the Donor Fund

    The Committee expressed concern about the proportion of the total sector budget, which is expected to come from donors. It was noted that out of the total budgetary provision of GH¢48,336,230 for the Ministry, an amount of GH¢22,619,610 or 47 per cent of the total budget, was expected to come from donors. The Committee considers this arrangement as a serious challenge towards achieving the targets the Ministry has set for 2013 financial year in view of uncertainties associated with the disbursement of donor funds over the years.

    The Committee recommends that the Ministry should commence the drawdown processes for these funds early in order to secure full disbursement.

    Alternative livelihood programmes

    The Committee also expressed concern about the poverty levels at the fishing communities and the possible worsening of the current status in view of the exploitation of the marine resources. The Committee recommends that the Ministry takes urgent steps and develop alternative livelihood programmes for the people in these communities while encouraging them to use modern technologies of fishing and aquaculture development.

    Illegal fishing

    The Committee was informed that the Ministry would establish and put into operation the Fisheries Enforcement Unit as provided for in the Fisheries Act, 2002

    (Act 625) in an effort to control illegal fishing. The Committee urges the Ministry to ensure that the Unit is provided with adequate resources to deal effectively with all illegal fishing activities in our water bodies.

    Conclusion

    The Committee has thoroughly scrutinised the budget estimates of the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development for the 2013 fiscal year and is satisfied that the policies and programmes outlined for the year could achieve the objective of self-sufficiency in fish production and help meet the nation's protein requirements.

    The Committee accordingly recom- mends to the House to adopt this Report and approve the total sum of forty-eight million, three hundred and thirty-six thousand, two hundred and thirty Ghana cedis (GH¢48,336,230), to enable the sector undertake its planned programmes and activities for the year 2013.

    Respectfully submited

    Ranking Member of the Committee (Dr Owusu A. Akoto): Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion on the floor.

    I think the Motion is a clear indication that sometimes, when one makes a mistake, one can go back and correct that mistake. I am talking about the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development. It sounds like sankofa in my view; aba base to me.

    One of the first things this Government did when they took over power in 2009 was to abolish what former President Kufuor had established, a Ministry of Fisheries. We knew at some stage, this

    Government would regret that decision. And I am glad that today, we are discussing a budget for a reinstated Ministry of Fisheries. I am so glad.
    Mr J. K. Gidisu 4:30 p.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, I think my Hon Colleague would have to get the situation clear and clearer. He is misleading the House. The former Ministry which he is talking about was the Ministry of Fisheries. But this time round, it is the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development. [Hear! Hear!] He cannot talk about the same situation.
    Dr Akoto 4:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is a question of semantics -- the fact of the matter, is the Ministry of -- [Interruptions.]
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:50 p.m.
    Hon Member, please, proceed with your presentation.
    Dr Akoto 4:50 p.m.
    I think he is rather misleading the House and I would want to put it right, Mr Speaker.
    Dr Alhassan 4:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he is entitled to his opinion but I would like him to gain more. The Ministry is Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development. So, it is not a reinstated Ministry of Fisheries.
    Dr Akoto 4:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Chairman knows that the Ministry of Fisheries had an aquaculture department. So, it is not as if it is a new activity -- [Interruption.]
    Dr Akoto 4:50 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    I would want to continue from where I was distracted, which is that, the reinstatement of this Ministry, I believe, is in response to the Government's recognition that there is a serious need for us to rehabilitate the fisheries industry in this country. This is because as we all know and it is a fact, nobody can run away from it.
    Mr Bilijo 4:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, point of information.
    Dr Akoto 4:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, this is not a point of order, so, I am not yielding. It is my privilege not to yield to a point of order and a point of information and the Minister would have to wait until I finish with my submission before he adds the information.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:50 p.m.
    Hon Minister, you would have the opportunity when you are summing up.
    Dr Akoto 4:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think I will just continue.
    The fact that the aquaculture sector is now picking up with rapid growth is something that we need to recognise and push. This is because while the marine catches are going down, the acquaculture part of it is growing at a very fast rate except that it is coming from a very small base.
    So, if we are able to provide the feed and the fingerlings and other inputs to the farmers, I am sure that at some stage in the future, we should be able to make up for the losses that we are witnessing in the sea.
    With these comments, Mr Speaker, I wish to add my voice to the Motion.
    Mr Gabriel Kodwo Essilfie (NDC -- Shama) 4:50 p.m.
    Thank you for the opportunity to add my voice to the Motion to approve the sum of GH¢38, 336, 230 for the services of the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development for the 2013 fiscal year.
    Mr Speaker, in doing so, I will want to point out a few areas in the Report, that I have some concerns with and that has to do, one, with the total amount that has been budgeted for the Ministry and the component of the amount that is budgeted.
    I am particularly concerned with the fact that about 47 per cent of the amount budgeted is coming from donor sources. Considering what we all know, that is happening globally, I would just like to appeal to the Ministry, that they re-look at this budget and during the supple- mentary, maybe, some adjustments are done, so that this Ministry would not be short-changed to indeed, achieve what it is intended to do.
    I am also particularly concerned with the amount that is budgeted for IGFs, which the report is saying that even in the previous year, what we targeted was not achieved. So, just as the Report pointed out, I would want to reiterate that, so that the Ministry is not short -changed.
    Mr Speaker, I turn my attention now to bullet 5.4 which talks about “alternative livelihood programmes” for the communities -- the fishing communities. My concern is the fact that being an MP from a constituency which is predomi-
    nantly fishermen and fishmongers, I have seen what my people have been going through and if indeed, seriously, what we have put in this Report is something that we really want to attain to help people from these communities, then we have to be serious with it.
    I can see the poverty level that is going on in my area and I am sure, Mr Speaker, you are experiencing the same thing in Cape Coast. So, definitely, we have to make sure that the alternative livelihood programme comes on course.
    Mr Speaker, to conclude --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:50 p.m.
    Hon Member, spare me the ordeal -- [Laugh- ter.]
    Mr Essilfie 4:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to help you because I know you have some fishermen in your constituency.
    Mr Speaker, to conclude, I would like to talk on bullet 5.5 which is on “illegal fishing”. Mr Speaker, in the area of illegal fishing, I would like to advise the Ministry that in their strategy to combat or somehow curtail the illegal fishing methods that are being used, when it comes to the area of monofilament or nets, we do not repeat what we heard was being done by thugs, forces going to the fishing communities and just seizing the nets of fishermen. That indeed, the programme we put together, will gradually phase out the fishing nets that are not to be used, so that these fishermen would not be displaced.
    I am just appealing that maybe, Government comes with a programme to purchase some of the proper nets that have to be used and somehow in an exchange kind of form through a subsidy, try to help these fishermen, so that the
    difficulties that they go through would be minimised.
    Mr Speaker, with these few words, I would like to entreat all my Hon Colleagues here to support the Motion to approve the amount that has been allocated to the Ministry for the Ministry to perform for the nation.
    I thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Joseph B. Adu Danquah (NPP -- Abuakwa-North) 4:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion on the floor for the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture Development by asking the House to approve the sum of GH¢48,336,230.00.
    Mr Speaker, I would like to touch on a few points in the Report, especially concerning the industry in the fish and aquaculture development sector.
    Mr Speaker, if you read the Report, it talks about private sector involvement in fish feed production and I would encourage the Government to encourage Ghanaian industrialists to take up a lot of initiatives in this area, so that they can produce fish feed and also in a way, create jobs and employment and acquire wealth.
    Most importantly, I realised that --a lot of the time, we talk of the Government -- in this Report, Government cannot do business and actually create the profitability that would ensure sustainable growth for our teeming youth and creation of employment. Especially, on 3.7, Government cannot actually create or complete a fish processing plant.
    In the 21st Century, they should further encourage the Ghanaian investor and the Ghanaian private sector to be going into such lucrative sectors and the Government should provide the enabling environment and the right incentives, so that the Ghanaian industrialist can actually help in the support of the growth of this sector.
    Mr Speaker, with these few words, I support the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Dr Kunbuor 4:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would like us to take the two items on the Addendum Order Paper.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 4:50 p.m.
    So, we go back to presentation of Papers.
    PAPERS 5 p.m.

    Dr Kunbuor 5 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if we could go to item numbered 18 on the Order Paper, on the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources.
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 5 p.m.

    Minister for Lands and Natural Resources (Alhaji Inusah A. B. Fuseini) 5 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢226,433,976 for the services of the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
    Mr Speaker, this amount of money is required for the Ministry's headquarters, and the agencies under the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources broken down into the following allocations:

    Item 1 (compensation), a total of

    GH¢28,690,84;

    Goods and services, total of

    GH¢146,414,988;

    Assets GH¢51,328,147.

    Mr Speaker, the total is GH¢226,433,976.

    Mr Speaker, this amount is required for the payment of salaries and compensation for the continuous discharge of the mandate of the Ministry and its allied Commissions and departments, through the acquisition of goods and services and also for the procurement of assets for the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources and its allied agencies.

    Thank you Mr Speaker.

    Question proposed.
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr Albert Abongo) 5 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to support the Motion and in doing so, present to you and the House, the Report of the joint Committee on Lands and Forestry and Mines and Energy on the annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources for the year 2013.
    Introduction
    The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2013 fiscal year was presented to Parliament by the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Terkpeh on Tuesday, 5th March, 2013 in accordance with article 179 of the 1992 Constitution of Ghana.
    The budget estimates of the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources were accordingly referred to the joint Committee on Lands and Forestry, and Mines and Energy for consideration and report, pursuant to Orders 140 (4), 177 and 188 of the Standing Orders of the House.
    During the consideration of the referral, the Committee met with the Hon. Minister for Lands and Natural Resources, Alhaji Inusah A. B. Fuseini and key officials of
    the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources and the schedule officers from the Ministry of Finance. The Committee lauds the Hon Minister and the officials for their assistance during its sitting.
    Agencies under the Ministry
    The Ministry has three sectors, namely; Land, Forestry and Mines. The land sector is managed by two agencies, that is, the Lands Commission and the Office of the Administrator of Stool Lands. The forestry sector is also managed by the Forestry Commission. The mines sector is managed by three agencies and these are: the Minerals Commission, the Geological Survey Department and the Precious Mineral Marketing Company.
    Reference
    The Committee used the underlisted as reference materials during its delibe- rations:
    (i) The 1992 Constitution of Ghana.
    (ii) The Standing Orders of the House.
    (iii) The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Govern- ment for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
    (iv) The Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) for 2013- 2015 and the Draft Annual Estimates for 2013 of the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources.
    (v) The Budget Estimates of the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources for 2013.
    Mission Statement
    The mission statement of the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources is to
    ensure sustainable management and utilization of the nation's land, forest, wildlife and mineral resources for the socioeconomic development and growth of Ghana. This is to be achieved through:
    (i) efficient formulation, implemen- tation, co-ordination, monitoring and evaluation of policies and programmes of the sector agencies;
    (ii) efficient management of public and stool lands as a means to ensure equitable land delivery;
    (iii) promoting effective inter-agency and cross-sectoral linkages;
    (iv) promoting sustainable and efficient forest, wildlife and mineral resource management and utilization;
    (v) creating an enabling environ- ment for effective private sector participation; and
    (vi) promoting effective community participation in multiple uses of land, forest, wildlife and mineral resources.
    Objectives
    The mission of the Ministry will be realised through the pursuit of the under- listed objectives:
    (i) Develop and manage sustainably, land, forest, wildlife and mineral resources.
    (ii) Facilitate equitable access, benefit sharing from and security to land, forest and mineral resources.
    (iii) Promote public awareness and local communities' participation in sustainable management and utilization of forest, wildlife, land and mineral resources.
    (iv) Review, update and consolidate existing legislation and policies affecting natural resource management.
    (v) Promote and facilitate effective private sector participation in land service delivery, forest, wildlife and mineral resource management and utilization.
    (vi) Develop and maintain effective institutional capacity and capa- bility at the national, regional, district and community levels for land, forest, wildlife and mineral service delivery.
    (vii) Develop and research into problems of forest, wildlife, mineral resources and land use.
    (viii) Build regional and global linkages towards the manage- ment of natural resources.
    Performance for 2012
    Lands sub-sector
    A blueprint to establish District Lands Commission Offices to decentralize lands administration services has been developed. A policy document on grants of large tracts of agricultural land to avert land grabbing and speculation as well as avoid landlessness has been completed.
    To increase efficiency in survey and mapping data collection, 5 continuous operation reference stations have been established in Accra, Kumasi, Takoradi, Tamale and Bolgatanga while a network of 42 stations has been designed to form the new Geodetic Reference Network for land surveying up-to-date orthophoto maps covering 14,282.30 sq km for land use planning have been provided in 100 towns nationwide.
    Forestry sub-sector
    The Ministry had completed the land use change and forestry classification maps for the whole country under the forest preservation programme. In addition, aerial surveys to acquire 3- dimensional structure of our forest were completed. A state-of-the-art geographical information system and photogrammetry laboratories for the analysis of satellite imagery and biomass modeling were established.
    A modern forestry inventory system was also developed. Under the National Plantation Development Programme, 9,426 ha were demarcated out of which 3,698 ha were planted; it created over 10,000 full time jobs. This is expected to restore degraded forest landscape, address the deficit in wood supply for both industrial and domestic purposes and create employment for forest fringe communities.
    To mitigate the rampant encroachment of forest reserves and protected areas as well as to address illegal logging, mining and settlement, a rapid response unit has been established to ensure compliance to the regulatory and legal requirements that protect our natural resources. Subsequently, 8 teams of this unit have been created, out of which 3 have been adequately equipped and deployed to seriously encroached areas to arrest the menace.
    As part of efforts to enable the implementation of the legality assurance system, the wood tracking system, the Resources (Legality Licensing) Regula- tions 2012 L.I. 2184 was passed.
    Under the Bamboo and Rattan Development Programme, 250 ha of bamboo and 8 ha model rattan plantations were established in the Brong Ahafo and Western Regions respectively.
    Mines sub-sector
    A number of new mining companies have started full scale operations in the country. They include: Perseus Mining Gh. Ltd. (Edikan Mine) at Ayanfuri, Owere Mines at Konongo and Noble Mines at Bibiani.
    To give full effect to Act 703, six Mining Regulations have been passed by Parliament to strengthen the regulatory
    Mr O. B . Amoah 5:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if I look at the Report, it is a joint Committee Report and I had the impression that after the Hon Member had submitted his portion of the Report, which is on Lands and Forestry, he would leave the Chairman of the Mines and Energy to also continue with the Report -- [Interruption] -- Indeed, Mr Speaker, I do not see how he not being part of that Committee, can submit a Report for the Committee even though it is joint --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:10 p.m.
    Hon Member, it is a joint Committee that has done this work.
    Mr O. B. Amoah 5:10 p.m.
    I understand you, Mr Speaker, but if the other committee was not part of the meeting, how do we expect them to contribute when it comes to supporting the Motion on the floor? For instance, those on the Committee on Lands and Forestry, are we expecting them to talk about Committee on Mines and Energy when it comes to supporting the Motion?
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:10 p.m.
    I do not see any problem with that. But the point is that it was referred to a joint Committee.
    So, my expectation is that members of both Committees would sit down and prepare the Report that is being presented to this House.
    Mr Benito Owusu-Bio 5:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the normal practice has been that every time this joint Committee's Report is being laid on the floor of the House regarding the estimates, that portion of the mining sector is always ceded to the Committee on Mines to also present and Mr Speaker, this has been the practice since I came to this House in 2005.
    It has always been that that portion is given to the Chairman of the Committee on Mines and Energy to also contribute and so, that is why the Hon Member was raising this issue.
    Mr Alfred K. Agbesi 5:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Member was saying that it is the normal practice -- But rather it is not the normal practice in this House, that when joint committees submit reports to this House, the two chairmen would come and present the Report with each Chairman giving his side of the Report. It is not the practice in this House. The practice is that the one who seconds the Motion presents the report and moves ahead. That is the practice in this House.
    Dr A. A. Osei 5:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Deputy Majority Leader has also been in this House for a long time, and on estimates, the Hon Member for Atwima Nwabiagya North (Mr Benito Owusu-Bio) is correct. We are talking about estimates. He is not saying that the two Chairmen should second the Motion.
    Mr Agbesi 5:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I do not know under which Order he is coming from. This is not the practice in this House. He may refer to me what Order he is coming from. It is not true.
    Mr Joseph Yieleh Chireh 5:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, on the concern of Hon O. B. Amoah of Akwapim South, now, the practice is, once it is under one Ministry, for the Chairmen to present the Report and his concern is whether the Hon Members who belong to the Committee on Mines and Energy would contribute to the debate.
    Of course, once it has been presented and seconded --And indeed, that is why I was urging him not to read all but to just go and conclude, so that the debate would allow everybody including members of the Committee on Mines and Energy to contribute. But it is not the practice as he is saying. The Order does not say so.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:10 p.m.
    All right. Hon Members, I do not want us to drag this thing on. I think that once the Chairman of one of the Committees presents the combined report, the Chairman of the other Committee can also contribute in the course of the debate, so that he deals with those aspects of the report which concern his Committee.
    Hon Chairman, please, continue.
    Mr Abongo 5:10 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Dr A. A. Osei 5:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he cannot leave it out; he should ask the Hansard Department to capture the entirety of the Report.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:10 p.m.
    He has already done so.
    Dr A. A. Osei 5:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he just said that he was leaving it out.
    Mr Abongo 5:10 p.m.
    I have already said that.
    Dr A. A. Osei 5:10 p.m.
    Then you come back and say you are leaving it out? Just conclude.
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:10 p.m.
    Hon Chairman, please, conclude.
    Mr Abongo 5:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Committee, having carefully examined the estimates, recommends to the House to approve the sum of GH¢226,433,976.00 for the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources for the year ending 31st December, 2013 financial year.
    Mr Benito Owosu-Bio (NPP -- Atwima-Nwabiagya North) 5:10 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for giving me the opportunity to contribute to the Motion on the floor.
    Mr Speaker, in 2012, GH¢217,983,309.00 was approved for the Ministry of Lands, Forestry and Mines. But in fact, the actual released amount was only GH¢129,141, 813.00. Mr Speaker, there was a shortfall of almost 41 per cent of what was actually approved for the Ministry. Mr Speaker, this was woefully inadequate --
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 5:10 p.m.
    Go ahead with your presentation.
    Hon Members, the Rt Hon Speaker would take over.
    MR SPEAKER rose
    Mr Speaker 5:18 p.m.
    Hon Member for Central Tongu, do you have a point of order?
    Mr Joe K. Gidisu 5:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am worried; when there is a shortfall, Colleague Hon Members opposite complain and when they also overspend, they complain. [Laughter.] So, what do they want the sectors to do?
    Mr Owusu-Bio 5:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we have the right to complain when there is a shortfall and we also have the right to complain when they overspend the estimated budget which has been given to them.
    Mr Speaker, in 2008, we in this House passed the Lands Commission Act. The whole idea of bringing this Act into being was to create a onestop shop for the Lands Commission where all the various divisions would be put under one house -- [Interruption] -- so that it would be easier for the public and Ghanaians to transact their various land transactions.
    Mr Speaker, but since 2008 till now, we still have the old Lands Commission still in place; there has not been any change. As we speak now, the Land Title Registry Division is at Christiansburg, the Lands Commission itself is at Cantonments and the Land Valuation Division is across the road, also in Cantonments, in another field. And the Survey Division Mr Speaker, is at El Wak.
    Mr Speaker, this was not what we envisaged and why is it that till now, after all the support which has been given by the German Government through donor support, we have not been able to put in
    place the construction of the head- quarters building for the Lands Commission to be able to bring this whole one-stop shop into being?
    Mr Speaker, this is because since 2008 till now, we have not been able to provide our counterpart funding of €2.3 million. As we speak now, the German Government is prepared with its 90 per cent funding. But we are not able to provide just the 10 per cent. Mr Speaker, the designs for the building are ready, and they have been ready for over three years now.
    The site allocation has been made, also over three years now. Mr Speaker, it is therefore, very sad that we have the 2013 estimates and we are here approving our estimates for the Ministry of Lands, Forestry and Mines without the 2.3 counterpart funding allocation. Why Mr Speaker? [Interruption.] Mr Speaker, as we speak now, there are plans that the inauguration for the commencement of this building would commence in May, two months from now. Meanwhile, we have not budgeted for it.
    Mr Chireh 5:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise on a point of order and the order is that he is misleading the House. This is because he is mentioning the counterpart funding not being budgeted for. The counterpart funding is not budgeted for by individual Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs). It is the Ministry of Finance that
    Mr Owusu-Bio 5:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he is a senior Member of the House and there is no indication in this book of any allocation towards this 10 per cent counterpart funding, and this book comes from the Ministry of Finance, and this is what I am saying. Mr Speaker, -- [Interruption.]
    Mr J. K. Avedzi 5:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, on a point of order.
    There is no budget line called “counterpart funding.” So, he would not see it in the budget. It is usually under the reserve vote. So, he should wait for the Other Government Obligations, then he can see something there.
    Dr A. A. Osei 5:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is not correct that it is not there. The Ministries that are doing their jobs properly put the counterpart funding under the investment or goods and services. If they are doing their work properly -- those Ministries always put it under investment to make sure that it would be available. It is those Ministries that are doing a poor job that end up in this situation. The contingency is for the unknown; so, if you tell me that the known counterpart funding is at the contingency, you are deceiving us.
    Mr Avedzi 5:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Ranking Member knows very well, when he was a Minister of State, that the Contingency Fund, it is not only the unknown that is put under --
    Mr Speaker 5:20 p.m.
    Is it contingency fund or contingency vote?
    Mr Avedzi 5:20 p.m.
    Contingency vote. It is not only the unknown which is put there; he knows very well, so, he should not deceive us.
    Dr A. A. Osei 5:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, my Chairman knows that he has never been at the Ministry of Finance. So far, we are praying, since there is only one Deputy Minister, that he may end up there. But if he starts acting as if he knows what is --
    Mr Speaker 5:20 p.m.
    Hon Member for Old Tafo, is it possible for you to access the counterpart fund from the contingency vote? This is because we were trying to draw a distinction between those who do their work properly and those who do not do their work properly -- those MDAs.
    Dr A. A. Osei 5:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, this is why we have ended up in the situation of over- spending.
    Mr Speaker 5:20 p.m.
    I just want to know whether it is possible for --
    Dr A. A. Osei 5:20 p.m.
    It is possible.
    Mr Speaker 5:20 p.m.
    Very well. But that should not be the case.
    Dr A. A. Osei 5:20 p.m.
    That is my point; that exactly is my point.
    Alhaji Inusah A. B. Fuseini 5:20 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am constrained to rise on the intervention of the Hon Member who last spoke. The Ministry of Finance where he was privileged to work as a Minister of State provided a framework to the Ministries for the purposes of budgeting, and indeed, this particular loan was negotiated for by the Ministry of Finance and they had indicated where they wanted the counterpart funding to come from.
    So, it is totally out of place to say that the Ministry of Finance, which is responsible for budgeting, their res- ponsibilities can be usurped by a sector Minister on matters of budgeting, by the sector Minister, indicating where the counterpart funding must be placed.
    It is not the case that where the Ministry of Finance decides that the counterpart funding will not reflect in the budget of the sector Ministry, that Ministry is not doing its work properly.
    Probably, the Hon Member has got it all wrong, since he left the Ministry of Finance.
    rose
    Mr Speaker 5:30 p.m.
    Hon Members, I think let me just hear from him and then we move -- then you can then conclude.
    Dr A. A. Osei 5:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, my Hon good Friend has been at the Ministry of Energy. Mr Speaker, you see, one of the worst culprits of this mis-budgetting is the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum where he was. They have over the last 10 years over-budgetted and that is what I am referring to, if you read the reports from the Ministry of Finance to, the Government, they point to the Ministry.
    When they are told to make provision for counterpart funding, they go and give more contracts. So, they are always running out of their budgets. Over the last 10 years, at least, they have gone over 50 per cent, because they are supposed to make provision for counterpart funding and then they go and put it somewhere else and they expect the Ministry to make up.
    Mr Speaker, if you do that, you give the Ministry of Finance too much authority that they should not have. When we approve it here, we expect that they will know their priorities and therefore provision -- But if you have counterpart funds provision, then you go and
    overspend somewhere, we would get caught in the mess we are in.
    Mr Speaker 5:30 p.m.
    Hon Members, I think that we have heard a lot on this point.
    Dr Kunbuor 5:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I just wanted some clarification for purposes of the records.
    I am aware that there is a Land Administration Project which has been ongoing. The Phase I was finished and there was the Phase II. But what I am seeing, I do not know whether it is a subheading misdescription; there is also the Land Administration Project, which is a building. So, I wanted to be sure whether they have just changed it or they are referring to that World Bank intervention, Phase II of the Land Administration Project. Let us get that thing clarified. [Interruption.] I have not asked a question. I am asking for some clarification on it.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I believe the World Bank intervention is a Lands Administration Reform Project
    (LARP).
    Dr Kunbuor 5:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, you see? After having told me that it is LARP, I have had some personal contact with that project and I am telling him it is a Land Administration Project Phase I, Phase II. It only comes under a Lands Sector Reform Programme. There is a lot of difference between the two. That is why I did not want this to go on record and it would be that we are interchanging that project for the building.
    Mr Speaker 5:30 p.m.
    Hon Owusu-Bio, can you conclude?
    Mr Owusu-Bio 5:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, Yes.
    I would want to add that I am very happy that this whole idea of the counterpart funding has really generated a lot of debate on the floor and I wish the Hon Minister for Finance was here on the
    Mr Owusu-Bio 5:30 p.m.
    floor to also have that in mind, so that he makes the necessary arrange-ments for providing the counterpart funding, so that this building would commence for us all to benefit.
    Mr Speaker, I was on the issue of the retention of IGFs. Yes, Mr Speaker, the Lands Commission generates a lot of funds but at the end of the day, when they give all these funds to GRA, GRA takes it to the Consolidated Fund and then gets commission payment. This is a bad practice; it is akin to “Monkey dey work, baboon dey chop”. They after doing the work, do not get anything. Rather, the person that they give the money to, goes to present it and collects commission.
    Mr Speaker, we need to motivate the staff of the Lands Commission by at least, allowing them to also retain a portion of their IGFs and they would use this portion judiciously by buying all the necessary equipment that they need, especially now that we are in a digital age.
    Mr Speaker, there is also the issue of the Mole Park. The Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC) has become a hindrance to the development of the Mole Park just because some time ago, it was agreed that they should have some interest in the Park-- the hotel in the Park.
    As we speak now, there are several private companies that are interested in investing in that facility but because of the interest of the GNPC, this is preventing all these private companies from coming on board and helping us to generate a lot of revenue.
    Mr Speaker, in East Africa, they are generating a lot of revenue through game and wildlife parks. Why can we not do

    the same here? We are only looking at our oil. Do we know the number of visitors that visited the Kakum Park alone last year? It is over a hundred thousand. Mr Speaker, that is very impressive. [Some Hon Members: Source!] From the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts and also the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources --
    Mr Owusu-Bio 5:30 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would end by saying that we should all support this Motion, also having in mind the counterpart funding and the retention of IGFs for the Lands Commission.
    Mr John Gyetuah (NPP -- Amenfi West) 5:30 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to contribute to the Motion, that has to do with approving a budgetary allocation for the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources for the financial year
    2013.
    Mr Speaker, I am very glad that in looking at your Committee's Report, bullet 5.7, that is paragraph 5, mines sub-sector, the last but one paragraph, with your permission, I beg to quote:
    “In addition, the Minister has facilitated the passage of the Minerals Development Fund Bill to help address developmental issues in mining communities.”
    Indeed, critically looking at the mining communities in the country, looking at the exploitation of the mines that have been done in various communities, they are relegated to the background in terms of infrastructural development, and I believe that when this Bill is passed, it would give a sigh of relief to the communities that are being exploited.
    Again, page 11 of your Committee's Report, the minerals sub-sector once again, your Committee noted with grave concern the alarming rate of illegal mining going on across the country and its devastating effects. Indeed, it is a major problem and a major canker that need to be addressed, considering the effect that it poses to the environment, looking at the water bodies.
    Indeed, when you get to certain communities, where the water bodies are so polluted that people resort to the drinking of unsafe water and unhealthy ones, of course. And I believe that it is a political will to actually ensure that this type of behaviour is put to the right perspective.
    Mr Speaker, looking at the forest sector, that has also been alluded to, indeed, coming from the forest zone in the Western Region, I know how most of the forest areas have been degraded --
    Mr Speaker 5:40 p.m.
    Hon Members, let us have some order in the Chamber. The background noise is getting too much.
    Mr Gyetuah 5:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the task force that has been set up to overlook with the safeguard of the forest resources, it will be better and I believe guidelines should be given to them to ensure that they put a human face on their activities. Those over there, at times land is released to them to work on but before you know, they get -up to the people and their farms are destroyed.
    So, I would want to hope that the galamsey operations which are actually devastating our lands, it will be critically
    looked at with the passage of this Bill that we are talking about.
    Mr Speaker, I thank you very much for the opportunity.
    Mr Henry Kwabena Kokofu (NPP -- Bantama) 5:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I thank you for the opportunity to contribute to the Motion on the floor .
    With your permission, I wish to say that tomorrow marks the International Day of Forest and Tree, that is March, 21 and I wish to congratulate all the players in there, for theirs is the call on man by God to undertake any professional duties. With reference to the Bible Genesis Chapter 1:26, 28 and 30.
    Mr Speaker, it is a fact that we are still believing in the old order where we practised cornucopianism and the end result has been the tragedy of commons that we find ourselves in, as a nation. However, the new world order calls for protectionism, conservationism and ultimately, sustainable development. [Hear! Hear!] That is why in Chapter 268 of our 1992 Constitution, we are enjoined to protect natural resources.
    Mr Speaker, as we speak, the forest estate of the nation is under sieged. The drivers are as many as you can think of. But one of the most easily avoidable one that we are unable to do as a nation, is the collection of fuel wood and burning of charcoal in our forest reserves. This has been occasioned by the shortage of LPG on the market.
    Some years past the nation had a policy of trying to encourage the use of Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) in our household, to the extent that my good Friend Hajia Memuna at the Asawase Constituency, a very prominent koko chef has resorted to the use of LPG, and so, have many, many bread bakers resorted to the use of LPG.
    Mr Speaker 5:40 p.m.
    Hon Member, you have laid sufficient foundation, let us talk about the estimates. [Laughter.]
    Mr Kokofu 5:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, on the estimates, we have been told that, the 2012 estimates fell short of 41 per cent and we do not know what has been given out to the Ministry now or been proposed to actually be given out. While other Ministries had the benefit of overspen- ding, the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources had been underfed. We know the importance of natural resources protection, therefore, it is important that this time round, they get the full complement of whatever is given out.
    Mr Speaker, on plantation develop- ment. We have been told on page 94 of the Budget Statement, paragraph 38, that 3,698 hectares were planted and given that planting was made by 3 metres by 3 metres, we were to expect 4,067,800 trees. We are being told again that 10,000 full time jobs were created, so, it comes to the point that 407 trees were planted by each person comparable to 2003 thereabout, the Plantation Development Programme (PDP) where a person planted 1,100 trees.
    So, it is gratifying that the Hon Minister, at his Ministry has a budget allocated to it, so that it goes to the Ministry's direct supervision. That is a good thing. However, the Forest Service Division of which the Plantation Department is a sub-sector, has a very low amount allocated to it. The plantation sector has 19,449,719 allocated, whereas the Forest Service Division, the parent body had 16,457,470 allocated to it.
    Mr Speaker, it is my plea that as the Ministry takes over the plantation, supervision and everything, agreeable, but then, it should be looked at -- the allocation made to the Forestry Service Division, there is the need to top it up because, that is the engine of the Forestry Commission in its entirety working.
    Mr Speaker, having said that, the wildlife sector which we are all agreeing that the eco-tourism is the order of the day, was allocated a paltry sum of GH¢750,000, whereas on its own, they are able to generate IGF and an amount of GH¢868,000. It means, given the neces- sary impetus and push the wildlife sector through, eco-tourism would be able to rake in revenue for the State.
    Mr Speaker, as we speak now, there was nothing to show that the Ministry is directly in touch with the education and research sectors of the Ministry. Here, we are talking about (FORIG) that is Forest Research Institute of Ghana and then the Faculty of Renewable Natural Resources, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST).
    We all know that there is a big gap between research and then the industry. So, I crave the indulgence of the Minister and the Ministry to try to bridge that gap, so that industry and the research and education sectors of the Ministry or the sub-sector will be able to bring up something better --
    Mr Speaker 5:40 p.m.
    Hon Member, conclude.
    Mr Kokofu 5:40 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, on this, I lend my support to the estimates being proposed.
    Mr Speaker 5:40 p.m.
    Hon Members, before I call on the Hon Minister to wind up, Chairman of the Committee, look at paragraph 5.7, under the mines sub-sector. There is a sentence there that the Hon Member has drawn our attention to. When

    did we pass the Minerals Development Fund Bill? It says “ . . .the passage of the Minerals Development Fund Bill . . .” If it is a mistake, correct it before I call on the Hon Minister to do the winding up. I cannot remember this House passing the Minerals Development Fund Bill.

    Hon Chairman, have you seen it. It s ays “In addition, the Ministry has facilitated the passage of the Minerals Development Fund Bill. . .” When did we pass that Bill?
    Mr Abongo 5:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that should be answered by the mines sub-sector Chairman. [Laughter.]
    Mr Speaker 5:50 p.m.
    I think you should just remove the “passage” and state that “the Ministry has facilitated the Minerals Development Fund Bill”.
    Mr Abongo 5:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think the statement is “the Ministry will facilitate . . .” That is the correction.
    Dr A. A. Osei 5:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Ministry has already been facilitating the preparation; we just have not passed it. The work is in progress; so, when he says “will” work has already begun. So, he should sa y “th e Min is t ry would continue . . .”
    Mr Speaker 5:50 p.m.
    Hon Chairman, this is your Report; you are also a signatory to this Report before us and you moved the Motion. You submitted the Report.
    Mr Abongo 5:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, this is a joint Committee's report -- [Laughter] - - and the Chairman for the mines sector is not around, so it is very difficult for me to be heckled about my response --
    Mr Speaker 5:50 p.m.
    But you are a very senior Member of this House. You know that we have not passed it. The language you used there, that “the passage” -- It means that we have passed the law here. If you say we passed a Bill, it means that it has been passed.
    Mr Abongo 5:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the correction, therefore, will be “In addition, the Ministry will continue to facilitate the passage of the Minerals Development Fund Bill to help address development issues in the mining communities.”
    Mr Kofi Frimpong 5:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I heard you call the Hon Minister to wind up, and this is an important sector -- the mining sub-sector -- and nobody has spoken to that sector. Before you came, Mr Speaker, I rose -- [Interruption.] A Leader shouting across; what type of Leader -- [Laughter.]
    Dr Benjamin Kunbuor 5:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, just because of the records -- the Chairman really intended to crave your indulgence to allow the amendment with your leave to reflect the new rendition.
    Mr Speaker 5:50 p.m.
    Amended accordingly. The amendment has been effected.
    Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, just a few things for the Minister to advert his mind to in his winding up.
    First of all, since I have not seen anything about the development of the Shai Hills Reserve, I do not know what is happening to it. It has been in abeyance for a very long time; over the past four years or so. I just wanted to know what is happening there.
    Mr Speaker, the other thing relating to the Report, I see bullet point 5.6 of the Committee's Report, which reads:
    Mr Speaker 5:50 p.m.
    Hon Members, it should be IGF and accordingly corrected.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I believe the Speakership is not participating at all in the debate?
    Mr Speaker 5:50 p.m.
    Hon Member, it is a typographical error. It is good you have drawn our attention to it as the Minority Leader. So, there is no need to waste time by calling on the Chairman to -- It is quite clear that it was an error.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is nearer IFC than IGF. But we can move on.
    Mr Speaker, we have been told --
    Mr Speaker 5:50 p.m.
    Which of the IFCs? [Laughter.]
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I believe the Hon Majority Leader would clear the air on that.
    Dr Kunbuor 5:50 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I only have the air to clear at one very small area. I was particularly very interested in the Shai Hills development but it looks like almost all the animals are ready except the elephants. And I am sure with time, when we are able to get the full complement of the elephants, the project would certainly take off in earnest. [Laughter.]
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, certainly, the degradation that is going on is not providing enough cover for the animals, and when they have attempted to introduce umbrellas, certainly, animals do not thrive under umbrellas.
    Mr Speaker, the Ranking Member who spoke to the allocation of resources indicated that, for last year, GH¢217.98 million was allocated to the Ministry. Today, we are doing GH¢226 million.
    Mr Speaker, if you took GH¢217 million and assuming you wanted the status quo to remain without any enhancement and just increased the figure by the margin of inflation, and if you settle on say 9 per cent, certainly, the figure that you arrive at is GH¢237 million and not GH¢226 million. That should tell the Hon Minister that not enough is happening there.
    We are not really developing the agencies and departments under the Ministry. We are not helping them to develop their various areas of jurisdiction. That is what I would want the Hon Minister to advert his mind to.
    But finally, on this issue of afforesta- tion, which is dear to the heart of many Ghanaians and lately, several non- governmental organizations (NGOs) have grown up to take up the course of the protection of our natural environment. Mr Speaker, we say to ourselves that at the turn of the previous century, the forest cover in this nation was about 8.5 million hectares.
    As we speak today, the forest cover is around 550,000 hectares and that explains why our timber industry is dying. We have made some attempt at afforestation.
    Mr Speaker, every year, some amounts are allocated to re-afforestation. This year, some allocation would go into that. But Mr Speaker, if we take ourselves serious as a nation in this enterprise, the Hon Minister should be able to tell us on yearly basis, how many acres we are able to bring under afforestations, how many people are we employing in this enterprise and how much as a nation have we spent on the number of people employed to cultivate the specific acreages?
    What kinds of trees are we growing and indeed, do we have value for money? That justification should come from the Ministry.

    On yearly basis, they only come and tell us that we are making an effort on afforestation and nothing really serious is going on. Meanwhile, travelling between Accra and Tamale and indeed, in particular between Techiman and Tamale, the Hon Minister on many occasions, witnesses wild bush fires but there is no bold decision to confront this and our lands are going waste.

    Which explains why the southern portion of Burkina Faso, which is drier than the northern portions of Ghana, is greener than the northern portions of Ghana. What is happening? Mr Speaker, something -- [Interruptions] -- I think the elephants are in Burkina Faso not even in Ghana. Mr Speaker, we have greener pastures in the southern portion of Burkina Faso and that is why we should be more concerned.

    Burkina Faso has decided to be more scientific. Today, they have what they call artificial rains -- They puncture the atmosphere and cause artificial rains to fall in c the southern half of Burkina Faso -- and nothing is happening. People even tell us that they pull the clouds from the northern portion of our country to the southern portion of Burkina Faso and detonate with chemicals to cause rain. What is happening?

    Mr Speaker, I would want the Hon Minister to advert his mind to some of these questions before we approve the estimates.
    Alhaji I. A. B. Fuseini 6 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, and let me take this opportunity to thank Hon Members for the interest shown in the activities of the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources and its allied Commissions and departments.
    Mr Speaker, indeed, the negotiation for the Lands Commission building was concluded last year, so the time frame for its construction is still on course.
    For the information of Members of Parliament, the inauguration to commence construction of the building is actually in June -- in June, the inauguration for the construction of a multi-purpose storey building for the Lands Commission.
    Mr Speaker, yes, the Mole Game Reserve, Mole Park, the difficulty is just with the hotel facilities. GNPC at some time in the past helped the Mole Park to refurbish the hotel facilities in the Park.
    The agreement did not indicate the length of time that GNPC will take to recover its investment in the hotel facilities. Discussions are under way to bring this to conclusion, to ensure that the time for GNPC to recoup its investment in the hotel facilities would be determined to allow other investors to come in.
    Mr Speaker, the Forestry Commission has a comprehensive programme for the Wildlife Division in the Shai hills. The wild- life around that place comes under a comprehensive programme. Mole Game Reserve has been singled out because of the difficulties in investing in the hotel facilities.
    Mr Speaker, let me also thank sincerely Member of Parliament (MP) for Bantama, Mr Henry K. Kokofu for his contribution, who has drawn our attention that tomorrow marks the International Forestry Day. It will be celebrated in Tamale tomorrow, and Hon Members who are able, can join us to celebrate the World Forestry Day tomorrow.
    The forestry cover for Ghana has actually increased; forestry cover today in Ghana is 1.6 million hectares. What the Minority Leader is talking about is 550 hectares of economic trees but the forest cover has increased in Ghana and the definition for forest cover is internationally ascertainable.
    This is because of the depletion of economic trees, the quantity of economic trees, or the extent of the forest that can yield economic trees has dwindled and naturally so, because we are harvesting it and it takes time. Those areas that have been put under plantations, when matured, will also be harvested.
    Mr Speaker, I think these were the issues--
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 6 p.m.
    Shai hills.
    Alhaji Fuseini 6 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker, I will address that. It comes under the comprehensive programme for the Wildlife Division of the Forestry Commission for the wildlife sector and clearly, it is true that, that will contribute significantly to the venue base of this country.
    Mr Speaker, the last thing I would want to address is the issue that was raised by the Hon Member for Bantama about the number of trees and cost. Mr Speaker, cost is not only to planting. So, it will be wrong to calculate cost only with reference to planting; many things go into the cost of afforestation, putting the seedlings and the nursery attract some cost. Preparing the land for planting has cost, taking care of the trees until they grow has cost.
    So, it will be misleading to just say that the number of trees planted, divided by the amount of money expended, will give you the cost. No! There is more to it than that and Mr Speaker, this year, a lot more areas will be put under cultivation, so that we can increase the forest cover of this country.
    With these words, I thank Hon Members for the interest generated by the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources and I crave your support in ensuring that we continue to manage our natural resources in a sustainable manner for the benefit of this present generation and also the future generations.
    Thank you.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think it is good to hear from the Minister, that, attributable to the effort of the Japanese, they are now telling us that the forest cover is increasing from about 800,000 ha to 1.6 million ha.
    Mr Speaker, I dispute it because the areas that they have given as being under cultivation -- many areas, there is nothing and many of the plantations that were given to individuals to manage or replant in conjunction with the local communities, if you go there, many of them have fallen apart.
    Even if we agree -- the Minister would agree with me that no funds to the lack of promotion for the use of Liquifed Petroleum Gas in households, certainly that figure is also going to suffer serious notation and demolition; he agrees with me. So, we should be more serious with what we are doing.
    Alhaji Fuseini 6 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we are very serious with what we are doing. Very very serious because of the value of forestry, trees to the environment. Even if not for logging purposes -- There is a common saying that “when the last tree goes, the last man goes”. But Mr Speaker, when we talk of forest cover, it has to do with the height of the tree and the canopy.
    It is not to say that when you put seedlings under plantation, they constitute the forest cover, no. When you talk about forest cover, you are meaning the trees have reached a certain height and they have a certain canopy.
    Mr Speaker 6 p.m.
    Hon Members, that brings us to the end of the debate on the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved:
    That this House approves the sum of GH¢226,433,976.00 for the services of the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources for the year ending 31st December, 2013.
    Mr Speaker 6:10 p.m.
    Hon Members, before I proceed further, I have received communication from the President.
    ANNOUNCEMENTS 6:10 p.m.

    MR SPEAKER 6:10 p.m.

    OFFICE OF PARLIAMENT 6:10 p.m.

    STATE HOUSE 6:10 p.m.

    OSU-ACCRA 6:10 p.m.

    Ministers-designate 6:10 p.m.


    1. Hon Cassiel Ato Forson -- Ministry of Finance

    2. Ambassador Thomas Kwesi Quartey -- Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration

    3. Hon Emmanuel Kwadwo Agyekum -- Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development.

    4. Dr Bernice Adiku Heloo -- Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and In- novation

    5. Mrs Joyce Bawa-Mogtari -- Ministry of Transport.

    Kindly accept, Mr Speaker, the assurances of my highest consideration.

    (Sgd.) JOHN DRAMANI MAHAMA
    PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC 6:10 p.m.

    Dr Kunbuor 6:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we have had an extended Sitting and in the cir- cumstances, we wonder whether we need a substantive Motion to adjourn the House.
    Mr Speaker 6:10 p.m.
    It is passed 2'o'clock but I just want to find out whether there is any further Motion; if there is no further Motion or no announcements from the Leaders, then I adjourn the House.
    Dr Kunbuor 6:10 p.m.
    Given the progress that we have made so far, we think that the Business Committee meeting will take place tomorrow to prepare business for the subsequent week. So, the Business Committee would be meeting. When the Business Committee meets and presents its Report on Friday, we would be able to address the concerns of our --
    rose
    Mr Speaker 6:10 p.m.
    Hon Member for Old Tafo, I thought you got the point that the Majority Leader made.
    Dr Kunbuor 6:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I was addressing it to one of the Hon over- grown Backbenchers.
    Dr A. A. Osei 6:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I get his drift but I wanted to see that if there is no indication of meeting of the joint Caucus, some of us on the Frontbench will begin the aluta.
    Mr Speaker 6:10 p.m.
    Hon Member for Old Tafo, you are a senior Member of the House, you do not talk like that. [Laughter.]
    Dr A. A. Osei 6:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, some coups d'etat in Ghana have been led by Generals, not NCOs. This matter is of severe importance to the House. So, I would want him to understand that, it is a serious matter.
    Mr Speaker 6:10 p.m.
    Which coup d'etat was led in Ghana by Generals? 1972, Acheampong was not a General.
    Dr A. A. Osei 6:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, General Ankrah was a General --
    Mr Speaker 6:10 p.m.
    They staged the coup d'etat and they invited him to come and take the post. Kotoka and Afrifa staged the coup d'etat and invited him to come and lead it. [Laughter.]
    Dr Kunbuor 6:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, just because we seem to be going through, I would like to give you some very useful advice to guide us when we are talking about these coups d'etat -- [Interruption.] I was reading the Hansard --
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:10 p.m.
    On a point of order.

    Mr Speaker, the Hon Majority Leader was called upon to give any indication about adjourning; he says there is nothing and only announced that there is going to be a Business Committee meeting and the Speaker was about to adjourn the House. Now, he is attempting to arrest your powers of adjournment.

    Mr Speaker, as for the Majority Leader, when he descends into the arena of theories --
    Mr Speaker 6:10 p.m.
    I was waiting eagerly to hear his story and I will also share with the House, a story told me by Hon J. H. Mensah about the 1972 coup d'etat. [Laughter.]
    Dr Kunbuor 6:10 p.m.
    It is a useful story which is parallel to what is happening. In 1980, when a Budget Statement again was being considered by this House, they had to discuss the tarring of the same Hamile- Bamboi road, this time not Bole-Bamboi. And there was an Hon Member of Parliament from the North, who got up and said; this time round, he wanted them to start the tarring from Hamile, because experience has shown that only people from the South make coup d'etat and so, if they had done the North and the Southerners make a coup d'etat, they can continue tarring the road -- [Laughter.]
    One Hon Member, I am sure, from a very strong tradition of the other side, ask him whether he was normal, that he is standing in a democratic House like the House of Parliament and dreaming of a coup d'etat.
    Well, what happened was that, when the House rose and they went, they never came back [Laughter.] And to that extent, I do not know the nature of the coup d'etat that the Hon Member for Old Tafo intends to prosecute.
    Dr A. A. Osei 6:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Majority Leader, I am sure, has been reading the news when a certain person called Rev. Owusu Bempa gave some indications about somebody's health. Some of my Hon Colleagues went to see him to pray.
    A few days ago, he has given some indication and that we should pray. So, if he has not read the Papers, he should please, come and join me to pray.
    Mr Speaker 6:10 p.m.
    Hon Members, I will share Hon J. H. Mensah's story with you next time, not today. [Interruptions.] Hon Members, you know the Hon J. H. Mensah once told me when the story of the coup d'etat was going round and they were monitoring the operations room --
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:10 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the coup d'etat against the Chair has succeeded. [Laughter.]
    Mr Speaker 6:10 p.m.
    Hon Minority Leader, I agree with you; I will not continue the story. [Laughter.]
    Hon Members, on that note, the House is adjourned till tomorrow at 10 o'clock in the morning.
    ADJOURNMENT 6:10 p.m.

  • The House was adjourned at 6.18 p.m. till Thursday, 21st March, 2013 at 10.00 a.m.